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Original New Theater header art

The New Theater Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> New Theater

WYSR spot at from August 26 1951
WSYR spot ad for New Theater from August 26 1951

Spot article from May 23 1951 announcing the anticipated return of NBC Theater to the air.
Spot article from May 23 1951 announcing the anticipated return of NBC Theater to the air.

Background

From the July 29, 1951 Reno Evening Gazette:

--John Crosby's
Radio and TV Comments

     When Budd Schulberg's novel "The Disenchanted" was first published, it was both privately and publicly assaulted on what I consider unfair grounds.  The book, as everyone knows, was inspired by a single unfortunate episode in F. Scott Fitzgerald's
life in which Mr. Schulberg himself figured strongly.  The pair collaborated on a movie centering around the Dartmouth winter carnival where Mr. Fitzgerald took to the waters a little too strongly.  I happened to have seen the movie and it was—summing it up as judiciously as possible, picking my words with the utmost care—altogether lousy.
     The criticisms of the book, both public and private, concentrated perhaps not unnaturally on the private lives and personal characteristics of Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald.  Wasn't Mr. Schulberg a little one-sided in his appraisal of a very fine writer? Wasn't he being terribly unfair to Zelda Fitzgerald who was, I'm told, quite a girl?  Did Mr. Schulberg, a much younger man than Fitzgerald, know him well enough to write about him?  These questions are completely irrelevant.  After all, Schulberg was writing fiction.  His characters were based on real people but then, so, according to Somerset Maugham, are all characters in fiction, even in bad fiction.
     Characters in novels, no matter whom they are based on, acquire their own special aromas, move off in their own private directions.  The question at issue is not whether Schulberg drew a rounded portrait of the Fitzgeralds but whether Manley and Jere Halliday were sufficiently real fictional characters to merit all the attention they attracted.  I don't think they were.  I found Mr. Halliday a little too querulous, far too self-absorbed for comfort, Jere Halliday a little asinine in her passion for self-destruction
     Still, the book had—as Stanley Walker once remarked of Fitzgerald's own books—bones in it.  There are some wonderful scenes, each pregnant with imminent disaster— the Hollywood party scene, the script conference at Dartmouth, the final collapse.  Mr. Schulberg—let's face it—had a hell of a good story to tell which stood up well last Sunday on N.B C.'s "New Theater Series."
     If you can tear yourself away from the television set at that hour on Sunday, you may hear some very adult drama on this series which is narrated by Eva Le Gallienne, is generally excellently cast and is produced with a scrupulous and impressive attention to detail.  After too much immersion in television drama, I'm always surprised by the polish and finish of radio drama, that ancient art form. 
     Schulberg's dialogue, especially that of the '20s ("I feel pale green tonight, darling! Pale green!") which seemed a little sticky in print, sounded remarkably literature on the radio, conceivably because you don't expect any degree of literacy on radio or more probably because of the thoroughly expert performances of Staats Cotsworth as Manley Halliday and Joan Alexander as Jere.  Mr. Cotsworth in particular deserves a low bow for managing somehow to play a drunk for almost a solid hour and at the same time remain both expressive and loving, a terrible task to ask of an actor.  I was considerably less happy with Don Buka's performance as the Schulberg character, Shep Stearns, but I suspect it wasn't Mr. Buka's fault.  He was badly miscast.  "The Disenchanted" is a very good title for a book but not a very apt one for this book. Schulberg,  it is my guess, it hopelessly enchanted both with the '20s and the Fitzgeralds and so, it appears, is everyone else.  "The "20s," said Miss Le Gallienne in her introduction, "for all their frivolity and wildness, produced fine writers. " But the emphasis, both in this book and in others, is not on the fine writing but on the frivolity and wildness, on the waste, the despair and the self-destruction of only a few of the gifted writers of the '20s.  Let's not kid ourselves, Miss Le Gallienne. 
     In case you're interested, a few of the other adaptations done on "New Theater" include Ernest Hemingway's "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," Dorothy Baker's "Young Man With A Horn," and Katherine Anne Porter's "Noon Wine."
Coming up tonight is Maritta Wolff's "Whistle Stop" and sometime in the future, "Camille," starring Miss Le Gallienne.

