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Original Studio One header art

The Studio One Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Studio One
Original Studio One coverr art
Studio One at CBS cover art

Studio One Announcement from April 27 1947
Studio One Announcement from
April 27 1947

Charles Laughton consults with Fletcher Markle over the 'South Riding' script
Charles Laughton consults with Fletcher Markle over the 'South Riding' script

Fletch Markle annotates a script with two-time Oscar-winner Luise Rainer.
Fletch Markle annotates a script with two-time Oscar-winner Luise Rainer.

Robert Young rehearses 'King's Row' script with Fletcher Markles's future wife, Mercedes McCambridge
Robert Young rehearses 'King's Row' script with Fletcher Markles's future wife, Mercedes McCambridge

John Rennie, Anne Burr and Everett Sloane take Fletcher Markle's suggestions regarding 'The Hunted'
John Rennie, Anne Burr and Everett Sloane take Fletcher Markle's suggestions regarding 'The Hunted'

Fletcher Markle and Madeleine Carroll confer over 'A Farewell to Arms'
Fletcher Markle and Madeleine Carroll confer over 'A Farewell to Arms'

John Garfield and Robert Dryden rehearse 'Let Me Do the Talking '
John Garfield and Robert Dryden rehearse 'Let Me Do the Talking '

James Mason rehearses Studio One's 1947 Christmas program, 'Painted Veils'
James Mason rehearses Studio One's 1947 Christmas program, 'Painted Veils'


CBS Television's Studio One began airing in 1948 and ran for ten seasons.
CBS Television's Studio One began airing in 1948 and ran for ten seasons.

Background

The World War II years were like a petri dish for Radio Drama. With many great actors, technicians, directors and producers involved in--or mindful of--the War effort in some degree, the entire Nation was holding its collective breath for six years. Radio programmers and audiences alike contented themselves with broad entertainment vehicles like comedies, soap operas or variety programs, interspersed with numerous patriotic send ups and War Bond appeals throughout the era.

The Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) had begun airing what it referred to as 'experimental' Radio programming as early as the mid- to late 1930s. The word experimental referred to an expansion of the dramatic envelope of Radio programming up to that point. Their Columbia Workshop began airing such experimental programming in 1936, introducing America to the talents of Norman Corwin, Bernard Herrmann, Orson Welles, Lyn Murray, Arch Oboler, William N. Robson, Brewster Morgan, Irving Reis, John Houseman, Perry Lafferty, and a stable of young east and west coast actors who found their first critical triumphs in Radio on Columbia Workshop.

Continuing on through the advent of World War II, to the mid-1940s and the end of World War II, Columbia Workshop continued to air some of Radio History's most thought-provoking, introspective and patriotic programming ever aired. The Columbia Workshop came to a close in January of 1947. But with the collective sigh of relief from the end of the War years, CBS wisely determined a need to continue cutting edge, well-mounted, fully developed Radio drama for a post-War audience.

CBS Premieres Studio One

Their answer was Studio One At CBS, or simply Studio One. Staged from CBS's own famous Studio One, the series was to be a continuation of the excellence in programming that America had come to expect from CBS and its virtually unequalled--for the era--stable of talent. But this was also the era during which, after the breakup of NBC, that CBS and NBC began to ruthlessly poach each other's talent--wholesale. If NBC mounted a great new detective comedy, CBS would answer with its own. If CBS mounted a fantastic new variety program, NBC would launch its own. Meanwhile, the Mutual Broadcasting System and the newly energized American Broadcasting Company (the former Blue Network) were also revving up the competition with no holds barred.

CBS placed its bets on young Canadian Broadcasting Company and American free-lancer Fletcher Markle to helm Studio One. But Markle wasn't given carte blanche just yet. He had yet to prove himself to CBS in the manner that Norman Corwin had before him. CBS's own Director of Program Writing, Robert Landry was appointed to supervise Markle's first productions.

Fletcher Markle soon proved himself up to the task. But this was also an era that was rapidly becoming saturated with competing serious dramatic productions the like of Lux Radio Theatre, The Screen Guild Theatre productions, NBC's University Theatre variants, and NBC's Ford Theatre. With the bar set that high, CBS hoped that the full-hour format, CBS's own tremendous stable of contract Radio actors, supplemented by the finest Stage and Screen actors of the era would put it over. And as if to guarantee Studio One's preeminence, CBS spared no expense in securing the works of the era's finest writers in assembling it's scheduled productions.

For his part, Markle worked tirelessly, producing, directing and often both writing and performing in Studio One's scheduled productions. But there's no question as to the quality of each and every Studio One production. They were absolutely superb. They remain some of the brightest gems from the best of Golden Age Radio. It's regrettable that the popularity of its competing productions seem to have somewhat dominated Golden Age Radio collections from the era. But all the more reason to collect Studio One. They're all available, including five to seven rehearsals, and they remain some of CBS' finest examples of great dramatic radio of the era.

Studio One ran for only fifteen months. After Studio One began airing, CBS acquired Ford Theatre from NBC, assigning Fletcher Markle to the helm of Ford Theatre over CBS. Studio One ended in late July of 1948 and Ford Theatre over CBS began airing the following October. It should come as no surprise that CBS opted to have a major sponsor pick up the tab for it's premiere dramatic offering, in lieu of sustaining its own production. That element of the equation is a self-evident.

