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The Player Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Textron Theatre




So let's apply a bit of inductive reasoning and work back from the theoretical end date for the entire run--September 15, 1952.

Series Derivatives:

Australian Syndication
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Mystery Dramas
Network(s): NBC, ABC Blue Network [West], The AFRS, and several other local affiliates and networks while in syndication.
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 1943-45 Run [Unknown]
Summer 1945 Run [Unknown]
1948-50 Run: 48-07-13 The Eagle Murder Case
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s):
Syndication:
Sponsors:
Director(s):
Principal Actors:
Recurring Character(s):
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s)
Music Direction:
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s):
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
Episodes in Circulation:
Total Episodes in Collection:
Provenances:
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the RadioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources.







The Player Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
1
Y
2
Y
3
Y
4
Y
5
Y
6
Y
7
Y
8
Y
9
Y
10
N
11
Y
12
Y
13
Y
14
Y
15
Y
16
Y
17
Y
18
Y
19
Y
20
Y
21
Y
22
Y
23
Y
24
Y
25
Y
26
Y
27
Y
28
Y
29
Y
30
Y
31
Y
32
Y
33
Y
34
Y
35
Y
36
Y
37
Y
38
Y
39
Y
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81






The Player Radio Program Biographies




Willard Huntington Wright
(S. S. Van Dine)

(1887-1939)
Birthplace: Virginia
Education: Harvard, Munich and Paris Art Institutes

Curriculum Vitae: Art Critic, Editor of 'Smart Set', and detective fiction author.

Radiography:

Willard Huntington Wright was a distinguished Art Critic before the personal epiphany that led him to become a fiction writer. A two-year breakdown left him essentially bed-ridden for two years from 1923 to 1925. During that period he read a reported 2,000 detective fiction and crime novels, inspiring him to try his skills as a fiction writer in his own right.

His often overly complex and convoluted plots and counter-plots were clearly character-driven, portraying his protagonist, Philo Vance, as a preening, demanding, arrogant, highly intellectual dilletante. And yet it was those very characteristics that framed the highly detailed plots that made his Philo Vance novels so fascinating.

That his novels fell out of popular fashion was more a testament to casual readers' mental fatigue in negotiating his plots than to the quality of his writing style. Though never 'cheating' his readers by leaving out significant details, the sheer exhaustion experienced by his readers eventually caused his later novels to fall out of popular demand. But for dyed-in-the wool detective fiction aficionados they were always both challenging and ultimately satisfying.

Perhaps he was more a reflection of his protagonist than he cared to admit--publicly anyway. In the end he never compromised with the public at large, ultimately producing the minimum six novels he intended to write from the outset--the public be damned.




José Ferrer
Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1912-1992)
Birthplace: San Juan, Puerto Rico

Radiography:

José Ferrer's deep, booming voice was tailor-made for the second voice behind Philo Vance. Anyone who's listened to the Philo Vance series can't help but notice the similarity between the three actors who assumed this radio role. From John Emery's commanding voice presence, to Jackson Beck's powerfully deep voice, all three actors sound uncannily similar.

But it's that cocky, arrogant, projected air that so perfectly channels the embodiment of Philo Vance to his audience.

Puerto Rico born José Ferrer was clearly the most highly accomplished and acclaimed actor of the three to portray Philo Vance on the radio. Ferrer's accomplishments on the stage, behind a radio microphone, in film, and even on television are the fabric of Hollywood legend.

But Ferrer's accomplishments in radio weren't limited to Philo Vance. He was equally as busy in Radio as he was in all the other Arts venues he pursued. His son Miguel Ferrer has carved out his own acting career in the steps of his father, producing a notable independent film "Where's Marlowe?", satirically patterned after the radio and film noir detective dramas of the 1940s, not to mention a distinguished career as a supporting actor on stage, screen and film.



Frances Robinson
Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress
(1916-1971)

Birthplace: Ft. Wandsworth, NY

Radiography:

Frances Robinson as Pat Lawrence in 1940's 'The Lone Wolf Keeps A Date'
To say that Frances Robinson was simply a multi-talented stage, screen, radio, and television actress doesn't do her justice. Between 1940 and 1955, she was one of the hardest working actresses in Radio. If her name seems familiar, you may remember her as George Valentine's loving personal assistant in 'Let George Do It', along with numerous appearances in Richard Diamond, Philip Marlowe, The Whistler, and many other Detective and Mystery genre programs of the era.

As cute as her voice, she was also a solid supporting actress in stage and film prior to her radio career, as well as a fine supporting actress throughout the Golden Age of Television. Seen in several of the popular Screen Serials of the 1930s, she was usually cast as either the blonde damsel in distress, or the gun moll with a heart.

She also distinguished herself as a fine supporting actress in Television, as well as a spokesperson, most notably as the spokesperson for Arrid Deodorant during the 1950s. Indeed after her career in radio she worked steadily in television, making over 50 appearances between 1954 and 1970.



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