Click to go to Digital Deli Too Home Page blank head
Preserving the Golden Age of Radio for A Digital Age
Explore Our Golden Age Radio Research Pages Click here to learn about our approach to Golden Age Radio Preservation [Under Development] Click to go to Our Radio Articles Page This Feature Is Currently Not Available
 
This will take you to our Numeric Radio logs
This will take you to our A Series Radio logs This will take you to our B Series Radio logs This will take you to our C Series Radio logs This will take you to our D Series Radio logs This will take you to our E Series Radio logs This will take you to our F Series Radio logs This will take you to our G Series Radio logs This will take you to our H Series Radio logs This will take you to our I Series Radio logs This will take you to our J Series Radio logs This will take you to our K Series Radio logs This will take you to our L Series Radio logs This will take you to our M Series Radio logs
This will take you to our N Series Radio logs This will take you to our O Series Radio logs This will take you to our P Series Radio logs This will take you to our Q Series Radio logs This will take you to our R Series Radio logs This will take you to our S Series Radio logs This will take you to our T Series Radio logs This will take you to our U Series Radio logs This will take you to our V Series Radio logs This will take you to our W Series Radio logs This will take you to our X Series Radio logs This will take you to our Y Series Radio logs This will take you to our Z Series Radio logs This will take you back to our Text List of Radio logs

Original Words At War header art

The Words At War Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Words At War

Spot ad for Johnson's Wax sponsorship from July 2 1944
Spot ad for Johnson's Wax sponsorship from July 2 1944

A poster from The Council on Books in Wartime circa 1943
A poster from The Council on Books in Wartime circa 1943

It's no coincidence that The Council on Books in Wartime selected several of the books dramatized in Words At War for their parallel Armed Services Edition series of books for our G.I.s
It's no coincidence that The Council on Books in Wartime selected several of the books dramatized in Words At War for their parallel Armed Services Edition series of books for our G.I.s. Here's Mr. Glencannon Ignores the War, one of the Words At War programs that was never broadcast.

Here's one that was broadcast -- Apartment In Athens which aired as Episode No. 92 on April 10 1945
Here's one that was broadcast -- Apartment In Athens which aired as Episode No. 92 on April 10 1945

C.S. Forester's Payment Deferred didn't fit the format of Words At War, but his 'The Ship' did, as Episode No. 5 from July 24 1943
C.S. Forester's Payment Deferred didn't fit the format of Words At War, but his 'The Ship' did, as Episode No. 5 from July 24 1943

Robert Carse's There Go the Ships didn't air over Words At War but his 'Lifeline' did as Episode No. 49 from May 17 1944
Robert Carse's There Go the Ships didn't air over Words At War but his 'Lifeline' did as Episode No. 49 from May 17 1944

Theodore Pratt's Mr Winkle Goes to War didn't make it into Words At War but one of his short stories did
Theodore Pratt's Mr Winkle Goes to War didn't make it into Words At War but one of his short stories did.

Then of course there was Superman. In all likelihood one of the more popular Armed Services Editions in the canon. But not quite appropriate for Words At War.
Then of course there was Superman. In all likelihood one of the more popular Armed Services Editions in the canon. But not quite appropriate for Words At War.

And as anyone might expect of a 1940s red-blooded G.I., Tarzan was high on the Armed Services Editions reading list as well.
And as anyone might expect of a 1940s red-blooded G.I., Tarzan was high on the Armed Services Editions reading list as well.

The Council's recommendations for our G.I.s ran the gamut of literature, as noted above with Superman and Tarzan. But they also appealed to the romantic and cultured of our G.I.s Here's The Story of George Gershwin. A tale sure to warm any foxhole.
The Council's recommendations for our G.I.s ran the gamut of literature, as noted above with Superman and Tarzan. But they also appealed to the romantic and cultured of our G.I.s Here's The Story of George Gershwin. A tale sure to warm any foxhole--one way or the other.

Western Pulp was equally represented. Here's Gunman's Gold by Max Brand.
Western Pulp was equally represented. Here's Gunman's Gold by Max Brand.

Even Broadway fans found something of interest in the Council's CARE packages, such as this copy of A Little Night Music.
Even Broadway fans found something of interest in the Council's CARE packages, such as this copy of A Little Night Music.

Golden Age Radio fans can think of these humble--but complete, reprints as the AFRS-Transcriptions of the literary field. The same content but in a G.I. package.

Background

As one might well imagine, World War II generated thousands of books, periodical stories and novels spanning the entire spectrum of America and its allies' involvement in the War. Ranging from detailed human interest vignettes to macroscopic views of the strategies, tactics, politics and philosophy of War, these books provided many compelling, heart-rending, inspirational, and cautionary tales of the effect--and aftermath--of war.

In 1943, the United States Office of War Information (OWI), in cooperation with The Council on Books in Wartime, and the National Broadcasting Company combined to suggest a Radio program dramatizing some of the more important of these books.

The Council on Books in Wartime was a non-profit organization founded in the Spring of 1942 by booksellers, publishers, librarians, and authors, with the purpose of channeling the use of books as “weapons in the war of ideas,” the Council's motto. Its stated aims were "the promotion of books to influence the thinking of the American people regarding the war, to build and maintain the will to win, to expose the true nature of the enemy, to disseminate technical information, to provide relaxation and inspiration, and to clarify war aims and problems of peace."

The efforts of this combine resulted in the premiere on June 24, 1943 of the critically acclaimed Words At War series, the name a play on the motto of the Council on Books in Wartime. The eventual result was a series that ran for some ninety-seven-plus, 30-minute programs aired mostly sustained over NBC and covering over 120 books and publications addressing elements of war and its impact on society. The series spanned the works of an international collection of authors, ranging from Colonel Carlos P. Romulo of the Army of The Philippines to the Chinese, Harvard educated author Lin Taiyi to authors representing their perspectives on World War II from The Netherlands, Italy, The Balkans, Soviet Russian, Japan, and even Nazi Germany, providing a comprehensive, domestic and international series unmatched in Radio History.

