Header image lookaround pages

About the SiteWhat's Playing at The Digital DeliGolden Age Radio Retro and NostalgiaGolden Age SpotlightAbout the SiteRecommendationsFTP SiteSite MapCommentsHome PageGoogle SiteSearch Tool




You Can Help to Keep Us Going.
Please Donate here:
Google Everything On The Site
Golden Age Radio History
Golden Age Radio Networks
ABC AFRTS CBS MBS NBC
Golden Age Radio Advertising
Golden Age Retro & Nostalgia
Golden Age Baseball
Golden Age Collectibles
Golden Age Diners
Golden Age Eateries
Golden Age Ephemeral Film
Golden Age Football
Golden Age Premiums
Golden Age Resources
Golden Age Serial Films
Golden Age Surfing
Golden Age Swing
Golden Age Trains
Golden Age Watercraft
Golden Age Woodies
Golden Age Radio Education
Radio Education Resources
Radio Preservation Clubs & Societies
Radio Research Resources
Perpetual Calendar
Radio Biographies:
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z
Radio Program Logs:
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z
Preserving Golden Age Radio
Support Our Archive
Radio Archive FAQ
Radio Archive Listings:
A B C D E F G
H I J K L M N
O P Q R S T U
V W X Y Z
Equipment
Techniques
Radio History Books
Radio Tribute Links
Recommended Tools
Golden Age Cover Art
Transcription Discs & Tapes
Special Collection Archives
AFRS Archive
AFRTS Archive
Christmas Archive
Hollywood Archive
Radio History Archive
Radio Scripts Archive
Star Showcase Archive
About The Digital Deli Online
Who Are We?
Why Golden Age Radio?
Contact Us
Sitemap and FAQ





The Neutrodyne Circuit

Please Touch That Dial

The Circuit That Made Radio Commercially Possible

Truly one of the classic electronic designs of the 20th century, American electrical engineer and physicist, Louis Alan Hazeltine (b. Aug. 7, 1886, Morristown, N.J., U.S. d. May 24, 1964, Maplewood, N.J.), invented the 'neutrodyne' circuit in 1922 while under contract to the U.S. Naval Yard outside Washington, D.C.. Professor Hazeltine's invention effectively neutralized the high-pitched squeals that plagued early radio sets.

Hazeltine patented his Neutrodyne circuit, offered it to independent manufacturers under license, and thus provided consumers with a vastly improved radio set, that broke the patent stranglehold that RCA then held on the commercial radio industry.

Radios bearing the Neutrodyne label would come to have a significance beyond their technical advances.

1927 Fada Desktop Console Closed

1927 Fada Desktop Console Opened


c.1928 Garod Tabletop Model


c. 1923

Take me to Spotlight on Advertising
Take me to Spotlight on the Golden Age
Take me to Spotlight on Networks
Take me to Spotlight on Personalities
Take me to Spotlight on Technology

The Independents begin to Compete

Classic Early Radio Designs from The Independent Radio Manufacturers, Inc.

Some truly timeless and beautiful radio designs and cabinets arose from the revolutionary neutrodyne design.

RCA's monopoly on radio circuitry patents had caused stagnation in early radio design. Independent companies like Freed-Eisemann, Fada, WorkRite, and Garod, now freed to compete with their own licensed designs introduced some of the most beautiful and innovative radios ever seen into the Amercian marketplace.

WorkRite, Garod, and Fada, in particular produced some of the most enduring, classic radio designs and cabinets in radio history.

1924 Saturday Evening Post WorkRite Ad 1


1924 Saturday Evening Post WorkRite Ad 2


1924 Saturday Evening Post WorkRite Ad 3



c. 1923