From John Crosby's "Radio Review" column in the May 13th 1947 edition of the Oakland Tribune:

47-05-13 Crosby Review

     In the light of its first two productions, "Studio One," the Columbia Broadcasting System's new hour-long dramatic program (not yet broadcast to the West) was launched with possibly a shade too much fanfare.  The first two offerings "Under The Volcano" and "Topaze," were ambitious, adult, absorbing and, as radio fare goes, very
sophisticated drama.  They were also in parts jerky, cloudy and over-elaborate.  Both, I think, could stand some incisive editing.
     The acting in both of them was superb.  Everett Sloane, who took the lead in both dramas, is one of the most brilliant, subtle and versatile actors on the air and his feminine lead, Anne Burr, is not far behind him.  Both of them, incidentally, can act rings around most of the Hollywood name actors who stumble into so many radio
scripts.  The acting and production by Fletcher Markle, 26-year-old boy whiz of CBS, was imaginative--with a few large round reservations.
SPEED NEEDED
     It's none of my business, but I feel Markle has taken on a bit too much in writing, or helping to write, the scripts he directs and produces.  Many of the scenes in both "Topaze" and "Under the Volcano" were slow and over-long. A director, who was not also the author, might have speeded things a bit here.
     Let's take them up in order.  "Under the Volcano," adapted from the novel by Malcolm Lowry, is a sultry, moody tone poem to alcoholism.  In it, a former English consul in Mexico drinks his way through a series of colorful balls, fiestas and bullfights and ultimately to his predestined destruction.  It's "The Lost Weekend" married to "The Sun Also Rises," one of the more flamboyant literary weddings of the season.
     The consul, Geoffrey, treads what is now a well-beaten psychological path, proceeding successively through remorse, defiance, self pity, self-abnegation and finally total despair—Dante's "Inferno" brought up to date, as it were.  There are many perceptive passages ("Do you realize the allowances made by the world which has to cope with you?") and some very corny ones ("This house has somehow become evil.")
A CHILLING MOMENT
     Geoffrey's ex-wife Yvonne and two men of extraordinary nobility try to save the British alcoholic, and Yvonne in one of the most chilling scenes in the play winds up dead under the heels of a horse.
     Threaded in with the alcoholism a side plot about Nazis in Mexico.  Close to the end of the drama Geoffrey
shouts "I choose hell.  I choose hell because I like it."  Somewhere in there—the Nazis and the speech—is a message of some sort but you'll have to figure it for yourself.  I can't make head nor tail of it.
     "Under the Volcano" is certainly ambitious and intelligent drama for radio.  Just why Markle picked it out isn't altogether clear.  An hour of alcoholism is difficult even on the screen, where conversation is not always necessary. On the air where a man must go to the dogs in prose, it's far more difficult.  Some hint as to this selection may be the fact that Markle is an ex disciple of Orson Welles.  This is just the sort of mood and character drama that would appeal immensely to Wells just because it is so hard.
     Benn Levy's old play, "Topaze," is possibly the most sophisticated comedy I ever heard on the air.
FRENCH MILQUETOAST

     In this, Professor Topaze, a magnificently innocent French Milquetoast, is used as an unwitting tool by an unscrupulous politician who sells equipment to the city at exorbitant profits.  The professor rapidly loses his innocence and steals the politician's business as well as his girl.
     Those who saw John Barrymore's witty portrayal of Topaze in the movies would be slightly disappointed in the radio drama.  Sloane's version was every bit as good as Barrymore's but you couldn't see him, which robbed the play of much of its flavor.  Some of the more Gallic comedy of the play had to be reworded rather extensively for radio but otherwise "Topaze" was a mighty bold bit of radio.
     Tonight "Studio One will present Ibsen's "An Enemy of the People" and coming along soon are F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby," George Kelly's "Craig's Wife" and Christopher Morley's "A Human Being," an array that certainly won't be found anywhere else on the air.
 Copyright, 1947, for The Tribune

And this, from the Summer 1948 edition of Radio Album:

     Nobody ever laughed when he got up to speak--not with his background.  He began his first novel at the ripe age of ten and even illustrated it himself with crayon pencils.  Now at 27, Fletcher Markle is radio's newest triple-threat man, writer-director-actor.  Born in Winnipeg, and educated at Prince of Wales High School, he balked at going to college, because he had "too many things to do," and he still hasn't done all of them.

     Fletcher was 18 when he formed his own acting group and like another fair-haired boy, did "Julius Caesar" in modern dress.  The group's next venture was "Dr. Faustus" but due to financial difficulties. the curtain never rose on it.  Radio beckoned, called, and practically dragged Fletcher into its fold for a sixty five week series of full hour plays entitled "Imagine Please"--they did everything from Shakespeare to Mother Goose.  Finally given a free hand in 1912 he produced a group of original radio diversions called "Baker's Dozen," consisting of folk tales and short surrealistic dramas.

     Serving with the Royal Canadian Air Force, he was kept from flying by a slight heart condition and while in London made a movie with Edward G. Robinson and numerous radio shows.  Never one to hide his diverse talents under a bushel, Fletcher was soon commissioned by the British Ministry of Information to write and narrate a documentary film called VI.  But even there it doesn't end, because this boy with the golden touch was awarded a $1,500 literary fellowship by 20th Century Fox to help him finish his novel,  "There Was a Young Man" (he was 24 at the time).

     It wasn't until after his discharge from the Air Force that Markle discovered America, and invited by CBS to do three Columbia Workshop scripts.  "Studio One" followed and now it's just about the best dramatic show in radio.  Using big Hollywood names (but only those who can act) as guest stars, Fletcher and a small core of regulars like Everett Sloane and Mercedes McCambridge have bound themselves into one of the finest repertory companies in any branch of the theatre.  Fletcher's married to former radio singer Blanche Willis, and they have a three-year·old son, Stephen.

     "Studio One" can he heard over CBS Tues., at 10 P.M.