NBC also aired Pacific Story (1943-1947) during the run of Words At War. Pacific Story was more documentary in nature, running for some 185 installments and tracing the evolution of the War in the Pacific Theatre. CBS for its part, aired the inspirational and moving personal retrospective of War with its Peabody award-winning The Man Behind The Gun (1942-1944). The three programs combined to provide North American radio audiences a fairly comprehensive, as well as philosophical, domestic account of the development of the War, its precedents, its personal side, and its aftermath. This was in stark contrast to the glut of uber-patriotic propaganda productions that flooded North American airwaves immediately following the United States' entry into World War II.

Both approaches to wartime information, and of course the daily, sometimes censored, accounts of the prosecution of the War in both major Theatres, were almost certainly necessary. The more jingoistic pieces were clearly necessary to capture the attention of the less aware elements of American society who remained oblivious to the effect of war on domestic consumption, the need for rationing, and the deleterious effects of black market micro-economies. And on a broader scale, American businessmen being what they've been since the Industrial Revolution, were less inclined to rein in their profligate excesses without the public pressures and government controls that inevitably ensued.

The Government, thankfully, was wise enough to target its more propagandistic efforts to radio listeners and newspaper readers who'd inevitably exert the power of their purses and bank accounts against the profiteers in the domestic wartime economy to act as a further curb against business community excesses.

Words At War, The Man Behind The Gun, and Pacific Story, served as an important balance in the dissemination of wartime information. Words At War, especially, recounted a ambitious spectrum of observations about the War and its effects. Employing several award-winning accounts of the thoughts, aspirations, and often very personal views of War, books such as Mark Murphy's Pulitzer prize winning account of naval gunner Basil Izzi and his eighty-three day story of survival on a raft in The Atlantic brought rivetting accounts of war to the North American public..

NBC Airs A Planned Thirteen Program Series, 'Words At War'

The series aired sustained through the summer of 1944, at which time it ran in the Fibber McGee and Molly timeslot during their summer break, with Johnson's Wax picking up the tab for that summer run. The program returned to sustaining following Fibber McGee and Molly's return to the air during the Fall 1944 season.

Production values of the series remained high from beginning to end. Directed by Joseph Losey, Frank Papp, Anton Leader, Herbert Rice, Garnet Garrison and Joseph Mansfield, the scripts progressed crisply, tightly and smoothly from beginning to end. Frank Black and to a lesser degree, Morris Mamorsky provided the moving and often atmospheric musical underscores for the productions. The casts supporting the several docudramas incorporated into the programs truly brought the literary works to life. Comprised of the finest voice talent of the era, the authors themselves--the real 'stars' of the production--often narrated or participated in the productions.

Begun as a planned Summer series of only thirteen programs, the production was almost immediately acclaimed as an important broadcast series. The initially ordered set of the customary thirteen installments soon expanded into a full Fall season of an additional thirty-nine programs which would have brought the entire run in at fifty-two programs. Each passing week of broadcasts brought even further acclaim and popularity. This apparently caught NBC by surprise as the giant network quickly--and often clumsily--attempted to reschedule the series for a full season of programming.

The 'fast-shuffle' was nothing new to NBC, the largest of the major networks to fiddle with some of their most popular programs into the programs' premature demise. But the outpouring of interest in Words At War couldn't be ignored--not even by NBC. Indeed, in spite of numerous rescheduling, unaired episodes, and--to be fair--preemptions often the result of being overcome by events of the era, the series 'soldiered on,' in spite of its network.

As, unbeknownst to most of America, as it approached D-Day, the clamp down on operational intelligence and increasing government-wide security created a vacuum of information surrounding America's response to its entry into the War. So it was that, throughout the first fifty-two broadcasts of the run, North American audiences were treated to some of the most introspective and fascinating War literature to ever be broadcast over public airwaves. The idea behind the concept of the series was clearly being viewed as an important contribution to listeners' understanding of the greater and more far-reaching effects of world war.

As noted above, the series dramatized literary works spanning the interests of virtually all parties to The War. This was a fairly radical departure for NBC, long known as the 'safe' network, with a long-standing policy of assiduously avoiding any form of controversial programming. But as each installment aired, ever more controversial and thought-provoking ideas and concepts were subtlely transforming listening audiences' views of the War, its progress, and possible outcomes. While clearly a boon to intellectual diversity over network programming, as the series progressed beyond D-Day and neared an unanticipated end to the War in Europe, NBC became increasingly sensitive to some of the more controversial selections it had been dramatizing from week to week.

Johnson's Wax sponsored the Summer 1944 run which commenced shortly after D-Day on July 27, 1944, with a planned fifteen-episode summer replacement program for Fibber McGee and Molly. Rebranded The Johhson's Wax Program -- Words At War, the series was rescheduled only once for a reshuffling to allow the broadcast of the dramatization of two books, Time For Decision and United States War Aims, in place of the previously announced Return of The Traveler. Once Words At War resumed as a sustaining broadcast, apparently in response to increasing popular demand, it annouced two 'by request' rebroadcasts from the Johnson's Wax-sponsored summer run to apparently catch up with continued demand for the program.

Once it had ordered--and resumed--new programs, the series was again overtaken by events such as the Election results of 1944. While juggling and re-juggling the line-up, the series seemed to finally settle in to a fairly regular Wednesday night series of final broadcasts. But as America unknowingly approached V-E Day, the backlash from the more conservative factions of American society were apparently wearing NBC down. Indeed, by the April 17, 1944 broadcast of They Left the Back Door Open, NBC felt compelled to distance themselves from their critically acclaimed production with pointed disclaimers at the beginning and end of the broadcast.

