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Original Pat Novak . . . for Hire mp3 cover art

Gallenkamp's spot ad from October 27 1946

The Pat Novak for Hire Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Pat Novak . . . for Hire

Here's a bit better photo of lovely Marilyn Buferd who was the reigning Miss America for 1946 having been crowned in September of 1946
Here's a better photo of lovely Marilyn Buferd who was the reigning Miss America for 1946 having been crowned in September of 1946.

The Gallenkamp's Shoes brand was a popular California brand for over fifty years. The company was owned by a prominent San Francisco family
The Gallenkamp's Shoes brand was a popular California brand for over fifty years. The company was owned by a prominent San Francisco family. Gallenkamp's Shoes sponsored twenty-six of the earliest broadcasts of Pat Novak . . . for Hire

Pat Novak on the fairer sex:

"She sauntered in, moving slowly from side to side like 118 pounds of warm smoke."

"She walked with the nice easy swing of a satisfied leopard--and for a smaller leopard, she had pretty good spots too."

-- Dixie Gillian

"When I came in, she was sitting on the couch, drinking my whiskey. She could have all she wanted--a 1949 Panther model, just the right amount of size 12, in a dress that looked like a well-tailored fig leaf. When she was through looking you over, you felt like the Sunday supplement." -- Jack of Clubs

"Her hair was red, and her eyes were about as cold as rigor mortis. And you knew the first time you met her, you'd been seeing her too often."

"She had nice hair, and the dress helped too. It was dark blue and had a V-neck, but the designer believed in big letters."

"It was enough to tell me that she was as safe as a tap dancer on a floor full of dynamite caps."

"She was a fast five-gaited horse trying for seven."

--Rory Malone

"She stood leaning there for a minute, the sort of a girl who moves when she stands still. She had blonde hair. She was kind of pretty, except you could see somebody had used her badly--like a dictionary in a stupid family." --Father Leahy

"She turned and walked out of there. It was the kind of the walk that makes you flip the calendar and find out how far away Spring is."

"It was pretty dark, so when I bumped into her, all I got was a vague outline. . . She had a good-looking vague outline."

"I began to think about the .32 caliber pistol. It's a woman's weapon--well, that doesn't prove anything. So's a bread knife if she's in a bad mood."

"She was wearing black lounging pajamas, tied tight around her slim waist. She looked like a wasp with a nice sting."

--Fleet Lady

"She was in her 30s and pushing 40 hard enough to bruise it. But she looked good standing there in the doorway, long and lean enough to make a greyhound turn in his card. She was wearing green lounging pajamas, and you've seen bananas in looser skins."

"Her lips were a pale red color and moist enough to put a desert on its feet. And you could tell she thought she used them to talk when you got tired of everything else."

"When she said 'good luck', you knew she was just being polite and didn't mean it anymore than the hangmen when he tells you to watch your step."

--Shirt Mix-up At the Laundry

"I knocked at the door and when she opened it, I knew it was time to wire home for money--a tall blonde blister with lots of Fahrenheit." --Give Envelope to John St. John

Pat Novak on Inspector Helmann (Raymond Burr):

"Hellmann, you ought to rent an idiot. The heavy thinking's too much for you."

"You couldn't smell a rat in a basement full of cheese."

"You couldn't track down a live bear in a telephone booth."

"He was a tough, hard cop, with a heart big enough to hide behind a piece of birdseed."

"You couldn't hear a rifle shot in a boxcar."

"Hellmann stood there a moment and smiled, like a guy who's just killed a landlord."

Pat Novak on Jocko Madigan (Tudor Owen):

"I looked up the only honest guy I know, an ex-doctor and a boozer by the name of Jocko Madigan--a good man until he began to figure that the last drink in the bottle is just as easy to get as the first."

“Something made him decide that life was temporary, at best. Now he's got a permanent post on a barstool looking for answers at the bottom of whiskey bottles. It's hard on the liver that way, but you're never short on dreams."

"I looked up the only honest guy I know, an ex-doctor and a boozer by the name of Jocko Madigan, a good guy, but to him a hangover is the price of being sober."

Pat Novak on Life--and Death--in general:

"Around here a set of morals won't cause any more of a stir than Mother's Day in an orphanage. Maybe that's not good, but that's the way it is. And it wouldn't do any good to build a church down here, because some guy would muscle in and start cutting the wine with wood alcohol. All you can do is try to make the books balance--and the easiest way to do that is to keep one hand on your billfold and the other hand on somebody else's."

"Sooner or later you get burned, and it doesn't make any difference whether you're a man or a mouse. Because down in the waterfront, in San Francisco, they build the traps both ways... Down here, if you reach out to help a panhandler, the guy'll take your arm and hand you back the dime... I rent boats and deal any place that'll give a good trade-in on a second-hand soul."

"Some mornings you can't trust yourself with a razor."

"The street was deserted except for a couple of winos near the corner, trying to buy back 1926 at a dollar a jug."

"His head was over to one side, and his body was twisted over the other away--as if he couldn't make up his mind which direction to die in."

"The best trouble always looks good from the outside."

"The street was as deserted as a warm bottle of beer."

(. . . to be continued in our Johnny Madero, Pier 23 and Jeff Regan, Investigator articles)


KGO's original building on the grounds of a G.E. transformer factory at 5441 E. 14th Street in Oakland
KGO's original building on the grounds of a G.E. transformer factory at 5441 E. 14th Street in Oakland


The new NBC--KPO--KGO building on Taylor and O'Farrell Streets. Dubbed NBC Radio City upon its completion

The new NBC--KPO--KGO building onTaylor and O'Farrell Streets. Dubbed NBC Radio City upon its completion April 26, 1942, it was home to all three entities for several years. The name Radio City was soon sup-planted by NBC's Radio City in Hollywood. Most of NBC's productions of the 1940s and beyond were moved to Holly-wood's NBC Radio City and the spanking new NBC Radio City in San Francisco remain-ed mostly unused--and un-occupied--until 1967.

This was the ceramic tiled NBC Radio City mural over the entrance to NBC's new San Francisco facility
This was the ceramic tiled NBC Radio City mural over the entrance to NBC's new San Francisco facility. Designed by C.J. Fitzgerald, it's somewhat reminiscent of the magnificent art deco murals adorning the Radio City facility of NBC's RCA Building in New York City.


Jack Webb as Pat Novak

Raymond Burr as Inspector Helmann

Tudor Owen as Jocko Madigan

Fred Foy as Announcer

George Fenneman as Announcer


KECA's original studios on North Highland Avenue in Hollywood.
KECA's original studios on North Highland Avenue in Hollywood.

ABC/KECA's spanking new studios on Vine street, near Hollywood Blvd
ABC/KECA's spanking new 1949 studios on Vine street, near Hollywood Blvd.

Background

'Patsy Novak.' That's the original listing given to what eventually became one of Jack Webb, Richard Breen and William P. Rousseau's most popular brainchildren. One can only imagine that the newspapers were responding to an advance recording of the program--or perhaps that's the way that KGO and Rousseau teased it. The newspapers of the era referred to the program, variously, as Patsy Novak, Pat Novak Presents, Patsy Novak for Hire, Novak for Hire, then eventually, Pat Novak for Hire. The newspapers finally got it right once Gallenkamp Shoes began placing full-gutter ads at the beginning of the Comics section of the Oakland Tribune (see above) every weekend. While we're not absolutely certain that Miss America of 1946 actually listened to the series, we're taking it as an act of faith in Gallenkamp's Shoes that she did.

Marliyn Buferd, the recently crowned Miss America of 1946, was a U.C.L.A. graduate--as opposed to a Stanford or Berkeley grad--so she probably couldn't have heard any of the Pat Novak . . . for Hire broadcasts in the first place due to KGO's then only 7,500 watt transmitting power. In any case, since she'd have had only a few weeks to actually hear any of the Pat Novak . . . for Hire broadcasts, and since she was reportedly almost immediately off to Rome to study at the University of Berlitz for the Spring semester of 1947, we harbor some doubts as to the veracity of Gallenkamp's claims.

Gallenkamp Shoes had been caught up in a costly--and embarrassing--strike by the Department and Specialty Stores Salesmen's Union against 15 Oakland retail shoe stores, eight of which were owned by Gallenkamp Shoes. We know from an announcement placement in Broadcasting - Telecasting Magazine that Gallenkamp had signed up for sponsorship of a 52-week run of the Pat Novak . . . for Hire series, commencing on September 29th 1946. But at about the time of the employee strike and resultant bad press, Gallenkamp apparently pulled its sponsorship at the 26-week point, coming as it was on the heels of it's employee--and public relations--fiasco. (Were there too many puns in that sentence? We got a kick out of them, anyway.)

Be that as it may, Pat Novak . . . for Hire soon achieved great local popularity just about the time that Jack Webb bowed out of the production--only to reenter it as the newly re-launched Pat Novak . . . for Hire production for the 1949 season. Jack Webb and Dick Breen had been roomies together in San Francisco. Once they'd both hooked up with William P. Rousseau, the trio became responsible for some of the campiest--and most popular--local radio noir productions to originate from the West Coast.

We know that Jack Webb performed in the initial thirteen-episode order for Pat Novak . . . for Hire. He also appeared in at least five of the second order of thirteen episodes--he's heard in the circulating Episode No. 15, Dixie Gillian, broadcast on November 24, 1946. Also, up through that episode, Tudor Owen appeared as Jocko Madigan and John Galbraith was heard as Inspector Helmann. The point at which Jack Webb departed the initial production run of Pat Novak . . . for Hire is still a point of some conjecture.