In any event, CBS was already preparing a Television version of Studio One, which began airing for CBS Television later in 1948 and ran for ten, critically acclaimed seasons. CBS clearly felt that if it was to sustain a premier dramatic production it should expend its investment in the exploding Television market. As the longevity of CBS Television's Studio One amply demonstrates, that was a wise decision indeed.

Indeed, CBS soon rolled out its Ford Theatre Hour for Television a month later in 1948. It ran for three seasons.

Norman Corwin cites the early 1950s as the end of The Golden Age of Radio. This article only underscores Corwin's view. Television was literally exploding across middle-income America. Any well-funded network's best investment during the era had to be over Television. The Golden Age of Radio was simply no longer sustainable at its previous levels.

Series Derivatives:

Ford Theatre; Studio One At CBS
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Dramas
Network(s): CBS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 47-04-29 01 Under The Volcano
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 47-04-29 to 48-07-27; CBS; Sixty-three, hour-long programs; Tuesdays, 7:30p.m.
Syndication: None
Sponsors: Sustaining
Director(s): Fletcher Markle[Producer/Director/Host/Adapter/Performer]
Robert Landry [Producer]
Principal Appearances: Fletcher Markle, Anne Burr, Everett Sloane, Joe DeSantis, Hedley Rennie, Juano Hernandez, Robert Dryden, Dan Ocko, Paquita Anderson, Don Alberto, Leo Badilla, Ralph Camargo, Ivor Francis, Hester Sondergaard, Sebastian Cabot, Harald Dyrenforth, Ian MacAllaster, Maver Moore, Paul McGrath, Frank Behrens, Ruth Gilbert, Howard Smith, William Woodson, Evelyn Varden, John Sylvester, Leon Janney, Joan Alexander, Cathleen Cordell, Sarah Burton, Abby Lewis, Miriam Wolfe, Gregory Morton, Lou Merrill, Sydney Smith, Stefan Schnabel, Clarence Derwent, Martin Wilson, Lamont Johnson, Mercedes McCambridge, Michael Dreyfus, Rosemary Rice, Edwin Bruce, Joyce Van Patten, Rosemary Rice, Frank Readick, Betty Garde, Bud Collyer, Myron McCormick, Gary Merrill, John McGovern, Elspeth Eric, Raymond Edward Johnson, Robert Mitchum, Charles Laughton, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Frank Richards, Anne Seymour, Gene Kely, Ralph Bellamy, James Mason, Eileen Farrell, Joan Blondell, Gertrude Warner, Edna Ferber, Glenn Anders, Horace Braham, Alan Devitt, John Merlin, Bonita Granville, Donald Hastings, Richard Arlen, Michael Artist, Ronald Liss, Brainard Duffield, Louis Quinn, Paul Muni, Charles Irving, Claire Niesen, Walter Slezak, Luise Rainer, Beverly Roberts, Madeleine Carroll, Robert Young, Kathy MacGregor, Michael Redgrave, Judith Evelyn, Brenda Forbes, Burgess Meredith, Susan Peters, Glenn Ford, John Stanley, Walter Huston, Alan Baxter, Elissa Landi, Michael Fitzmaurice, Connie Lembcke, Bartlett Robinson, Betty Field, Ann Blyth, Margaret Philips, Franchot Tone, Rosemary De Camp, Michael Redgrave, Rene Ray, Marlene Dietrich, Jan Merlin, George Breen
Recurring Character(s): Varied from production to production
Protagonist(s): Varied from production to production
Author(s): Malcolm Lowery, Ben Levy, Marcel Pagnol, Henrik Ibsen, Ring Lardner, Sinclair Lewis, Noel Coward, Stephen Crane, Ellen Glasgow, George M. Cohan, Eugene O'Neill, Philip Barry, Jane Austen, J.B. Priestly, Booth Tarkington, Robert Audrey, Rudolph Bessier, Irwin Shaw, Emily Bronte, Betty Smith, Herbie Allen, Max Brand, Christopher Morley, Katherine Brush, Gwethalyn Graham, Graham Greene, Leopold Atlas, Ernest Hemingway, Fletcher Markle, Robert Nathan, Sinclair Lewis, Dashiell Hammett, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Hardy, Geoffrey Household
Writer(s) Gerald Maxim, Van Woodward, Sheldon Stark, Peter Lyon, Vincent McConnor [Adapters]
Music Direction: Alexander Semmler [Composer/Conductor]
Alfredo Antonini [Conductor]
Curtis Beaver, Lana Domian, Charles Fried [Composers]
Musical Theme(s): Unknown Organ Music
Announcer(s): Lee Vines
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
63 plus 5 rehearsals
Episodes in Circulation: 62 plus 5 rehearsals
Total Episodes in Collection: 57 plus 6 rehearsals
Provenances:
Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspaper listings and articles.


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The Studio One Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
47-04-29
1
Under the Volcano
Y
47-04-16 Daily Mail
CBS, the network which has pioneered in guest dramas, has decided to extend the category to Tuesday nights at 8:30 p.m. This time instead of relying on a movie format, novels and stage plalys will be turned into radio scripts. Under the title of "Studio One", a full hour is to be used, enabling more elaborate presentation. Selected for the opener next week is "
Under the Volcano," current romantic novel described as being symbolical of some of the problems of the modern world. Stage and radio performaers are to be used in the casts.

47-04-29 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m. -- Studio One (WBBM): new series; Everett Sloane in "
Under the Volcano," adaptation of Malcolm Lowry's novel.
47-05-06
2
Topaze
Y
47-05-06 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m. Studio One (WBBM): "
Topaze," story of French schoolmaster who turns to graft.