By the end of the series one could almost sense NBC breathing a collective sigh of relief at the end of the production. The--again--unanticipated arrival of V.E. Day apparently signaled an appropriate end for the ground-breaking and controversial Words At War series. Perhaps it was simply a corporate fear that they were beginning to sound more like their more progressive competitor, CBS. And indeed, V-J Day, as it turned out, was still some three months off. But the powers that be apparently felt enough was enough. Grappling with a public that had begun to grow more than a little disenchanted with the power politics and corporate compromises that had forced the World into War in the first place, wasn't a prospect NBC felt compelled to deal with any further.

What remains from this fascinating series is a highly reflective, introspective and in many respects still controversial production of literary observations on the dynamics of World War, the innocent millions caught in the crossfire of War, and the inevitable microscope focused on the causes of War in the first place. The World was unquestionably relieved at the end of world war, but the four years of questioning the rationale behind world war was viewed by many in power as a threat. For the over one hundred authors of the works dramatized in Words At War, their widely varying, yet common message throughout the series was poignantly simple--"Why?" . . . . "Why war in the first place?" . . . "How do we stop any further conflicts in their tracks?" . . . and ultimately, "Why do the populations of the world continue to allow those in power to undertake war as any form of alternative?"

Though the answers to those enduring questions may seem self-evident to some, for a powerful minority of special interests throughout the world, those questions are--and remain--the fabric of anarchy, communism, socialism, or whatever 'ism' those powerful interests oppose as a threat to their continued power and influence.

All the more reason to mark this historic series as a genuine anomaly for its era--especially, uncharacteristically, from NBC. But even more reason to respect the immeasurable value of broadcasts such as Words At War--which unfornately have never been repeated so freely and openly during the remainder of broadcast history over any medium outside of the Internet. And all the more reason to marvel at the true freedom of thought and expression throughout The Golden Age of Radio; a period that remains one of the most genuinely democratic eras of American History. Indeed, an era that even NBC felt compelled to honor--for a while at least.

We challenge anyone to give Words At War an at least occasional re-airing without coming away with the a sense of loss regarding how free and diverse the 'public airwaves' truly were . . . once upon a time.

Series Derivatives:

The Johnson Wax Program - 'Words At War';
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Wartime Literary Adaptations
Network(s): NBC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 43-06-24 01 Combined Operations: The Official Story of The British Commandoes
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 43-06-24 to 45-06-05; NBC; One-hundred, 30-minute programs;
Syndication: NBC Orthacoustic Transcriptions
Sponsors: Sustaining; The OWI; The Council on Books In Wartime; Johnson Wax
Director(s): Joseph Losey , Frank Papp, Anton Leader, Herbert Rice , Garnet Garrison, Joseph Mansfield
Principal Actors: John Mason Brown, Everett Sloane, Mandel Kramer, Frank Lovejoy, Karl Weber, Ed Begley, Wendell Holmes, Santos Ortega, Lawson Zerbe, Luis Van Rooten, Joan Alexander, Fay Baker, Lon Clark, Richard Widmark, Jackson Beck, Staats Cotsworth, Norman Lloyd, Berry Kroeger, Dan Ocko, Junius Matthews, Ed Jerome, Richard Stark, Raymond E. Johnson, Walter Burke, Sam Wanamaker, Arnold Moss, Alexander Scourby, Joseph Julian, Santos Ortega, Lamont Johnson, Ann Sheppard, Marjorie Quayle, Florence Eldridge, James Monks, Paul Mann, Karl Swenson, Les Damon, Ned Wever, Mason Adams, Francis Heflin, Ted Jewett, Ann Seymour
Recurring Character(s): None
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): George Saunders, Clark Lee, Boris Voyetekhov, Robert St. John, C. S. Forester, Charles Spaulding, Gwen Dew, Otis Carney, George F. Burling, Leslie Roberts, Fred Herman, Margaret Buhl Wilder, Jean Helion, Agnes Smedley, Mark Murphy, Etta Schieber, Corey Ford, Frederick Watts, Ernie Pyle, John Mason Brown, Michael Padev, Herbert Matthews, George Seldes, Reynolds and Eleanor Packard, Carlos Romulo, Frank Lasker, Otto Zoff, Lin Taiyi, U.S.N. Captain Frederick Bell, Robert Goffin, Rackham Holt, Taro Yashima, Selden Menafee, Juanita Redmond, Vicki Baum, George W. Gray, Robert Carse, Lawrence Thompson, H. E. Bates, George Creel, Donald Huff, Bernt Balkan, Corey Ford, Oliver La Farge, James Norman Hall, Robert Parker, Willard Waller, Don Gentille, Jack Belden, Thomas Coghill Treanor, Kent Cooper, Barbara Claw, Alfred Friendly, Marie Serkin, Albert Maltz, Kenneth Gould, Gustavus Meyers, Beverly Nichols, Jan Karski, Louis Nizer, Welborn Kelly, Walter Karig, Elwood C. Nantz, Wanda Wasilewska, William Bradford Huey, Elliott Arnold, Jim Phelan, William Beveridge, Lionel S. B. Shapiro, Egon Hostovsky, Friedrich Hayek, George Pratt, Russell Davenport, Alan Chase
Writer(s) Russell Davenport, Lawrence Mencken, Max Erlich [Adapters]
Music Direction: Frank Black [Composer/Conductor]; Morris Mamorsky, William Meader
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): Martin Wolfson [Narrator]
Hosts: Carl Van Doren [Johnson's Wax Programs], Clifton Fadiman [Johnson's Wax Programs]
Commercial Spokesman: Jack Costello [Johnson's Wax Programs]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
99 broadcasts; 94 unique scripts
Episodes in Circulation: 95
Total Episodes in Collection: 89
Provenances:

Billboard Magazine review of Words At War from July 24 1943
Billboard Magazine review of Words At War from July 24 1943
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the radioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings. Indeed, virtually every other 'conventional' radio history source we consulted was in error as to the details of this historic program.