It was at some point between the Dixie Gillian broadcast and April of 1947 that Jack Webb was putting together his own production of Johnny Madero, Pier 23--we're guessing that Webb's departure from the first run coincided with the departure of Gallenkamp Shoes as a sponsor. Our best guess at present is that Jack Webb left Pat Novak . . . for Hire after Episode 26.

Johnny Madero, Pier 23 ran from April to September 1947. Then, in 1948, Webb wrote for and starred in Jeff Regan, Detective, which ran from July 1948 to August 1950. Webb dropped out of Jeff Regan, Investigator in December of 1948 to reintroduce Pat Novak . . . for Hire for its 1949 run. Webb was simultaneously gearing up for his Dragnet program in 1949. Here's a summary of Webb's productions, both leading up to Pat Novak . . . for Hire's 1949 run and subsequent to Pat Novak:

October 1949 spot ad for Pat Novak for Hire over KGO

KGO-ABC Productions Begin End Webb Departs
The Little Man Inside 45-09-19 45-11-09 45-11-09
One Out of Seven 46-02-06 46-03-20 46-03-20
The Jack Webb Show 46-03-27 46-08-07 46-08-07
Spotlight Playhouse 46-06-06
Music for The Family 46-06-24 46-07-26
Pat Novak . . . for Hire 46-08-22 48-01-04 ??
Are These Our Children? 46-10-06
Murder and Mr. Malone 47-01-11 48-04-17 47-04-24
Hollywood Productions Begin End Webb Departs
Johnny Madero, Pier 23 47-04-24 47-09-04 47-09-04
Jeff Regan, Investigator 48-07-10 50-08-27 48-12-18
Pat Novak . . . for Hire 49-02-13 49-06-26 49-06-26
Dragnet 49-06-03 57-02-26 57-02-26
Pete Kelly's Blues 51-07-04 51-09-17 51-09-17

From the table above, it would appear that it was Dragnet that essentially ended the Pat Novak . . . for Hire-type franchise for good--not that Webb wasn't the consummate multi-tasker, as were his peers, Raymond Burr, William P. Rousseau, Richard Breen, and William Conrad during the same period. The extraordinary success of Dragnet, combined with Webb's total immersion in the project--while still finding time to mount his pet project for the summer of 1951, Pete Kelly's Blues--simply left no time to keep Pat Novak . . . for Hire running for another season or more.

Rumors of course abound as to the actual reasons behind the departure of Richard Breen, then Jack Webb, from the KGO production of Pat Novak . . . for Hire. Some of the more plausible and persuasive 'anecdotes' have it that Breen had become disenchanted with either KGO or ABC management at KGO and, after 24 broadcasts of Pat Novak . . . for Hire, decided to seek greener pastures and a potential Film deal down south in Hollywood. Jack Webb, arguably the more thoughtful and practical of the team, departed a day later, driving to L.A. to live with his Mom again in Santa Monica for a while. Webb, at least, apparently reasoned that as the production neared the twenty-six program mark, their incremental obligation was near the end in any case--to either KGO or Gallenkamp. Gallenkamp, for their part, terminated their sponsorship of the program either: a.) as a consequence of the departure of Breen and Webb, b.) having agreed to sponsor only the first twenty-six installments, or c.) due to an impromptu combination of both factors.

We're as yet unsure of the actual last broadcast of the first airing of Pat Novak . . . for Hire. The show that replaced it was Music By Adlam. When, exactly Pat Novak . . . for Hire ended and Music By Adlam began is still undetermined. We gather that when ABC finally pulled the plug on Pat Novak it was abrupt. It's no coincidence that the 'Adlam' in Music By Adlam was Basil 'Buzz' Adlam the music director for Pat Novak . . . for Hire. As best as we can determine, Pat Novak left the air between December 21, 1947 and January 4, 1948. Since it was already being transcribed, stations in Utah and Nevada were still airing it as late as January 11, 1948. We're stating, provisionally, that the first run of Pat Novak . . . for Hire left the air on December 21, 1947 until we learn otherwise. Our sense is that Basil Adlam either stepped forward to fill the spot, or was 'volunteered to fill the spot until a suitable replacement could be found. Buzz Adlam's various music programs ended up running for years in various formats.

As can also be seen in the table above, it was Webb's departure from CBS' Jeff Regan, Investigator that allowed him to relaunch Pat Novak . . . for Hire's 1949 season. By 1949 Jack Webb could do pretty much anything he set his mind to in Radio. With the amazing success of Dragnet over Radio, Webb subsequently launched Dragnet over Televsion--to equal success. Webb also found time to appear in the Film Classic, Sunset Boulevard in 1950.

The influential Webb--Breen--Rousseau Formula takes off

It goes without saying that the Webb, Breen, and Rousseau formula highly influenced the West Coast radio noir landscape for the latter half of the 1940s. Other similar productions of the era also tended to imitate the formula. Webb, Breen and Rousseau's only real initial limitation during the era was being based in San Francisco. The Hollywood network studios were simultaneously cranking out all manner of radio noir--or radio grise--gumshoe and crime dramas throughout the era:

The above list is by no means exhaustive. It's merely to point out the extraordinary saturation--and overlap--of such programming throughout the World War II years and the waning years of The Golden Age of Radio. We point out the competition to underscore the highly innovative early style of Jack Webb and his associates--a style that set them very much apart from the pack. Indeed, by the time Webb launched Dragnet, he'd all but abandoned the grittier, satirical, lampoonish elements of radio noir for the stark realism of his Dragnet productions.

It's not so much that Webb had lost his sense of humor or irony, as was amply displayed, tongue well in cheek, throughout his productions of the 1940s. It was more likely Webb's intrinsic idealism and respect for Law Enforcement in general that inspired him to mount Dragnet in the highly realistic docudrama manner which marked the entire franchise for the following thirty years of legendary success.

Webb and Breen were masters of the gumshoe patter and ubiquitous, antagonistic backchat between, and among, the denizens of big city crime--the paid civil servants, the criminals, and the private gumshoes. With Pat Novak . . . for Hire, Webb and Breen began to weave a brand of dialogue that had never before been heard on broadcast Radio of the era.

Their model was the growing body of Film portrayals of the darker, starker, more conflicted and tortured depictions of crime dramas of the era--the style ultimately coined 'film noir,' or 'black film.' Webb and Breen's rendition of such dialogue simply amped it up a notch--or several notches in many cases. The wonderfully novel written dialogue of Brett Halliday, Raymond Chandler, and Dashiell Hammett was some of the most colorful pulp dialogue that had ever been read--and subsequently depicted in Film. Webb's intimate familiarity with the Jazz world certainly served to inform his contributions to the dialogue.

The language was often coined, 'Chandleresque,' for its tone and grittiness. Its exaggeration and often tortured similes and street-wisened aphorisms were the most authentic depiction of the lingua franca of the underworld ever read--or heard--before. And it was that very common talk that continued to fascinate readers and Film audiences of the era. But Webb and Breen's translation of that language might well have been coined Webb-esque or Breen-esque from that point forward in radio noir. Many tried to emulate or imitate it, but it was the Webb--Breen--Rousseau combination that seemed to master it. It's far easier to simply illustrate some of the examples: (and even more down the sidebar to the left)

"She sauntered in, moving slowly from side to side like 118 pounds of warm smoke."

"She turned and walked out of there. It was the kind of the walk that makes you flip the calendar and find out how far away Spring is."

"It was pretty dark, so when I bumped into her, all I got was a vague outline. . . She had a good-looking vague outline."

"I began to think about the .32 caliber pistol. It's a woman's weapon--well, that doesn't prove anything. So's a bread knife if she's in a bad mood."

"She was wearing black lounging pajamas, tied tight around her slim waist. She looked like a wasp with a nice sting."

"Hellmann, you ought to rent an idiot. The heavy thinking's too much for you."

"You couldn't smell a rat in a basement full of cheese."

"You couldn't track down a live bear in a telephone booth."

"You couldn't hear a rifle shot in a boxcar."

"Hellmann stood there a moment and smiled--like a guy who's just killed a landlord."

"I looked up the only honest guy I know, an ex-doctor and a boozer by the name of Jocko Madigan--a good guy, but to him a hangover is the price of being sober."

"I looked up Jocko Madigan. He's a good guy, and he used to be a smart one, except he didn't like the San Francisco fog and worked out one of his own."

"Sooner or later you get burned, and it doesn't make any difference whether you're a man or a mouse. Because down on the waterfront, in San Francisco, they build the traps both ways. Down here, if you reach out to help a panhandler, the guy'll take your arm and hand you back the dime. I rent boats and deal any place that'll give a good trade-in on a second-hand soul."

(. . . to be continued in our Johnny Madero, Pier 23 and Jeff Regan, Investigator articles)

Webb and Breen reprised that brand of dialogue in Pete Kelly's Blues as well. Herb Margolis emulated much of that dialogue in Johnny Madero, Pier 23, and the brilliant dialogue writer, E. Jack Neuman added that same flavor to Webb's Jeff Regan, Investigator scripts for CBS. The closest non-Webb radio noir vehicle to capture that same brand of dialogue was the William P. Rousseau-produced run of The New Adventures of Michael Shayne. Indeed, Jack Webb made several repeat appearances in The New Adventures of Michael Shayne--as a police detective. Jeff Chandler, for his part, delivered the dialogue as faithfully as Jack Webb.

Greater Broadcast Power = Greater Audience . . . or not

It was a brilliant formula and an exponentially growing body of West Coast fans of Webb's dialogue eagerly anticipated each new Jack Webb Radio venture with increasing interest. But the key predicate in the preceding sentence was 'West Coast.'

