Click to go to Digital Deli Too Home Page blank head
Preserving the Golden Age of Radio for A Digital Age
Explore Our Golden Age Radio Research Pages Click here to learn about our approach to Golden Age Radio Preservation [Under Development] Click to go to Our Radio Articles Page This Feature Is Currently Not Available
 
This will take you to our Numeric Radio logs
This will take you to our A Series Radio logs This will take you to our B Series Radio logs This will take you to our C Series Radio logs This will take you to our D Series Radio logs This will take you to our E Series Radio logs This will take you to our F Series Radio logs This will take you to our G Series Radio logs This will take you to our H Series Radio logs This will take you to our I Series Radio logs This will take you to our J Series Radio logs This will take you to our K Series Radio logs This will take you to our L Series Radio logs This will take you to our M Series Radio logs
This will take you to our N Series Radio logs This will take you to our O Series Radio logs This will take you to our P Series Radio logs This will take you to our Q Series Radio logs This will take you to our R Series Radio logs This will take you to our S Series Radio logs This will take you to our T Series Radio logs This will take you to our U Series Radio logs This will take you to our V Series Radio logs This will take you to our W Series Radio logs This will take you to our X Series Radio logs This will take you to our Y Series Radio logs This will take you to our Z Series Radio logs This will take you back to our Text List of Radio logs

Original Rogues Gallery header art

The Rogue's Gallery Radio Program

Dee-Scription:
Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Rogue's Gallery

Rogue's Gallery Seasons 1, 2, and 3 MP3 Cover Art
Rogue's Gallery Seasons 1, 2, and 3 MP3 Cover Art

June 24, 1945 Premiere Spot Ad for Fitch Bandwagon Mysteries
June 24, 1945 Spot Ad for Fitch Bandwagon Mysteries

Sep 27, 1945 Premiere Spot Ad for Rogue's Gallery
Sep. 27, 1945 Premiere Spot Ad for Rogue's Gallery

Fitch Dandruff Remover Shampoo

Announcement of Rogue's Gallery move from MBS to NBC for Summer 1946 Run
Announcement of Rogue's Gallery move from MBS to NBC for Summer 1946 Run

Announcement of Rogue's Gallery NBC Summer 1947 Run
Announcement of Rogue's Gallery NBC Summer 1947 Run

Paul Stewart promo for Rogue's Gallery from January 30 1951
Paul Stewart promo for Rogue's Gallery from January 30 1951

Background

Rogue's Gallery was one of those Golden Age Radio programs that simply wouldn't quit. It resurfaced again and again between 1945 and 1951 in original broadcast--and in rebroadcast for years later. We've seen this before in Nero Wolfe and The Saint, with public demand so insistent that an otherwise short-lived production seems to take on a life of its own. Rogue's Gallery was broadcast through five different runs, over three major networks: NBC, The Mutual Broadcasting System, and ABC. The protagonist, fictional detective Richard Rogue, was performed by three different major dramatic actors: Dick Powell for the first three runs, Barry Sullivan for the 1947 Summer run, and critically acclaimed Mercury Theatre alumnus, Paul Stewart, for the 1950-1951 run.

The program was wonderfully entertaining in all of its incarnations. The story line developed around Richard Rogue, a very likeable, albeit catastrophe-prone private detective--or variously, 'creep', 'gumshoe', 'private dick', 'P.I.', or 'shadow'. And yes, the series is replete with all of the colorful Chandleresque radio noir dialogue America had come to expect from the darker--and often tongue-in-cheek--detective dramas of the 1940s and 1950s.

One of the more carefully guarded, yet signature elements of the Rogue's Gallery formula was Richard Rogue's alter ego, 'Eugor' (Rogue spelled backwards), played by the famous--but uncredited--character actor, Peter Leeds. 'Eugor' resides in a particularly entertaining recess of Richard Rogue's mind called "Cloud Eight", an obvious play on the euphemism, 'Cloud Nine', which by the 1940s had come to describe a euphoric state induced in one form or another--by alcohol, drugs, or often love or intense emotional satisfaction. Interestingly, the origin of the term Cloud Nine itself is often--mistakenly--attributed to the term's use in the "Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar" radio program whose popularity post-dated Rogue's Gallery by over five years. In fact, the term was in wide use well before 'Johnny Dollar'.

To set euphemism etymology--and Golden Age Radio history--straight, we'll remind the reader that 'Cloud Nine' had been around since the 1930s, attributed most often to an arcane practice of the U.S. Weather Bureau. According to weather bureau lore, some time during the 1930s they began to classify clouds by an arithmetic sequence. Level Nine was the very highest cumulonimbus, which can reach 30,000 to 40,000 feet, appearing to be glorious white mountains in the sky. Therefore, if you were on 'cloud nine' you were at the very peak of existence. Early examples show a lot of numerical variability, with the cloud sometimes being as low as number seven or eight--or as high as thirty-nine, though seven and nine were most common.

But we digress. Richard Rogue's 'Cloud Eight' by contrast was not so much the product of euphoria, but rather induced by one or more blows to Richard Rogue's head--or in some instances by being slipped a "mickey" of one sort or another. And in even more of a twist, Rogue's Cloud Eight is inhabited by a denizen of Richard Rogue's convuluted conscience--Eugor. Eugor alternatively counsels Rogue, entreats him to correct whatever situation landed him on Cloud Eight--yet again, or chides him for ending up there in the first place. Peter Leeds, a wonderful, prolific character actor in Radio, Television, and Film, voices Eugor, with a cacklely, high-pitched voice. Apparently the program went to great lengths to deny Peter Leeds a credit in the recurring role. One suspects this may have been at Peter Leeds' insistence. But we're more inclined to believe that it was simply an attempt to keep Eugor's true identity a closely held secret for the duration of the program to keep it mysterious and unique.

Be that as it may, Eugor became an integral element of many of the Rogue's Gallery scripts. Indeed, Rogue's self-reflection during his visits to Cloud Eight were often instrumental to solving the caper in which he was involved. The capers themselves were both well-crafted and entertaining, as much for Rogue's first-person exposition as for the often complex plots themselves. Dick Powell, in particular, had popularized the expositional narrative in his 1944 "Murder, My Sweet" portrayal of legendary Raymond Chandler detective, Philip Marlowe. Powell's soft-spoken, though gritty, expositions consumed as much as a third of some of the Rogue's Gallery scripts. One can't help but wonder if it was Powell's performance in "Murder, My Sweet" that made this project so attractive to both NBC and F.W. Fitch, its sponsor for its first four incarnations.

Fitch Sponsorship

The F.W. Fitch sponsorship bears some reflection. It was Fitch's sponsorship of the long running Fitch Bandwagon variety program that helped perpetuate Dick Powell's image as one of America's favorite fresh-faced, young radio entertainers. DickPowell was by then reaching his 40s, with the fresh-faced singing idol image quickly being displaced by a more rugged, worldly-wise appearance. Powell's successful re-invention of himself as a serious dramatic actor--with his portrayal of Philip Marlowe in "Murder, My Sweet"--was instrumental in persuading Fitch to spin Powell off into a dramatic role. Fitch's Bandwagon Mysteries ran during the Summer of 1945--as a three-month replacement for its successful Bandwagon variety program. The Bandwagon Mysteries inaugurated Powell's Richard Rogue character, a somewhat transparent incarnation of his Philip Marlowe characterization.

The fourteen-week summer replacement series was so successful that The Mutual Broadcasting System signed up to deliver it to their rapidly growing network. The Fitch Bandwagon was already scheduled to return for its regular season over NBC, so there was nowhere for Fitch to take Bandwagon Mysteries but to another network. The MBS-rebranded Rogue's Gallery took to the air for a full 39-episode run, from September 1945 to the summer of 1946, at which time NBC picked it up, yet again, as the summer replacement for the Fitch Bandwagon, this time continuing the Rogue's Gallery program name.

The chemical process of Saponification
The chemical process of Saponification

LIFE magazine Fitch ad promoting Rogue's Gallery from August 12 1946
LIFE magazine Fitch ad promoting Rogue's Gallery from August 12 1946

Fitch's sponsorship was also noteworthy for it's shampoo products themselves. Touting it's 'saponified' shampoo formula, Fitch claimed--rather elaborately--to be able to eradicate dandruff with its "revolutionary" saponified formula. As with much of the florid prose in feminine requisites advertising of the era, Fitch characterized saponification itself, as a revolutionary process unique to F.W. Fitch. In point of fact, saponification was in wide use in manufacturing soap products as early as 1908. Saponification is simply the process by which an alkali (sodium hydroxide) is introduced to a base (animal fat) to produce a salt (soap) and a free alcohol (glycerin). The only thing that made the Fitch's 'saponified' references mysterious was its otherwise arcane--but by then ubiquitous--usage in virtually all other common soap production of the era. And in fact it was Fitch's claims to eradicate dandruff that raised the dander of the Federal Trade Commission during the late 1940s, and which, by 1950, enjoined F.W. Fitch for its elaborate claims to eradicate dandruff with its use. Dandruff, a normal, mammalian by-product of life processes, cannot be eradicated--by any product. The damage caused by the injunction and ruling--and all the attendant bad press--almost ruined Fitch.