[Stars Everett Sloane]
47-05-13
3
An Enemy Of the People
Y
47-05-13 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Ibsen's "
Enemy of the People."
47-05-20
4
Alibi Ike
Y
47-05-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Ring Lardner's "Alibi Ike," baseball story.
47-05-27
5
Dodsworth
Y
47-05-27 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) "
Dodsworth," Sinclair Lewis' distinguished novel about the middle-aged American couple who go to Europe to seek culture they feel they have missed, and lose their marriage enroute, is the "Studio One" full-hour dramatic presentation.
47-06-03
6
Hay Fever
Y
47-06-03 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) Noel Coward's sparkling comedy, "
Hay Fever," has been adapted by Fletcher Markle for presentation on "Studio One." Leading roles will be handled by a trio of top Broadway and radio performers--Evelyn Varden, Anne Burr and Everett Sloane. "Hay Fever" is the story of a completely chaotic weekend at the home of the rude, unprincipled Bliss family.
47-06-10
7
The Red Badge Of Courage
N
47-06-10 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) "
The Red Badge of Courage," Stephen Crane's Civil war masterpiece mirroring the emotions of the individual soldier in the stress of battle, has been adopted by Fletcher Markle. Everett Sloane, as stephen Crane, narrates teh drama, and John SYlvester portrays the central character. Other roles will be played by Anne Burr and Hester Sondergaard.
47-06-17
8
To Mary With Love
Mysterious Mickey Finn
N
[Postponed]

47-06-17 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) Eliot Paul's captivating detective-comedy, "
Mysterious Mickey Finn," concerning a knockout potion, homicide, kidnapping, blackmail, and a missing El Greco, is the full-hour of "Studio One" production. Central characters are one Homer Evans, a wealthy person with a yen for sleuthing, his sweetheart, Miriam, and Homer's friend, a Norwegian artist.

47-06-17 New York Times
9:30-10:30--Studio One: Play, "
Mysterious Mickey Finn," With Anne Burr, Everett Sloane, Others--WCBS.
47-06-24
9
The Romantic Comedians
Y
47-06-24 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) "
The Romantic Comedians," the late Ellen Glasgow's novel about the ill-fated marriage of an elderly Virginia jurist to a youthful southern beauty, has been adapted by Margaret Lewerth for presentation on the full-hour dramatic series, "Studio One." Everett Sloane will play the leading role of the 65 year old Judge Honeywell.
47-07-01
10
Baby Cyclone
Y
47-07-01 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m. Studio One (WBBM): "
Baby Cyclone," by George M. Cohan.
47-07-08
11
Payment Deferred
Y
47-07-08 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m.--Studio One(WBBM): Agnes Moorehead, Everett Sloane in C.S. Forester's "
Payment Deferred."
47-07-15
12
Ah, Wilderness
Y
47-07-15 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m. Studio One (WBBM): "
Ah, Wilderness."
47-07-22
13
Holiday
Y
47-07-22 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m. Studio One (WBBM): Philip Barry's "
Holiday."
47-07-29
14
A Bill Of Divorcement
Y
47-07-29 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m. Studio One (WBBM): Clarence Dane's "
A Bill of Divorcement."
47-08-05
15
Carmen
Y
47-08-05 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) 100 years ago Prosper Merimee wrote a short story. Since then it has been set to music to become familiar as a world-famous opera "
Carmen." Anne Burr will be heard in the title roll of the tempestuous Carmen in this radio-adaptation of the story.

Announces "
Mysterious Mickey Finn" previously postponed, as next
47-08-12
16
Pride And Prejudice
Mysterious Mickey Finn
Y
[Previously postponed "Mysterious Mickey Finn" fails, yet again, to air. Pride and Prejudice airs in its place]

47-08-12 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Eliot Paul's "
Mysterious Mickey Finn."

47-08-12 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) The dramatic program presents a full-hour adaptation of Eliot Paul's mystery-comedy, "
Mysterious Mickey Finn." Fletcher Markle directs the program and Alexander Semmler conducts the orchestra.

Announces "
Laburnum Grove" as next
47-08-19
17
Laburnum Grove
Y
47-08-19 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) J. B. Priestley's play "
Laburnum Grove" will be presented. The play tells the story of George Radfern, living a quiet, uneventful life near London but who is burdened with sponging relatives. The harrassed Radfern announces that he is one of the leaders of a big counterfeit ring. With that, all his relatives leave him. They all try to get back into his good graces only to be shocked in a surprising climax.
47-08-26
18
The Hunted
Y
47-08-26 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) Booth Tarkington's play "Beauty and the Jacobin," has been adapted, and retitled "
The Hunted," for presentation on the full-hour dramatic series. Enacting leading roles in the drama of romance, danger and intrigue during the French Revolution will be Anne Burr, Everett Sloane, and Miriam Wolfe. The play revolves about the attempted escape of 3 aristocrats from Paris.
47-09-02
19
Thunder Rock
Y
47-09-02 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) Robert Ardrey's play "
Thunder Rock" has been adapted by Fletcher Markle, who will direct and play the lead on the full hour dramatic series. Ardrey's play tells the story of a lighthouse keeper who despairs of the chaos enveloping the world and secludes himself in his Lake MIchigan lighthouse, his troubled mind pondering what can be done to create a better, united world.
47-09-09
20
The Barretts Of Wimpole Street
Y
47-09-09 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) Rudolf Besier's play "
The Barretts of Wimpole Street," starring Anne Burr and Fletcher Markle, tells the story of the tender love affair of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning, both poets, she an invalid, he hearty and gay, and of Elizabeth's selfish and domineering father. Original music is composed and conducted by Alexander Semmler.
47-09-16
21
Act Of Faith
Y
[Half-hour format]