We invite you to compare our fully provenanced research with the '1,500 expert researchers' at the OTRR and their Words At War log, which the OTRR claims to be correct according to their 'OTTER log' they represent as the "most authoritative and accurate vintage Radio database in the world":

OTRRpedia

We've provided a screen shot of their current log for comparison, HERE to protect our own ongoing due diligence and intellectual property.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

We've recounted time and time again the destructiveness of plagiarism in logging radio programs from The Golden Age of Radio. We take no delight whatsoever in continually revealing the gross misinformation regarding these programs that's been circulated--to apparently great commercial success--by the commercial 'otr purveyors' of the vintage radio hobby. But 'the big lie' that this harmful minority of collectors and book-sellers has perpetuated for the past 35 years comes into greater and greater focus with each new series that we document.

The misinformation regarding Words At War is even more befuddling given the obviously literary source material that was dramatized by this series in the first place..

As we've done before, we simply ask any rational, thoughtful collector--novice or expert--to conduct a few simple internet searches to illustrate the problem of rampant plagiarism far better than we ever could. Simply type any of the following quoted searches in any search engine and witness the plagiarism problem first hand:

  • "The Last Days of Sevestopol"
  • "Firm Hands, Silent People"
  • "Dynamate Cargo"
  • "Free Lands" "Words At War"
  • "Hail Caesar (El Duce)"
  • "Fair Stood the Winds of France"
  • "One Thing After Another" "Words At War"
  • "It's Always Bright Tomorrow"
  • "Borrowed Nights" "Words At War"
  • "Faith of Our Fathers" "Words At War"
  • "Tomorrow We'll See" "Words At War"
  • "The Road To Curftom"
  • "Lin Taie"
  • "Boris Voitikov"
  • "Michael Peddap"
  • "Tom Traynor" "Words At War"

What do all of those searches have in common? They're all factually inaccurate, misleading, misspelled or simply made up.

And yes, you'll find our own .pdf log from four years ago in a couple of those searches as well. We pulled that log some time ago, but it remains circulating in the recesses of Google's gigantic caches. We used to believe that when we paid $90 for an 'authoritative' book on Radio Drama that we had every right to expect it to be accurate--$90 accurate in any case. Oops, we were mislead as well. But we didn't perpetuate the problem--we fixed it. 'nuff said.

And a suggestion for all of those 'successful otr authors' profiting so handsomely from plundering and plagiarizing the radioGOLDINdex: when the radioGOLDINdex puts a "(?)" after a name or title it means it isn't sure if that's the correct spelling. That's the signal to actually do some homework of your own--for a change.

Several of the programs from the Words At War canon apparently never aired as a conventional, scheduled broadcast. We believe that list to include:

  • White Brigade
  • Pastoral
  • Traveler From Tokyo
  • Tarawa
  • Return of The Traveler
  • Mr. Glencannon Ignores the War

This also underscores our belief that the original canon of Words At War might well have included 104 programs in all, including the genuine rebroadcasts. As it currently stands we count at least 99 possible broadcasts, with at least the above cited six episodes never having actually aired. Given the 'magic number' "104," divisible by the industry-standard 13-episode increments, that would yield eight, ordered increments of 13 episodes over the course of the various runs. We feel that estimate is well supported. But it remains to be proven. We'll keep looking.

The series experienced several misfires over its run, as evidenced by the four programs that never apparently aired, as well as the numerous rescheduled programs and pre-emptions the series experienced over its various runs.


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. Here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here's the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







The Words At War Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
43-06-24
1
Combined Operations: The Official Story of the British Commandos
Y
43-06-24 Wisconsin State Journal - Words at War, a new weekly series, dramatizes important new books on the war. The series will open with "Combined Operations: The Official Story of the Commandos," current best seller by Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): , and will be heard over WIBA at 7 p.m. The dramatization will deal with the training of the commandos and the attack on St. Nazaire. Dr. Frank Black will conduct original background music.
43-07-01
2
One World
N
43-07-01 Lima News - Wendell Wilkie makes his first appearance in radio drama in the air presentation of his own best seller, "One World," Thursday, at 8 p.m., EWT, over WEAF. On this program, second in "Words at War" series Mr. Willkie will be heard three times as narrator. In the actual drama, the role of "Mr. Willkie" will be played by Thomas Chalmers, veteran radio actor, opera singer and film commentator.
43-07-10
3
They Call It Pacific
Y
43-07-02 Salamanca Republican-Press - Sponsor of Fanny Brice and Frank Morgan, who are away until September 2, has decided to have a vacation replacement after all. He will return to NBC July 8 with an audience participation show. "Blind Date," run by Arlene Francis. Contestants will be six servicemen who will try to date three unseen beautiful girls. Words at War, the book drama series which occupoied the time for two weeks, will be sent to saturdays at 8:30 on July 10. 43-07-10 Salamanca Republican-Press - NBC--8:30, New time for Words at War, Clark Lee's "They Call It Pacific."
43-07-17
4
The Last Days of Sevastopol
The Last Days of Sevestopol
Y
43-07-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "The Last Days of Sevastopol."
43-07-24
5
The Ship
Y
43-07-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of "The Ship," novel by C.S. Forester.
43-07-31
6
From the Land Of the Silent People
Firm Hands, Silent People
Y
43-07-31 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "From the Land Of the Silent People" by Robert St. John.
43-08-07
7
Prisoner Of the Japs
Y
43-08-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Prisoner of the Japs," by Gwen Dew.
43-08-14
8
Love At First Flight
Y
43-08-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Love at First Flight."