So it was that by the fifth incarnation of Rogue's Gallery, the series no longer enjoyed F.W. Fitch sponsorship. The 1947 Summer run of Rogue's Gallery starred successful Film actor, Barry Sullivan, who would subsequently popularize Milt Caniff's famous Steve Canyon (1948) character on Radio. The series was picked up by NBC, yet again, as the final F.W. Fitch sponsored Bandwagon production, airing as Rogue's Gallery. Rogue's Gallery's fifth and final incarnation was broadcast over the ABC Radio network in 1950, as a sustaining production, for a full, fifty-five program season. This incarnation starred noted character actor, Paul Stewart, of Mercury Theatre and 'Citizen Kane' fame. Stewart delivered the Richard Rogue character in a somewhat more foreboding manner, but the musical accompaniment and scripts maintained the lighter fare that Rogue's Gallery fans had come to prefer. Indeed, Stewart's somewhat grittier delivery was more reminiscent of the various performances of William Gargan's Barrie Craig (1951), than the far lighter, more whimsical Richard Rogue and Richard Diamond of Dick Powell.

In fact, Dick Powell , having distanced himself from F.W. Fitch sponsorship, segued his Richard Rogue character into a four-year run of Richard Diamond, "The Singing Detective" [Richard Diamond, Private Detective], from 1949 through 1953. A highly successful program in its own right, Richard Diamond, Private Detective ran for two years over NBC before, ironically, running over ABC from 1951 to 1952, while the last incarnation of Rogue's Gallery was airing over the same network. Richard Diamond, Private Detective eventually outlived Rogue's Gallery by two years, finishing over CBS in 1953, with Powell in the role to the end. And in yet another irony--or not--Dick Powell may have borrowed his 'Rogue' moniker for the title of his critically acclaimed role as Whit Corbett in the 1948 film, "Rogue's Regiment."

Series Derivatives:

Bandwagon Mysteries; AFRS R- Series', Rogue's Gallery and Mystery Playhouse
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Detective Dramas
Network(s): 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: NBC
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: MBS
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: NBC
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: NBC
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:ABC [KGO and KECA]
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]:
45-06-17 01 I Break Into Print--The Hard Way
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
45-09-27 01 [Unknown]
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
46-06-23 01 The Star of Savoy
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
47-06-08 01 [Unknown]
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
50-11-29 01 [Unknown]
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]:
45-06-17 to 45-09-16; NBC; Fourteen, 30-minute programs; Sundays, 7:30 p.m. EWT
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
45-09-27 to 46-06-20; MBS; Thirty-nine, 30-minute programs; Thursdays, 8:30 p.m. EST; [46-05-02 - 46-06-20; Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. EST]
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
46-06-23 to 46-09-22; NBC; Fourteen, 30-minute programs; Sundays, 6:30 p.m. EST
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
47-06-08 to 47-09-28; NBC; Seventeen, 30-minute programs; Sundays, 7:30 p.m.
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
50-11-15 to 52-03-26; ABC; Seventy-eight, 30-minute programs; Wednesdays, 9:00 p.m.
Syndication: AFRS and AFRTS R- Series, as Mystery Playhouse
Sponsors: 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: F.W. Fitch
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: F.W. Fitch
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: F.W. Fitch; Nescafe
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: F.W. Fitch
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Sustaining [with various local affiliate sponsors]
Director(s): 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: Dee Engelbach [Producer/Director]
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:Dee Engelbach [Producer/Director]
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:Dee Engelbach [Producer/Director]
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Charles Vanda
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Unknown
Principal Actors:
Dick Powell, Cathy Lewis, Peter Leeds, Gerald Mohr, Lurene Tuttle, Lou Merrill, Paul Frees, Harry Bartell, Paul Stewart, Ken Christy, Herb Butterfield, Tony Barrett
Recurring Character(s): 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]:
Richard Rogue [Dick Powell]
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
Richard Rogue [Dick Powell], and his alter ego, 'Eugor' [Peter Leeds] [Eugor is Rogue spelled backward].
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
Richard Rogue [Dick Powell], and his alter ego, 'Eugor' [Peter Leeds] [Eugor is Rogue spelled backward].
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
Richard Rogue [Barry Sullivan, and his alter ego, 'Eugor' [Peter Leeds] [Eugor is Rogue spelled backward].
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
Richard Rogue [Paul Stewart]
Protagonist(s): Richard Rogue, a private detective and his alter ego, Eugor [Rogue spelled backward]
Author(s): 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: Ray Buffum
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Ray Buffum
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Ray Buffum
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Doug Hayes
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
Writer(s) 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: Ray Buffum
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Ray Buffum
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Ray Buffum
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Doug Hayes
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: [Unknown]
Music Direction: 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: Leith Stevens - Composer/Conductor
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Leith Stevens - Composer/Conductor
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Leith Stevens - Composer/Conductor
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
Musical Theme(s): Leith Stevens Orchestra
Announcer(s): 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: Jim Doyle
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Jim Doyle
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Jim Doyle
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: Jim Doyle
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]:
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: 14
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 39
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 14
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 17
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 78
Episodes in Circulation: 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: None
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 13
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 4
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 1
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 1
Total Episodes in Collection: 1945 Summer Run [Bandwagon Mysteries]: None
1945 - 1946 Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 16
1946 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 5 [Includes 1 Rehearsal]
1947 Summer Run [Rogue's Gallery]: 1
1950-52 Run [Rogue's Gallery] : 1
AFRS Mystery Playhouse: 2
Provenances:
Bandwagon Mysteries spot ad from 1945
Bandwagon Mysteries spot ad from 1945

LIFE Magazine Nescafe ad promoting Rogue's Gallery over MBS from May 13 1946
LIFE Magazine Nescafe ad promoting Rogue's Gallery over MBS from May 13 1946

Nov. 21, 1950 Spot Ad for Rogue's Gallery over ABC
Nov. 21, 1950 Spot Ad for Rogue's Gallery over ABC

Rogue's Gallery spot ad from December 21 1951
Rogue's Gallery spot ad from December 21 1951
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide, 'The Directory of The Armed Forces Radio Service Series'.

Notes on Provenances:

All above cited provenances are in error in one form or another. The most helpful provenance was the log of the radioGOLDINdex and the Wisconsin Daily Journal.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


Rogue's Gallery has been lumped into one long contiguous run of programs for over 37 years--coincident with the invention of 'OTR.' In fact, the Rogue's Gallery canon represents five distinct and separate runs over a six-year span. Program numbering for these various programs should not be amalgamated into one long series of program numbers. This was not a single run of a program, it was five--separated by spans of between one and three years.

We do not impune the honest motivations of what, statistically at least, would have to be at least a handful of otr proponents. We can well imagine those individuals' continuing efforts to rehabilitate the various otr groups and their preposterous claims to 'most accurate in the world.' We applaud that minority and hope they continue to make some headway. None of us in the vintage radio preservation community deserve any less.

OTRisms:

The title of the first program of the Summer run of 1945 is 'I Break Into Print--The Hard Way', which first aired June 17, 1945, not the reported June 24, 1945 in all of the extant 'OTR' logs. We've discovered seven more titles to add to the existing Summer 1945 canon.

We turned up only six known titles for the 1946 NBC Summer Run of Fitch Bandwagon's Rogue's Gallery. The remaining eight program titles and their sequence remain unknown as of this writing. Of note in this run is the apparent rehearsal of Program #4, Where There's A Will There's A Murder. The rehearsal remains undated as of this writing.

The last run of Rogue's Gallery over the ABC Network remains undated, unsequenced and predominately un-titled. The only known program from the run is possibly the first, second, or third program of the Paul Stewart run, titled The Janice Kroll Murder Case, provisionally dated 50-11-29, due to Paul Stewart's comments at the close of the program. We've uncovered one more title--the final episode of the series.

[
Update: We've added 26 more provenanced titles to the knowledge base of Rogue's Gallery. They're updated in the logs below]


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here's the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







Rogue's Gallery Program Logs

Fitch Bandwagon Mysteries Summer Run [NBC]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
45-06-17
1
I Break Into Print--The Hard Way
N
[ Premiere Episode, Sundays ]

45-06-17 Zanesville Signal
These summer replacements are
due Sunday: MBS 2:45 p. m.
Crooked Square, detective series,
for Dale Carnegie; CBS 6 Conrad
Nagel theater for Ozzie and Harriet,
Mary Astor in "One Day After
Another;" CBS 7 Men Of Vision
for first half of Kate Smith hour,
aviation drama; CBS 7:30 That's
My Pop, comedy with Hugh Herbert,
for second half of Kate Smith;
7:30 Bandwagon dropping orchestras
for detective series, Rogue's
Gallery, with Dick Powell
; NBC
10:30 Meet Me at Parley's for Harold
Lloyd theater.