Radio station KGO, the originator of Pat Novak . . . for Hire, was operating under a wartime freeze regarding any expansion of broadcast facilities. As late as 1946, KGO was still operating from the same General Electric plant, and the same 7,500 watt transmitter it had employed up through World War II. As soon as the freeze was lifted, KGO applied for--and the F.C.C. granted--permission to transmit at 50,000 watts. That was enough to reach from Washington and Oregon to Baja California and everywhere in between. KGO began broadcasting at 50,000 watts on December 1, 1947. Indeed, KGO proudly announced its spanking new 50,000 watt power output during its November 30, 1947 broadcast of Death in Herald Square.

Once a larger audience was able to pick up KGO's broadcasts, Webb's Bay Area productions exponentially reached more new fans. An even greater number of listeners could hear Webb's fascinating dialoque and delivery clear as a bell for the first time. Those were the mitigating factors.

The militating factor was KGO's new affiliation with the American Broadcasting Company. KGO was formerly part of NBC's Orange Network of West Coast affiliate stations. KGO had been NBC's Key station on the West Coast. The F.C.C.-instigated break-up of NBC's five networks of the preceding era--the Orange Network, the Red Network, the Blue Network, the Gold Network, and the White Network--was in response to NBC's growing monopolization of affiliate stations across the U.S. The ensuing consolidations essentially reduced NBC to two major networks--Red and Blue. (KGO, at the time, was part of the Western Blue Network, the Orange and Gold networks having been disbanded in the late 1930s.) It was the F.C.C.'s suit and the Justice Department-mandated break-up of Red and Blue that found the Blue Network sold to the then "Lifesavers King," Edward J. Noble and his Blue Network, Inc., which by 1946 became the American Broadcasting Company (ABC). Noble also purchased Earle C. Anthony's radio station, KECA a year later.

ABC was the 'new kid on the block' and still feeling its way in 1946. Once KGO got its new transmitter power it was still hampered by many of ABC's early missteps in competing with NBC--its closest competitor for the most part--in the Bay Area. But just as the Mutual Broadcasting System had managed to compete with NBC and CBS with a wealth of established, highly popular juvenile adventure and serial dramas of the late 1930s and 1940s, KGO soon became as much of a powerhouse for ABC as their Detroit flagship station, WXYZ. Compelling features like Pat Novak . . . for Hire and Johnny Madero, Pier 23, and their subsequent counter-programming strategies, their disc jockey format of the 1950s, and their later all-talk format of the 1960s and beyond served to set KGO apart and keep it highly competitive.

Pat Novak . . . for Hire gets a new lease on life

Any frustration that Jack Webb and company may have experienced with the growing pains of KGO under ABC might have been put to rest with the station's increased reach. But in the interim, Jack Webb's own star had continued to rise. As we indicated above, by the time Jack Webb and Bill Rousseau re-launched Pat Novak in 1949, Webb continued to triumph in Southern California as well. His recent success in CBS's Jeff Regan, Investigator, found Jack Webb with Dragnet production planning already underway (with NBC). His future--albeit tragically short-lived--Dragnet sidekick, Barton Yarborough had appeared as a recurring character with Webb in Jeff Regan, Investigator. Webb and company could easily have simply let Pat Novak . . . for Hire be. Pat Novak had been highly popular in the Bay area and KGO's reach was now second only to it's only real competitors, former sister stations, KPO and KNBC. The second time around, Pat Novak . . . for Hire would have reached ten times as many listeners as it had during its original run--if it continued to be broadcast from KGO.

The unfortunate common denominator in this whole series revival was the ABC Network, who, taking its cue from its former owners--NBC Blue--didn't believe in silly nonsense like promotional publicity, advance coordination with the print media, or strategically placed teasers about the program--not even in local Bay area newspapers. The unfortunate side effect of non-promotion was that new listeners to the program could only stumble across it on their Southern California, Utah, Arizona, Washington and Oregon radio dials. Jack Webb, in retrospect, would never make that mistake again for the remainder of his career.

The program's second debut aired on the night of the 13th of February, 1949, replacing a quiz program, "Go for The House." The new order for twenty-six scripts was some of the finest writing in the franchise's history. The ensemble cast consisted of Jack Webb, Tudor Owen, and Raymond Burr with occasional appearances by William Conrad. Jack Lewis also returned on at least one occasion to fill in for Tudor Owen as Jocko Madigan. It's clear that Webb's recent year of Jeff Regan portrayals continued to improve the crisp, snappy dialogue of Pat Novak . . . for Hire. The timing between Raymond Burr, Tudor Owen, and Jack Webb was becoming impeccable. The backchat, Owen's derisive assessments of 'Patsy' Novak, and Burr's catty digs at Pat Novak were now being delivered in almost staccato fashion.

For a program that aired only twenty times, the production experienced at least five different announcers, including the masterful Fred Foy and George Fenneman. It was Fenneman who best voiced the breathless:

"Ladies and Gentleman, The American Broadcasting Company brings, transcribed, to its entire network, Pat Novak . . . . . . . for Hire."

The original intro had been:

"Ladies and Gentleman, The American Broadcasting Company brings to its entire network, Pat Novak . . . . . . . for Hire."

Note the addition of 'transcribed' in the 1st intro above (from Dixie Gillian) and the original intro from Jack of Clubs. Clearly, by Episode No. 10 at least, Pat Novak . . . for Hire was being transcribed for later airing in different parts of the country. This was another shrewd move by ABC, Webb, and Rousseau, making it easier for more distant audiences to finally hear Pat Novak . . . for Hire.

As it turns out, the revival project was overtaken by events. In spite of KGO's new reach, the 1949 run of Pat Novak . . . for Hire was ultimately recorded in ABC's Hollywood studios--presumably either the old KECA studios on North Highland, or the spanking new ABC/KECA studios on Vine--or both. All of the announcers for the 1949 run can be heard announcing that the programs were recorded 'from Hollywood.'

The supporting casts for the Pat Novak revival were the equal of any talent previously heard on the program. It would also appear, from a closer listening to the recordings, that visiting artists entirely enjoyed the experience of appearing with the Pat Novak ensemble. Radio legends Parley Baer, Herb Butterfield, Vic Perrin, Frank Lovejoy, Ted De Corsia, Lillian Buyeff and Betty Lou Gerson made regular return visits to the short-lived revival.

Irrespective of Pat Novak's success, the die was cast by the Summer of 1949. Webb debuted Dragnet over Radio on June 3, 1949, beginning a series of an eventual 382 broadcasts over six years. Dragnet was a Southern California production and Pat Novak was now a Southern California production as well. After the move to Hollywood, the Bay area would never again originate Pat Novak. And once Dragnet was fully underway, Pat Novak didn't stand a chance of continuing beyond June 1949--not with Jack Webb in the lead, in any case. Pat Novak . . . for Hire without Jack Webb in the lead would have been a non-starter at that point in its popularity.

So it was that one of Radio's most influential programs--for its genre and time--finally ended in the Summer of 1949. But it didn't 'go gentle into that good night.' Pat Novak . . . for Hire had set the tone for virtually all of the remaining radio noir crime and detective genre programs that followed it, and it's influence was also felt in early Television as well. Jack Webb's snappy, staccato delivery continued to evolve throughout the Dragnet franchise, becoming a signature element of all of his productions from 1949 forward.

All told, for a program with only some twenty-three circulating exemplars out of an estimated script order of 104, Pat Novak . . . for Hire has become one of the Golden Age of Radio's most prized remnants. It's both historic for its introduction of Jack Webb's signature dialogue delivery and important for its further synthesis of the Chandleresque dialogue from the radio noir and film noir era.

Series Derivatives:

AFRS END-113 'Pat Novak'; Gallenkamp Shoe Show; Pat Novak Presents; Johnny Madero, Pier 23
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Crime Dramas
Network(s): ABC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 1946-48 Run: [Unknown]
1949 Run: 49-02-13 01
John Singer
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 1946-48 Run: 46-08-22 to 48-01-04; ABC [KGO]; Seventy-three, 30-minute programs; Thursdays, then Sundays
1949 Run: 49-02-13 to 49-06-25; ABC [KECA]; Twenty-six, 30-minute programs; Sundays, then Saturdays, then Sundays
Syndication: AFRTS
Sponsors: 1946-48 Run: Gallenkamp's Shoes
1949 Run:
Director(s): William P. Rousseau [Director/Producer]
Bill Johnson, Kan Manson [ABC Producers]
Principal Actors: 1946-48 Run: Ben Morris, John Galbraith, Jack Lewis, Herb Ellis, Mary Beth Milford, Henry Leff, Jerry Zinneman, Kurt Martell, Gerry Walters, Lucille Bliss, Dick Ellers, Ed MacDonald
1949 Run: Jack Webb, William Conrad, Tudor Owen, Carlisle Bibbers, Herb Butterfield, Betty Lou Gerson, Parley Baer, Yvonne Fahey, Tol Avery, Vic Perrin, Ted De Corsia, Frank Lovejoy, Lillian Buyeff
Recurring Character(s): 1946-48 Run: Jack Webb and Ben Morris as Pat Novak, John Galbraith as Inspector Helmann, Tudor Owen and Jack Lewis as Jocko Madigan
1949 Run: Jack Webb as Pat Novak, Raymond Burr as Inspector Helmann, Jack Lewis and Tudor Owen as Jocko Madigan
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s) 1946-48 Run: Alex Mason, Richard Breen
1949 Run: Richard Breen
Music Direction: 1946-48 Run: Otto Clair
1949 Run: Basil Adlam
Bud Tollifson, Wayne Kenworthy [Sound]
Norman Dewes [Engineer]
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): 1946-48 Run: Franklin Evans
1949 Run: Fred Foy, Raymond Burr, George Fenneman, Hal Gibney, William Conrad
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
1946-48 Run: 71
1949 Run: 20
Episodes in Circulation: 1946-48 Run: 5
1949 Run: 18
Total Episodes in Collection: 1946-48 Run: 5
1949 Run: 17
Provenances:
Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspaper listings. The least helpful and accurate were the Hickerson Guide contributions from Martin Grams.

