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Orginal The Unexpected header art

The Unexpected Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> The Unexpected

Billboard's May 3rd 1947 announcement of The Unexpected
Billboard's May 3rd 1947 announcement of The Unexpected

Billboard's July 12th 1947 announcement of availability of The Unexpected
Billboard's July 12th 1947 announcement of availability of The Unexpected

Spot ad for the KGER run of The Unexpected sponsored by Smitty's-U-Drive of Long Beach
August 29th 1947 Spot ad for the KGER run of The Unexpected sponsored by Smittys-U-Drive of Long Beach


December 24th 1947 Spot ad for the KGER run of The Unexpected
December 24th 1947 Spot ad for the KGER run of The Unexpected

Screen star Marsha Hunt was featured or co-starred in several of The Unexpected episodes
Screen star Marsha Hunt was
featured or co-starred in several of
The Unexpected episodes

 Screen star Steve Cochran starred in two of The Unexpected episodes
Screen star Steve Cochran starred
in two of The Unexpected episodes

Sultry screen star Marjorie Riordan starred in  two of The Unexpected episodes
Sultry screen star Marjorie Riordan
starred in two of The Unexpected
episodes

Early Film star Binnie Barnes starred in two of The Unexpected episodes
Early Film star Binnie Barnes starred
in two of The Unexpected episodes

Early Film star Lyle Talbot starred in three of The Unexpected episodes
Early Film star Lyle Talbot starred in
three of The Unexpected episodes

Famous child actor Jackie Cooper starred in two of The Unexpected episodes
Famous child actor Jackie Cooper
starred in two of The Unexpected
episodes

Facsimile 1948 Mayfair Transcription label for transcription number 106, 'Revenge.' starring Barry Sullivan
1948 Mayfair Transcription label for transcription number 106, 'Revenge.' starring Barry Sullivan


Facsimile 1948 Mayfair Transcription label for transcription number 113, 'Understudy.' starring Lurene Tuttle
1948 Mayfair Transcription label for transcription number 113, 'Understudy.' starring Lurene Tuttle

Background

Throughout The Golden Age of Radio era, supernatural suspense thrillers, as a dramatic genre, were a popular staple over Radio--indeed, over early Television as well. While several were originated and produced by independent programming syndicators, the majority of the more enduring supernatural thrillers and suspense dramas originated from key stations of one of the larger networks--occasionally larger affiliate stations within a network's chain. Some of the more popular of the genre were as follows:

Though not all-inclusive, the list reflects a representative mix of affiliate origination, key station origination and independent syndicator programming.

Independent Radio programming syndicators launched several of the more successful suspense-thriller dramas during the 1940s. Such was the case with the suspense-thriller-mystery series, The Unexpected, initially produced, recorded and transcribed by Hamilton-Whitney Radio Productions during 1947.

The Unexpected debuts over Los Angeles airwaves

Hamilton-Whitney first announced its production of The Unexpected in Billboard magazine in May 1947. Further Summer 1947 announcements cited twenty-six programs available as of July 1947, with twenty-six more programs in production. The 15-minute series was announced as a suspense mystery series starring "top-flight stars." And indeed, the proprosed headliners for the series included Barry Sullivan, Lyle Talbot, Jackie Cooper, Steve Cochran, Marsha Hunt, Marjorie Riordan, Binnie Barnes, Jack Holt and Lon Chaney, all distinguished Film actors of the 1930s and 1940s. The Unexpected also headlined some of Radio's greatest West Coast talent, including Lurene Tuttle, Betty Lou Gerson, Virginia Gregg, Joan Banks, and Gerald Mohr.

"Life is filled with the unexpected: romantic, tragic and mysterious endings to our most ordinary actions. Dreams come true . . . Dreams are shattered by sudden twists of fate . . . in The Unexpected."

So opens each 15-minute episode of The Unexpected. The series was similar to Diary of Fate (1947) and reminiscent of Stroke of Fate (1953). 1953's Stroke of Fate concerned itself with thirteen historical hypotheses on what might have happened if fate had taken a different turn at some crucial historic juncture, 1947's Diary of Fate traced the fate of normal people and their life situations immediately preceding and following an act of fate that changed their lives. While one might be tempted to conclude that the competing transcription houses--Larry Finley Syndication and Hamilton-Whitney Radio Productions--were simply poaching concepts from each other, there are several uniquely different characteristics of the two transcribed, syndicated programs:

  • Diary of Fate featured durable Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television character actor Herb Lytton as 'Fate,' providing the exposition necessary to frame each "entry" in the 'Diary of Fate.' The Unexpected by contrast starred major Film and Radio actors reacting to the fate that undertook them near the conclusion of each episode.
  • Diary of Fate was a 30-minute feature, whereas The Unexpected was a 15-minute feature. Diary of Fate's longer format allowed greater exposition from 'Fate' as well as tracing the impact of fate on the lives of each protagonist. The Unexpected provided no expositional element, simply allowing each playlet to trace its course as the consequences of each twist of fate took their inevitable course in the lives of each episode's protagonists.
  • Diary of Fate had a comparatively far greater distribution for its 39-episode transcription set. The Unexpected experienced comparatively fewer takers for its projected 52-episode transcription set, at least two subscribers airing only the first 26-episodes.

Contrasts aside, both productions were recorded, produced and pressed during 1947 in Hollywood. Both productions featured some of the West Coast's finest Radio talent. Diary of Fate featured the voices of Lurene Tuttle, Larry Dobkin, Hal Sawyer, Gloria Blondell, Frank Albertson, Jerry Hausner, Howard McNear, Peter Leeds, Ken Peters, Daws Butler and William Johnstone, among others. The Unexpected featured many of the same supporting West Coast Radio actors while significantly highlighting the work of Lurene Tuttle, Betty Lou Gerson, Virginia Gregg, Joan Banks, and Gerald Mohr in particular. The Unexpected went even further, featuring some of Stage and Film's most respected character actors in the leading roles.

Hamilton-Whitney's first 26-episode tranche of The Unexpected met its promise of major motion picture actors reasonably well, featuring Barry Sullivan, Jackie Cooper, Lyle Talbot, Marsha Hunt, Steve Cochran, Binnie Barnes, Jack Holt, Marjorie Riordan, and Tom Neal. Lon Chaney, though promised, never actually materialized during the series--nor did Virginia Bruce. By the time the second tranche of 26 programs entered production, Barry Sullivan was the only "major motion picture star" to continue appearances in the program.