47-09-16 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) "
Act of Faith," author-playwright Irwin Shaw's provocative story pubvlished last yar in The New Yorker, will be the dramatic presentation. "Studio One" director Fletcher Markle will play the leading role. The story concerns an American soldier of Jewish descent, who, after contemplating postwar prejudice, performs an "act of faith"--surrender of a German Luger pistol with which a Nazi officer almost killed him.
47-09-23
22
Gentle Julia
Y
47-09-23 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (7:30 p.m.) "Gentle Julia," Booth Tarkington's delightful novel about the beautiful but fickle small town belle and her long line of competing suitors, will be dramatized. Anne Burr will play the title role of the 20 yar old local beauty, with Fletcher Markle assuming the character of Noble Dill, aged 20, who is Julia's most persistent and suffering swain.
47-09-30
23
Wuthering Heights
Y
47-09-30 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Emily Bronte's literary classic, "Wuthering Heights," has been adapted for presentation on the full-hour dramatic series, "Studio One." Leading roles in this drama of emotional conflict will be played by Director Fletcher Markle as Heathcliff, Miriam Wolfe as Cathy and Anne Burr as Isabel. Music for the program is by Alexander Semmler. NOTE TIME CHANGES
47-10-07
24
A Tree Grows In Brooklyn
Y
47-10-07 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) A full-hour adaptation of one of the most memorable novels of the last decade, Betty Smith's best--seller "A Tree Grows In Brooklyn," will be presented. The story portrays the Nolan family of Brooklyn--Johnny Nolan, the easy going father and singing waiter, who would have his family live on dreams alone; his wife, Katie, who can foresee nothing but endless poverty; and the 2 children who share their father's dreams.
47-10-14
25
Anthony Adverse
Y
47-10-14 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Fletcher Markle's production of Hervey Allen's massive novel, "Anthony Adverse," is the bill-of-fare. The story tells of Anthony's mission to track down the Gallegos, long-time debtors of his guardian, Mr. Bonneyfeather, who have mysteriously disappeared, and of Adverse's romantic interludes with 2 Cuban beauties, Dolores de la Fuenta and Neleta.
47-10-21
26
Singing Guns
Y
47-10-21 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) The story is Max Brand's exciting novel, "Singing Guns." Seems there's a brave sheriff in town, and he goies into the hills to capture a notorious outlaw. But the outlaw turns out to be a decent sort of fellow. So the sheriff decides he isn't going to turn him in--just bring him into town and give him a chance to start life over again in the sheriff's home.
47-10-28
-
Pre-Empted
-
47-10-28 Daily Messenger - CBS 9:30 "Fear Begins at Forty," documentary on the problems of age, with Eddie Albert in the lead. Program replaces studio one for single broadcast.
47-11-04
27
Kitty Foyle
Y
47-11-04 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Christopher Morley's novel "Kitty Foyle" is the full-hour drama to be presented. Enacting the top roles in this touching study of a young girl's heart are Mercedes McCambridge as Kitty and Director Fletcher Markle as Wyn Strafford VI, the Philadelphia mainliner with whom Kitty falls in love. Music is composed and conducted by Alexander Semmler.
47-11-11
28
Let Me Do the Talking
Y
47-11-11 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Columbia network's full-horu dramatic series inaugurates a policy of presenting top-flight film stars with the casting of John Garfield in Richard Mealand's new novel "Let Me Do the Talking." The story, a biting and houmorous satire on teh publishing business, has for its central character a fast-talking, dynamic New York literary agent, Charles Gabriel, a characterization perfectly fitted to the talents of Garfield.
47-11-18
29
Young Man Of Manhattan
Y
47-11-18 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Hollywood's Robert Mitchum will play the sports writer Toby McLean in a radio version of "Young Man of Manhattan" on the full-hour dramatic show. Mitchum, as Toby, will be heard as a tough-grained scribe who climbs to fame in the fiction field after his ever-loving young wife--who is a gal reporter herself--displays soophisticated and mildly romantic interest in other men.
47-11-25
30
Payment Deferred
Y
47-11-25 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m. -- Studio One (WBBM): Charles Laughton in "Payment Deferred."
47-12-02
31
Earth and High Heaven
Y
47-12-02 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Geraldine Fitzgerald stars in an adaptation of "Earth and High Heaven," a novel about 2 people in love confronted by the obstacle of bigotry and intolerance. Miss Fitzgerald plays the leading feminine role as Erica Drake who, with her devoted friend Marc Reiser, faces and finally overcomes the objections of family and society to the romance.
47-12-09
32
To Mary, With Love
Y
47-12-09 Wisconsin State Journal 8:30 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Gene Kelly stars in Fletcher Markle's "To Mary, with Love."
47-12-16
33
Experiment Perilous
Y
47-12-16 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Stage and screen star Ralph Bellamy will portray 2 roles, Piers de Jong, the father, and Dirk de Jong, the son, in a radio version of Edna Ferber's novel "So Big." The novel tells the story of a young school teacher who migrates to the country from Chicago, marries de Jong, and then defies the prejudices and customs of her old-fashioned neighbors by doing farm work herself and sending her son to college to become an architect.
47-12-23
34
Painted Veils

N
[Christmas Drama]