We invite you to compare our fully provenanced research with the '1,500 expert researchers' at the OTRR and their Pat Novak for Hire log. We've provided a screen shot of their current log for comparison, HERE to protect our own further due diligence, content and intellectual property.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

  • The OTRR log (and others) fails to cite the correct premiere for the series. They cite Episode No. 7 as the premiere, with its move to Sundays.
  • Citations that the original run of Pat Novak for Hire originated from the KECA (ABC) studios in Los Angeles, versus the actual originating studio, KGO in Oakland. If, as widely misrepresented, the series originated in the KECA studios in Los Angeles, then it would have to have originated without Jack Webb. We find that assertion something of a stretch. Jack Webb wasn't even in Los Angeles until after he and Richard Breen departed San Francisco during the Spring of 1947.
  • Citations of the the title of Episode No. 7 of the KECA run as Joe Candono. The actual anecdotal title should be Joe Condano.
  • Citations of the the title of Episode No. 8 of the KECA run as Father Lahey. The actual anecdotal title is Father Leahy.
  • Citations of the the title of Episode No. 9 of the KECA run as Sam Tolliver. The actual anecdotal title is Shirt Mix-up At the Laundry.
  • Citations of the title of Episode No. 11 of the KECA run as Shirt Mix-up At the Laundry The actual anecdotal title is Sam Tolliver.
  • Citations of the title of Episode No. 18 of the KECA run as George Lampson The actual anecdotal title would be Georgie Lampson. Georgie Lampson is a female, not a male.

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We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







The Pat Novak for Hire Radio Program Log [1946-1947 Run]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
46-08-15
--
--
46-08-22
1
Title Unknown
N
[Program premiere, Thursdays at 9:30 p.m.; Replaces The Masters' Spotlight Playhouse]

46-08-22 Oakland Tribune
9:30 p.m. KGO--Patsy Novak
46-08-29
2
Title Unknown
N
46-08-29 Oakland Tribune
9:30 p.m. KGO--Patsy Novak
46-09-05
3
Title Unknown
N
46-09-05 Oakland Tribune
9:30 p.m. KGO--Patsy Novak
46-09-12
4
Title Unknown
N
46-09-12 Oakland Tribune
9:30 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak

46-09-12 News-Herald
0:00 to 10:00 P.M.
KGO--9:30, Patsy Novak

46-09-19
5
Title Unknown
N
46-09-19 Oakland Tribune
9:30 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak
46-09-26
6
Probable Preemption
N
46-09-26 Hayward Review
9:30 p.m. KGO--Patsy Novak for Hire

46-09-26 Oakland Tribune
9:30 p.m. KGO--
Football Prevue






46-09-29
1
Title Unknown
N
[Moves to Sundays at 8 p.m.; Begin Gallenkamp's Shoes sponsorship]

46-09-29 San Mateo Times
8:00 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak Presents
46-10-06
2
Title Unknown
N
46-10-05 San Mateo Times
8:00 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak Presents
46-10-13
3
Title Unknown
N
46-10-12 San Mateo Times
8:00 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak Presents

46-10-14 BROADCASTING - TELECASTING Magazine
DICK BREEN is writer-producer of the detective mystery series, "Pat Novak, for Hire," on ABC Pacific stations for Gallenkamp Stores [BROADCASTING, Sept 30]

GALLENKAMP STORES, San Francisco (retail chain), Sept. 29 for 52 weeks started "Patsy Novak" on 12 ABC Pacific stations, Sun. 8:30-9 p.m. (PST). Agency: Bruce Eldridge Adv., San Francisco.

46-10-20
4
Title Unknown
N
46-10-20 Long Beach Independent
8:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
46-10-27
5
Title Unknown
N
46-10-27 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-11-03
6
Title Unknown
N
46-11-03 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-11-10
7
Title Unknown
N
46-11-10 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-11-17
8
Title Unknown
N
46-11-17 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-11-24
9
Dixie Gillian
Y
46-11-24 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-12-01
10
Title Unknown
N
46-12-01 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-12-08
11
Title Unknown
N
46-12-08 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-12-15
12
Title Unknown
N
46-12-15 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-12-22
13
Title Unknown
N
46-12-22 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
46-12-29
14
Title Unknown
N
46-12-29 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-01-05
15
Title Unknown
N
47-01-05 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-01-12
16
Title Unknown
N
47-01-12 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-01-19
17
Title Unknown
N
47-01-19 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-01-26
18
Title Unknown
N
47-01-26 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-02-02
19
Title Unknown
N
47-02-02 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-02-09
20
Title Unknown
N
47-02-09 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire

47-02-13 Harrisburg Telegraph
Charley Brackett and Billy Wilder didn't waste any time after hearing the air show, "Pat Novak for Hire." Learning that Richard Breen writes it, they signed him pronto for their Paramount unit. Breen's dialog is out of this world.

47-02-16
21
Title Unknown
N
47-02-16 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-02-23
22
Title Unknown
N
47-02-23 Oakland Tribune
8:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-03-02
23
Title Unknown
N
47-03-02 Long Beach Independent
8:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-03-09
24
Title Unknown
N
47-03-09 Long Beach Independent
8:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-03-16
25
Title Unknown
N
47-03-16 Long Beach Independent
8:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-03-23
26
Title Unknown
N
47-03-23 Long Beach Independent
8:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak





47-03-30
1
Title Unknown
N
[End Gallenkamp's Shoes sponsorship.
Probable departure of Jack Webb from the series ;Moves to 9 p.m.]

47-03-30 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-04-06
2
Title Unknown
N
47-04-06 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-04-13
3
Title Unknown
N
47-04-13 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-04-20
4
Title Unknown
N
47-04-20 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-04-27
5
Title Unknown
N
47-04-27 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-05-04
6
Title Unknown
N
47-05-04 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-05-11
7
Title Unknown
N
47-05-11 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-05-18
8
Title Unknown
N
47-05-18 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-05-25
9
Title Unknown
N
47-05-25 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-06-01
10
Title Unknown
N
47-06-01 Long Beach Independent
9:00 p.m. KECA--Pat Novak
47-06-08
11
Title Unknown
N
47-06-08 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-06-15
12
Title Unknown
N
47-06-15 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-06-22
13
Title Unknown
N
47-06-22 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-06-29
14
Title Unknown
N
47-06-29 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-07-06
15
Title Unknown
N
47-07-06 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-07-13
16
Title Unknown
N
47-07-13 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-07-20
17
Title Unknown
N
47-07-20 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-07-27
18
Title Unknown
N
47-07-27 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-08-03
19
John Brown Gambling Ring
Y
47-08-02 San Mateo Times
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-08-10
20
The Mysterious Set of Books
Y
47-08-09 San Mateo Times
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-08-17
21
Title Unknown
N
47-08-17 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-08-24
22
Title Unknown
N
47-08-24 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-08-31
23
Title Unknown
N
47-08-31 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-09-07
24
Title Unknown
N
47-09-07 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-09-14
25
Title Unknown
N
47-09-14 San Mateo Times
9:00 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak
47-09-21
26
Title Unknown
N
47-09-21 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-09-28
27
Title Unknown
N
47-09-28 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-10-05
28
Title Unknown
N
47-10-05 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-10-12
29
Title Unknown
N
47-10-12 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-10-19
30
Title Unknown
N
47-10-19 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-10-26
31
Title Unknown
N
47-10-26 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-11-02
32
Title Unknown
N
47-11-02 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-11-09
33
Title Unknown
N
47-11-09 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-11-16
34
Title Unknown
N
47-11-16 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-11-23
35
The Lydia Reynolds Case
Y
47-11-23 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-11-30
36
Death in Herald Square
Y
47-11-30 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-12-07
37
Title Unknown
N
47-12-07 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-12-14
38
Title Unknown
N
47-12-14 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-12-21
39
Title Unknown
N
[Last Program]

47-12-20 San Mateo Times
9:00 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak

47-12-21 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Novak for Hire
47-12-28
--
--
47-12-27 San Mateo Times
9:00 p.m. KGO--Pat Novak

47-12-28 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Adams Music
48-01-04
--
--
48-01-04 Nevada State Journal
9:30 p.m. KWRN--Pat Novak

48-01-04 Ogden Standard-Examiner
1:30 p.m. KUTA--Pat Novak

48-01-04 Oakland Tribune
9:00 p.m. KGO--Adams Music
48-01-11
--
--
[Replaced by 'Music By Adlam']





The Pat Novak for Hire Radio Program Log [1949 Run]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
49-02-13
--
--
49-02-13
1
John Singer
N
[Hollywood run from KECA Studios]

49-02-13 Long Beach Press-Telegram

Mystery Show
Starts Sunday

Beginning Sunday at 6 to 6:30 p. m. over ABC, KWNO AM and PM, Go for the House will be replaced by Pat Novak for Hire, a mystery-adventure tale with special handling. The show takes Its pitch from the eerie sound of the San Francisco water front, fog horns, underworld whispers and stealthy footsteps in dark alleyways.
Jack Webb, with his years of radio experience, takes the part of Pat Novak, the tough, cynical, but charming guy who has the amazing talent for finding beautiful women and murder walking hand in hand!!