By contrast, West Coast Radio stars of the era were very well-represented throughout the series. Lurene Tuttle, Virginia Gregg, Joan Banks, Betty Lou Gerson, and Gerald Mohr were all featured in starring roles during the run, with Lurene Tuttle taking the lioness' share of the leading female roles.

The Unexpected was interesting fare for the genre. Apparently targeted more toward an adult female audience, most of the scripts had an adventurous romantic twist in one form or another. Given the format, most of the scripts had only about ten and a half minutes of dialogue, exposition and action to propel their protagonists to their crossroad with fate. The formula usually entailed nine minutes of framing the protagonist's background, with the last two minutes or so devoted to fate's denouement.

Epilogues

Alan Ladd's Mayfair Transcription Company produced--or distributed--at least the following syndicated programs:

During Mayfair Transcription Company's brief life, it produced a fairly eclectic mix of syndicated programming genres:

  • Box Thirteen was an action-adventure-mystery drama starring Alan Ladd as Dan Holiday, adventurer at large.
  • The Damon Runyon Theatre was a series of adaptations of famous sports writer Damon Runyon's New York underworld denizens.
  • The Unexpected was a romantic-supernatural drama series.
  • Knox Manning's Behind the Scenes was a "and here's the rest of the story" series much in the spirit of famous ABC broadcaster Paul Harvey. The Knox Manning stories comprised mostly historical figures or events. Knox Manning's Behind the Scenes had originated as another Hamilton-Whitney production.
  • The Greatest of These traced the adventures of Radio actor Tom Collins as Harvey Desmond, a religious lawyer.

In 195o Mayfair Transcription Company ran afoul of the American Federation of Radio Artists (AFRA) when it sold a set of Box Thirteen to Harry Alan Towers and his Towers of London production company for broadcast in South Africa and Australia. Box Thirteen, starring Alan Ladd himself, had pretty much exhausted its syndication opportunities in North America by 1950. Mayfair clearly viewed the Towers of London sale as a means of extracting a bit more from its Box Thirteen production. In the end, a three-man arbritration panel agreed with AFRA, returning a ruling that required Mayfair to provide AFRA almost $12,000 in compensation [approximately $112,000 in today's dollars]. It was a relatively pyrrhic victory for AFRA, but it helped further AFRA's legitimacy while underscoring AFRA's international reach during the era.

Mayfair apparently survived the bad press, with its syndicated productions airing across America well into the mid-1950s. As an example, here's the 6:45 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. lineup from Galveston's KGBC for the night of Saturday, January 12th 1952:

  • 6:45--The Unexpected
  • 7:00--Alan Ladd [Box Thirteen]
  • 7:30--Damon Runyon Theater [sic]
And here's an entry from the November 22nd, 1951 edition of the Oakland Tribune's Radio Listings page:

SHOW TIME
By Bob Franklin:

For the past few months a stack of letters has been accumulating on a desk at KGO—letters asking for the return of a program formerly berthed on KGO. The men who man KGO's Kilocycles took note and last week John Brown strolled back into KGO's radio lineup as "Broadway" in THE DAMON RUNYON THEATRE.

"Broadway", together with his pals "Harry the Horse," "Last Card Louie," and others from the Damon Runyon stable are camping in the 9 p.m. spot tonight and every Thursday on KGO. If you are a Runyon fan, and who isn't, this show is a cinch to draw your applause.

Preceding the Runyon stories at 8:45 is a "new program. THE UNEXPECTED, from which I'm told you can expect a variety of drama starring top Hollywood names.

Note that the 1951 KGO run of The Unexpected actually premiered over KGO the week earlier on November 15th 1951. Of course it's no coincidence that KGO, an ABC Key Station, aired The Unexpected and The Damon Runyon Theatre back to back. ABC Key Stations KGO, San Francisco and KECA, Los Angeles, had aired both Mayfair Transcription Company productions--The Unexpected and The Damon Runyon Theatre--during 1948. Mayfair Transcription Company sold their transcriptions to their customers, so neither KGO nor KECA would have had to pay for the previously acquired series any further after those first purchases.

The Unexpected concept finds its way to 1950s Television

But that wasn't quite the end of the line for The Unexpected. In 1952 Frederick Ziv and his Ziv Television Productions picked up The Unexpected concept for a Television incarnation. The series featured Herbert Marshall as host and appeared over NBC on Wednesday nights. The Television series ran for thirty-nine, half-hour episodes, several of which were written by the successful Radio writing team of Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee.

Series Derivatives:

Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Supernatural Suspense Dramas
Network(s): KGER; KECA [ABC]; WOR [Mutual]; KGO [ABC]
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): 47-04-xx Title Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 1947 KGER Run:
47-08-01 01
Mercy Killing

1947 KGER Run:
48-04-11 01
Mercy Killing
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 1947 KGER Run:
47-08-01 to 47-12-31; KGER; Twenty-six, 15-minute programs; Fridays then Wednesdays

1948 WOR Run:
48-04-11 to 48-09-26; WOR; Twenty-five, 15-minute programs; Sunday at 10:30 p.m.
Syndication: Hamilton-Whitney Radio Productions; Mayfair Transcriptions
Sponsors: Smitty's-U-Drive
Director(s): Frank K. Danzig, Mel Williamson [Directors]
Alvin C. Gershenson [Production Supervisor]
Principal Actors: Barry Sullivan, Marsha Hunt, Tom Neal, Lurene Tuttle, Lyle Talbot, Binnie Barnes, Marjorie Riordan, Jackie Cooper, Jack Holt, Steve Cochran, Virginia Gregg, Joan Banks, Betty Lou Gerson, Gerald Mohr, Inez Seabury, Marlo Dwyer, Michael Barret, Eddie Fields, Ginny Johnson, Herbert Lytton, Dawes Butler, Margie Liszt, Dave Light, Pat McGeehan, Doug Young, Cliff Thorsness, Jimmy Murphy, Stanley Waxman, John Fustini, Alice Drake, Ed Rand, Inge Yolas, Dan Reis, Parker Cornell, Bob Anderson, Jack Nestle, Eda Reiss Merin
Recurring Character(s): Varied from production to production
Protagonist(s): Varied from production to production
Author(s): Guy de Maupassant
Writer(s) Robert Libbott and Frank Burt
Music Direction: Rex Koury, Eddie Dunstedter [Organ]
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): Hal Sawyer
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
52
Episodes in Circulation: 39
Total Episodes in Collection: 39
Provenances:


KGER 1390

Contributor Jerry Haendiges.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the radioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


From the Billboard announcement above in the Dee-scription sidebar, Hamilton-Whitney had already recorded the first twenty-six episodes of The Unexpected by July 12th 1947. That announcement also promised a "Second 26 in production." There were several audible differences between the first tranche of 26-episodes and the 27th and beyond episodes:

  • The sound of thunder accompanied every mention of the phrase, "The Unexpected."
  • Hal Sawyer identifed himself as the announcer at the close of each episode.
  • The closing credits expanded to include some of the supporting players.
  • The taglines in the prologue to each episode changed to:

    "The Unexpected . . . a secret future . . . a hidden destiny waiting for you . . . where? . . . when? . . . who knows? Tomorrow? Today? An hour from now? Perhaps in just a moment, you too will meet . . . [thunder clap] The Unexpected."
  • Each opening of the second tranche of episodes teased a portion of the script to generate interest in the episode.
  • Of the 13 circulating exemplars of the second tranche of The Unexpected, only one of the promised "favorite motion picture stars" is actually represented--Barry Sullivan. Lurene Tuttle is announced as "Radio's most famous actress."

There is no reference to Hamilton-Whitney Radio Productions on the transcription labels of the circulating Mayfair Transcription E.T.s of The Unexpected. Either the original Hamilton-Whitney Radio Productions discs were separate and distinct from the Mayfair Transcription discs pressed by RCA, or Hamilton-Whitney simply sold the production to Alan Ladd's Mayfair Transcription company prior to--or during--1948.

OTRisms:

The EXPECTED . . .

  • The Hickerson Guide predictably cites only a 1948 [WOR] run of The Unexpected--and only 32 episodes available. In fact the series first aired over KGER and KECA in Long Beach and Los Angeles respectively, as early as August 1st, 1947. There were in fact at least 39 of the proposed 52 episodes actually recorded and produced.
  • The radioGOLDINdex The Unexpected page and the Vintage Radio Place's The Unexpected cassette catalog cite 'their' transcription sets as from 1948--as a Hamilton-Whitney transcribed set. The Hamilton-Whitney transcription set(s) would have been recorded and pressed during the Summer of 1947, not 1948. The Mayfair Transcriptions set may have been pressed during 1948.
  • The OTRR, in its customary practice, simply plagiarized the same inaccuracies as those contained in Hickerson, the radioGOLDINdex, and the Vintage Radio Place for their OTRRPedia entries and OTTER log. We wonder--yet again--precisely what their claim to 'the most accurate database of OTR in the world' actually means to the OTRR and its members and supporters.

All of the transcription sets cited by the above are numbered sequentially from '100' to at least '138,' giving further evidence that the transcription set(s) cited were from the purported 1948 Mayfair Transcriptions/RCA pressing. We have yet to determine how the original Hamilton-Whitney Radio Productions set(s) were sequentially numbered--or if they were even a separate pressing.

We have little right to complain about the obviously conspiratorial nature of the the OTRR and the other commercial OTR elements of Vintage Radio Collecting. They're in the business of propping up each others' alleged holdings and their alleged details to maintain the perceived value of those holdings at OTR Conventions, through Internet sales, and eBay. Lying about either the extent or details of one's holdings is a moral issue every commercial OTR vendor decides for themselves. As such, the commercial element of OTR has its own cross to bear and apparently the weight of that 'cross' is light as a feather of late. But referring to each other as historians or researchers is simply fraud. In the present instance, all of the commercial parties perpetuating the fraud that the first run of The Unexpected was broadcast over WOR between April 11th 1948 through December 19th 1948 are equally culpable. As proven below, that run as currently misrepresented is a complete fabrication of broadcast history. The last time we checked common law, deliberately misrepresenting a commercial service or offering with the intent to deceive is criminal fraud.

We've researched and written in excess of 1.5 million words on the subject of some 400 Radio programs of the era. We have yet to fathom why the 'OTR' community in particular seems so fixated on East Coast Radio that they often ascribe West Coast Radio productions to origination on the East Coast. While we understand the pride one might feel if one was raised on the East Coast, we're at a loss to understand how it furthers the honest documentation of the history of Vintage Broadcast Radio to continually lie about the true origination of many of the more interesting and collectable canons from the era. Wishful thinking we can just barely tolerate, but we have no patience for deliberate misrepresentation.

If the overwhelming majority of 'OTR promoters' genuinely believe that the East Coast was either the epicenter of the development of Broadcast Radio or the vast majority of the Radio programming from the Golden Age of Radio we feel obliged to continue to disabuse them of that wishful thinking. As best as we've been able to determine to date, the overwhelming majority of the surviving exemplars of recordings from the Golden Age of Radio [including almost all of the AFRS and AFRTS denatured programming] originated from the West Coast and Midwest, not the East Coast.


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here are the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

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We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article, findings, concept and log copyright 2011 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.

[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







The Unexpected Radio Program Broadcast Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
47-07-11
1
Mercy Killing
Y
47-04-26 Wisconsin State Journal
Barry Sullivan, star of "Rogues Gallery," which starts on NBC June 1, also co-stars with Marsha Hunt in "The Unexpected," a transcription series now being made.

47-05-03 Billboard
A new transcription firm, Hamilton-Whitney Radio Productions, cut its first sides of a 15-minute dramatic program, The Unexpected. Frank K. Danzig, formerly with WNEW, WHN and CBS, directs.

47-07-11 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:15 P.M.--KGER "Unexpected" mystery

Features
Barry Sullivan. Announces Marsha Hunt starring in the next program
47-07-18
2
Birthday Present
Y
47-07-18 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:15 P.M.--KGER "Unexpected" mystery

Features
Marsha Hunt.
47-07-25
3
Solid Citizen
Y
47-07-25 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:15 P.M.--KGER "Unexpected" mystery

Features
Tom Neal. Announces Marsha Hunt featured in the next program
47-08-01
4
Finale
Y
47-08-01 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:15 P.M.--KGER "Unexpected" mystery

Features
Lurene Tuttle and Marsha Hunt. Announces a famous motion picture star in the next program
47-08-08
5
Cargo Unknown
Y
47-08-08 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:15 P.M.--KGER "Unexpected" mystery.

