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. . . that in 1923 the ad dept of The Coca-Cola Company offered to supply these 24 sheet billboards free if local bottlers would pay for the arrangement to have them put on billboards in their territories.  This is the first one available under the plan....


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Birminghan Bottler Hitchinson Bottle circa 1896
Birminghan Bottler Hitchinson Bottle circa 1896
1914 Capped Bottle
1914 Capped Bottle
1920s - 30s Hex Green Bottle
1920s - 30s Hex Green Bottle
Take Home A Carton. Easy to Carry


Coca-Cola Interactive Menue Board. Roll-over the Menu for navigation choices.
Coca-Cola History
Coca-Cola's Formula
Coca-Cola's Early Advertising
Coca-Cola Sponsors Radio
Coca-Cola Goes to War
Coca-Cola and The Holidays
Coca-Cola's Calendar Girls
Coca-Cola International
Coca-Cola's Famous Bottles
Coca-Cola Processing and Delivery
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1894--the first appearance of bottled Coca-Cola; Vicksburg, Mississippi. Candy store owner Joseph A Biedenham markets Coca-Cola as a bottled beverage

In 1879, Charles G. Hutchinson, who happened to be the son of a prominent Chicago bottler, devised a spring-clasped internal bottle closure known as the "Hutchinson Stopper." Hutchinson was issued a patent for his invention from the United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO), as follows:

"Be it known that I, Charles G. Hutchinson, of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Bottle-Stoppers, of which the following, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification...My invention relates to that class of bottle-stoppers provided with a laterally-yielding spring extending upward from the plug, and adapted to hold the latter in its open and closed position, alternately, according to the adjustment vertically of the spring in the neck of the bottle."

It's popularity spread rapidly during the period, becoming a virtual standard of the time. It proved so popular that bottles produced for years to follow became referred to as "Hutchinson Bottles."

Stoppered bottles were still being used by some small American companies as late as the 1920's. Inevitably, laws restricting their use due to the absence of uniform sanitary processing of the stoppered bottles brought a premature end to an interesting era in bottling.

1884 Hygeia bottle
1900 25ml bottle
1913 Root Bottle
1884
1900
1913
1915 Classic Coke bottle
1957 Classic Green Bottle 25ml 1961 Classic Coca-Cola bottle 35ml
1915
1957
1961


Vintage Coca-Cola syrup dispenser Samovar

Vintage Coca-Cola tin sign

Ironically, Asa Candler didn't think much of the idea of bottling his famous beverage, concentrating exclusively on the dispensed syrup and soda fountain market. It would be 5 more years before the first officially sanctioned bottling of Coca-Cola would get underway.


Original patent submission for Coca-Cola bottle
"Patent submission for the classic Coca-Cola Bottle" The prototype sketch for the original shape of the 'hobbleskirt bottle' was inspired by an illustration of a cocoa bean from the 1913 edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. The vertical grooves were used to create the distinctive contours which distinguish the bottle from its all of it's counterparts.

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The design of the world famous "Coke Bottle" shaped Coca-Cola bottle was no accident of design. Benjamin Thomas, was a bottler from Chattanooga, Tennessee. He'd written to The Coca-Cola Company citing the need for a package that "a person could recognise as a 'Coca-Cola' bottle when feeling it in the dark, so shaped that even if broken, a person could tell at a glance what it was."

The Root Glass Company's designers Alexander Samuelson and Earl R Dean effectively answered that request with their 1915 design for the original "hobble skirt" contoured bottle in Terre Haute, Indiana. They chose green-tinged glass, named 'Georgia Green', after the company's home State, for the first run of bottles. On April 19, 1994 -- 50 years after the release of the glass contour bottle -- the P.E.T. contour bottle was released to US markets.

By 1937, the hobble skirt bottle enjoyed widespread use throughout America, but the twice reissued patent was due to expire. Understandably, by this time, the bottle had come to be universally associated with the 'Coca-Cola' brand, but existing law prevented the Root Glass Company from renewing the original patent again, so The Coca-Cola Company applied for -- and received -- a "design patent" for the hobble skirt bottle on March 24, 1937. This category of patent had been reserved for original manufacturing designs. Thus, the patent was transferred patent from The Root Glass Company to The Coca-Cola Company and effectively prevented competitors from imitating the bottle for another 14 years.

By 1957, bottling technology progressed beyond the need for embossing the Coca-Cola script and lettering, instead applying "applied color labelling" (ACL) as a replacement. The white ACL lettering gave a 'cleaner' graphic 'look' and made the 'Coca-Cola' logo more easily recognizable to new consumers. In a final effort to safeguard the 'Root' bottle design indefinitely, The Coca-Cola Company requested that the US Patent Office grant a trademark on the bottle. The Company argued that the bottle had become so well known that it had taken on trademark status. On April 12, 1960, the trademark was granted, indefinitely, protecting the unique design.



Hot Dog! and Coca-Cola
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Have A Coke tin sign

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From bottles, to bottling, to packaging; Coca-Cola trverses every step of the process with consistent genius. . .and in most cases ahead of their competitors

''Save The Carton'' with Coca-Cola's 'Thirst Knows No Season' slogan -- The First 6-Pack carton of Coca-Cola circa 1903
''Save The Carton'' with Coca-Cola's 'Thirst Knows No Season' slogan -- The First 6-Pack carton of Coca-Cola circa 1903
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Early vintage four-pack carton


Vintage Four-pack
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Take Some Home Today!

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Seasons Greetings four-pack

Announcement of Paducah Coca-Cola plant

Salesman's Profit Chat circa1957

Salesman's Profit Chat circa1957
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Ceramic Syrup Bottle, circa 1900s

Ceramic Syrup Bottle, circa 1900s
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1920s Wooden Bottle-Crate
1920s Wooden Bottle-Crate
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Little Sprite with 10oz. Classic embossed bottle circa 1956
Little Sprite with 10oz. Classic embossed bottle circa 1956

1955 Tin Sign
1955 Tin Sign

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Need more? Try these links to learn more about Coca-Cola Advertising