49-02-13 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:00-KECA-Pat Novak

49-02-20
2
The Jack of Clubs
Y
49-02-20 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:00-KECA-Pat Novak does a double take when he discovers somebody has deposited $1000 to his bank account. He discovers that it was done by a "dame" named "Connie ' . . . then the script becomes more murderful than mirthful. The patter In this show is amusing.

George Fenneman announces
2nd in the series and welcomes KARM, Fresno to ABC

KARM, Fresno logo 1949

49-02-27
3
Marcia Halpern
Y
49-02-27 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:00-KECA-Pat Novak

William Conrad announces
3rd in the series
49-03-06
4
Fleet Lady
Y
49-03-06 The Anniston Star
It's WHMA-WHMA-FM for "Pat Novak For Hire." tonight at 6 o'-clock.


Fred Foy announces
4th in series
49-03-13
5
Reuben Callaway's Pictures
Y
49-03-13 The Anniston Star
Exceeding even the fondest hopes as an audience builder for ABC is "Pat Novak For Hire the sensational mystery vehicle with a different touch, which is heard each Sunday night at 6 o'clock. Tonight, trouble descends when he pulls one man out of the water and finds him shot Before
it is all over, Novak meets up with a sound heating and wonders who administered same. It's WHMA-WHMA-FM for "Pat Novak For Hire." tonight at 6 o'-clock.


Hal Gibney announces
5th in series
49-03-20
6
Rory Malone
Y
49-03-20 The Anniston Star
Pat Novak discovers that all the fighting in a championship bout doesn't necessarily occur in the ring itself when he becomes involved in a fight "Fix" that results in murdering of a participant when he broadcasts his Pat Novak For Hire" mystery drama tonight at 6 o'clock.


Raymond Burr announces
6th in series
49-03-27
7
Joe Condano
N
49-03-27 The Anniston Star
When a woman hires him to pay off her brother's I. O. U. to a notorious gambler, Pat Novak discovers that there is more than money in such things. In fact, he learns that sometimes murder goes hand-ln-hand with such transactions. It all comes about during the broadcast of "Pat Novak For Hire" tonight at 6 o'-clock over WHMA and WHMA-FM.

[AFRS Only}
49-04-02
8
Father Leahy
Y
[Moves to Saturdays]

49-04-02 Reno Evening Gazette
PAT NOVAK FOR HIRE, the mystery-adventure thriller starring Jack Webb and featuring Raymond Burr and Tudor Owen, switches to a new time of 9.00 p m. starting with tonight's broadcast. For the initial broadcast at the new time, Novak becomes involved in an unusual murder case when a certain priest engages him to deliver a paroled convict to him. Many complications are in store for Pat Novak and the listeners in this thrilling half hour adventure

49-04-02 Chicago Daily Tribune
9:30-WCFL-Pat Novak for Hire

a.k.a Escape from Prison, Joe Feldman
49-04-09
9
Shirt Mix-up At the Laundry
Y
49-04-09 The Anniston Star
Another super murder thriller will be aired on "Pat Novak For Hire," which will be broadcast tomorrow night at 8:30 o'clock. Here is the kind of mystery that will appeal to all ages as the sharp-tongued Novak crosses wits with every type criminal in the book. There's mystery, intrigue, romance all involved in every broadcast of "Pat Novak For Hire," heard over WHMA-WHMA-FM Saturday night at 8:30 o'clock.
49-04-16
10
Dixie Gillian
Y
49-04-16 The Anniston Star
8:30--Pat Novak (WHMA-WHMA-FM)

George Fenneman announces
10th in the series
49-04-23
11
Sam Toliver
Y
49-04-22 The Anniston Star
Giving assistance to an old acquaintance can have tremendous coomplications. Pat Novak learns when he is requested to pursue a mysterious package on tomorrow night's broadcast of "Pat Novak For Hire" which is heard over WHMA and WHMA-FM at 8:30 p.m. The complications in this case prove to be murder when Novak's friend, Sam Toliver, asks him to retrieve a package from a boat in San Francisco Harbor. Everybody listens to "Pat Novak For Hire" Saturday evenings at 8:30 o'clock.
49-05-01
12
Rita Malloy
Y
[Moves back to Sundays]

49-04-30 Hayward Daily Review
9:30--KGO--Pat Novak for Hire

49-05-01 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:30 PM.KECA—Fast-talking Pat Novak gets involved with a fast talking client and more murder on the seansational "Pat Novak for Hire." Here's a guy that you'll have to really follow if you want to be in on the payoff.
49-05-08
13
Wendy Morris
N
[AFRS Only}
49-05-07 San Mateo Times
9:30--KGO--Pat Novak
49-05-15
14
Geranium Plant
Y
49-05-14 San Mateo Times
9:30--KGO--Pat Novak
49-05-22
15
Give Envelope to John St. John
Y
49-05-21 San Mateo Times
9:30--KGO--Pat Novak

49-05-22 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:30 KECA --A hit-and-run incident, which causes the death of a man, puts Pat Novak on the trail of another man, which leads to the solution of an underground problem.
49-05-29
16
Lola Madden
N
[Provenanced by original sponsor's copy of script, dated May 28th]

49-05-28 San Mateo Times
9:30--KGO--Pat Novak

49-05-29 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:30 KECA--Pat Novak

49-06-05
17
Agnes Bolton
N
[AFRS Only; Provenanced by original sponsor's copy of script, dated June 5th]

49-06-05 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:30 KECA--Pat Novak

49-06-12
18
Georgie Lampson
Y
49-06-12 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:30 KECA--Pat Novak

49-06-18
19
Joe Dineen
Y
[Provenanced by original sponsor's copy of script, dated June 18th]

49-06-18 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 7:00 Pat Novak for Hire

49-06-18 New York Times
8:00-WJZ--Drama. Pat Novak for Hire
49-06-19
19
Joe Dineen
N
49-06-19 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:30 KECA--Pat Novak

49-06-26
20
Little Jake Siegel
Y
[Last Program -- Clipped close]

49-06-26 Long Beach Press-Telegram
9:30 KECA--Pat Novak

49-07-02
21
Title Unknown
N
47-09-02 The Daily Mail
Sunday
Also theses changes: Tonight--ABC 8 Buzz Adlam's Playroom, guest solists, for 'Pat Novak,' changing time.

49-07-09
22
Title Unknown
N
49-07-16
23
Title Unknown
N
49-07-23
24
Title Unknown
N
49-07-30
--
--





AFRS END-113 'Pat Novak' Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
49-03-13 Reuben Callaway's Pictures
Y
49-03-27 Joe Condano
Y
49-04-02 Father Leahy
Y
49-04-09 Shirt Mix-Up at the Dry Cleaners
Y
49-04-23 Sam Toliver
Y
49-05-01 Rita Malloy
Y
49-05-08 Wendy Morris
Y
49-05-15 Geranium Plant
Y
49-05-22 Give Envelope to John St John
Y
49-06-05 Agnes Bolton
Y






The Pat Novak for Hire Radio Program Biographies




John Randolph 'Jack' Webb
(Pat 'Patsy' Novak)

Radio, Stage, Screen and Television Actor, Radio Disc Jockey, Recording Artist, Producer, Director, and Writer
(1920-1982)

Birthplace: Santa Monica, CA

Education: Belmont High School, Los Angeles, CA

Radiography:

1945 The Little Man Inside
1946 Spotlight Playhouse
1946 The Jack Webb Show
1946 Music for the Family
1946 Are These Our Children?
1946 One Out of Seven
1947 The New Adventures Of Michael Shayne
1947 Johnny Madero, Pier 23
1947 Suspense
1948 Murder and Mr Malone
1948 Escape
1948 The Whistler
1948 Ellery Queen
1948 Jeff Regan, Investigator
1948 Errand Of Mercy
1948 Guest Star
1948 The Anacin Hollywood Star Theatre
1949 Three For Adventure
1949 Pat Novak For Hire
1949 Dragnet
1949 The Adventures Of Sam Spade
1950 Family Theatre
1950 Night Beat
1950 The Story Of Dr Kildare
1951 Pete Kelly's Blues
1953 The Martin and Lewis Show
1953 The Bob Hope Show
1959 Hollywood Salutes the National Guard
1963 Weekend Sound Flights
1969 The Charlie Greer Show
1969 Special Delivery: Vietnam
Three For Adventure

Mark VII, Limited Productions:

Mark VII Logo, 1953

1951-1959 Dragnet
1956-1957 Noah's Ark
1959 The D.A.'s Man
1959 Pete Kelly's Blues
1962-1963 General Electric 'TRUE'
1967-1970 Dragnet
1968-1975 Adam-12
1971-1972 The D.A.
1971-1972 O'Hara, U.S. Treasury
1972-1979 Emergency!
1972-1974 Hec Ramsey
1973 Escape
1973-1974 Chase
1974 Sierra
1975 Mobile One
1978-1979 Project UFO


August 16, 1951 Article on Jack Webb's Work Ethic
August 16, 1951 Article on Jack Webb's Work Ethic


Jack Webb ca. 1955
Jack Webb ca. 1955

Jack Webb (lower right) at Belmont High School ca. 1938
Jack Webb (lower right) at Belmont High School ca. 1938

Jack Webb ca. 1948
Jack Webb ca. 1948

Jack Webb as Joe Friday, ca. 1951
Jack Webb as Joe Friday ca. 1951

Jack Webb, providing direction to Ella Fitzgerald, ca 1954
Jack Webb, providing direction to Ella Fitzgerald, ca 1954

Jack Webb and first wife famed Jazz songstress, Julie London ca 1955
Jack Webb and first wife famed Jazz songstress, Julie London ca 1955

Jack Webb at home with his first daughter, Stacey ca. 1953
Jack Webb at home with his first daughter, Stacey ca. 1953

Jack Webb, reading a script on set, ca 1953
Jack Webb, reading a script on set, ca. 1953

Webb, with Peggy Lee and George Jessel at 1953 Cerebral Palsy Fund Raiser
Webb, with Peggy Lee and George Jessel at 1953 Cerebral Palsy Fund Raiser

Ben Alexander and Jack Webb confer in the Radio studio for Dragnet, ca. 1953

Ben Alexander and Jack Webb confer in the Radio studio for Dragnet, ca. 1953

Jack Webb, resting on a lighting board for the production set of Pete Kelly's Blues, ca. 1955
Jack Webb, resting on a lighting board for the production set of Pete Kelly's Blues, ca. 1955

Jack Webb, ca. 1965
Jack Webb, ca. 1965
Born in Santa Monica, California, on April 2, 1920, Jack Webb's father had already left home before his birth and Jack Webb would never know him. John Randolph Webb was raised by his mother and maternal grandmother amidst the poverty immediately preceding the Great Depression.