Features
Lyle Talbot. Announces another famous motion picture star in the next program
47-08-15
6
Find The Man
Y
[Moves to 8:30 p.m.]

47-08-15 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Binnie Barnes. Announces another famous motion picture star in the next program.
47-08-22
7
Revenge
Y
47-08-22 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Barry Sullivan and Marsha Hunt. Announces another famous motion picture star in the next program.
47-08-29
8
The Cripple

Spot ad for the KGER run of The Unexpected sponsored by Smitty's-U-Drive of Long Beach

Y
47-08-29 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Marjorie Riordan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
47-09-05
9
Fool's Silver
Y
47-09-05 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
47-09-12
10
Horoscope
Y
47-09-12 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Marjorie Riordan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
47-09-19
11
Eavesdropper
Y
47-09-19 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
47-09-26
12
Legacy
Y
47-09-26 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lurene Tuttle. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-10-01
13
Museum
Y
[Moves to Wednesday due to KGER coverage of Football season]

47-10-01 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Jackie Cooper. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-10-08
14
Understudy
Y
47-10-08 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lurene Tuttle. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-10-15
15
King Champion
Y
47-10-15 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Jack Holt. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-10-22
16
The Mink Coat
Y
47-10-22 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lurene Tuttle. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-10-29
17
Easy Money
Y
47-10-29 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Steve Cochran. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-11-05
18
Free Passage
Y
47-11-05 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lurene Tuttle. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-11-12
19
Re-Match
Y
47-11-12 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Jackie Cooper. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-11-19
20
Sweet Sixteen
Y
47-11-19 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lurene Tuttle. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-11-26
21
Shipwreck
Y
47-11-26 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Jack Holt. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-12-03
22
The Winfield Diamond
Y
47-12-03 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Binnie Barnes. Announces another famous motion picture star in the next program.
47-12-10
23
Jailbreak
Y
47-12-10 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Steve Cochran. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-12-17
24
The Tulip Garden
Y
47-12-17 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lyle Talbot. Announces another famous motion picture star in the next program
47-12-24
25
The Revere Cup
Y
47-12-24 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lurene Tuttle. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
47-12-31
26
Silver Fox
Y
47-12-31 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected

Features
Lyle Talbot. Announces another famous motion picture star in the next program





Date Trans. No. Title Avail. Notes
48-03-19
--
--
48-03-19 Los Angeles Times
6:30 P.M. KECA--Orch..
48-03-26
100
Mercy Killing
Y
48-03-26 Los Angeles Times
6:30 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-04-02
101
Birthday Present
Y
48-04-02 Los Angeles Times
6:30 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-04-09
102
Solid Citizen
Y
48-04-09 Los Angeles Times
6:30 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-04-16
103
Finale
Y
48-04-16 Los Angeles Times
6:30 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.

48-04-16 Long Beach Press-Telegram
6:30 P.M.--KGER The Unexpected
48-04-23
104
Cargo Unknown
Y
48-04-23 Los Angeles Times
6:30 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-04-25
105
Find The Man
Y
[Moves to Sundays]

48-04-25 Los Angeles Times
6:30 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-05-02
106
Revenge
Y
48-05-02 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-05-09
107
The Cripple
Y
48-05-09 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-05-16
108
Fool's Silver
Y
48-05-16 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-05-23
109
Horoscope
Y
48-05-23 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-05-30
110
Eavesdropper
Y
48-05-30 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-06-06
111
Legacy
Y
48-06-06 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-06-13
112
Museum
Y
48-06-13 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--10,000th Celeb.

48-06-13 New York Times
10:30-WOR--The Unexpected--Sketch
48-06-20
113
Understudy
Y
48-06-20 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-06-27
114
King Champion
Y
48-06-27 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-07-04
115
The Mink Coat
Y
48-07-04 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-07-11
116
Easy Money
Y
48-07-11 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-07-18
117
Free Passage
Y
48-07-18 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-07-25
118
Re-Match
Y
48-07-25 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--Unexpected.
48-08-01
119
Sweet Sixteen
Y
48-08-01 Los Angeles Times
9 P.M. KECA--News, Music.

48-08-01 New York Times
10:30-WOR--No listing
48-08-08
120
Shipwreck
Y
48-08-08 New York Times
10:30-WOR--No listing
48-08-15
121
The Winfield Diamond
Y
48-08-15 New York Times
10:30-WOR--Broadway--Hy Gardner and Danton Walker
48-08-22
122
Jailbreak
Y
48-08-22 New York Times
10:30-WOR--Broadway--Hy Gardner and Danton Walker
48-08-29
123
The Tulip Garden
Y
48-08-29 New York Times
10:30-WOR--Broadway--Hy Gardner and Danton Walker
48-09-05
124
The Revere Cup
Y
48-09-05 New York Times
10:30-WOR--Broadway--Hy Gardner and Danton Walker
48-09-12
125
Silver Fox
Y
48-09-12 New York Times
10:30-WOR--Broadway--Hy Gardner and Danton Walker
48-09-19
126
Masterpiece
Y
48-09-19 New York Times
10:30-WOR--Broadway--Hy Gardner and Danton Walker


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-09-26
127
Two of A Kind
Y
48-09-26 New York Times
10:30--WOR--The Unexpected--Play

Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.





48-10-03
128
Counterfeit
Y
48-10-03 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-10-10
129
Passport To Danger
Y
48-10-10 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-10-17
130
Voodoo Night
Y
48-10-17 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-10-24
131
Mirage
Y
48-10-24 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-10-31
132
Nightmare

Y
48-10-31 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


Stars
Lurene Tuttle. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program
48-11-07
133
Handle with Care
Y
48-11-07 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-11-14
134
Heat Wave
Y
48-11-14 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Handyman Show


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-11-21
135
Twilight Meeting
Y
48-11-21 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Box 13--Play


Stars
Barry Sullivan. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-11-28
136
Heard But Not Seen
Y
48-11-28 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Box 13: Play


Stars
Virginia Gregg. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-12-05
137
Career Woman
Y
48-12-05 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Alan Ladd Show


Stars
Joan Banks. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-12-12
138
The Necklace
Y
48-12-12 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Alan Ladd Show


Stars
Betty Lou Gerson and Gerald Mohr. Announces another favorite motion picture star in the next program.
48-12-19
--
--





The Unexpected Radio Program Broadcast Log [Alleged complete 39-episode 1948 WOR Run]