We occasionally rush to disclaim or distance ourselves from critic-curmudgeon John Crosby's critiques of Radio. In this instance we can't endorse it too much. Crosby was spot on with this one. Eva Le Gallienne's influence in Radio extended far beyond her rare--but prized--personal appearances over the medium. Le Gallienne personally coached scores of successful Radio performers over her career, including Staats Cotsworth mentioned in Crosby's article. She also coached Humphrey Bogart, Joseph Schildkraut, Burgess Meredith, Barton Yarborough, Elspeth Eric, Cornel Wilde, Francis X. Bushman, Arnold Moss, Joan Alexander, Basil Rathbone, Jan Miner, Richard Widmark, Van Heflin and countless others.

When it came time for Ms. Le Gallienne to host her own, long-awaited Radio program, many of her most successful former students were lining up to appear in her Summer Drama anthology of 1951. Le Gallienne could easily have showcased a single one of her former students in each of even fifty-two programs had NBC chosen to shape the series in that manner. As it was, NBC, in typical fashion, apparently had no clue what it had on its hands. After waffling over and teasing the title "Eva Le Gallienne Presents the NBC New Theater" for a couple of months, NBC inexplicably reduced the name of the Summer series to simply, New Theater,' a somewhat less ceremonious celebration of a showcase for one of American Drama's most famous promoters, performers, producers and coaches.

NBC further went out of its way to avoid all appearance of promotion of the historic program. Had it not been for John Crosby's widely syndicated article and widespeard public interest in the series, it may not have been promoted at all. But not even NBC could keep a lid on the quality of a series of Eva Le Gallienne productions.

Hosted by Eva Le Gallienne herself, and announced by Fred Collins, the series was produced by Hugh Kemp and directed by Edward King. Ms. Le Gallienne selected most of the plays that the series dramatized and famed and gifted writer, Ernest Kinoy adapted most of them for New Theater.

Series Derivatives:

Eva Le Gallienne Presents the NBC Theater; Eva Le Gallienne Presents
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Dramas
Network(s): NBC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 51-06-10 01 The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 51-06-10 to 51-09-23; NBC; Sixteen, hour-long programs; Sundays, 4:30 p.m.
Syndication:
Sponsors:
Director(s): Edward King
Hugh Kemp [Producer]
Principal Actors: Eva Le Gallienne, John Larkin, Sarah Churchill, Francis X. Bushman, Ramsay Hill, Tony Barrett, Arnold Moss, Armand Duval, Betty Garrett, Betty Field, Cornel Wilde, Basil Rathbone, Staats Cotsworth, Joan Alexander, Don Buka
Recurring Character(s):
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): Katherine Anne Porter, Elizabeth Madox Roberts, Budd Schulberg, Aldoux Huxley, E.M. Forster, Daphne Du Maurier, Pamela Frankau, Ernest Hemmingway, Dorothy Baker, Henry James, Emlyn Williams, Shirley Jackson, Maritta Wolff
Writer(s) Ernest Kinoy
Music Direction:
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): Fred Collins
Eva Le Gallienne [Host]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
16
Episodes in Circulation: 6
Total Episodes in Collection: 4
Provenances:
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the radioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

The widely employed and oft-plagiarized New Theatre episodic otrsite.com log incorrectly cites New Theater as the replacement for Tales Of the Texas Rangers instead of Hedda Hopper. It also incorrectly cites Episode No. 8 as Whistlestop instead of After Many A Summer Dies the Swan. Had anyone at otrsite.com actually listened to the program, they'd had heard Eva Le Gallienne state at the opening of Episode No. 8 that they were unable to air Whistle Stop and would, instead, air a previously transcribed program. It also incorrectly cites After Many A Summer Dies the Swan as #9 instead of Rebecca (which was also announced in Episode No. 8).


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[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







The New Theater Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
51-06-10
1
The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber
The Macomber Affair
N
51-05-17 Syracuse Herald Journal
The NBC Theater changes its name to Eva Le Gallienne Presents the NBC Theater June 10 and takes over the 4:30 to 5:30 slot on WSYR with Budd Schulberg's "The Disenchanted."

51-06-11 Syracuse Herald Journal
NBC MADE a last minute switch in the title of Eva Le Gallienne's new dramatic series last night, titling the show New Theater and presented
"The MacComber Affair" instead of the scheduled "Disenchanted."

51-06-10 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30 P. M.
KFI-NBC New Theater: "Eva La Gallienne Presents"
51-06-17
2
Young Man With A Horn
Y
51-06-17 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): "
Young Man With a Horn," based on the life of Bix Beiderbecke.

51-06-17 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30 P. M.
KFI-NBC New Theater
51-06-24
3
Daisy Kenyon
N
1-06-24 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): "
Daisy Kenyon."