43-08-19
9
The Last Days of Sevastopol
The Last Days of Sevestopol
Y
[Some regional seasons overlap: Moves to Thursdays]

43-08-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA)

Announces
9th program, a repetition of an earlier presentation and Malta Spitfire for Saturday's evening presentation and Burma Surgeon as the next Thursday program.

43-08-21
10
Malta Spitfire
Y
43-08-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Malta Spitfire."
43-08-26
11
Burma Surgeon
N
43-08-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Burma Surgeon," story of Dr. Gordon S. Seagrave's work in the Orient.
43-09-02
12
Dynamite Cargo
Dynamate Cargo
Y
43-09-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): Dynamite Cargo."

Announces
12th presentation and Falange as next program.
43-09-09
13
Falange
Free Lands
Y
43-09-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Falange" by Alan Chase.
43-09-16
14
Since You Went Away
Y
43-09-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Since You Went Away."
43-09-23
15
They Shall Not Have Me
Y
43-09-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "They Shall Not Have Me."
43-09-30
16
The Battle Hymn Of China
Y
43-09-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): dramatization of Agnes Smedley's "The Battle Hymn of China."





43-10-05
17
Eighty-Three Days: The Survival Of Seaman Izzi
Y
[Moves back to Tuesdays]

43-10-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "83 days: The Survival of Seaman Izzi," by Mark Murphy.

Announces
17th presentation and Paris Underground as next program.

43-10-12
18
Paris Underground
Y
43-10-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Paris Underground" by Etta Shiber, with author in person.
43-10-19
19
Shortcut To Tokyo
Y
43-10-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Short Cut to Tokyo."
43-10-26
20
Who Dare To Live
Y
43-10-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of narrative poem, "Who Dare to Live," by Frederick B. Watt, a lieutenant commander in Royal Canadian navy.
43-11-02
21
Here Is Your War
Y
43-11-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Here Is Your War," dramatization of book by war correspondent, Ernie Pyle.

Announces
21st presentation and To All Hands as next program.
43-11-09
22
To All Hands
Y
43-11-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): Lieut. John Mason Brown, USNR, in dramatization of his own book, "To All Hands," depicting his experiences in Battle of Sicily.
43-11-16
23
Skyways To Berlin
N
43-11-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Skyways to Berlin," story of operations of American Eighth army air force in Great Britain.
43-11-23
24
Escape From the Balkans
Y
43-11-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of Michael Padev's book, "Escape from the Balkans."

Announces
24th presentation
43-11-30
25
Ave Duce
Hail Caesar (El Duce)
Y
43-11-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): story of Mussolini based on three best-selling books. 43-11-30 Lowell Sun - WORDS AT WAR: "Ave Duce," story of Mussolini; WBZ, 11:30 to 12.

Announces
A Books of War Letters as next program
43-12-07
26
A Book Of War Letters
Y
[Pearl Harbor Day Program]

43-12-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "A Book of War Letters."

Announces
Mother America as next program
43-12-14
27
Mother America
Y
43-12-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of "Mother America," by Col. Carlos P. Romulo of the Philippine army.
43-12-21
28
Log Book
Y
43-12-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): salute to merchant marine in dramatization of Frank Laskier's "Log Book."

Announces
28th program and The Ninth Commandment as next program
43-12-28
29
The Ninth Commandment
Y
43-12-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): Hendrik Van Loon serves as narrator for dramatization of his book, "Thou Shalt Not Bear False Witness."

Announces
They Shall Inherit The Earth as next program
44-01-04
30
They Shall Inherit the Earth
Y
43-01-04 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "They Shall Inherit the Earth," by Arnold Zoff.
44-01-11
31
Eighty-Three Days: The Survival Of Seaman Izzi
Y
43-01-11 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA)

Announces
31st program and War Tide as next program





44-01-21
32
War Tide
Y
43-01-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Wartide" by Lin Taiyi.
44-01-28
33
Condition: Red
Y
43-01-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Condition Red" by Comdr. Frederick J. Bell.
44-02-04
34
White Brigade
Y
[Preempted for War Bond Parade]

43-02-04 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:00 NBC War Bond Parade--WMAQ.

Announces
The Life of George Washington Carver as next program
44-02-11
35
The Life of George Washington Carver
George Washington Carver
Y
[Lincoln's Birthday Tribute]

44-02-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "George Washington Carver," biography by Mrs. Rackham Holt, with Negro chorus; Canada Lee, Negro actor; and Fredric March, narrator.

Announces the
35th program of the series
44-02-18
36
The New Sun
Y
44-02-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): adaptation of Taro Yashima's book, "The New Sun."
44-02-22
37
Assignment USA 44-02-22 Daily Mail
RADIO PROGRAM NEW YORK, Feb. 22--It will be "Red Cross Day" on all networks next Tuesday from sign-on to sign-off. The purpose is to help in getting under way the 1944 war fund drive with a goal of $200,000,000 which is to continue through March. Each program on the day's schedule is to have something to say or do about the Red Cross, with here and there special broadcasts entirely Red Cross. Among the specials is the appearance of Tallulah Bankhead in a repeat performance of "I Served on Bataan" for the NBC Words at War.

44-02-22 Huntington Daily News
11:30 Words At War--Assignment U.S.A.--WEAF (NBC-Red)

44-02-25 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:15 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): dramatization of "Assignment USA," with the author, Seldon Menefee.

Announces
I Served on Bataan as next program starring Tallulah Bankhead
44-03-03
38
I Served On Bataan
N
[Red Cross Day Special]

44-03-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "I Served on Bataan" starring Tallulah Bankhead.
44-03-10
39
The Weeping Wood
Weeping Wood
Y
44-03-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): Vicki Baum's "The Weeping Wood."
44-03-17
40
Science At War
Y
44-03-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Science at War" by George W. Gray.