To make matters worse, Webb suffered from acute asthma from the age of six until his death, despite a cigarette intake that often reached three packs a day throughout his adulthood. Even as a young man, Jack Webb's great passion was movies, and he dreamed of one day directing them. His other passion--Jazz, was the gift of an ex-jazz performer who lived in Webb's Bunker Hill, L.A. apartment building. He gave Webb an LP of the legendary Bix Beiderbecke, the first of over 6,000 jazz recordings Jack Webb would collect over his lifetime.

Jack Webb served in the U.S. Army Air Forces as a crewmember of a B-26 Marauder medium bomber during World War II. Upon receiving his discharge, he relocated to San Francisco, working first as a late night disc jockey, then starring in his own radio show, The Jack Webb Show (1946), a half-hour comedy that aired on the West Coast over ABC Radio.

His first acting roles in Radio were in San Francisco-based Monte Masters' Spotlight Playhouse (1946) performing with Masters' wife Natalie Park (later of Candy Matson fame), 1947's The New Adventures of Michael Shayne, and his own Johnny Madero, Pier 23. He would later spin off his Johnny Madero character into Pat Novak for Hire and Jeff Regan, Detective before he refined his crime drama sights to the more realistic and subdued Joe Friday character in Dragnet. Most notable--and personal--of his early projects was One Out of Seven (1946) in which Webb performed all the voices, attacking many social ills of the era, including race prejudice, corrupt politicians, and Red-baiting.

Jack Webb had an extraordinary ear for the 'throwaway line' most often associated with the work of Raymond Chandler. But it was Webb's genius for drolly and cynically delivering those Chandleresque lines, that made every radio program he recorded during that era some of the most often revisited recordings among Golden Age Radio collectors. Nevermind the fact that he was bouncing those memorable, hard-boiled retorts off of the likes of Raymond Burr, William Conrad, Wilms Herbert, Tudor Owen, Herb Butterfield--and yes, even the famous Carlisle Bibbers. Webb's influence continued throughout most of the radio noir genre detective and crime dramas that followed, even though Webb's own Joe Friday character never uttered a Chandleresque line himself during any of the iterations of Dragnet that followed.

Indeed it was a small role as a crime lab technician in the film noir classic He Walked by Night (1948) that led him to the creation of "Dragnet." Dragnet first aired over NBC radio on June 3, 1949, and moved to TV ("Dragnet" (1951)) on December 16, 1951, where it ran until September 1959. Webb also appeared in the famous Billy Wilder film, Sunset Boulevard (1950) as William Holden's energetic best friend. But it was the influence of the gritty, hyper-realistic He Walked By Night, that linked Webb to Detective Sergeant Marty Wynn of the Los Angeles Police Department. Wynn was a technical consultant for He Walked By Night, and with Wynn's assistance--and entre to legendary LAPD Chief William H. Parker--that Webb mapped out the pains-taking, hyper-realistic model for Dragnet.

Dragnet's ground-breaking influence was being felt in both Radio and Television. Webb's star continued rising fast, and the 1950s saw him become a film director, directing (and starring in) five features: Dragnet (1954), Pete Kelly's Blues (1955), The D.I. (1957), -30- (1959), and The Last Time I Saw Archie (1961). Webb's famous--or infamous--attention to the minutest details made him a natural behind the camera, but his last two directorial outings were box office flops.

Jack Webb's personal life was also arcing from the mid-1940s through the 1950s. He met and married beautiful Jazz songstress and actress Julie London, in 1947. The couple had two daughters, Stacey (1950) and Alisa (1952) and Webb was a doting father, albeit greatly compromised for quality time throughout what came to be the most active and demanding years of his professional life.

The compromises inevitably took their toll, and the couple divorced in 1953. Webb would marry three more times during his life; to Dorothy Towne (2 years), Jackie Loughery (6 years), and Opal Wright (2 years). After his divorce from Jackie Loughery in 1964, Webb would remain single until he married Opal Wright in 1980, just two years before his sudden heart attack just before Christmas of 1982.

Webb's return to Television in 1962 led to his appointment as Head of Production for Warner Bros. Television in February 1963. Webb had taken over from William T. Orr as executive producer of the hit ABC detective series 77 Sunset Strip (1958). Webb demanded wholesale changes in the program, retaining only Efrem Zimbalist, Jr., in the role of Stuart Bailey from the previous rotating ensemble cast of Zimbalist, Ed Byrnes, Roger Smith, Louis Quinn, Jaqueline Beer, and Richard Long. The result was a predictable disaster. Its ratings plummeted, and Warner Bros. canceled the Webb-helmed series midway into its sixth season. Apart from the poor box office showing of Webb's two previous films, Webb's reputation as one of Hollywood's wunderkind had continued to rise. The loss of his position with Warner Bros. was the first significant stumble of Webb's career

Following two years of unemployment--and reflection, Universal Studios invited Webb to do a new Dragnet as a TV movie. The result so pleased NBC and Universal that they offered Webb a new Dragnet series--Dragnet 1967. The new, updated series was an almost instant hit, and Dragnet 1967 ran for three seasons, followed by over ten years in syndication. Webb leveraged Dragnet 1967's success into a second hit, Adam-12 (1968), which gave both Jack Webb and his Mark VII, Limited production company a new lease on life. Webb's success developing new television programs with Mark VII continued through the 1970s, right up until the time of his unexpected passing in 1982. Webb's daughter Stacy tragically died in an automobile accident in 1996.

Jack Webb was a tireless champion of both social justice and the peace officers he so respected throughout his adult life. Jack Webb's mark in Radio influenced hundreds of other productions throughout the 1940s and 1950s. His influence on Television is felt to this day.

But for his Radio fans, his body of work--and its far-reaching influence--carries on, generation after generation through the magic of The Golden Age of Radio and the wonderful recordings we've managed to preserve from the era.

Rest In Peace, Detective Sergeant Friday




William Conrad [William Cann]
(Announcer, Performer)

Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor, Director, Producer, Narrator
(1920-1994)

Birthplace: Louisville, Kentucky

Radiography:

1944 The Whistler
1945 Destination Tomorrow
1946 Dark Venture
1946 Strange Wills
1946 I Deal In Crime
1946 Favorite Story
1946 Cavalcade Of America
1946 Meet Miss Sherlock
1947 Voyage Of the Scarlet Queen
1947 The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe
1947 Johnny Madero, Pier 23
1947 Mr President
1947 Escape
1947 Lux Radio Theatre
1947 Shorty Bell, Cub Reporter
1948 The New Adventures Of Michael Shayne
1948 Damon Runyon Theatre
1948 The First Nighter Program
1948 Ellery Queen
1948 The Adventures Of Sam Spade
1948 Let George Do It
1948 Jeff Regan, Investigator
1948 Hallmark Playhouse
1948 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1948 Prudential Family Hour Of Stars
1948 Command Performance
1948 Hawk Larabee
1949 Pat Novak For Hire
1949 Our Miss Brooks
1949 This Is Your FBI
1949 Hollywood Mystery Playhouse
1949 Rocky Jordan
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1949 Box Thirteen
1949 The Green Lama
1949 Dangerous Assignment
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 Four Star Playhouse
1949 The Adventures Of the Saint
1949 The Count Of Monte Cristo
1950 Dragnet
1950 The Halls Of Ivy
1950 The Adventures Of Frank Race
1950 Night Beat
1950 Rocky Jordan
1950 T-Man
1950 Philip Morris Playhouse
1950 The Adventures Of Sam Spade
1950 The Story Of Dr Kildare
1950 Romance
1950 Broadway Is My Beat
1950 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1951 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 The Man Called X
1951 Tales Of the Texas Rangers
1951 Pete Kelly's Blues
1951 Mr I.A. Moto
1951 The Silent Men
1951 The Railroad Hour
1952 Gunsmoke
1952 Stars Over Hollywood
1952 The Line-Up
1952 Jason and the Golden Fleece
1952 Tums Hollywood Theatre
1953 Bakers' Theatre Of Stars
1953 The Six-Shooter
1953 Crime Classics
1953 On Stage
1953 Hallmark Hall Of Fame
1953 Fibber McGee and Molly
1954 High Adventure
1955 The Adventures Of Captain Courage
1955 I Was A Communist For the FBI
1955 Mystery Theatre
1956 The Key
1956 CBS Radio Workshop
1958 Heartbeat Theatre
Bold Venture
The Clock
Secret Mission
The Roy Rogers Show
The Pendleton Story
The Adventures Of Maisie
At Ease
Safari
Obsession
Peril

William Conrad, ca. 1943
William Conrad, ca. 1943

William Conrad in Killers (1947)
William Conrad in Killers (1947)

William Conrad as Matt Dillon, ca. 1953 (Courtesy of Harry Bartell)
William Conrad as Matt Dillon, ca. 1953 (Courtesy of Harry Bartell)
William Conrad, for ABC, ca. 1957
William Conrad, for ABC, ca. 1957

William Conrad and Jack Webb, in Webb's Film --30-- (1959)
William Conrad and Jack Webb, in Webb's Film, --30-- (1959)

Conrad in Cannon publcity still, ca 1971
Conrad in Cannon publicity still, ca 1971
Bill Conrad, ca. 1972
Bill Conrad, ca. 1972
William Conrad was born William Cann in Louisville, Kentucky. He started work in radio in the late 1930s in California. During World War II, Conrad served as a fighter pilot. He returned to the airwaves after the war, going on to accumulate over 7,000 roles in radio-by his own estimate. We can attest to at least 2,000--Conrad had been a fighter pilot, after all.