51-06-24 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30-KFI—New Theater, "Daisy Kenyon"
51-07-01
4
Noon Wine
N
51-07-01 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA):
"Noon Wine," by Katherine Anne Porter; Eva LeGallienne, hostess.

51-07-01 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30-KFI—New Theater, "Noon Wine"
51-07-08
5
The Willow Cabin
Y
51-07-08 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): Sarah Churchill in
"The Willow Cabin," drama of love in the theater.

51-07-08 Long Beach Independent
4:30
KFI—NBC New Theater:
"The Willow Cabin," Sarah Churchill
51-07-15
6
The Time of Man
Y
51-07-15 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): Eva LaGallienne presents
"The Time of Man," by Elizabeth Madox Roberts

51-07-15 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30-KFI—New Theater . . . "The Time of Man"
51-07-22
7
The Disenchanted
N
51-07-22 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA):
"The Disenchanted," by Budd Schulberg.

51-07-22 Long Beach Independent
4:30
KFI—NBC New Theater:
"The Disenchanted"
51-07-29
8
After Many A Summer Dies the Swan
Y
51-07-29 Reno Evening Gazette
John Crosby's Radio and TV Comments
"In case you're interested, a few of the other adaptations done on "New Theater" include Ernest Hemmingway's "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber," Dorothy Baker's "Young Man With A Horn," and Katherine Anne Porter's "Noon Wine." Coming up tonight is Maritta Wolff's "
Whistle Stop" and sometime in the future, "Camille," starring Miss LeGallienne."
51-08-05
9
Rebecca
N
51-08-05 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): Eva LeGallienne presents Arnold Moss in
"Rebecca."

51-08-05 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30-KFI—New Theater . . . "Rebecca"
51-08-12
10
Camille
N
51-08-12 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA):
"Camille," starring Eva Le Gallienne, Armand Duval, and Betty Garrett.

51-08-12 Long Beach Independent
4:30
KFI—NBC New Theater:
"
Camllle," Eve LeGallienne
"Rebecca," Arnold Moss
51-08-19
11
A Passage To India
N
51-08-19 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA):
"A Passage To India."

51-08-19 Long Beach Press-Telegram
E. M. Forster's
"A Passage to India" will be presented on the "New Theater'
from KFI at 4:30, with Eve Le Gallienne as hostess. . . .
51-08-26
12
The Informer
N
51-08-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): "The Informer."

51-08-26 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30-KFI—New Theater, "The Informer"
51-09-02
13
The Corn Is Green
N
51-09-02 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): Eva LeGallienne in
"The Corn Is Green."

51-09-02 Long Beach Press-Telegram
4:30-KFI—New Theater, "The Corn Is Green."
51-09-09
14
The Heiress
N
51-09-09 Wisconsin State Journal
7:00 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): returns with Betty Field, Cornel Wilde, and Basil Rathbone in
"The Heiress."
51-09-16
15
The Lottery
N
51-09-16 Wisconsin State Journal
7:00 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA):
"The Lottery."
51-09-23
16
The Twelve-Pound Look
N
[Final Program]

51-09-23 Wisconsin State Journal
7:00 p.m.--New Theater (WIBA): "Eva LeGallienne in "
The 12-Pound Look."






The New Theater Radio Program Biographies




Eva le Gallienne
(Host/Actor)

(1899-1991)

Birthplace: Virginia

Education: Harvard, Munich and Paris Art Institutes

Radiography:
1939 Great Plays
1947 Born In A Merry Hour
1947 Suspense
1951 New Theater
1952 Best Plays
1952 The Fir Tree
1953 Invitation To Learning
Eva Le Gallienne circa 1923 as a suffragist
Eva Le Gallienne circa 1923 as a suffragist

Le Gallienne as Peter Pan
Le Gallienne as Peter Pan

Eva Le Gallienne circa 1947
Eva Le Gallienne circa 1947

Al Hischfeld immortalized Eva Le Gallienne with this caricature of her performance in The Corn is Green (1950) with Richard Waring
Al Hischfeld immortalized Eva Le Gallienne with this caricature of her performance in The Corn is Green (1950) with Richard Waring.

Le Gallienne's production of Alice in Wonderland was so popular on Stage that it resulted in a reprise over Television in 1955 and an RCA Victor LP of the original cast performance in 1956
Le Gallienne's production of Alice in Wonderland was so popular on Stage that it resulted in a reprise over Television in 1955 and an RCA Victor LP of the original cast performance in 1956.