45-06-17 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p. m. — Rogue's Gallery (WIBA): premiere of series starring Dick Powell as "The Private Eye" detective; first episode, "
I Break Into Print — The Hard Way."
45-06-24
2
Won't You Come Into My Parlor?
N
45-06-24 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA)

45-06-24 Chicago Tribune
6:30--WMAQ--Rogue's Gallery, with Dick Powell in "
Won't You Come Into My Parlor?"
45-07-01
3
I Used My Head
N
45-07-01 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA): Dick Powell in "
I Used My Head."
45-07-08
4
The Lady and the Letters
N
45-07-08 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA): Dick Powell, "
The Lady and the Letters."
45-07-15
5
Title Unknown
N
45-07-15 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA)
45-07-22
6
My Client Loses His Head
N
45-07-22 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA): "
My Client Loses His Head."
45-07-29
7
Storm and Strife
N
45-07-29 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA): Dick Powell in "
Storm and Strife."
45-08-05
8
Beautiful Lady
N
45-08-05 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA): Dick Powell in "
Beautiful Lady."
45-08-12
9
Father Sheay's Miracle
N
45-08-12 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA): "
Father Sheay's Miracle" is a gold nugget on a dead man.
45-08-19
10
Title Unknown
N
45-08-19 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 NBC Bandwagon Mysteries
45-08-26
11
Title Unknown
N
45-08-26 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 NBC Bandwagon Mysteries
45-09-02
12
Title Unknown
N
45-09-02 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 NBC Bandwagon Mysteries
45-09-09
13
Jailbreak
N
45-09-09 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Bandwagon Mysteries (WIBA): Dick Powell in "
Jailbreak."
45-09-16
14
Title Unknown
N
[ Last Episode ]

45-09-16 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 NBC Bandwagon Mysteries





Rogue's Gallery [MBS]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
45-09-27
1
Murder On The House
N
[ Premiere Episode, MBS, Thursdays ]

45-09-27 Walla Walla Union-Bulletin

"Rogue's Gallery"

A wholesale case of " Murder on the House " presents itself for the skillful detection of private detective Richard
Rogue — as played by Dick Powell. Tonight at 8:30

[Replaces Boston Blackie]

45-09-27 New York Times
8:30-9--Drama: "
Murder in the House," With Dick Powell--WOR (Premiere).

45-10-04
2
Blondes Prefer Gentlemen
Y
Announces "Murder In Drawing Room A" as next
45-10-11
3
Murder In Drawing Room A
N
[AFRS Mystery Playhouse only]

45-10-11 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "
Murder in Drawing Room A."
45-10-18
4
Title Unknown
N
45-10-18 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in drama concerning prize fighters.

[
Little Drops of Rain has nothing to do with prize fighters]
45-10-25
5
Murder With Muriel
Y
45-10-25 Walla Walla Union-Bulletin
Murder, mayhem and sudden death on the —Rogue's Gallery show, starring Dick Powell. 8:30 P.M. TONIGHT

45-10-25 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "
Murder With Muriel."

Announces "
Photo-Finish" as next
45-11-01
6
Photo-Finish
N
45-11-01 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell deals with a lug wanted for murder in "
Photo Finish."
45-11-08
7
Little Drops of Rain
Y
45-11-08 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "Little Drops of Rain."

Announces "
The House of Fear" as next
45-11-15
8
The House of Fear
Y
45-11-15 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m.--Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell investigates theft of "
Sombaland Diamond."

Dick Powell announces the title as "
The House of Fear". Features Peter Leeds as other than 'EUGOR'.
Announces "
Last Race", not "The Last Race" as next
45-11-22
9
Last Race
N
45-11-22 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m.--Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "
Last Race."
45-11-29
10
Lovely Little Old Lady
Y
45-11-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "Lovely Little Old Lady," with Dick Powell.

45-11-29 Walla Walla Union-Bulletin
Rogue's Gallery
8:30 P.M.
Dick Powell, as Richard Rogue, visits a "
Little Did Lady," to talk about her son, and lingers only to get into trouble.

Announces
Eve and The Apple as next
45-12-06
11
Eve and The Apple
N
45-12-06 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "Eve and the Apple."
45-12-13
12
Blood On the Sand
Y
45-12-13 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "Blood on the Sand."

Features
Peter Leeds and Gerald Mohr. Announces "Fortune In Furs" as next.
45-12-20
13
A Fortune In Furs

Y
{Christmas Program]

45-12-20 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "
A Fortune in Furs."

45-12-20 Walla Walla Union-Bulletin
"Private Detective Richard
Rogue" takes up the trail of a rough arson gang where a bullet—riddled informer leaves off, during "A Fortune
in Furs" Thursday, December 20 — 8:30 to 9:00 p. m. over KUJ.
45-12-27
14
Hot Rubber
N
45-12-27 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell as Richard Rogue, cracks an automobile racket in "Hot Rubber."
46-01-03
15
Murder At Minden
Y
46-01-03 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU):
Dick Powell as Richard Rogue gets hit on the head again.

Announces "
Best Laid Plans" as next
46-01-10
16
As the Twig Is Bent . . .
N
46-01-10 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "
As the Twig Is Bent."

46-01-10 Chicago Tribune
7:30--W-G-N--Rogues' Gallery: Dick Powell in "
Terrifying Night."
46-01-17
17
A Will In Question
Y
46-01-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 Rogue's Gallery--WGN WIBU

a.k.a. Suspicious Will; Anson Leeds Murder

Lurene Tuttle
as Pamela Leeds

Announces "The Murder Habit" as next
46-01-24
18
The Murder Habit
N
46-01-24 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "
The Murder Habit."
46-01-31
19
Special Added Attraction
Y
46-01-31 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "Special Added Attraction," starring Dick Powell.

a.k.a. Murder Under the Big Top; Carlotta the Magnificent

Announces "
A Boy, A Girl and A Gun" as next
46-02-07
20
A Girl, A Boy, and A Gun
N
46-02-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 Rogue's Gallery--WGN WIBU
46-02-14
21
The Case of the Eager Murderer
N
46-02-14 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "Case of the Eager Murderer."
46-02-21
22
The Triangle Murder Case
Y
[Credits intentionally truncated]

46-02-21 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "The Triangle Murder Case."

a.k.a. Alibi Master

46-02-28
23
Alias Harold Hallaway
N
46-02-28 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "Alias Harold Hallaway."
46-03-07
24
Title Unknown
N
46-03-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 Rogue's Gallery--WGN WIBU
46-03-14
25
The Cat Dies Once
N
46-03-14 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): "The Cat Dies Once."

46-03-14 Coshocton News
Richard Rogue stalks with catlike tiead as ho undri takes the task of guarding the life of a wealthy feline whose demise would have serious consequences if it happened that "
The Cat Dies Once" on Rogue's Gallery at 8:30 p m MBS-WHKC.

46-03-14 Lima News
The claws of greed reach menacingly toward private investigator Richard Rogue, as Dick Powell, plaving the character of the hardboiled sleuth at 8:30 p. m. Thursday over MBS, on "Rogue's Gallery" discovers that the "
Cat Dies Once."

46-03-14 Syracuse Herald Journal
8:30 P.M.--WOLF--Rogue's Gallery, Dick Powell in "
The Cat Dies Once."
46-03-21
26
A Date With Tangerine
N
46-03-21 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): postponed story about a cat with a large legacy.

46-03-21 Syracuse Herald Journal
8:30--WOLF--Rogue's Gallery, Dick Powell In "
A Date With Tangerine"

46-03-21 Walla-Walla Union Bulletin
Rogue's Gallery-- 8:30— KUJ--Rogue keeps a postponed date to guard that feline named '
Tangerine" who boasts a bad temper and a very sizeable legacy.
46-03-28
27
Callahan's Hat
N
46-03-28 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "Callahan's Hat."
46-04-04
28
Title Unknown
N
46-04-04 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Richard Rogue (Dick Powell) follows the trail of a clip of bullets aimed at a fleeing girl in "
The Message."

46-04-04 Syracuse Herald Journal
8:30 P.M.--WOLF--Rogue's Gallery, Dick Powell in "
The Message."

46-04-04 Chicago Tribune
7:30--W-G-N--Rogue's Gallery: Dick Powell in '
The Message,"
46-04-11
29
The Message
Y
46-04-11 Wisconsin State Journal - Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in postponed drama, "The Message."

46-04-11 Syracuse Herald Journal
8:30 P.M.--WOLF--Rogue's Gallery, Dick Powell in "
The Message."

46-04-11 Abilene Reporter-News
The Rogue's Gallery dramatization of
The Message, in which Rogue (Dick Powell) follows the trait of a clip of bullets aimed at a fleeing girl as it leads to an elusive piece of paper, will be heard Thursday at 7:30 p, m.

46-04-11 Chicago Tribune
7:30--W-G-N--Rogue's Gallery, with Dick Powell taking lead.

a.k.a.
Favor for A Condemned Man

Features
Ken Christy, Gerald Mohr
46-04-18
30
Stormy Knights
N
46-04-18 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN, WIBU): Dick Powell in "
Headline Murder."

46-04-18 Chicago Tribune - 7:30--W-G-N--Rogue's Gallery, with Dick Powell in "
Stormy Knights."
46-04-25
31
Headline Murder

46-04-25 Delta Democrat-Times spot ad for Headline Murder

N
46-04-18 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogue's Gallery (WGN): Dick Powell in "
Headline Murder."