Date Trans. No. Title Avail. Notes
48-04-11
100
Mercy Killing
N
[WOR Premiere; Replaces 'Play At Home' quiz program slot; Play At Home moves to 10:45]

48-04-11 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-04-18
101
Birthday Present
N
48-04-18 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-04-25
102
Solid Citizen
N
48-04-25 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-05-02
103
Finale
N
48-05-02 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-05-09
104
Cargo Unknown
N
48-05-09 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-05-16
105
Find The Man
N
48-05-16 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-05-23
106
Revenge
N
48-05-23 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-05-30
107
The Cripple
N
48-05-30 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-06-06
108
Fool's Silver
N
48-06-06 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-06-13
109
Horoscope
N
48-06-13 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-06-20
110
Eavesdropper
N
48-06-20 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-06-27
111
Legacy
N
48-06-27 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-07-04
112
Museum
N
48-07-04 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-07-11
113
Understudy
N
48-07-11 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-07-18
114
King Champion
N
48-07-18 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-07-25
115
The Mink Coat
N
48-07-25 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-08-01
116
Easy Money
N
48-08-01 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-08-08
117
Free Passage
N
48-08-08 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-08-15
118
Re-Match
N
48-08-15 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-08-22
119
Sweet Sixteen
N
48-08-22 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-08-29
120
Shipwreck
N
48-08-29 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-09-05
121
The Winfield Diamond
N
48-09-05 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-09-12
122
Jailbreak
N
48-09-12 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-09-19
123
The Tulip Garden
N
48-09-19 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch
48-09-26
124
The Revere Cup
N
48-09-26 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--The Unexpected-Sketch





48-10-03
125
Silver Fox
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-10-03 New York Times
10:30 p.m.--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs

48-10-10
126
Masterpiece
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-10-10 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs

48-10-17
127
Two of A Kind
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-10-17 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


48-10-24
128
Counterfeit
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-10-24 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


48-10-31
129
Passport To Danger
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-10-31 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Pat Hollis, Songs


48-11-07
130
Voodoo Night
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-11-07 New York Times
10:30--WOR----Pat Hollis, Songs


48-11-14
131
Mirage
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-11-21 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Handyman Show


48-11-21
132
Nightmare
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-11-21 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Box 13--Play


48-11-28
133
Handle with Care
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-11-28 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Box 13: Play


48-12-05
134
Heat Wave
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-12-05 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Alan Ladd Show


48-12-12
135
Twilight Meeting
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-12-12 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Alan Ladd Show

48-12-19
136
Heard But Not Seen
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-12-19 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Alan Ladd Show


48-12-26
137
Career Woman
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

48-12-26 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Alan Ladd Show


49-01-02
138
The Necklace
--
[No WOR listing for The Unexpected whatsoever]

49-01-09 New York Times
10:30--WOR--Alan Ladd Show








The Unexpected Radio Program Biographies




[Patrick] Barry Sullivan
(Recurring Lead)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actor
(1912-1994)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1943 Lux Radio Theatre
1946 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1947 Rogue's Gallery
1947 In Your Name
1947 The Unexpected
1948 Steve Canyon
1948 NBC University Theatre
1949Adventures Of the Saint
1949 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1950 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 Guest Star
1951 Cavalcade Of America
1951 Family Theatre
1951 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1952 Hallmark Playhouse
1954 Stars Over Hollywood
Proudly We Hail
Obsession

Barry Sullivan, ca. 1952
Barry Sullivan, ca. 1952

Director Joseph Lewis talking with Polly Bergen and Barry Sullivan, on the set of Cry of the Hunted (1953)
Director Joseph Lewis talking with Polly Bergen and Barry Sullivan, on the set of Cry of the Hunted (1953).
Barry Sullivan and Lana Turner in The Bad and The Beautiful (1952)
Barry Sullivan and Lana Turner in The Bad and The Beautiful (1952)

Barry Sullivan with Audrey Totter, in Tension (1949)
Barry Sullivan with Audrey Totter in Tension (1949)

Barry Sullivan publicity photo, ca. 1955
Barry Sullivan publicity photo, ca. 1955
Barry Sullivan was a theater usher and department store employee when he made his first Broadway appearance in I Want a Policeman at the Lyceum Theatre in January of 1936. The show ran for only 47 performances. His other 1936 appearances on Broadway were the drama St. Helena in October, and the comedies All That Glitters and Eye On the Sparrow. All three plays were flops. His first hit play was in the role of Bert Jefferson in The Man Who Came to Dinner, by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. But throughout the late 1930s, Sullivan gained movie acting experience in two-reel comedies produced by the Manhattan-based Educational Studios.

By the 1942 Broadway season, he'd experienced three more flops: Mr. Big, Ring Around Elizabeth, and Johnny Wisely. Quite understandably, he then steered clear of Broadway for over a decade, during which time he performed in Radio and early Television.

Sullivan made several dramatic appearances in Radio dramas during the early 1940s, but his first lead role was as the second Richard Rogue in the Summer 1947 run of Rogue's Gallery, for NBC. Sullivan followed his lead in Rogue's Gallery when he brought famous cartoonist Milt Caniff's beloved Steve Canyon comic strip to life in 1948's Steve Canyon radio program. 1949 found him in the role of Simon Templar, The Saint for two episodes. Sullivan continued to perform in straight dramatic roles on Radio until 1954.

Barry Sullivan's 1945 return to Broadway landed him a hit play, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, taking over the role of Barney Greenwald from Henry Fonda. Indeed, in 1955, Sullivan was nominated for a Best Actor - Single Performance Emmy Award in his reprise of the Barney Greenwald role on Ford Star Jubilee's The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial. Sullivan's last appearance on Broadway, was in the original Too Late the Phalarope (1956), which true to form, was also a flop.

Sullivan starred in movies with Joan Crawford, Loretta Young, and most of the forties and fifties leading ladies. Sullivan toured the US with Bette Davis in theatrical readings of the poetry of Carl Sandburg and starred opposite her in the 1951 film Payment on Demand.

Having wisely abandoned his Broadway career, Sullivan had made his commercial film debut in the western The Woman of the Town (1943). And while Sullivan never caught on as a lead, he excelled at supporting roles in which he could play tough, aggressive characters more apropos of his height, athleticism and physique. His most notable roles were as the lead in The Gangster (1947), as Tom Buchanan in the Alan Ladd version of The Great Gatsby (1949), and as movie director in The Bad and the Beautiful (1952). He continued acting in movies until 1977, rounding off a near 40-year movie career with an appearance in Oh, God! (1977). He continued occasional appearances on television until retiring in 1980. He was coaxed out of retirement for one last role, 1987's appropriately titled, The Last Straw.