47-12-23 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) With screen star James Mason playing the lead role of the aged music critic, and soprano Eileen Farrell performing the songs he hears in reverie, "Studio One presents a dramatization of James Huneker's novel "
Painted Veils." This is the Christmas Eve story of a noted usic and opera critic who in his old age recalls his halcyon days and rekindles the ashes of an old romance by listening to the "recorded" voice of a singer who capitalized on his heart interest to promote her own career.
47-12-30
35
So Big
Y
47-12-30 Mason City Globe-Gazette - Studio One (8:30 p.m.) Lovely Joan Blondell stars as the winsome young school teacher who shocks High Prairie village with her modern ideas, in Edna Ferber's sociological novel, "So Big." This is the story of a school teacher who migrates from Chicago to High Prairie, marries a reactionary farmer, member of the school board, then proceeds to change the old-fashioned ideas of the community.
48-01-05
36R
Confidential Agent
Y
48-01-06
36
Confidential Agent
N
48-01-06 Lowell Sun - STUDIO ONE: Graham Green's spy novel, "Confidential Agent," starring Raymond Massey; WENR, 8:30.
48-01-13
37
Wednesday's Child
Y
48-01-13 Syracuse Herald Journal
9:30 P.M.--WFBL--Studio One, drama, starring Director Fletcher Merkle, Mercedes McCambridge, Anne Burr, Everett Sloane, Miriam Wolfe, Robert Dryden, Bonita Granville and Richard Arlen in "
Wednesday's Child."
48-01-20
38
The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse
Y
48-01-20 Syracuse Herald Journal
9:30 P.M.--WFBL--Studio One, drama, starring Director Fletcher Merkle, Mercedes McCambridge, Anne Burr, Everett Sloane, Miriam Wolfe, Robert Dryden and Paul Muni in "The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse."
48-01-27
39
The Great Impersonation
Y
48-01-27 The Capital - CBS--9:30, Studio One "Great Impersonation."
48-02-03
40
Dodsworth
Y
48-02-03 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Walter Huston in "Dodsworth."
48-02-10
41
Golden Boy
N
48-02-10 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Dane Clark in "Golden Boy."
48-02-17
42
A Farewell To Arms
Y
48-02-17 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Madeleine Carroll in "Farewell to Arms."
48-02-24
43
King's Row
Y
48-02-24 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Robert Young in "Kings Row."
48-03-02
44
Uncle Harry
Y
48-03-02 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Michael Redgrave in "Uncle Harry."
48-03-09
45
Sometime Every Summertime
Y
48-03-09 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Burgess Meredith in "Sometime Every Summertime".
48-03-16
46
One More Spring
Y
48-03-16 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Susan Peters in "One More Spring" by Robert Nathan.
48-03-23
47
The Thirty-Nine Steps
Y
48-03-23 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Glenn Ford in John Buchan's "The 39 Steps."
48-03-30
48
Babbitt
Y
48-03-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Walter Huston in "Babbitt."
48-04-06
49
I Love Trouble
Y
48-04-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Franchot Tone in "I Love Trouble," based on "The Kimballs."
48-04-13
50
The Glass Key
Y
48-04-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Alan Baxter and Elissa Landi in Dashiell Hammett's "The Glass Key".
48-04-20
51
Pride and Prejudice
N
48-04-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Geraldine Fitzgerald in Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice."

48-04-27
52
South Riding
Y
48-04-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): first anniversary; Charles Laughton in "South Riding."
48-05-04
53
Private Worlds
Y
48-05-04 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Madeleine Carroll in "Private Worlds."
48-05-11
54
Wine Of the Country
Y
48-05-11 Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune - 9:00 Studio One, "Wine of the Country."
48-05-18
55
The Last Tycoon
Y
48-05-18 Syracuse Herald Journal - 10:00 P.M.--WFBL--Studio One, drama, starring Mercedes McCambridge, Anne Burr, Everett Sloane, Miriam Wolfe, Robert Dryden and Betty Field in "The Last Tycoon."
48-05-25
56
The Angelic Avengers

Y
48-05-25 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Ann Blyth in "The Angelic Avengers."
48-06-01
57
One Foot In Heaven
Y
48-06-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Franchot Tone in "One Foot in Heaven."
48-06-08
58
Let Me Do the Talking
Y
48-06-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Melvyn Douglas as glib literary agent in "Let Me Do the Talking."
48-06-15
59
The Return Of the Native
Y
48-06-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Michael Redgrave in "The Return of the Native."
48-06-22
-
Pre-Empted
-
Pre-empted in most markets.
48-06-29
60
Arabesque
Y
48-06-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Marlene Dietrich and Fletcher Markle in "Arabesque."
48-07-06
61
Topaze
N
48-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Claude Rains in "
Topaze."

[Rescripted for Claude Rains]
48-07-13
-
Pre-Empted
-
Pre-empted in most markets.
48-07-20
62
Spanish Bayonet
Y
48-07-20 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): Burgess Meredith in "
Spanish Bayonet," by Stephen Vincent Benet.
48-07-27
63
The Constant Nymph
Y
48-07-27 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Studio One (WBBM): "
The Constant Nymph."





The Studio One Radio Rehearals Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
47-11-17
29
Young Man of Manhattan
Y
[Rehearsal]
47-12-01
31
Earth and High Heaven
Y
[Rehearsal]
47-12-08
32
To Mary With Love
Y
[Rehearsal]
47-12-15
33
Experiment Perilous
Y
[Rehearsal]
47-12-22
34
Painted Veils

Y
[Rehearsal]
[Christmas Drama]

47-12-23 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Studio One (8:30 p.m.) With screen star James Mason playing the lead role of the aged music critic, and soprano Eileen Farrell performing the songs he hears in reverie, "Studio One presents a dramatization of James Huneker's novel "
Painted Veils." This is the Christmas Eve story of a noted usic and opera critic who in his old age recalls his halcyon days and rekindles the ashes of an old romance by listening to the "recorded" voice of a singer who capitalized on his heart interest to promote her own career.
47-01-05
36
Confidential Agent
Y
[Rehearsal]






The Studio One Radio Program Biographies




Fletcher Markle
(Producer, Director, Writer and Performer)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Producer, Director, Writer and Actor
(1921-1991)