46-04-25 Chicago Tribune
7:30--W-G-N--Rogue:s Gallery, with Dick Powell in "
Headline Murder."
46-05-02
32
The Case of the Forgetful Blonde
N
46-05-02 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WGN): "
The Case of the Forgetful Blonde."
46-05-09
33
Snowbound
Y
46-05-09 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WGN): Dick Powell as Richard Rogue, meets a Latin beauty and a hermit in "
Snowbound."
46-05-16
34
The Impossible Murder
Y
46-05-16 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WGN): "
The Impossible Murder."
46-05-23
35
The Latin Type
N
[Available only as AFRS]

46-05-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 6:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WGN): "
The Latin Type."
46-05-30
36
Blue Eyes
Y
46-06-06 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WGN): "
Blue Eyes," starring Dick Powell.

a.k.a Jeolousy Is A Very Strange Thing; Patricia Flynn
46-06-06
37
Title Unknown
N
46-06-13
38
The Corpse I Didn't Kill
Y
46-06-13 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WGN): Dick Powell stars in "
The Corpse I Didn't Kill."
46-06-20
39
Missing Witness
N
[ Last Episode ]

46-06-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 6:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WGN): Dick Powell in "Missing Witness."





Rogue's Gallery 1946 Summer Run [NBC]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
46-06-23
1
The Star of Savoy
Y
[ Premiere Episode ]
[ From Thursday to Sunday on NBC, still for Fitch]

BACK ON THE AIR: "Vic and Sade," starring Bernadine Flynn formerly of Madison, will returne to the air via WIBU and WGN at 6-30 p m. Thursday. The half-hour, weekly show will replace "Rogue's Gallery" on Mutual. The comedy series first hit the air in 1932 as a daytime serial.

46-06-23 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WIBA): New series starring Dick Powell.

46-06-23 Wisconsin State Journal
Rogues Gallery starring Dick Powell as Richard Rogue, private detective which has been a regular MBS feature will bow in for the second successive summer season on NBC this evening
replacing Cass Daley's Bandwagon show

a.k.a.
The MacDonald Murder Case
Gerald Mohr
as Charles MacDonald, Lurene Tuttle as Betty Callahan

Announces "
Lady With A Gun"
46-06-30
2
Lady With A Gun
Y
46-06-30 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 Rogue's Gallery--WMAQ

Peter Leeds as Matt Webb
Lurene Tuttle as Betty Callahan

Announces "
Cabin On A Lake" as next
46-07-07
3
Cabin On A Lake
Y
46-07-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 5:30 Rogue's Gallery--WMAQ

a.k.a. Janice Cole

Announces "Where There's A Will, There's A Murder" as next
46-07-1x
4R
Where There's A Will There's A Murder
Y
[ Rehearsal -- Provisional Date]
46-07-14
4
Where There's A Will There's A Murder
Y
46-07-21
5
Murderer's Apprentice
N
46-07-21 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WIBA): "
Murderer's Apprentice."
46-07-28
6
Title Unknown
N
46-07-28 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WIBA): Dick Powell, as Richard Rogue, gets mixed up with a murder at a prize fight.
46-08-04
7
The Lovely Alibi
N
46-08-04 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WIBA): "
The Lovely Alibi."
46-08-11
8
Title Unknown
N
46-08-11 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 p.m. Rogue's Gallery (WIBA):
a coin collection leads to murder.
46-08-18
9
Title Unknown
N
46-08-18 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 NBC The Rogue's Gallery
46-08-25
10
Title Unknown
N
[6:45:40 PM] Dee Neyhart: 46-08-25 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 5:30 NBC The Rogue's Gallery
46-09-01
11
Title Unknown
N
[6:46:16 PM] Dee Neyhart: 46-09-01 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 5:30 NBC The Rogue's Gallery
46-09-08
12
Title Unknown
N
46-09-08 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 5:30 NBC The Rogue's Gallery
46-09-15
13
Title Unknown
N
46-09-15 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 5:30 NBC The Rogue's Gallery
46-09-22
14
Title Unknown
N
[46-09-22 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 NBC The Rogue's Gallery

Last Episode ]





Rogue's Gallery 1947 Summer Run [NBC]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
47-06-08
1
Title Unknown
N
[ Premiere Episode ]

47-06-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 5:30 p.m.--Rogues Gallery (WIBA): new series with
Barry Sullivan.
47-06-15
2
Title Unknown
N
47-06-15 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-06-22
3
Title Unknown
N
47-06-22 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-06-29
4
Phyllis Adrian Is Missing
Y
47-06-29 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-07-06
5
Title Unknown
N
47-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-07-13
6
Title Unknown
N
47-07-13 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-07-20
7
Buried Treasure
N
47-07-20 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 p.m.--Rogue's Gallery (WIBA): "
Buried Treasure" and death.
47-07-27
8
Title Unknown
N
47-07-27 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-08-03
9
Title Unknown
N
47-08-03 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-08-10
10
Title Unknown
N
47-08-10 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-08-17
11
Title Unknown
N
47-08-17 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-08-24
12
Title Unknown
N
47-08-24 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery
47-08-31
13
The Amusement Pier Murder
N
47-08-31 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30 p.m.--Rogue's Gallery (WIBA): murder on an amusement pier.
47-09-07
14
Title Unknown
N
47-09-07 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 5:30 Rogue's Gallery

47-09-07 Chicago Tribune
6:30--WMAQ--Rogue's Gallery, starring Barry Sullivan.
47-09-14
15
Title Unknown
N
47-09-14 Chicago Tribune
6:30--WMAQ--Rogue's Gallery
47-09-21
16
Title Unknown
N
47-09-21 Chicago Tribune
6:30--WMAQ--Rogue's Gallery
47-09-28
17
Title Unknown
N
[ Last Episode ]
Last Fitch-Sponsored Program

47-09-28 Chicago Tribune
6:30--WMAQ--Rogue's Gallery





Rogue's Gallery [ABC]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
50-11-15
1
The Janice Kroll Murder Case
Y
[ Premiere Episode Wednesdays, 8:30 p.m.]
[ Provisional ]

50-11-15 San Mateo Times
Rogue's Gallery will be heard on KGO at 8:30
50-11-22
2
Title Unknown
N
50-11-22 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
50-11-29
3
Title Unknown
N
50-11-29 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
50-12-06
4
Title Unknown
N
50-12-06 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
50-12-13
5
Title Unknown
N
50-12-13 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
50-12-20
6
Title Unknown
N
50-12-20 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
50-12-27
7
Title Unknown
N
50-12-27 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-01-03
8
Title Unknown
N
51-01-03 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-01-10
9
Title Unknown
N
51-01-10 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-01-17
10
Title Unknown
N
51-01-17 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-01-24
11
Title Unknown
N
51-01-24 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-01-31
12
Title Unknown
N
51-01-31 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-02-07
13
Title Unknown
N
51-02-14
14
Title Unknown
N
51-02-21
15
Title Unknown
N
51-02-28
16
Title Unknown
N
51-02-28 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-03-07
17
Title Unknown
N
51-03-14
18
Title Unknown
N
51-03-14 San Mateo Times
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-03-21
19
Title Unknown
N
51-03-28
20
Title Unknown
N
51-04-04
21
Title Unknown
N
51-04-11
22
Title Unknown
N
51-04-18
23
Title Unknown
N
51-04-18 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-04-25
24
Title Unknown
N
51-04-25 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30 -- KECA--Rogue's Gallery
51-05-02
25
Title Unknown
N
51-05-02 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-05-09
26
Title Unknown
N
51-05-16
27
Title Unknown
N
51-05-23
28
Title Unknown
N
51-05-30
29
Title Unknown
N
51-06-06
30
Title Unknown
N
51-06-13
31
Title Unknown
N
51-06-20
32
Title Unknown
N
51-06-27
33
Title Unknown
N
51-06-27 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-07-04
34
Title Unknown
N
51-07-11
35
Title Unknown
N
51-07-18
36
Title Unknown
N
51-07-18 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-07-25
37
Title Unknown
N
51-07-25 Hayward Daily Review
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-08-01
38
Title Unknown
N
51-08-08
39
Title Unknown
N
51-08-15
40
Title Unknown
N
51-08-22
41
Title Unknown
N
51-08-29
42
Title Unknown
N
51-09-05
43
Title Unknown
N
51-09-12
44
Title Unknown
N
51-09-19
45
Title Unknown
N
51-09-26
46
Title Unknown
N
51-10-03
47
Title Unknown
N
51-10-10 San Mateo Times
8:30 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-10-10
48
Title Unknown
N
[Moves to 8:00 p.m.]