Sullivan was a Democratic Party activist and a tireless advocate for the mentally disabled. Barry Sullivan died of a respiratory ailment on June 6, 1994 in Sherman Oaks, California. He was 81 years old.




Lurene Tuttle portraying both the murderess and victim in the Whistler dramatization of 'Death Sees Double'
Lurene Tuttle
(Ensemble performer)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress; Lecturer and Acting Coach
(1907-1986)

Birthplace: Pleasant Lake, IN

Radiography:
1937 Hollywood Hotel
1937 White Fires of Inspiration
1937 Columbia Workshop
1937 Lux Radio Theatre
1938 CBS Hollywood Showcase
1938 Silver Theatre
1938 Texaco Star Theatre
1939 Calling All Cars
1939 The Chase and Sanborn Hour
1939 The Jello Program
1940 Good News of 1940
1940 Forecast
1940 The Rudy Valee Sealtest Show
1941 The Great Gildersleeve
1941 Hollywood Premier
1942 CBS Looks At Hollywood
1942 Cavalcade of America
1942 The Adventures of Red Ryder
1942 Stars Over Hollywood
1942 Forty Years Remembered
1942 Hello Mom
1942 The Mayor of the Town
1942 Dr Christian
1943 Wings To Victory
1943 Victory Belles
1943 Lights Out
1943 Suspense
1944 Globe Theatre
1944 Mystery House
1944 The Star and the Story
1944 This Is My Story
1944 Columbia Presents Corwin
1945 Theatre of Famous Radio Players
1945 Arch Oboler's Plays
1945 On A Note of Triumph
1945 Twelve Players
1945 The Whistler
1945 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1945 Theatre of Romance
1945 Rogue's Gallery
1946 Strange Wills
1946 Hollywood Star Time
1946 The World of Rosalind Marlowe
1946 Encore Theatre
1946 Dark Venture
1946 The Adventures of Sam Spade
1946 Academy Award
1946 The Mercury Summer Theatre
1946 Favorite Story
1946 The Cat
1947 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1947 The Rudy Vallee Show
1947 The Smiths of Hollywood
1947 The Right To Live
1947 Operation Nightmare
1947 The Adventures of Philip Marlowe
1947 Mystery In the Air
1947 Sound Stage For Joan Crawford
1947 The Raleigh Cigarette Program
1947 Errand Of Mercy
1948 The Unexpected
1948 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1948 Ellery Queen
1948 In Your Name
1948 The Diary of Fate
1948 Guest Star
1948 Hallmark Playhouse
1948 NBC University Theatre
1948 Make Believe Town
1948 Jeff Regan, Investigator
1948 Let George Do It
1948 Camel Screen Guild Theatre
1948 The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet
1948 The George O'Hanlon Show
1948 The Red Skelton Show
1949 Sealtest Variety Theatre
1949 Pat Novak For Hire
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1949 The Prudential Family Hour of Stars
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 Family Theatre
1949 The Adventures of the Saint
1949 Four Star Playhouse
1950 For the Living
1950 Presenting Charles Boyer
1950 Night Beat
1950 The Story of Doctor Kildare
1950 Sara's Private Caper
1950 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1950 Rocky Jordan
1950 The Adventures of Philip Marlowe
1950 The Miracle of America
1950 Tales of the Texas Rangers
1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1950 Mr President
1952 The Silent Men
1952 The Railroad Hour
1952 The Freedom Story
1953 The Hallmark Hall of Fame
1953 Broadway Is My Beat
1953 The First Nighter Program
1953 General Electric Theatre
1953 You Were There
1956 CBS Radio Workshop
1956 Those Young Bryans
1957 The Ruggles
1958 Heartbeat Theatre
1959 Have Gun, Will Travel

Caption: Lurene Tuttle, Western radio actress, frequently plays in sketches on the CBS Hollywood Showcase (1938)
Caption: Lurene Tuttle, Western radio actress, frequently plays in sketches on the CBS Hollywood Showcase (1938)

Lurene Tuttle circa 1940
Lurene Tuttle circa 1940

Lurene Tuttle circa 1957
Lurene Tuttle circa 1957

Lurene Tuttle with Howard Duff
Lurene Tuttle with Howard Duff
as 'Effie' and Sam Spade circa 1946

Lurene Tuttle plays a duet at the piano with daughter Barbara
Lurene Tuttle plays a duet at the piano with daughter Barbara

Lurene Tuttle rehearses with Dick Haymes for Everything for The Boys
Lurene Tuttle rehearses with Dick Haymes for Everything for The Boys

Lurene Tuttle was also a Mom, one of her great pleasures in life.
Lurene Tuttle was also a Mom, one of her great pleasures in life.

Lurene Tuttle in one of her more sultry roles.
Lurene Tuttle in one of her more sultry roles.

Lurene Tuttle shows her amazing versatility yet again.
Lurene Tuttle shows her amazing versatility yet again.

News clipping about Lurene Tuttle, November 5, 1949 thumb
News clipping about Lurene Tuttle, November 5, 1949

Lurene Tuttle with Rosalind Russell
Lurene Tuttle with Rosalind Russell
in the Suspense production of 'The
Sisters' from Dec. 9 1948

Barbara Ruick, daughter of Lurene Tuttle and Mel Ruick circa 1954
Barbara Ruick, daughter of Lurene Tuttle and Mel Ruick circa 1954

Lurene Tuttle served as the first woman President of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Union
Lurene Tuttle served as the first woman President of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Union

Lurene Tuttle served on the Board of the Screen Actors Guild from 1951-1954
Lurene Tuttle served on the Board of the Screen Actors Guild from 1951-1954
Lurene Tuttle served on the faculty of the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts
Lurene Tuttle served on the faculty of the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts
Lurene Tuttle's Radiography is arguably the most extensive and versatile in the annals of Golden Age Radio History. There was simply nothing she--and her amazing voice--could not do, and do superbly. She remains this author's all-time favorite radio actress. Lurene Tuttle was born in Pleasant Lake, Indiana in 1907, but was reared out west on a ranch in Arizona near the California border. O.V. Tuttle, her father, had performed in minstrel shows but relied primarily on work as a railroad station agent during the 1920s. Lurene Tuttle's grandfather had been a Drama teacher, managing an opera house at one time in Indiana, her birth state. Lurene studied acting in Phoenix and the cute, petite redhead showed her scene-stealing comedic talent early on.