Announces
40th in the series
44-03-21
41
Der Fuehrer
Y
44-03-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of Konrad Heiden's "Der Fuehrer."

Announces
41st in the series and announces A Bell for Adano as next program
44-03-28
42
A Bell for Adano
Y
44-03-28 Daily News - 11:30 Words at War: A Bell for Adano.

Announces
42nd in the series and next program is a repeat of Assignment U.S.A. from 44-02-22 in response to a highly favorable piece from Variety.
44-04-04
43
Pre-Empted in many markets
Rebroadcast of Assignment U.S.A.
Y
44-04-04 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30 p.m.--(WIBA): Election Reports.

44-04-04 New York Times
Words at War: "Assignment U.S.A."--WEAF. 11:30-12.
44-04-11
44
Wild River
Y
44-04-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Wild River," drama of Dnieper Dam, by Anna Louise Strong; musical background by group of Russian-American war workers, singing "Kalinka," "Along the Vales and Hills" and "Song of the Plains," with accordian and balalaika accompaniment.

Announces
44th in the series
44-04-18
45
The Silence Of the Sea
The Silence Of the Seas
Y
44-04-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "The Silence of the Sea," novel written in Nazi-occupied France.

Announces
45th in the series and announces Tarawa as next program
44-04-25
46
Tarawa
N
44-04-25 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30 p.m.--Treasury Salute (WIBA)

44-04-25 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30 p.m.--Roy Shield & Co. (WMAQ)
44-05-03
47
The Curtain Rises
Y
44-05-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "The Curtain Rises" by Quentin Reynolds.
44-05-10
48
Gunners Get Glory
Y
44-05-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Gunners Get Glory" by Lloyd Wendt.
44-05-17
49
Lifeline
Y
44-05-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Lifeline" by Robert Carse.
44-05-24
50
Lend Lease: Weapon For Victory
Y
44-05-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): dramatization of "Lend-Lease: Weapon for Victory," by Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., undersecretary of state, who will speak at the conclusion of dramatization.
44-05-31
51
The Navy Hunts the CGR-3070
Y
44-05-31 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "The Navy Hunts the CGR-3070."

Announces
43rd program in the series
44-06-07
52
Pacific Partner
N
44-06-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Pacific Partner," story of Australia."
44-06-13
--
D-Day 5th War Bond Drive Special
Y
44-06-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 One for the Money—War Bond Show—WMAQ WCFL

44-06-13 Carbondale Free Press
(Fifth War Bond drives continues
to 2 a. m.) -- NBC
44-06-20
--
44-06-13 Wisconsin State Journal
11:30 Roy Shield Orch—WMAQ

44-06-13 Wisconsin State Journal
11:30 Roy Shield Orch—WIBA





44-06-27
53
Fair Stood the Wind For France
Fair Stood the Winds of France
Y
[Summer replacement season for Fibber McGee and Molly, sponsored by Johnson's Wax]

44-06-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): new series, with Carl Van Doren as narrator; "Fair Stood the Wind for France."

Announces
War Criminals and Punishment as next program
44-07-04
54
War Criminals and Punishment
Y
44-07-03 Wisconsin State Journal - Tuesday 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "War Criminals and Punishment," by George Creel.
44-07-11
55
Captain Retread
Y
44-07-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Captain Retread," by Donald Hough.
44-07-18
56
War Below Zero
Y
44-07-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "War Below Zero," story of loneliness of war in the Arctic, by Col. Bernt Balchen, Maj. Corey Ford, and Maj. Oliver LaFarge.

Announces Traveler From Tokyo for next program.
44-07-25
57
Lost Island
Y
44-07-25 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War - life in "The People vs. Ezra Bid-(WIBA): dramatization of "Lost Island" by James Norman Hall.

Announces
Traveler From Tokyo will be postponed to a later date. Announces Headquarters Budapest for next program.
44-08-01
58
Headquarters Budapest
Y
44-08-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WMAQ): "Headquarters Budapest" by Robert Parker, former head of Balkan's staff of Associated Press; Clifton Fadiman, narrator.
44-08-08
59
The Nazi's Go Underground
Y
44-08-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of "The Nazis Go Underground," by Curt Riess, showing how Nazis plan to perpetuate their party after the war.
44-08-15
60
Pastoral
N
44-08-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): Nevil Shute's "Pastoral."
44-08-22
61
Argentine Diary
N
44-08-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of Ray Josephs' "Argentine Diary"
44-08-29
62
Simone
Y
44-08-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): Lion Feuchtwanger's "Simone."
44-09-05
63
The Veteran Comes Back
Y
44-09-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of Willard Waller's "The Veteran Comes Back."
44-09-12
64
One Man Air Force
Y
44-09-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "One Man Air Force," story of American flying ace, Don Gentile.

Announces
The Return of The Traveler
44-09-19
65
Time For Decision and United States War Aims
Y
[Pre-empts the scheduled broadcast of The Return of The Traveler]

44-09-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): dramatization of "Time for Decision" by Sumner Welles, and "United States War Aims" by Walter Lippman.
44-09-26
66
Journey Through Chaos
Y
44-09-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): "Journey Through Chaos" by Agnes Meyer.

Announces
next to last Johnson's Wax sponsored program and Pacific Victory, 1945 as next program.
44-10-03
67
Pacific Victory, 1945
Y
[End of Johnson's Wax sponsorship]

44-10-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): Signe Hasso and Ralph Bellamy in Robert Nathan's "The Sea-Gull Cry."

Announces Fibber McGee and Molly's return to the air. Thanks listeners for 15-weeks of programs. Announces
Tueday night resumption of Words At War at 11:30.





44-10-10
68
The Veteran Comes Back
Y
[Repeat of 44-09-05]

44-10-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): program continues at new hour; "The Veteran Comes Back" by Willard Waller.