Conrad's deep, resonant voice led to a number of noteworthy roles in radio drama, most prominently his role as the original Marshal Matt Dillon on the Western program Gunsmoke (1952–1961). For the Gunsmoke purists, we'd remind them that the two actors that technically preceded Conrad in the role--Rye Billsbury and Howard Culver--auditioned as Mark Dillon, not Matt Dillon.

He was considered for the Television role of Matt Dillon when the series was brought to the small screen in 1955, but increasing obesity led to the casting of James Arness instead. As it turned out, relatively few of the other cast members were cast in the TV version.

Other radio programs to which Conrad contributed his talents included
The Whistler, Strange Wills, The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, Johnny Madero, Pier 23, The New Adventures of Michael Shayne, Ellery Queen, The Adventures of Sam Spade, Jeff Regan, Investigator, Let George Do It, Pat Novak for Hire, Escape!, Suspense and The Damon Runyon Theater. One particularly memorable radio role was his breathtaking performance in "Leinengen Vs. The Ants" first heard in the January 14, 1948 broadcast of Escape!, and in a later rendition in the August 25, 1957 Suspense broadcast of "Leinengen Vs. The Ants." Conrad, of course was also memorable as the 'voice' of Escape!.

Conrad's long association with Jack Webb produced some of radio noir's most memorable moments as well. Conrad was heard in every Jack Webb production he ever mounted, and the chemistry between the two of them is one of radio's greatest pairings. From Johnny Madero, Pier 23, to Dragnet--and beyond, the verbal interplay between Conrad and Webb always made for fascinating radio--and Film.

Conrad's possessed an amazing gift for creating bone-chilling Radio characterizations of a seemingly endless array of toughs, gangsters, hard-boiled cops, corporate magnates, and hundreds of other commanding, self-assured, scoundrels and heroes alike. Those roles created a Radio following for him rarely equalled in Radio History. He was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 1997.

Among Conrad's various film roles, where he was usually cast as threatening figures, perhaps his most notable role was his first credited one, as one of the gunmen sent to eliminate
Burt Lancaster in the 1946 film The Killers. He also appeared in Body and Soul (1947), Sorry, Wrong Number and Joan of Arc (1948), and The Naked Jungle (1954). And again, his characterizations of tough guys, aided by his amazing deep baritone and chillingly authoritative presence made for some of Film Noir's most enduring depictions.

Conrad moved to television in the 1960s, first guest-starring in NBC's science fiction series The Man and the Challenge. Conrad guest-starred--and directed-episodes of ABC's crime drama Target: The Corruptors! (1962). Indeed, both Conrad and the legendary Sam Peckinpah directed episodes of NBC's Klondike (1960–1961). He returned to voice work, most notably as narrator of The Fugitive (1963–1967) and as the director of Brainstorm (1965).

Conrad is as fondly remembered for his voice work in Animation. He narrated the animated Rocky and Bullwinkle series from 1959–64 (as "Bill Conrad"), and later performed the role of Denethor in the animated Television version of J. R. R. Tolkien's The Return of the King (1980).

The 1970s brought him further small-screen success with leading roles in Cannon (1971-1976), Nero Wolfe (1981) and Jake and The Fat Man (1987-1990). Conrad was also the on-camera spokesman for First Alert fire prevention products for many years, as well as Hai Karate men's cologne.

Conrad's credits as a director include episodes of The Rifleman, Bat Masterson, Route 66, Have Gun, Will Travel, and 77 Sunset Strip, among others, and feature films such as Two on a Guillotine.

Conrad had one son, Christopher, with his first wife, Susie. When Susie died after thirty years of marriage, Conrad married Tippy Stringer Huntley, a graduate of the University of Maryland at College Park and widow of famed former NBC newscaster Chet Huntley.

Conrad died from congestive heart failure on February 11, 1994, in Los Angeles, California. He is interred at Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills Cemetery in the Lincoln Terrace.




Raymond William Stacey Burr
(
Inspector Helmann)
(1917-1993)
Actor, Producer, Director, Vintner

Birthplace:
New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada

Radiography:
1947
Favorite Story
1948
Suspense
1949
Screen Director's Playhouse
1949
Pat Novak For Hire
1949
Dragnet
1949
Family Theatre
1950
This Is the Story
1950
Presenting Charles Boyer
1950
Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1950
The Story Of Dr Kildare
1950
The Line-Up
1951
The Pendleton Story
1951
Escape
1951
The Silent Men
1951
Hallmark Playhouse
1952
The Whistler
1952
Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1952
Night Beat
1952
Dangerous Assignment
1952
Errand Of Mercy
1953
Bud's Bandwagon
1953
The Railroad Hour
1953
Hallmark Hall Of Fame
1953
Romance
1954
Rocky Fortune
1956
Fort Laramie
1956
CBS Radio Workshop
1961
The Jack Benny Program
1969
Special Delivery: Vietnam

The New Adventures Of Michael Shayne
Words With Music
Hollywood Calling

Raymond Burr c. 1939
Raymond Burr c. 1939
Raymond Burr c. 1942
Raymond Burr c. 1942
Raymond Burr c. 1943
Raymond Burr c. 1943
Raymond Burr c. 1945
Raymond Burr c. 1945
Raymond Burr c. 1954
Raymond Burr c. 1954
Raymond Burr aboard the U.S.S. Repose a Vietnam War era Hospital Ship c. 1969
Raymond Burr aboard the U.S.S. Repose a Vietnam War era Hospital Ship c. 1969
Raymond Burr Vintners Label
Raymond Burr Vintners Label
Raymond William Stacey Burr was born on May 21, 1917 in New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada. His father, William Johnston Burr (1889-1985), was an Irish hardware salesman from County Cork, Ireland, and his mother, Minerva Smith (1892-1974), was a concert pianist and music teacher who had emigrated to Canada from Chicago. Raymond Burr later spent part of his childhood in China where his father worked as a trade agent.

Following his parents' divorce, Burr moved to Vallejo, California with his mother, younger sister, and brother. By the age of 18, Burr was working as a ranch hand and photo salesman, in an effort to help support his mother, sister and brother. Burr enlisted in The Navy, and after only two years he was wounded in the stomach on Okinawa, effectively terminating his Navy service. He was processed-out back to California.

In 1937 Burr began his acting career at the Pasadena Playhouse. By 1941, he'd landed his first Broadway role in Crazy with the Heart. Upon returning from his Navy service, he became a contract player at RKO Studios, playing mostly villains, and had roles in over 60 movies between 1946 and 1957. Burr received favorable notice for his role as a prosecutor in A Place in the Sun (1951), co-starring Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift, but his best-known role of the period was in the Alfred Hitchcock classic Rear Window (1954), starring
James Stewart and Grace Kelly.

It was during the late 1940s and early 1950s that Raymond Burr's distinctive voice and delivery was first enjoyed by an exponentially growing community of Radio fans. While performing in several straight drama roles, Burr's friendship with other young West Coast actors--Jack Webb, William Conrad, and John Dehner--would see him propelled into a string of wonderfully gritty, Radio-Noir characterizations. Among them, Pat Novak for Hire; Pete Kelly's Blues; Jeff Regan, Investigator; Johnny Madero, Pier 23; The New Adventures of Michael Shayne; Dragnet; Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar; The Line-Up; and Night Beat. Burr's timing was a perfect match for both Jack Webb and William Conrad, and the fascinating back and forth between their various characters was pure Radio Noir magic.

Not one to be typecast, Raymond Burr also landed the starring role in Fort Laramie (1956-CBS) as no-nonsense U.S. Cavalry Captain, Lee Quince. But Burr was also emerging as a prolific television character actor in the 1950s--again, much like his friends and rivals, Webb, Dehner, and Conrad. Burr was seen in early episodes of Television's The Amazing Mr. Malone; Dragnet; Chesterfield Sound Off Time; Four Star Playhouse; Mr. & Mrs. North; Schlitz Playhouse of Stardom; The Ford Television Theatre; and Lux Video Theatre--all successful transitions from their Radio versions to their Television versions.

In 1955, Burr co-starred as Steve Martin in Godzilla, King of the Monsters!, a cult favorite that would cling to him for the remainder of his career. But it was in 1956 that Burr auditioned for the role of District Attorney Hamilton Burger in Erle Stanley Gardner's Perry Mason, for CBS, a new courtroom drama based on Gardner's highly successful novels.

William Talman auditioned for the title role of Perry Mason, but, Gardner was present and demanded that the actors switch parts. So it was, that Burr became Perry Mason and William Talman became Hamilton Burger--Television History in the making. It's often re-told that Burr and Talman--both wise, experienced professionals--would purposely blow some of their own lines, so as to relax some of the younger actors on the set. Raymond Burr went on to win two Emmy Awards for his role as Perry Mason between 1957 and 1966.