51-10-17 San Mateo Times
8:00 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-10-17
49
Title Unknown
N
51-10-17 San Mateo Times
8:00 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-10-24
50
Title Unknown
N
51-10-24 San Mateo Times
8:00 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-10-31
51
Title Unknown
N
51-10-31 San Mateo Times
8:00 -- KGO--Rogue's Gallery
51-11-07
52
Title Unknown
N
51-11-07 Oakland Tribune
8 p.m.--KGO--Rogues Gallery
51-11-14
53
Title Unknown
N
51-11-14 Oakland Tribune
8 p.m.--KGO--Rogues Gallery
51-11-21
54
Title Unknown
N
51-11-21 Oakland Tribune
8 p.m.--KGO--Rogues Gallery
51-11-28
55
The Case of The Small Package
N
51-11-28 Oakland Tribune
"The screen's Paul Stewart stars in ABC's ROGUE'S GALLERY, tonight at 8 on KGO-radio locally. The noted actor is now in Hollywood working in a new picture with Humphrey Bogart. "Case of the Small Package" is tonight's story, an awful lot of trouble all because of what's in a very small package."
51-12-05
56
An Unscholarly Case of Homicide
N
51-12-05 Oakland Tribune
8 p.m.--KGO--Rogues Gallery: Paul Stewart as Richard Rogue finds
an unscholarly case of homicide at a sedate girl's school.
51-12-12
57
Title Unknown
N
51-12-12 Oakland Tribune
8 p.m.--KGO--Rogues Gallery
51-12-19
58
Title Unknown
N
51-12-19 Oakland Tribune
8 p.m.--KGO--Rogues Gallery
51-12-26
59
Title Unknown
N
51-12-26 Oakland Tribune
8 p.m.--KGO--Rogues Gallery
52-01-02
60
Title Unknown
N
52-01-02 Oakland Tribune
8:00 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-01-09
61
Title Unknown
N
52-01-09 Oakland Tribune
8:00 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-01-16
62
Title Unknown
N
52-01-16 Oakland Tribune
8:00 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-01-23
63
Title Unknown
N
52-01-22 Oakland Tribune
If you're a mystery fan there's good cause to stick with KGO-radio tomorrow night for programs right down your alley…at 8:00 Paul Stewrt turns in another fine performance on ROGUE'S GALLERY.

52-01-23 Oakland Tribune
8:00 P.M. KGO--Rogue's Gallery.
52-01-30
64
Title Unknown
N
52-01-30 Oakland Tribune
8:00 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-02-06
65
Title Unknown
N
[Moves back to 8:30 p.m.]

52-02-06 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-02-13
66
Title Unknown
N
52-02-13 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-02-20
67
Title Unknown
N
52-02-20 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-02-27
68
Title Unknown
N
52-02-27 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-03-05
69
Title Unknown
N
52-03-05 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-03-12
70
Title Unknown
N
52-03-12 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-03-19
71
Title Unknown
N
52-03-19 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.
52-03-26
72
Title Unknown
N
[Last Episode]

53-03-26 Oakland Tribune
8:30 P.M. KGO Rogue's Gallery.





Mystery Playhouse [AFRS/AFRTS R-Series]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
45-10-11
3
Rogue's Gallery - Murder In Drawing Room A
Y
46-05-23
35
Rogue's Gallery - The Latin Type
Y






Rogue's Gallery Biographies




Richard Ewing 'Dick' Powell
(Richard Rogue)

[Writer, Director, Producer, Stage, Screen, Television and Radio Actor]
(1904-1963)

Birthplace: Mountain View, Arkansas, U.S.A.

Education:
Little Rock College.

Radiography:

1934 The Old Gold Program
1934 Hollywood Hotel
1936 The Burns and Allen Show
1936 Lux Radio Theatre
1938 The Raleigh and Kool Cigarette Program
1939 Good News Of 1939
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 Good News of 1940
1940 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1941 America Calling
1941 Miss Pinkerton, Inc.
1941 The Treasury Hour
1942 Command Performance
1943 The Dick Powell Program
1943 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1943 Mail Call
1943 Campana Serenade
1943 Treasury Star Parade
1944 Fitch Bandwagon
1944 The March Of Dimes
1944 The Harold Lloyd Comedy Theatre
1945 Radio Hall Of Fame
1945 A Tribute To...
1945 Rogue's Gallery
1945 Request Performance
1946 Hollywood Star Time
1947 Front and Center
1947 Music Box Theatre
1948 The Life Of Riley
1948 Philco Radio Time
1948 The Bill Stern Colgate Sports Newsreel
1948 Sealtest Variety Theatre
1948 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1950 The Adventures Of the Saint
1950 The Bing Crosby Show
1950 The Harold Peary Show
1950 The Bing Crosby Show
1951 The Edgar Bergen Show
1951 Suspense
1951 Cavalcade Of America
1951 The Man From Homicide
1952 Guest Star
1953 This I Believe
1953 The Korea Story
1954 Hallmark Hall Of Fame
1962 Army Of Stars
Showtime
Hollywood's Open House
Treasury Song Parade
Rexall Rhythm Round-Up

Dick Powell, ca. 1937
Dick Powell, ca. 1937

Dick Powell's first record producer, Vocalion, later Vocalion-Brunswick, Warner Bros. having purchased Brunswick outright
Dick Powell's first record producer, Vocalion, later Vocalion-Brunswick, Warner Bros. having purchased Brunswick outright.

Powell as a Depression-era crooner, ca. 1932
Powell as a Depression-era crooner, ca. 1932

Dick Powell publicity photo, ca. 1936
Dick Powell publicity photo, ca. 1936

Powell with Jean Harlow, ca. 1936
Powell with Jean Harlow, ca. 1936

Player's Cigarette premium card of Dick Powell, ca. 1937
Player's Cigarette premium card of Dick Powell, ca. 1937

Dick Powell, Warren William, and Claudette Colbert, ca. 1937
Dick Powell, Warren William, and Claudette Colbert, ca. 1937

Dick Powell, Pat O-Brien, fellow Arkansan Bob Burns, and Robert Armstrong of King Kong fame, form an impromptu glee club
Dick Powell, Pat O-Brien, fellow Arkansan Bob Burns, and Robert Armstrong of King Kong fame, form an impromptu glee club

Powell and first wife, Joan Blondell, ca. 1938
Powell and first wife, Joan Blondell, ca. 1938

Dick Powell in 1940's Christmas In July
Dick Powell in 1940's Christmas In July

Dick Powell mugging with Ann Sheridan in 1939's Naughty But Nice
Dick Powell mugging with Ann Sheridan in 1939's Naughty But Nice

Dick Powell as Philip Marlowe in his breakout dramatic blockbuster, Murder My Sweet (1944)
Dick Powell as Philip Marlowe in his breakout dramatic blockbuster, Murder My Sweet (1944)

Bogie and Betty Bogart bought their beloved schooner, Santana, from Dick Powell and June Allyson in 1945
Bogie and Betty Bogart bought their beloved schooner, Santana, from Dick Powell and June Allyson in 1945

Dick Powell with Peggy Dow in You Never Can Tell (1951)
Dick Powell with Peggy Dow in You Never Can Tell (1951)

Dick Powell and Harold Lloyd confer on a script for NBC, ca. 1949
Dick Powell and Harold Lloyd confer on a script for NBC, ca. 1949

Three decades of Diamonds--Dick Powell and David Janssen review a script for TV's Richard Diamond, Private Detective (1957)
Three decades of Diamonds--Dick Powell and David Janssen review a script for TV's Richard Diamond, Private Detective (1957)

Dick Powell Theatre, Powell's premiere dramatic production
Dick Powell Theatre, Powell's premiere dramatic production.

Powell's successful Western Anthology, Zane Grey Theatre, ca. 1956
Powell's successful Western Anthology, Zane Grey Theatre, ca. 1956

Honey West's beautiful Shelby Cobra (1965) was an inspired selection for the short-lived series--but it still jumped the shark after one season
Honey West's beautiful Shelby Cobra (1965) was an inspired selection for the short-lived series--but it still jumped the shark after one season

Baby faced, rosy-cheeked singing idol, Dick Powell may be best remembered as a movie star, but it was as a boyish crooner in dozens of Hollywood musicals of the 1930s and later, that he made his biggest splash in The Arts. As the star of numerous Warner Brothers musicals, Powell was one of Hollywood's top box-office draws during the 1930s--and quickly became just as popular on Radio. By mid-decade the young crooner was lobbying to break into more serious roles, but his efforts were rebuffed by Jack Warner.

Born in Mountain View, Stone County in northern Arkansas, Powell attended the former Little Rock College
, before embarking on an entertainment career as a singer with the midwest-based Charlie Davis Orchestra. Powell recorded a number of records with Davis--and in solo outings as well--for the Vocalion label in the late 1920s.

Powell then moved to Pittsburgh, where he found local success as the Master of Ceremonies at the Enright Theater, and the
Stanley Theater. In April 1930, Warner Bros. bought Brunswick Records, which at that time owned Vocalion. In 1932, Warner Bros. was sufficiently impressed by Powell's singing and stage presence to offer Powell a Film contract. Powell's film debut was as a singing bandleader in Blessed Event (1932). Dick Powell went on to star as a boyish crooner in movie musicals such as 42nd Street, Footlight Parade, Gold Diggers of 1933, Dames, Flirtation Walk, and On the Avenue, often appearing opposite Ruby Keeler and Joan Blondell.