Birthplace: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Radiography:
1944 What War Means To Me
1946 Columbia Workshop
1946 Mercury Summer Theatre
1947 Studio One
1948 Ford Theatre
1949 The Lucky Strike Program
1953 General Electric Theatre
1977 CBS Radio Mystery Theatre
1979 Sears Radio Theatre


Fletcher Markle circa 1948


Fletcher Markle at work at The CBC


Fletcher Markle circa 1948


Fletcher Markle was married to Mercedes McCambridge for 12 years.
Born in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Fletcher Markle began his career with the Canadian Broadcasting Company (The CBC) in the early 1940s in Vancouver, British Columbia. He started out doing radio dramas with a group whose members included John Drainie, Lister Sinclair, Bernie Braden, and Alan Young on local canadian stations and The CBC network.

During World War II Markle performed in Journey Together (1946). Markle subsequently moved to New York City and though uncredited, wrote for Orson Welles' The Lady from Shanghai. During his time with CBS and NBC in New York, he produced, directed, wrote for, and performed in the CBS Radio drama anthology, Studio One. When Ford Theater moved to CBS from NBC, Markle was selected to helm the Ford program while tapping the same pool of excellent Radio actors he employed in Studio One.

He produced, wrote for and played a cameo role in the movie Jigsaw (1949). Night into Morning (1951) saw him direct Nancy Davis, Ray Milland, and John Hodiak.

Throughout the 1950s and early 1960s, he was director, producer and host for a number of television series such as Studio One for television, Front Row Center, Boris Karloff's Thriller, Father of The Bride, and Life with Father. He also directed Telescope for The CBC. In 1963 Markle directed the movie The Incredible Journey (1963) for Walt Disney Studios.

Markle met Academy Award winning actress Mercedes McCambridge while working with her during The Mercury Theatre Summer Program of 1946. Markle produced and directed many of the Summer Theatre programs, and subsequently directed his, then, wife Mercedes McCambridge in both Studio One and Ford Theatre for Radio and Television. The couple were married for 12 years and Markle adopted McCambridge's son, John, with her. The couple divorced in 1962.

Markle continued actively producing, directing and writing for Television both in Canada and the U.S. through the 1960s. Markle retired from Television from the 1970s, on.



Everett Sloane
Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Director, Writer and Actor
(1909-1965)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Education:
Public School No. 46
Townsend Harris High School, New York
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Radiography:
1937 Les Miserables
1937 The Shadow
1939 Campbell Playhouse
1939 Columbia Workshop
1940 Betty and Bob
1941 Inner Sanctum
1941 The Free Company
1941 Forecast
1941 Cavalcade Of America
1941 Bulldog Drummond
1941 The Goldbergs
1942 Man Your Battle Stations
1942 This Is War
1942 An American In England
1944 Words At War
1944 Columbia Presents Corwin
1944 You Can't Take It With You
1945 Mr and Mrs America
1945 Treasury Salute
1945 Guest Critic Series
1945 Theatre Guild On the Air
1945 The Danny Kaye Show
1946 Lest We Forget: These Great Americans
1946 Mercury Summer Theatre
1947 Treasury Agent
1947 Studio One
1947 Radio Reader's Digest
1947 Molle Mystery Theatre
1947 Inner Sanctum
1948 Lest We Forget: Stories To Remember
1948 Mr Ace and Jane
1948 Ford Theatre
1949 Hogan's Daughter
1949 And Not Yet Free
1950 Mysterious Traveler
1950 You Are There
1950 Crime Does Not Pay
1950 Beyond Tomorrow
1950 The Joe DiMaggio Show
1950 The Big Guy
1950 MGM Theatre Of the Air
1950 Cloak and Dagger
1951 The Louella Parsons Show
1952 Philip Morris Playhouse On Broadway
1952 The Falcon
1953 Man Against the Crippler
1953 21st Precinct
1953 Stroke Of Fate
1954 From the House Of Bondage
1954 Hallmark Hall Of Fame
1954 Crime and Peter Chambers
1954 Inheritance
1955 The Adventures Of the Abbotts
1955 Biography In Sound
1956 This Is My Story
1957 CBS Radio Workshop
1957 Suspense
The Guiding Light

Everett Sloane as Mr. Bernstein in Citizen Kane (1941)


Everett Sloane in The Lady From Shanghai (1947)


Everett Sloane with Tyrone Power in Prince of Foxes (1949)


Everett Sloane with Marlon Brando in The Men (1950)


Everett Sloane with Paul Newman in Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956)


Everett Sloane as cantankerous Jeb Drummond in Bonanza (1960)


Everett Sloane as District Attorney in Perry Mason episode The Case of The Poison Pen Pal (1962)
A native New Yorker, Everett Sloane was born, raised and educated in New York City through high school. Opting for a Stage career, in 1927 Sloane joined Jasper Deeter's stock company based in Moylan, Pennsylvania. 1928 marked Sloane's New York stage debut. Sloane was forced to work for a Wall Street broker when New York Stage work evaporated during The Great Depression.

It was during this period that Everett Sloane began working in Radio with the brilliant young writer -- director -- producer, Orson Welles and his Mercury Theatre Players. It was also the period during which he met and married the former Luba [Lillian] Herman, a Stage and Radio actress. The couple were married until Sloane's death in 1965.

It was with the Mercury Theatre that Sloane found regular work, first with Federal Theatre Project funded plays and later with the amazing success of Welles' and Houseman's Radio productions.

As with most Mercury Theatre alumni, the experience vaulted Sloane's career into overdrive. From the 1940s through the 1960s, Sloane soon found himself ranked with some of the greatest character actors in Film, Radio and Television history.