Burr's parents, William and Minerva, had remarried in 1955 after 33 years of separation. Burr had remained close to both of them during their separation and moreso after their second marriage. Sidelined numerous times throughout his life with medical problems, in January 1993, Burr was diagnosed with cancer in his left kidney. But he refused to undergo surgery, as this would have interfered with the shooting schedule of his final two television movies. After filming was completed, it was determined that the cancer had spread to several other organs, making it inoperable.

Burr was interred with his parents at Fraser Cemetery, New Westminster, British Columbia, Canada. On October 1, 1993, friends of Burr mourned him at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena, California. The private memorial was attended by Robert Benevides, Barbara Hale, Don Galloway, Don Mitchell, Barbara Anderson, Elizabeth Baur, Dean Hargrove, William R. Moses, and Christian I. Nyby II.

Burr had at least a dozen hobbies over the course of his lifetime: cultivating orchids, collecting wine and art, collecting seashells, cooking, flying, sailing, fishing and throwing small get togethers with friends. Burr was also an avid reader with a photographic memory. In addition, he taught acting classes at Columbia University.

Burr was devoted to his favorite hobby, cultivating and hybridizing orchids. He later developed this passion into an orchid business--Sea God Nurseries--with nurseries in Fiji, Hawaii, the Azores Islands, Southern California, and Northern California, and was responsible for adding more than 1,500 new orchids to the worldwide catalogue. Indeed, he developed an orchid he named the "Barbara Hale Orchid".

Burr long held land in Sonoma County, California, were where he raised Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and Port grapes--as well as orchids. The land is still in production, and is today known as the Raymond Burr Vineyards. In 1965, Burr also purchased 4,000 acres on the island of Naitauba, Fiji, for raising copra (coconut meat or kernel) and cattle--as well as orchids.

Servicemen will remember him for his participation in United Service Organizations [USO] tours in Korea and Vietnam. He also gave generously over the years to the McGeorge School of Law in Sacramento, California, donating some of his Perry Mason scripts.

"Try to live your life the way you wish other people would live theirs."
--- Raymond Burr




Tudor Owen
(Jocko Madigan)

Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor, Director, Producer
(1898-1979)

Birthplace: Wales, U.K.

Radiography:
1949 Pat Novak For Hire
1949 Chandu the Magician
1949 NBC University Theater
1949 Family Theater
1949 The Adventures Of Sam Spade
1949 Escape
1949 Lux Radio Theatre
1950 The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe
1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1950 Night Beat
1950 Presenting Charles Boyer
1950 The Story Of Doctor Kildare
1951 The Adventures Of the Saint
1951 The Pendleton Story
1951 Stars Over Hollywood
1951 Suspense
1952 Pursuit
1952 Hallmark Playhouse
1952 Crime Classics
1953 Errand Of Mercy
1953 Hallmark Hall Of Fame

Tudor Owen as Bishop Minter in The Lone Wolf (1954)
Tudor Owen as Bishop Minter in The Lone Wolf (1954)

Tudor Owen as Don Pedro Miguel Hernandez Santiago O'Sullivan in The Return of Don Pedro O'Sullivan from The Lone Ranger (1956)
Tudor Owen as Don Pedro Miguel Hernandez Santiago O'Sullivan in The Return of Don Pedro O'Sullivan from The Lone Ranger (1956)

Tudor Owen in The Case of The Malicious Mariner from Perry Mason (1961)
Tudor Owen in The Case of The Malicious Mariner from Perry Mason (1961)

Tudor Owen in Perry Mason (1961)
Tudor Owen in Perry Mason (1961)
Though born and raised in turn of the century Wales, proud Welchman Tudor Owen clearly wasn't above portraying Scots and Irishmen for the vast majority of his career.

To the last couple of generations of TV and film viewers, Tudor Owen is simply ''one of those Irish guys who used to be on TV and in the movies''. To dyed in the wool character actor aficionados, Tudor Owen's brilliant, and almost always highly sympathetic characterizations of ethnic British Empire characters, were always examples of understated acting craft, personified.

Though he could be bombastic in any role he chose--on Television and Film anyway, his mere presence in the cast could be intimidating. But in almost every instance, once Tudor Owen made his entrance the viewer knew he or she was in for an interesting ride, irrespective of the actual duration of Owen's performance.

Tudor Owen's Radio fans, by contrast, had known that about Owen for well over a decade by then. Though the breadth and depth of Tudor Owen's radiography spans the entire second half of The Golden Age of Radio, Tudor Owen's most ardent fans almost certainly refer to his work with Jack Webb as some of Owen's most memorable performances. Tudor Owen appeared with Webb in Johnny Madero (Father Leahy), Pat Novak for Hire ('Jocko' Madigan), and Pete Kelly's Blues (Barney Rickett). Though playing four different characters, Tudor Owen's basic role in each of the Webb vehicles was almost the same: Jack Webb's conscience, advisor, and severest critic.

The remainder of Tudor Owen's Radio work genuinely ran the gamut of West Coast drama. He made numerous repeat appearances in University Theatre, Escape, Suspense, Family Theatre, Lux Radio Theatre, Yours Truly Johnny Dollar, Crime Classics and The Lone Ranger--in all, some 1,200 appearances in Radio over a relatively short, 9-year career.

Tudor Owen was reported to have been appearing in Stage plays throughout the North Bay area of California through the 1920s and 1930s. But it was Owen's Film and Television work that occupied the lion's share of his time throughout The Golden Age of Television years. And although Tudor Owen actually appeared in his first credited Film in 1926, it wasn't until almost 22 years later, in 1948, that Owen acquired his next Film credit--the first of the forty that followed--in The Pilgrimage Play (1949) as Nicodemus. Owen's absence from the public spotlight for those missing twenty-two years is probably a fascinating tale in itself.

Between the 1950s and the mid-1960s, he added another 100+ Television credits to his 40+ Film credits. Seen in virtually every prime time, popular, recurring drama series, Tudor Owen found himself even more in demand on Television than in Film. An inveterate scene-stealer, Owen could clearly suppress his often overwhelming personality when the script called for it. But his most emblematic performances were as irrascible Irish -- Scots -- Welch scoundrels who, by script's end, whether a villain or hero, captured the imagination of every viewer watching him.

Tudor Owen's longest running recurring role was as first mate ''Elihu Snow'' in the South Seas adventure series Captain David Grief (1957-1960), based on the stories of Jack London. Saturday morning Television fans from the 1950s may remember Owen as Sgt. Tim O'Gara in My Friend Flicka (1956) for several episodes.

Owen appears to have retired from Acting in the mid-1960s. He passed away in 1979 at the age of 81. To those readers who knew Tudor Owen's name only from Radio, we hope we've helped you place a background and face with this fine, underrecognized character actor. For those of you who may be only recent fans of Tudor Owen you can now fit a 'face' to all of his amazing characterizations over Radio.

And for all of us, this simple reminder of the timelessness of Tudor Owen's performances-- and his ability to make us smile--continue to remind us of the natural genius of his portrayals, on big screen, small screen, or no screen.



Frederick William 'Fred' Foy
(Announcer)
(March 27, 1921 - )

Birthplace:
Detroit, Michigan

Curriculum Vitae:
1939
WBMC,
Detroit
1942
WXYZ,
Detroit
1942-1946
United States Army
14th Special Services Unit
1960
American Broadcasting Company


Radiography:
1939
Father Coughlin
1942-1946 (U.S. Army)
Egyptian State Broadcasting
'American Newsletter'
'Headline News of the Day'
'Up To Scratch'
'Shows On Parade'
1945
The Lone Ranger
1947
The Challenge of The Yukon
1963
The Kennedy Assassination
1964
Theatre Five
1967
Voices In The Headlines
1970
Return To Studio 1A
1976
Radio's Golden Age
1979
Sears Radio Theatre

Fred Foy during the ABC Years
Fred Foy during the ABC Years

Foy's Autobiography
Foy's Autobiography
'Fred Foy From XZY to ABC'

Promotional Poster from Fred Foy's Book Tour
Promotional Poster from
Fred Foy's Book Tour
Fred Foy's voice is one of those unmistakable, visceral sounds that will forever be associated with The Golden Age of Radio Era. Few radio voice talents have left the impression upon the listener as has Fred Foy.

Fred began his career in Radio, part-time at WBMC, Detroit. His voice was first heard on the Father Coughlin radio program in 1939. By 1942 Mr. Foy had obtained a position with Detroit's legendary WXYZ, home to Fran Striker and the wonderfully emblematic series' 'The Lone Ranger', 'The Green Hornet', and 'The Challenge of The Yukon'.

By 1945, Fred Foy was regularly being heard as the booming announcer for 'The Lone Ranger', indeed serving as Brace Beemer's understudy for a time.

During World War II, Fred Foy served as Sergeant Foy, Technician 4th Grade, with the Army's 14th Special Services Unit, in Cairo, Egypt and throughout the Middle East, distinguishing himself as one of the most well-recognized American voices in the Middle East.

After his discharge from The Army, Mr. Foy returned to WXYZ to become the full-time announcer for 'The Lone Ranger' for the remainder of it's run. He also voiced the equally stirring introduction to the television run of 'The Lone Ranger'.

Mr. Foy joined the ABC Network in 1960, serving as a staff announcer with ABC for the following twenty years. It was during his time with ABC that he became the voice of 'Theatre Five'.

Foy recounted his amazing career spanning the WXYZ years through the ABC years in his autobiography appropriately entitled, 'Fred Foy from XYZ to ABC'.

Fred Foy was inducted into The Radio Hall of Fame in March, 2000. He was awarded The Motion Picture and Television Fund's 'Golden Boot Award' in August, 2004.



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