But even during the 1930s, Powell desperately wanted to expand his range, but Warner Bros.--Jack Warner in particular--wouldn’t let him. The parts became somewhat more varied after his 1940 move to Paramount, but the actor's dramatic ambitions were stifled there as well. Finally, reaching his forties and knowing that his young romantic leading man days were behind him, he lobbied hard for the lead in Double Indemnity (1944). He lost out to Fred MacMurray, another fresh-faced Hollywood nice guy. MacMurray’s success only fueled Powell’s resolve to pursue projects with greater range. Finally in 1944, he was cast in the first of a series of classic films noir, as Raymond Chandler's private detective Philip Marlowe in Murder, My Sweet, directed by Edward Dmytryk. The film was brilliant, and Dick Powell had successfully reinvented himself as a dramatic actor.

The following year, Dmytryk and Powell re-teamed to make Cornered (1945), a gripping, post-WWII thriller that helped further define the film noir style. Powell became a popular "tough guy" lead, appearing in movies such as Johnny O'Clock (1947) and Cry Danger (1951). From that point forward in his career--with the exception of his Radio detective roles, even when appearing in lighter fare such as The Reformer and the Redhead (1950) and Susan Slept Here (1954), Powell never again sang in his Film roles.

Powell began a new career in Radio as well, remaking his radio persona with gumshoe Richard Rogue in Fitch Bandwagon Mysteries' Rogue's Gallery, followed later by four years as Richard Diamond, Private Detective.

Still eager to broaden his creative horizons, Powell set his sights on directing Film in the late 1940s, but yet again met with resistance from studio heads. Finally, in 1952, RKO studio head Howard Hughes gave Powell the green light to direct the thriller Split Second, and the success of that film led Hughes to offer Powell a position as Producer. While there was some speculation in Hollywood that Powell would become Head of Production at RKO, he was able to complete only one feature, The Conqueror, before Hughes sold the company in 1955. Powell went on to helm three more features in as many years at other studios.

Although the leadership of RKO had eluded him, Powell had already begun his rise as an early television mogul. On the heels of his first feature assignment Powell had formed an independent telefilm production company with actors Charles Boyer and David Niven. Four Star Films derived its name from its first project, the half-hour anthology Four Star Playhouse, in which one of the three partners would rotate with a different weekly guest star. In its second season the partners invited guest Ida Lupino to become the show's permanent "fourth star." Although she did not become a stockholder in the firm, Lupino went on to direct many episodes of Playhouse and other Four Star series, in addition to her acting duties.

While Boyer and Niven each owned a sizeable share of Four Star, it was Dick Powell that ran the company. A 1962 Television magazine profile of Powell called him the company's "principal architect of policy as well as the most valuable performer and production executive," and noted that Four Star's fortunes moved in direct proportion to the time Dick Powell devoted to it's operations. Powell was notoriously driven, and closely involved with both the financial and creative aspects of Four Star. He not only managed operations, but was active in developing story properties, overseeing script conferences, and, when needed, used his charm--and the weight of his celebrity--to close a program sale.

Four Star's primary commodity was anthologies. Powell followed up Four Star Playhouse (1954) with the short-lived Stage 7, and two years later Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theatre, hosted by--and occasionally starring-the Four Star chief executive officer himself. Powell and company also produced one season of Alcoa Theatre (1958), and in subsequent years crafted anthologies around one of Powell's partners (The David Niven Theater), and his wife (The June Allyson Show), both featuring the requisite array of Hollywood stars.

Zane Grey Theatre ran for five years, at once feeding and riding the crest of the phenomenal surge of western programs on television in the late 1950s. Four Star generated its share of the stampede, scoring its biggest hits in the genre with The Rifleman, Wanted: Dead or Alive, and Trackdown, as well as less successful entries like Johnny Ringo, Black Saddle, Law of the Plainsman, Stagecoach West, and the highly-regarded but extremely short-lived Sam Peckinpah project, The Westerner.

Four Star's western output highlights the creative economy of program development under Powell. Anthologies were the perfect vehicles by which to generate new program pilots at a network or sponsor's expense. Most of the Four Star westerns, for example, were born as installments of Zane Grey Theatre (Wanted: Dead or Alive had its trial run as an episode of Trackdown). Four Star Playhouse spawned two crime series featuring gambler Willy Dante: eight Four Star installments starring Powell as Dante were repackaged as a 1956 summer replacement series (The Best in Mystery), and a new Dante series was hatched in 1960 with Howard Duff in the title role. Another spin-off of sorts came in 1957 when Powell revived his Richard Diamond radio vehicle for television, with young David Janssen as the suave P.I--and an even younger Mary Tyler Moore as the 'legs' of the program's later preface sequence.

Michael Shayne, Private Detective was a less successful Four Star entry in the private eye cycle of the late 1950s.

Four Star was one of the busiest telefilm suppliers in the business in 1959. The following year the newly renamed Four Star Television marked its peak in prime time with a remarkable twelve series on the networks. Four Star was producing more programming than any other Hollywood independent, surpassed only by MCA-Revue and Columbia-Screen Gems. Powell resisted the increasingly common practice of ceding control of off-network distribution to the networks themselves. So even though Four Star was often obliged to cut broadcasters in on series profits, it was Four Star that retained syndication rights to all its shows. Four Star inaugurated its own syndication division--albeit belatedly--in 1962.

Powell the executive was uncharacteristically sensitive--as Studio Heads go--to the creative process as well as profits. Many Four Star alumni have attested to Powell's sensitivity and support for their pet writing projects. Powell personally fielded ideas from writers, interceded with sponsors to protect controversial scripts from censorship, and would support any story if the writer was passionate enough about it.

Indeed, Powell mentored writer-producers Sam Peckinpah, Blake Edwards, Bruce Geller and Aaron Spelling, and signed young writers like Christopher Knopf, Richard Levinson and William Link, Leslie Stevens, and Robert Towne early in their careers. By all accounts, Powell was universally respected by his creative team.

With the western on the wane in the early sixties, Four Star diversified its product, turning out situation comedies like The Tom Ewell Show, Peter Loves Mary, McKeever and the Colonel, The Gertrude Berg Show, and Ensign O'Toole, as well as a courtroom drama, The Law and Mr. Jones, an organized crime saga, Target: The Corrupters, and an unusual anthology, The Lloyd Bridges Show. Only The Detectives, starring Robert Taylor was even a modest success. By 1961 Powell had reduced his hands-on involvement in the overall operations at Four Star and focused his attentions on producing The Dick Powell Show, a star-studded drama anthology featuring Powell as host and frequent star.

The new anthology presented even more pilots than Zane Grey--over a dozen in two years--which eventually yielded the newspaper series Saints and Sinners in 1962, and the detective series Burke's Law the following year. Among the unsold projects was Luxury Liner--produced by future Love Boat creator Aaron Spelling. The Dick Powell Show show received an Emmy nomination for Outstanding Dramatic Achievement for both its seasons on the air.

After Powell's death in January of 1963, Four Star continued operation, but Four Star's reign as a "TV major" was over. With six series on the fall schedule for 1962, by a year later Burke's Law was the firm's only prime-time entry. The change in Four Star's fortunes probably had as much to do with ratings as anything else. The firm's continued resistance to network control of syndication may have cost it prime-time sales. Certainly the loss of Powell's leadership, his formidable salesmanship powers, and indeed his reputation, could not have helped matters. With declining network program sales, more flops like Honey West and The Rogues, and the disappointing performance of the company's own belated entry into the syndication business, Four Star was awash in red ink by 1966. The Big Valley was the last series being produced under the Four Star banner when the firm was sold in 1967.

Powell's relatively abbreviated life was not without some fascinating ironies:

  • He may have been yet another of the famous casualties of the 1956 film The Conqueror. The movie was filmed near a nuclear test site in Utah. Many of the people involved with the film, including Powell--who directed--eventually died of cancer, either caused by--or exacerbated by--working on location near the site. The others included actors John Wayne, Susan Hayward, Ted de Corsia, and Agnes Moorehead--none of them shrinking violets, or capitulators, in any respect.
  • Powell died on the same day and of the exact cause as fellow Radio, Film and Television star, Jack Carson.
  • Powell sold his famous yacht, Santana to Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall in 1945. The beautiful schooner had been previously owned by Ray Milland, George Brent, and Charles Issacs and Eva Gabor.