Announces that with the return of Words of War, the series will resume with
two repeats, The Veteran Comes Back and War Criminals and Punishment.
44-10-17
69
War Criminals and Punishment
Y
[Repeat of 44-07-04]

44-10-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA):
repeat broadcast of George Creel's "War Criminals and Punishment."

44-10-24
70
Still Time To Die
Y
44-10-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Words at War (WIBA): Jack Belden's "Still Time to Die."

Announces
Return of The Traveler.
44-10-31
71
Why Was I Killed?
N
44-10-31 Lima News - Rex Warner's book in which a dead English soldier returns to ask the people why he was killed, will be dramatized on "Words at War" Tuesday at 10:30 p.m., Lima time over WEAF. Ben Kagan, of the NBC script staff, has adapted the book, which was originally published in England under the title "Why Was I Killed?" Anton M. Leader directs the "Words at War" series, which is presesnted in cooperation with the Council on Books in Wartime.
44-11-07
--
Pre-empted
Return of The Traveler

[Election Results]

Networks to Devote
Night to Elections

All regular Tuesday night radio
programs, with the exception of
some news broadcasts, have been
cancelled to permit complete
coverage of the election by radio
stations. Many of the network
stars will be heard nt intervals
throughout the evening.
Through its affiliation with the
National Broadcasting Co., WIBA
will provide a continuous report
on all local, state and national results.
44-11-14
--
[No Program]
44-11-17
72
One Damn Thing After Another
Y

[Moves to Fridays]

44-11-14 Hayward Review

War Correspondents
Killed During War
Are Honored Tonight

NEW YORK, '(U.R)—Twenty four war correspondents who have lost their lives in this war will be honored on NBC's "Words at War" program at 10:30 p. m. PWT, tonight in a dramatization of the late Tom Treanor's book "One Damn Thing After Another."
Treanor, correspondent for the Los Angeles Times and NBC, was killed in France on Aug. 21, 1944. Saluted with him on the program will be: Webb Miller, Harry Leslie Percy and Brydon Taves of the United Press; Harry Crockett, Bede Irvin and Asahe J Bush of the Associated Press; Ralph Barnes and Ben Robertson of the New York Herald Tribune; Melville Jacobs of Time and Life; Mrs. Leah Burdett, PM; Eugene Petrov, North American Newspaper Alliance; Jack Singer, Interlational News Service; Byron Darnton and Robert Post of the New York Times; Frank J. Cuhel, NBC; Carl Thursgaard, Acme News Pictures; Lucien LeBandt, Life magazine; Raymond Clapper, Scripps Howard newspapers; Frederick Faust, Harpers; Harold W. Kulick, Popular Science; Danien Parer, Paramount News; David Lardner, New Yorker magazine, and Stanley Grimm, Fort Worth Star Telegram and Houston Chronicle.

44-11-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m. Words at War (WMAQ): "One Damn Thing After Another" by Tom Treanor.

Announces
Camp Follower by Barbara Claw as next program.

44-11-24
73
Barriers Down
Y
[Scheduled performance of Camp Follower replaced by Barriers Down]

44-11-24 "Barriers Down," by Kent Cooper, press association manager, who speaks at conclusion of dramatization on "World-Wide Freedom of the Press in Peace Treaties."

Announces
Camp Follower by Barbara Claw as next program.
44-11-29
74
Camp Follower
Y
[Moves to Wednesdays]

44-11-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m. Words at War (WMAQ): "Camp Folower" by Barbara Klaw, story of life in towns near army camps.

Announces
Ten Escape from Tojo as next program
44-12-06
75
Guys On the Ground
Y
44-12-06 "The Guys on the Ground," by Capt. Alfred Friendly, story of work of ground forces.

Announces
You, Your Children as next program
44-12-13
76
Your School, Your Children
Y
44-12-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m. Words at War (WMAQ): "Your School, Your Children."
44-12-20
77
The Cross and the Arrow
Y
44-12-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m. Words at War (WMAQ): "The Cross and the Arrow."

Announces
The Scapegoats of History as next program
44-12-27
78
Scapegoats In History
Scapegoats of History
Y
[Christmas Program]

44-12-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m. Words at War (WMAQ): "The Scapegoats of History."

The second book addressed is 'History of Bigotry in The United States'
45-01-03
79
It's Always Tomorrow
It's Always Bright Tomorrow
Y
45-01-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m. Words at War (WMAQ): "It's Always Tomorrow" by Robert St. John, foreign correspondent and commentator.

Announces
Borrowed Night as next program
45-01-09
80
Borrowed Night
Borrowed Nights
Y
45-01-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m. Words at War (WIBA): "Borrowed Night," by Oscar Ray.

Announces
Verdict On India as next program
45-01-16
81
Verdict On India
Y
45-01-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m. Words at War (WIBA): "Verdict On India" by Beverly Nichol.

Announces
The Secret State as next program
45-01-23
82
Story of A Secret State
The Story Of A Secret State
Y
45-01-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m. Words at War (WIBA): "Story of a Secret State" by Jan Karski.

Announces a special presentation for the following week, and
Battle Report as next program two weeks following.
45-01-30
--
Pre-empted 45-01-23 Wisconsin State Journal
10:15-11:15-- NBC The President's Birthday (WIBA)
45-02-06
83
Ten Escape From Tojo [2nd half only]
Y
45-02-06 New York Times
Words at War: "Ten Escape From Tojo"--WEAF, 11:30-12.

Announces
What To Do With Germany as next program.
45-02-13
84
What to Do With Germany
Y
[Airs the day of the announcement of the results of the Yalta Conference]

45-02-13 Salamanca Republican-Press - NBC--11:30 Words at War. "What to Do with Germany."

Announces
Battle Report as next program.
45-02-20
85
Battle Report: Pearl Harbor To Coral Sea
Y
45-02-20 New York Times
Words at War: "Battle Report"--WEAF, 11:30-12.