His extraordinarily measured performance as Mr. Bernstein in Citizen Kane ranks as one of the greatest character performances in Film History. Sloane soon followed up with critical triumphs in Journey Into Fear (1943), The Lady From Shanghai (1947), Prince of Foxes (1949), The Men (1950) and Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), playing with Film's greatest stars.

Already a Film legend by the mid-1940s, it was Sloane's Radio career that stands head and shoulders above most of his acting peers. From the early 1930s through the waning years of the Golden Age of Radio in the late 1950s, Sloane was a fixture on virtually every significant Radio offering that aired.

From his start in the history making Mercury Theatre productions of the late 30s, Sloane soon found himself in demand on virtually every high-profile dramatic production over Radio from either coast, but predominantly out of New York studios. With some 3,000 appearances over Radio to his credit, Everett Sloane remains a Radio legend the equal of his mentor, Orson Welles.

If one were to assemble an 'A-List' of Radio's most prestigious and ambitious Radio productions over a period of 25 years, it's a foregone conclusion that Everett Sloane's credit would appear at least once in each and every one of them. Sloane's range was as extraordinary as his intensity. Sloane could play action/adventure, comedy, serious drama, crime genre, and thrillers with equal dexterity. The versality he'd learned as a repertory player with Mercury Theatre served him well throughout his extraordinary career.

By the late 1950s, Everett Sloane found himself typecast for top of the line character roles, which somewhat limited any triumphs above and beyond what he'd experienced during the 1940s. But it was The Stage that was Sloane's first love. When he attempted to regain the Stage triumphs he'd enjoyed as a younger actor he found an ambivalent demand for his talent.

Sloane found himself faced with that bittersweet dilemma of many great character actors of his era: become a comparitive giant in television, or accept relegation to mediocre roles in Film or The Stage. Sloane opted for the former until his eyesight began failing him in the mid-1960s.

Confronted with the prospect of going blind, Sloane ended his own life with an overdose of barbiturates at the age of 55. He was survived by his wife of 32 years, Lillian, a son, Ned and a daughter, Erika.

It's not for us to pronounce judgements on another person's quality of life. Sloane lived for his dramatic performances. The prospect of being unable to proceed with his first love while only in his mid-50s was clearly an untenable one. We often reflect on the candles that burn the brightest, burning out the quickest. In some instances this is brought about by the talented performer himself. In rarer instances the performer's ambitions and aspirations are simply overtaken by events.

In the end, we each live Life on our own terms. Everett Sloane had set the bar very high for himself, and his reach clearly met his grasp on every occasion it was called for. One can't ask for better than that. Those who loved Everett Sloane the most knew what his writing, acting and directing meant to him . . . and they've forgiven him.



Anne Burr [McDermott]
Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress
(1920-2003)

Birthplace: Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1943 Big Sister
1945 New World A' Coming
1946 Theatre Guild On the Air
1946 When A Girl Marries
1947 Studio One
1948 The Abbott and Costello Kids Show
1948 Gang Busters
1949 The Big Story
1952 Best Plays
1952 The Falcon
1953 Stroke Of Fate
1979 Sears Radio Theatre

Anne Burr McDermott circa 1942


Anne Burr McDermott circa 1950
A native New Englander, Anne Burr was born, raised and schooled in the Boston area of Massachusetts. Anne Burr appeared on the Broadway stage in such productions as Detective Story and was a busy performer on radio dramas throughout the 1940s. She played many leading roles on Fletcher Markle's dramatic anthology series Studio One on radio in 1947 and 1948. Throughout the early 1950s, she was regularly featured on daytime soap operas--both Radio and Television--such as When A Girl Marries, Big Sister, The Guiding Light, As The World Turns, The Greatest Gift and The Way of The World. She also appeared in a recurring role in City Hospital (1951) as Dr. Kate Morrow.

Anne Burr played the major female role of the Nurse in the Broadway production of The Hasty Heart in the 1940s. Burr's role in the filmed version of the play was played by Patricia Neal.

One of Radio, Television and The Stage's most versatile young actresses, Anne Burr's range garnered praise in each medium. As with many young actresses of her era, she worked with several studios at a time, on several series' at a time, while attempting to raise a growing family. By the end of the 1950s, Anne Burr was raising three young children and wisely opted for family over career. She went into retirement from the 1960s through the 1970s, only occasionally appearing on Radio and writing for The Stage.

From the New York Times, March 3, 2003:

Anne Burr McDermott, 84, Early TV Actress

Anne Burr McDermott, who as Anne Burr was a leading lady on Broadway and radio and in early television in the 1940's and 50's, died on Feb. 1 not far from her home in Old Lyme, Conn. She was 84.

After acting in stock and radio roles, she made her Broadway debut in 1941 in the drama 'Native Son,' staged by Orson Welles.

Brooks Atkinson in The New York Times praised what he called her ''grim acting of the rich man's daughter'' as ''an accurate and fearless sketch of character without loss of time or motion.''

Other plays she acted in included Plan M (1942) and The Hasty Heart (1945). She signed a long-term contract at R.K.O. Radio Pictures and performed in radio dramas. In the early 1950's she was the leading lady, playing a doctor, in the CBS television series City Hospital.

She was also one of the original stars of As the World Turns.

After being blacklisted during the McCarthy era, she returned to an active television career.

In 1959 she ended her professional career and moved to Los Angeles with her husband, Tom McDermott, whom she had married in 1953.

Her husband died in 1990. She is survived by a daughter, Maggie McDermott-Walsh of Bernardsville, N.J.; two sons, Burr, of Boston, and Michael, of Beijing; and five grandchildren.




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