After she turned 15, her family relocated to Monrovia, California, where Lurene Tuttle began her performing career in earnest. She obtained her formal dramatic training at the Pasadena Playhouse, appearing in many of their productions with great success. She later joined Murphy's Comedians, a vaudeville troupe, and began performing as a dramatic ingénue in stock productions.

Though Broadway eluded her, Lurene Tuttle performed on Stage regularly until the 1930s.

Known for her fine speaking voice and extraordinary range of dialects, The Depression Years lead her to work in Radio, a natural medium for her extraordinary voice talent. For the next 25 years of the Golden Age of Radio, Lurene Tuttle became one of Radio's most recognized voices in virtually every Radio venue in which she performed.

From the August 1947 issue of Radio Mirror, in Lurene Tuttle's Own words:

Luck Is Hard Work
By Lurene Tuttle

I WONDER if the first "split-personality" a psychologist ever discovered wasn't an actress?  And if you're a radio actress as well, believe me--my personality isn't just split, it's all in little pieces.
     In the morning I wake up, peer at myself in the mirror and--yes--I can recognize the Ted hair and the grey eyes that belong to Lurene Tuttle; but an hour later I'm standing in front of a microphone, sneering my way through a broadcast as a blackhearted murderess . . . or as an eighty-year-old grandmother . . . or as a brat or as a queen . . or a barmaid.
     And that goes on all day long.

     Is it any wonder I sometimes wonder just who Lurene Tuttle is?  Not only are there all these make-helieve characters I slip in and out of during broadcasting hours--but there's the me that is mother to my teen-age Barbara.  And the me that likes to prowl around in dusty antique shops for the little porcelain dogs I collect.  And likes to play crazy word games with friends or settle weighty problems over a midnight pot of coffee.
     And there's the me that's known around the studios as "The Rock."  (It doesn't apply, they tell me, to the way I look; I can't gain an ounce over my hundred and two pounds and I stopped growing at five feet three.)  It's short for the Rock of Gibralter, that symbol of stability and dependability.  Maybe it's not glamorous, but I'd rather be known as "The Rock" than as almost anything eise, because it indicates that I've been at least a little successful in being where I'm supposed to be when I'm supposed to be there, and in giving the best performance I know how no matter what the part.
      I say almost anything else.  That means that, above all, I want to be the me that's Barbara's mother.  I don't understand actresses who are ashamed to admit they have grown-up daughters.  Barbara is in High School, and I see no point in talking about her as "my little girl," trying to disguise my age, as I've heard some do.  I'm a lot more apt to brag about her!  She's bright and she's pretty and some day I think she'll be showing me how to act.
     Barbara's father, Mel Ruick, and I were divorced a few years ago.  We're still good friends.  Though his radio announcing keeps him in New York, Mel was able to spend Christmas here with Barbara and they are still a close father-and-daughter team.  But, for most of the year, it's just the two of us, and Miss Johnson, who looks after us both.  And, of course, all of Barbara's friends . . . I'll never forget, for instance, last New Year's Eve.  It's seldom I go to a party, but this one I was looking forward to.  Yet--promptly at twelve midnight I had to excuse myself, explain hastily to my escort, and drive home and then taxi an assorted bunch of some twenty-five kids from Barbara's party to their respective homes which were scattered all over the San Fernando Valley!  I got back to my own party and date at two-thirty in the moming, just as all the other guests were yawning their way out the front door.
     But I'm no Big Sister, only, to Babs. I'm her mother.  She comes to me with help with her problems as well as for her fun.  Whether it's boy-friends or clothes or our endless discussions of what she will do when she's "grownup," I try my honest best to help her.  We have our rules, too.  When it comes to schoolwork--my share is helping in research, but she's the one to actually do the job.
     And there's one opening night I'm looking forward to as intensely as if it were my own premiere of the movie "Heaven Only Knows."
     Babs and her gang of friends have made a movie of their own, with themselves as actors, and they tell me its showing is to have an audience of one.  The kids have decided that only Mother Tuttle is to be permitted to peek at it, because it seems they feel I'll take a professional attitude and not a parental one . . . and they're afraid of shocking their own families!
     I do understand--because I remember wondering how my mother and dad were going to react the first time they saw me kiss a boy on stage!
     Between that first kiss and that good part I mentioned in Seymour Nebenzal's "Heaven Only Knows" there have been a lot of years, a lot of disappointments, a lot of hard, hard work.
     Before Barbara goes into anything like that, I want her to have all the sound preparation she can get; I want her to have the same safe, lovely life I had as a child.  Not that my family was rich, or that I was sheltered from the world.  But there had always been affection, family ties, experiences shared.
     It was in a small mining town called Johannesburg, on the edge of the California Mojave desert that I spent my childhood.
     DAD was station master and every day I met the trains with him.  The mines at Johannesburg and Atolia and the Yellow Aster at Ransburg, nearby, were going full blast and it attracted people from all over the country.  I was excited by all these colorful people and, unconsciously, I studied them and watched them.  Afterwards I would imitate them.  Dad always encouraged me, because his own hobby was putting on amateur theatricals.
     It wasn't difficult to break into stock companies.  For many years I was leading lady for major stock companies, among them the Henry Duffy Players.
     Then came the depression--and stock was out.  Came my marriage to Mel Ruick and Barbara.
     Even if stock companies hadn't gone out of business, though, I had resolved to be a mother, entirely, for the first three years of Barbara's life.  That kind of security I felt she needed because I knew how formative are these early years of a child.  After that, I felt, she wouldn't need me with her; she would be sure of my love for her.  But until she was three years old I had determined to forget the stage.
     The time passed.  Three years were soon over.  Barbara had had everything, so far, that I could give her, and I was ready to go back to work.  I was and am an actress; an actress has to act to be happy.  But at that point, I suddenly discovered that I was a frustrated housewife with no future in sight.  A person doesn't just walk out and get a good part on the stage or in the movies.  I hadn't thought at all of radio.  I got very, very discouraged indeed.
     And all of a sudden a friend, Cy Kendall, called me to say that tryouts for the Hollywood Hotel program were being held at CBS and why didn't I rush right over?  But I've never been in front of a microphone in my life, I worried--even as I was putting on my hat and running out the front door.  I was scared, all right, but it was a chance to act, and I was passing up no chance at that stage of my career!
     At ten o'clock I entered the studio.  It was five o'clock before my turn came.  But I got the part!
     Though I signed a contract with the Hollywood Hotel program for three years, new parts came slowly.  Then I heard Charles Vanda of CBS was producing White Fires.  I begged for a chance.  White Fi res was the weekly dramatic presentation of lives of famous people--just the kind of roles I wanted.
     The next week I was on the show, and I stayed with White Fires for two years.  I grew with that show.
     I learned something very strange about myself, then.  In a theater or in a movie you have costumes, and makeup men to change your appearance.  But there is nothmg of that in radio.  You wear the same dress you wore when you were out shopping an hour before and your make-up is just what you would ordinarily have on the street.
     But I swear that with me there is an actual physical as well as emotional change that goes on when I pick up the script and start reading my lines.
     The time I spent on White Fires really paid off and nowadays I have so much work it's like hopping on and off a merry-go-round every week, grabbing for the brass ring at every show.
     Want to take a ride with me for one week?  Here's how it goes--
MONDAY:  Breakfast with Barbara.  To the movie set of "Heaven Only Knows" (I play Mrs. O'Donnell, the
scrublady).  Rehearsal of the Dark Venture radio show at five; broadcast at 9:00 (murderess) .
     Tuesday: Movie set in the morning.  Rehearsal for Academy Award show (fourteen-year-old girl).   Home to spend an hour with Barbara.
     Wednesday:  Ten o'clock broadcast of serial Masquerade.  On to movie set.  Back to studio for Academy Award broadcast.  Home, to check household accounts and plan week's menus with Miss Johnson.
     Thursday:  This was the day I almost fell off that merry-go-round.  Morning, on "Heaven Only Knows" set in costume and make-up.  Since we were going to be shooting off and on all day, I had the bright idea of keeping my scrublady costume on even when I went to broadcasts.
     But it didn't work out that way.  At 2: 45 when I put in an appearance for the Dick Haymes rehearsal, the director took one horrified look at me and loudly said No!  Nothing to do but send a studio page for my own clothes on the set; showed up just in time for me to change and dash over to the first show of Burns and Allen at NBC; back to movie set at 6:30 (and into scrublady costume); back to Burns and Allen again for second show; to Dick Haymes broadcast on CBS; back to movie set again and into scrublady costume for night shooting that lasted until 12: 30 in the morning!
     Friday:  Up in the morning for Masquerade.  Rehearsal then of Star Tune show (tough chorus girl).
     For the future I want what every radio actress wants--a show of my own.  Top billing, instead of building characters to prop up someone else.  And a chance to use originality.
     But until that time, I'll go on being "the Rock."  It's not so bad really.  And it has its rewards.  There's a true story about an evening at the Robert Youngs' house where a friend was telling Mrs. Young that her husband was getting to be very popular in radio, in addition to his movie career.
     "Why," the friend said, "every time I turn on the radio lately, I hear Bob on some program."
     "Yes," Mrs. Young replied, "Bob is getting to be the male Lurene Tuttle of radio."