Announces
Faith of Our Fighters as next program.
45-02-27
86
Faith of Our Fighters: The Bid Was Four Hearts
Faith Of Our Fathers
Y
45-02-27 Zanesville Signal - NBC--10:30 Words at War, "Faith Of Our Fighters."

Announces
The Rainbow as next program.
45-03-06
87
The Rainbow
Rainbow
Y
45-03-06 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "The Rainbow"--WEAF.
45-03-13
88
Can Do
Y
45-03-13 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "Can Do"--WEAF.


Announces
Tomorrow Will Sing as next program.
45-03-20
89
Tomorrow Will Sing
Tomorrow We'll See
N
45-03-20 New York Times - 11:30-12--Words at War: "Tomorrow Will Sing"--WEAF.

Cited by Variety as One of the Most Outstanding Programs in Current Radio.
45-03-27
90
Banshee Harvest
Y
45-03-27 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "Banshee Harvest"--WEAF.


Announces
Full Employment In A Free Society as next program and addresses himself as John Patrick Costello in honor of the program.
45-04-03
91
Full Employment In A Free Society
Y
45-04-03 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "Full Employment in a Free Society"--WEAF.


Announces Merchant Marine PSA
45-04-10
92
Apartment In Athens [end clipped]
Mr. Glencannon Ignores the War
Y
45-04-10 Winnipeg Free Press
The NBC feature "Words at War" heard over the Dominion network and CKRC, Tuesday at 10:30 p.m. (C.D.T.) will this week be the story of Guy Gilpatrick's Mr. Glencannon Ignores the War. The radio adaptation by Martin Sterne is the wonderful and highly improbable adventures of Colin Glencannon. The sea-going gentleman with the walrus moustache, the Scottish accent, and the canny smile, gets into a peck of trouble in Pandalang harbor, but teh Japs have their share of it too, as Glencannon merrily carries out his plan of ignoring the war.
45-04-17
93
They Left the Back Door Open
Y
45-04-17 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "They Left the Back Door Open"--WEAF.


NBC announces two disclaimers regarding the content of recent broadcasts.
45-04-24
94
Brave Men
Y
[Tribute to Ernie Pyle preempts the planned broadcast]

45-04-24 Zanesville Signal
Ernie Pyle's book, "Brave Men," gets another radio dramatization tonight at 11:30 in the NBC "Words at War.
45-05-01
95
The Hideout
Y
45-05-01 Zanesville Signal
WHIZ—Words at War.


Announces
The Road To Serfdom as next program
45-05-08
--
Pre-empted for V.E. Day News
45-05-15
96
The Road To Serfdom
The Road To Curftom
Y
[Friedrich Hayek]

45-05-15 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "The Road to Serfdom"--WEAF.


Announces
Wartime Racketeers as next program
45-05-22
97
Wartime Racketeers
Y
45-05-22 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "Wartime Racketeers"--WEAF.
45-05-29
98
Soldier To Civilian
Y
45-05-29 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "Soldier to Civilian"--WEAF.
45-06-05
99
My Country: A Poem of America 45-06-05 New York Times
11:30-12--Words at War: "My Country"--WEAF.

Announces this is the
last program of the series.






The Words At War Radio Program Biographies




Joseph Walton Losey, III
(Director)

(1909-1984)

Birthplace: La Crosse, Wisconsin, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1937 The Columbia Workshop
1943 The Long Name None Could Spell
1943 Words At War
Joseph Losey circa 1943
Joseph Losey circa 1943

Joseph Losey circa 1955
Joseph Losey circa 1955

Losey directed over 30 films between
Losey directed over 30 films between 1939 and 1985

Losey directed Taylor-Burton in 1968's Boom
Losey directed Taylor-Burton in 1968's Boom
Joseph Losey would have been 100 years of age this year. Born to a prominent Wisconsin family, he was tall, handsome, Ivy League educated, and an extremely idealistic young American. He received his Drama and Stage education studying under Berthold Brecht in Germany. Upon returning to the U.S., he traveled to Hollywood, anxious to get involved with the film industry as a writer or director.

His first film was a promotional feature for The Petroleum Industries of America, titled Pete-Roleum and His Cousins (1939). Considering his later notoriety as an alleged enemy of 'commerce and the American Way,' Losey's first film assignment is more than ironic, upon reflection.

Pretty much relegated to documentary shorts for M-G-M, Losey's first four films between 1939 and 1945 were documentary shorts of one type or another, the most important of which was probably Crime Does Not Pay No. 46, 'A Gun In His Hand.'

It should come as no surprise then, that Losey jumped at the opportunity to direct the first two orders of NBC's Words At War in 1943. Given Losey's background he should have been the ideal selection as director of the series. The more idealistic books and literary selections dramatized during the series very much reflected Losey's staunchly idealistic--albeit somewhat naive--beliefs about America and its ideals. Those twenty-six programs spanned a fairly wide swath of the literary landscape of the era--especially over the stauchly conservative NBC.

Once free of his obligations to NBC, Losey launched his first successful feature length film, Galileo (1947), a period piece starring Charles Laughton as Galileo Galilei. Losey followed Galileo with his The Boy With Green Hair (1948) a film still considered a classic of its era. A 'message piece', The Boy with Green Hair was very much in the mold of the war books Losey had dramatized in Radio's Words At War for twenty-six installments. And in fact it was that very idealism that ran him afoul with the infamous House Un-American Activities Committee during the McCarthy era--even more ironic since both McCarthy and Losey were famous sons of Wisconsin. But that didn't stop McCarthy from running Losey out of the country on a rail.

He emigrated to Great Britain in 1952, because of the common language – and to join the growing community of MCarthy-era American ex-patriate artists, writers, actors and directors living in self-imposed asylum in the U.K. during the 1950s and 1960s.




Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Words At War