Paul Stewart [Paul Sternberg]
(Richard Rogue)

Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1908-1986)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Education: Columbia University

Radiography:

1936 The Jack Pearl Show
1937 The Shadow
1938 The Raleigh and Kool Cigarette Program
1938 Mercury Theatre
1939 Campbell Playhouse
1939 Arch Oboler's Plays
1940 Cavalcade Of America
1941 The Free Company
1941 Columbia Workshop
1941 Orson Welles Theatre
1942 Suspense
1943 Lights Out
1948 Gangbusters
1951 Rogue's Gallerly
1954 You Were There

Paul Stewart in The Bad and The Beautiful (1952)
Paul Stewart in The Bad and The Beautiful (1952)
Paul Stewart as Raymond, in Citizen Kane (1941)
Paul Stewart as Raymond, in Citizen Kane (1941)
Paul Stewart and Kirk Douglas in Champion (1949)
Paul Stewart and Kirk Douglas in Champion (1949)
Paul Stewart and Kirk Douglas in Top Secret Affair (1957)
Paul Stewart and Kirk Douglas in Top Secret Affair (1957)
Paul Stewart's sinister, foreboding gaze landed him hundreds of Hollywood 'heavy' roles
Paul Stewart's sinister, foreboding gaze landed him hundreds of Hollywood 'heavy' roles.
Paul Stewart as sinister crime boss, Carl Evello, in 1955's Kiss Me Deadly
Paul Stewart as sinister crime boss, Carl Evello, in 1955's Kiss Me Deadly
Born Paul Sternberg in New York City on March 13, 1908, Paul Stewart developed a yen for acting in his teens, making his Broadway debut in 1931's Two Seconds, which ran about as long. Upon graduating from Columbia University, he performed in a few more stage roles in New York City when he met and made a favorable impression upon Orson Welles. As a result of that relationship he became a founding member of the Welles' famous Mercury Theatre Players and a founding member of AFTRA when it was still a Radio Union. Having already made a name for himself as a reliable dramatic actor in Radio, by the time he helped found The Mercury Theatre, he soon proved himself a valuable asset to the ensemble. Indeed, Stewart performed in the notorious orginal airing of 1938's The War of The Worlds over Welles and John Houseman's Mercury Theatre On The Air.

In 1939 Stewart met and married band singer/actress Peg La Centra (1910-1996) and over the years they appeared together on many radio programs. She was the lead singer for Artie Shaw's original orchestra and made her name in Radio singing for Johnny Greene's Orchestra and eventually with her own Peg La Centra Show. La Centra also dubbed singing voices for film stars Ida Lupino and Susan Hayward and went on to make many solo recordings.

As a natural progression from Stewart's excellent ensemble work on Mercury Theatre On The Air, Orson Welles cast Stewart in Welles' classic Citizen Kane (1941) as the very integral 'Raymond', Kane's wily, world-weary valet and keeper of secrets. 'Kane' served as Stewart's springboard into a fiteen year series of critically acclaimed, film noir roles including Johnny Eager (1942), Mr. Lucky (1943), Champion (1949), Twelve O'Clock High (1949), Carbine Williams (1952), The Bad and the Beautiful (1952), and Kiss Me Deadly (1955).

Indeed, 1952's The Bad and The Beautiful reunited two of the Rogue's Gallery Radio stars--Stewart and Barry Sullivan--in the same film--at about the same time that Paul Stewart's performances in Rogue's Gallery were still airing. Never truly type-cast, Stewart had nonetheless made something of a reputation for himself as several sinister, foreboding mob boss, gangster, or gang-busting District Attorney types.

On television, he appeared in Playhouse 90, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Alcoa Theatre, Dr. Kildare, Wagon Train, Gunsmoke, It Takes a Thief, Mannix, The Name of the Game, McMillan & Wife, The Rockford Files, and Lou Grant, among many others. He became a regular on two short-lived series--Top Secret (1955) and The Man Who Never Was (1966).

By the late 1950s Stewart turned his directorial talents to Stage and Television, directing a number of popular crime fiction dramas such as Peter Gunn, Michael Shayne, Perry Mason, It Takes a Thief, and Hawaii 5-0. He both acted in and directing several Remington Steele episodes. He also directed several Twilight Zone episodes for Rod Serling. Stewart's voice talent also found its way into several animated features during the 1960s.

In 1974 Stewart suffered a heart attack while on location in New Mexico for the movie Bite the Bullet (1975), but returned sporadically to Film upon his recovery. Paul Stewart suffered a second--and fatal--heart attack in 1986 at age 77.




[Patrick] Barry Sullivan
(Richard Rogue)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actor
(1912-1994)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1943 Lux Radio Theatre
1946 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1947 Rogue's Gallery
1947 In Your Name
1948 The Unexpected
1948 Steve Canyon
1948 NBC University Theatre
1949Adventures Of the Saint
1949 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1950 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 Guest Star
1951 Cavalcade Of America
1951 Family Theatre
1951 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1952 Hallmark Playhouse
1954 Stars Over Hollywood
Proudly We Hail
Obsession

Barry Sullivan, ca. 1952
Barry Sullivan, ca. 1952

Director Joseph Lewis talking with Polly Bergen and Barry Sullivan, on the set of Cry of the Hunted (1953)
Director Joseph Lewis talking with Polly Bergen and Barry Sullivan, on the set of Cry of the Hunted (1953).
Barry Sullivan and Lana Turner in The Bad and The Beautiful (1952)
Barry Sullivan and Lana Turner in The Bad and The Beautiful (1952)

Barry Sullivan with Audrey Totter, in Tension (1949)
Barry Sullivan with Audrey Totter, in Tension (1949)

Barry Sullivan publicity photo, ca. 1955
Barry Sullivan publicity photo, ca. 1955
Barry Sullivan was a theater usher and department store employee when he made his first Broadway appearance in I Want a Policeman at the Lyceum Theatre in January of 1936. The show ran for only 47 performances. His other 1936 appearances on Broadway were the drama St. Helena in October, and the comedies All That Glitters and Eye On the Sparrow. All three plays were flops. His first hit play was in the role of Bert Jefferson in The Man Who Came to Dinner, by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. But throughout the late 1930s, Sullivan gained movie acting experience in two-reel comedies produced by the Manhattan-based Educational Studios.

By the 1942 Broadway season, he'd experienced three more flops: Mr. Big, Ring Around Elizabeth, and Johnny Wisely. Quite understandably, he then steered clear of Broadway for over a decade, during which time he performed in Radio and early Television.

Sullivan made several dramatic appearances in Radio dramas during the early 1940s, but his first lead role was as the second Richard Rogue in the Summer 1947 run of Rogue's Gallery, for NBC. Sullivan followed his lead in Rogue's Gallery when he brought famous cartoonist Milt Caniff's beloved Steve Canyon comic strip to life in 1948's Steve Canyon radio program. 1949 found him in the role of Simon Templar, The Saint for two episodes. Sullivan continued to perform in straight dramatic roles on Radio until 1954.

Barry Sullivan's 1945 return to Broadway landed him a hit play, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, taking over the role of Barney Greenwald from Henry Fonda. Indeed, in 1955, Sullivan was nominated for a Best Actor - Single Performance Emmy Award in his reprise of the Barney Greenwald role on Ford Star Jubilee's The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial. Sullivan's last appearance on Broadway, was in the original Too Late the Phalarope (1956), which true to form, was also a flop.

Sullivan starred in movies with Joan Crawford, Loretta Young, and most of the forties and fifties leading ladies. Sullivan toured the US with Bette Davis in theatrical readings of the poetry of Carl Sandburg and starred opposite her in the 1951 film Payment on Demand.

Having wisely abandoned his Broadway career, Sullivan had made his commercial film debut in the western The Woman of the Town (1943). And while Sullivan never caught on as a lead, he excelled at supporting roles in which he could play tough, aggressive characters more apropos of his height, athleticism and physique. His most notable roles were as the lead in The Gangster (1947), as Tom Buchanan in the Alan Ladd version of The Great Gatsby (1949), and as movie director in The Bad and the Beautiful (1952). He continued acting in movies until 1977, rounding off a near 40-year movie career with an appearance in Oh, God! (1977). He continued occasional appearances on television until retiring in 1980. He was coaxed out of retirement for one last role, 1987's fittingly titled, The Last Straw.

Sullivan was a democratic party activist and a tireless advocate for the mentally disabled. Barry Sullivan died of a respiratory ailment on June 6, 1994 in Sherman Oaks, California. He was 81 years old.




Peter Leeds
(Eugor)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actor
(1917-1996)

Birthplace: Bayonne, New Jersey, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1941 Lux Radio Theatre
1943 Wings To Victory
1944 Wings Over the West
1945 Rogue's Gallery
1945 Theatre Of Romance
1946 Cavalcade Of America
1946 The Alan Young Show
1946 The Lucky Strike Program
1947 The Adventures Of the Saint
1947 Errand Of Mercy
1947 In Your Name
1948 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1948 Ellery Queen
1948 Let George Do It
1948 Diary Of Fate
1948 Hallmark Playhouse
1948 Guest Star
1948 Sealtest Variety Theatre
1948 Skippy Hollywood Theatre
1949 Sam Pilgrim's Progress
1949 The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe
1949 Prowl Car
1949 This Is Your FBI
1949 My Favorite Husband
1949 Our Miss Brooks
1949 Young Love
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1949 Rocky Jordan
1949 The Adventures Of Frank Race
1950 The Adventures Of Maisie
1950 Presenting Charles Boyer
1950 The Railroad Hour
1950 The Adventures Of Christopher London
1950 Night Beat
1950 Escape
1950 Sara's Private Caper
1950 Fibber McGee and Molly
1950 The New Adventures Of Nero Wolfe
1950 The Amazing Nero Wolfe
1951 The Magnificent Montague
1951 The Halls Ov Ivy
1951 The New Adventures Of Nero Wolfe
1951 The Amazing Nero Wolfe
1951 The Story Of Dr Kildare
1951 The Harold Peary Show
1951 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1951 The Man Called X
1951 The Railroad Hour
1951 The Whistler
1951 The Line-Up
1951 The Bickersons
1951 The Whisperer
1951 Mr Aladdin
1952 Stars Over Hollywood
1952 Suspense
1952 The Bob Hope Show
1952 Tales Of the Texas Rangers
1952 Gunsmoke
1952 Romance
1952 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1952 Broadway Is My Beat
1952 Dragnet
1953 Destination Blood Center
1953 My Friend Irma
1953 Dangerous Assignment
1953 The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show
1953 The Great Gildersleeve
1953 Wild Bill Hickok
1954 That's Rich
1954 Life With Luigi
1954 You Were There
1956 CBS Radio Workshop
1957 The Stan Freberg Show
1958 Heartbeat Theatre
1958 Frontier Gentleman
1958 Luke Slaughter Of Tombstone
1973 Hollywood Radio Theatre
1979 Sears Radio Theatre
1982 Nightfall
I Was A Communist For the FBI
The Hardy Family
Premier Performance
Douglas Of the World
Hollywood Sound Stage