Aptly referred to as "The First Lady of Radio," she was most fondly remembered for her role as Effie, the deliciously endearing "Girl Friday," to Howard Duff's Sam Spade on The Adventures of Sam Spade. Dyed-in-the-wool Sam Spade fans universally refer to the interaction between Duff and Tuttle as pure Radio magic--and deservedly so. Her comedic timing and interplay with Duff was absolutely superb, rivalled only by the Radio chemistry between Frances Robinson and Bob Bailey in Let George Do It.

By the time Film and early Television discovered her acting talent she found second and third careers as a durable, versatile character actress in a wide range of roles characterized primarily by their depiction of archetypal middle-American wisdom and warmth. Later years found her in recurring characterizations as a 'brittle' world-weary matron.

She debuted in Film in Heaven Only Knows (1947), then appeared alongside Cary Grant in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948) and Room for One More (1952). She performed with Marilyn Monroe in Don't Bother to Knock (1952) and Niagara (1953). She also appeared with Joan Crawford in Goodbye, My Fancy (1951) and Leslie Caron in The Glass Slipper (1955). To Film's everlasting shame, she never got her chance to appear as a lead, not for lack of either versatility or talent. As it was, she continued to develop her talent as a durable, reliable character actor--and occasional scene-stealer.

Indeed her innate ability to steal any scene--on big screen or small--with an impish, knowing grin or world-weary, cynical glance remained two of her signature characterizations throughout her remarkable career. Her only real lead during this period was her portrayal of the crazed Ma Barker, in Ma Barker's Killer Brood (1960), a B-movie that's reached cult status.

Television was more cognizant of Lurene Tuttle's natural warmth and wisdom, which, given the kinder, gentler, family oriented fare of 1950s Television, found her performing regularly in a wonderful array of sitcoms, appearing as a starchy relative, gossipy gadfly, or archetypal down-home townfolk.

Lurene Tuttle married fellow actor and announcer, Mel Ruick a performer she met often while both were performing in Radio. Their daughter, Barbara Ruick, became an actress best known for her portrayal of Carrie Pipperidge in the wonderful musical comedy Carousel (1956). Barbara Ruick later married famed American composer John Williams, but died unexpectedly in 1974, just as John Williams' world-renowned talent was becoming recognized.

Lurene Tuttle became a widely-respected Drama and diction coach for several decades. She taught radio technique in the 1940s and re-trained several prominent actors returning from World War II duty. After her Television career in the 1950s, Lurene Tuttle returned to teaching. Her students included Red Skelton, Orson Welles, Milton Berle, Steve Allen, and Jayne Meadows. She joined the faculty of The University of Southern California, teaching acting technique, and remained in Southern California until she succumbed to cancer at the age of 78.

"I have a full life - radio acting, TV shows, movies, and my daily teaching - all crammed with delight. I find that the best way for me to conduct my life is to run my life - my way." -- Lurene Tuttle

Thankfully, her fame endures as new generations of Golden Age Radio and Television fans continue to discover her anew. Thus she remains to this day--and throughout the forseeable future--as one of the most beloved, most enjoyed and most admired voice and character talents of The 20th Century.

Lurene Tuttle as listed with Wormser, Heldfond & Joseph circa 1986
Lurene Tuttle as listed with Wormser, Heldfond & Joseph circa 1986




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