Peter Leeds, ca. 1962
Peter Leeds, ca. 1962

Peter Leeds as a hopeless drunk in Dragnet, ca. 1954
Peter Leeds as a hopeless drunk in Dragnet, ca. 1954
Peter Leeds on TV, in TV, on TV in My Little Margie, ca 1954
Peter Leeds on TV, in TV, on TV in My Little Margie, ca 1954 .

Peter Leeds on the run from Boston Blackie, ca. 1953
Peter Leeds on the run from Boston Blackie, ca. 1953.

Leeds in Thriller, ca. 1960
Leeds in Thriller, ca. 1960

Leeds as a game show emcee in Leave it to Beaver (1959)
Leeds as a game show emcee in Leave it to Beaver (1959)


Leeds as a game show emcee in Leave it to Beaver (1959)
Leeds as a game show emcee in Leave it to Beaver (1959)


Leeds as a security guard in Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1957)
Leeds as a security guard in Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1957)

Peter Leeds as Lt. Sherman in Honey West (1965)
Peter Leeds as Lt. Sherman in Honey West (1965)

Peter Leeds as Lt. Coombs in Honey West (1965)
Peter Leeds as Lt. Coombs in Honey West (1965)

Peter Leeds as yet another (unnamed) Police Lieutenant in Honey West (1965)
Peter Leeds as yet another (unnamed) Police Lieutenant in Honey West (1965)

Peter Leeds singing 'Thanks for The Memories' with Bob Hope on USO Tour, 1962
Peter Leeds singing 'Thanks for The Memories' with Bob Hope on USO Tour, 1962

Leeds was awarded AFTRA's prestigious Gold AFTRA card for his many years of service to the Union
Leeds was awarded AFTRA's prestigious Gold AFTRA card for his many years of service to the Union.

We've observed elsewhere in these biographies, that some of the greatest character actors of the 2oth Century often disappear into obscurity. And even though ubiquitous throughout Radio, Television and Film, their very workman-like ethic and skill at their craft are the very traits that leave them all too often taken for granted. Peter Leeds was such a craftsman.

A native of Bayonne, New Jersey, Peter Leeds received his training at The Neighborhood Playhouse just across the Hudson. He debuted in Film with a bit part in Public Enemies (1941). Leeds broke into Radio in 1941, and from that day forward never stopped working until The Golden Age of Radio effectively ended. His career in radio spanned well over 3,000 appearances. Indeed his radiography in the RadioGOLDINdex is one of the longest in their database. Leeds' talent was by no means limited to Radio. Leeds was seen in 28 films between his debut in 1941 and his entry into Television in 1951. But Television is where Leeds posted a truly astonishing record of over 8,000 appearances over his fifty-year career as a character actor.

Clearly appreciated--and respected--by fellow actors and technicians alike, it's clear that none of his peers begrudged him his extraordinary success. Leeds' specialty, if one had to pin one down was as a straight man. Leeds worked with virtually every major comedian and comedienne in entertainment history in one medium or another. Having seen him in Film and Television and having heard hundreds of his Radio performances, we can attest to Leeds' impeccable timing, versatility and effectiveness. From comedy to radio noir to straight dramatic roles to action-adventure, we can vouch for Leeds' expert craftmanship. And so it should have been. Leeds was a character actor, and the consummate character actor, in the final analysis.

We grew up during the Golden Age of Television, and though I can't say I've seen all 8,000 of his Television performances, I can certainly say with great conviction that I know I've watched at least 1,000 of his performances on Television. I must also confess to having taken the vast majority of those performances for granted myself--until I began listening to his work in Radio. I had no understanding of either comedic or dramatic timing when I was younger. I just knew what made me laugh and what made me cry. Peter Leeds simply popped up in a Television role, performed his role seemingly effortlessly, then exited the scene. Simple, straightforward. No muss, no fuss. Impeccable. I had no informed appreciation then of the skill and craft I was witnessing.

Perhaps that's the magic of Radio. I grew up during the tail-end of The Golden Age of Radio. I listened to enough of it, to remember Peter Leeds' voice even though I never made the connection to the actor I watched on Television. That was his genius, and that was the perfection of his craft as an actor. And it's the wonderful imposed limitation of Radio that made me all the more aware of his talent in that medium than I had ever learned to appreciate in his Television roles. It's not counterintuitive at all, when you think about it. A Radio drama focuses one's attention on the spoken word, to the aural ambience, to the pace, the timing, and the ability of the actors and technicians to successfully draw you into their reality.

Peter Leeds was always brilliant in that respect. I've heard him as a gangster, a detective, a romeo, a dupe, a con-man, a killer, a rich wastrel, a drunk, a wrangler, a sheriff, and a corporate magnate. Indeed, I can't even begin to recount all of the roles I've heard him perform. And that's precisely what we do here--listen to Radio. We do it because we love it, and we love it because it's still a fascinating and compelling entertainment medium. When you listen to as much Golden Age Radio as we do, you can't help but keep picking up more and more nuances in the performances of your favorite voice talent. My particular favorites are the detective and crime genre programs. I didn't even have to glance at the Leeds' Radiography to know that I've heard him in every single major detective and crime genre program recorded from the 1940s through the end of The Golden Age of Radio.

He was everywhere. I can still recall the first time I watched him on Television. It was a Dragnet episode--from the orginal series--in which he brilliantly portrayed a drunk and a murderer who, once nabbed by Sgt. Friday, still couldn't bring himself to admit his guilt. I watched fascinated as he 'unpeeled' himself, layer by layer. Like peeling an onion, each thin new layer revealed a more resolute, matter-of-fact acknowledgement of his guilt--but only the most begrudgingly. Until finally--relieved to have fully exposed himself and his crime--he literally thanks Friday and his partner for catching up with him. This is not a new arc for a drama script by any means. Indeed it's been over-used in Television. But it's an arc that very few character actors can pull off as seamlessly, as deftly, and as convincingly as Peter Leeds could.

His comedic timing was probably even more appreciated than his straight dramatic talent. And again, I've watched him play off of Lucille Ball, Eve Arden, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Jack Benny, Jerry Lewis, Johnny Carson, etc, etc, etc. And yet again, the man's timing and effectiveness were always brilliant. Often forgettably so. Is that a contradiction in terms? Of course it is. But isnt' that precisely what he was selected to do? And he did it, and did it brilliantly. So brilliantly, in fact that it's been estimated that for as much as seven years, he logged more days acting than any other member of the Screen Actor's Guild. I have no reason to doubt that assertion.

Bob Hope specifically requested that Leeds accompany him on fourteen of his U.S.O. tours, both stateside and abroad, precisely because of Leeds' impeccable timing in sketch comedy. Leeds was a regular on Stan Freberg's radio show and on many of his records. And no less a talent than Johnny Carson adored him. Anyone who watched the Carson Show saw Peter Leeds in Johnny's sketch pieces again and again, from Carson's earliest years to his last.

One of his last appearances in Film was one that felt most poignant to me, personally. The 1987 Dragnet film seemed to go out of its way to cameo as many of the old Dragnet regulars as were still alive. And there was Peter Leeds. I felt every bit of my forty years of age at that point. That first memory I had of him in the original Dragnet, contrasted with the image of him in his 1987 cameo role . . . . It all came rushing back to me with that one cameo. The hundreds and thousands of character actors and extras that had passed before my eyes in Film and Television, and yet here was the one ubiquitous face in a crowd of great Television character actors, that I most recognized.

Thankfully Leeds' great talent hadn't gone unnoticed by his peers. During the 1970s, Leeds served for five years as the president of the Los Angeles chapter of AFTRA and later served on the actors' union's national and local Board of Directors. In 1992, AFTRA repaid his many years of service with its highest honor, The Gold AFTRA Card. Leeds later served on the Board of Governors for the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

Leeds succumbed to cancer on November 12, 1996, at the age of 79. As with many of his peers, we miss their presence among us, but we have only to listen to one of their thousands of Golden Age Radio performances to experience their genius all over again.



Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Rogue's Gallery