Eva Le Gallienne commissioned a translation from the Danish publication Seven Tales by Hans Christian Andersen into English for American children in 1959
Eva Le Gallienne commissioned a translation from the Danish publication Seven Tales by Hans Christian Andersen into English for American children in 1959

Eva Le Gallienne in her last film as Grandma Pearl with Ellen Burstyn in Resurrection (1980)
Eva Le Gallienne in her last film as Grandma Pearl with Ellen Burstyn in Resurrection (1980)

Eva Le Gallienne circa 1983
Eva Le Gallienne circa 1983

From the June 6, 1991 Indiana Gazette:

EVA LE GALLIENNE Pioneering U.S. actress dies at 92

     WESTON, Conn. (AP) -- Eva Le Gallienne, a pioneering actress, director and producer whose career in the American theater spanned eight decades has died at age 92.
     Le Gallienne died at home Monday of heart failure, said a longtime friend, Anne Kaufman Schneider.
     She made her American acting debut in 1915, playing Rose in"Mrs Boltay's Daughters."
  She last appeared on the stage as the White Queen in the 1982 broadway production of "Alice In Wonderland," a play she also directed and co-wrote.
  The revival ran only 22 performances before closing.
     Le Gallienne is credited with opening the first successful American theater company, the Civic Repertory Theatre, in 1926.
     "She was something of a pioneer in the American theater," Schneider said Tuesday.
  "(She was) a very idealistic person, very strong person who stuck to her guns and her way of life, all her life."
     In 1921, Le Gallienne gained fame for her role as Julie in "Liliom."
  Two years later, she got star billing for her portrayal of Princess Alexandra in "The Swan."
     Her career as a producer began in the 1925-26 season, when she produced and starred in "The Master Builder" and "John Gabriel Borkman."
     She established the Civic Repertory Theatre with the idea of offering audiences low-priced productions of classics.
     She directed and appeared in many of the company's productions, including "Twelfth Night," "Peter Pan" and her first rendition of the White Queen in "Alice In Wonderland."
  The theater company dissolved during the Depression in 1934.
     "It ran out of money and steam," Schneider said.
     One of Le Gallienne's biggest successes was a play called "Uncle Harry," which opened on Broadway in 1942.
  The Drama, which also starred Joseph Schildkraut, ran for over a year in New York and later toured for six months.
     In 1946, Le Gallienne tried again to open another reportory theater company, this time with director Margaret Webster and producer Cheryl Crawford.

Eva Le Gallienne was born in 1899, the daughter of poet Richard Le Gallienne. Throughout her formative years it was famed actress, Sarah Bernhardt (1844-1923) that was her idol. Eva Le Gallienne made her own debut on the London stage in 1914 at the age of 15 in Monna Vanna. At the age of 16 Eva traveled with her mother to New York. By 1916 she was making her Broadway debut in 16 performances of Bunny (January 1916). Her debut in London in 1914 and her final appearance on the Broadway stage in To Grandmother's House We Go (1981) spanned a stage career of over sixty-seven years. Fittingly enough, her last appearance on Broadway also garnered her yet another Tony nomination.

Over almost seven decades in the Theatre, Eva Le Gallienne was noted as much for her roles as stage coach, director, producer and stage manager as she was for her own marvelous and gifted appearances behind the footlights. One of the more idealistic--perhaps most idealistic--directors of the New York Stage, Eva Le Gallienne devoted herself to inspiring new playwrights, translating the plays of Henrik Ibsen, and continually promoting improvements in the quality of American stage work throughout her storied career.

She ran ran her own 1100-seat, Civic Repertory Theatre (the '14th Street Theater') for 10 years (1926-1936), producing 37 plays. The theater was also home to her Civic Repertory Theater Company whose actors included, initially, herself, J. Edward Bromberg, Paul Leyssac, Florida Friebus, and Leona Roberts. The rolls of her famed students would later include Radio's own Barton Yarborough, Staats Cotsworth, Burgess Meredith, and Joseph Schildkraut, among scores of others.

Le Gallienne's
own growing repetoire of theatre portrayals would include everything from Peter Pan to Hamlet. In spite of almost completely avoiding Film, she did appear in a handful of Film roles spanning some thirty years. Beginning as Gertrude in the 1955 treatement of Prince of Players with young Richard Burton as Hamlet, and ending with a marvelously evocative performance as Grandma Pearl in 1980's Resurrection with Ellen Burstyn, Le Gallienne's rare big screen appearances were extraordinary treats for four generations of Film audiences

Eva Le Gallienne's Television appearances were somewhat more frequent, by comparison. Themselves spanning thirty-six years, Le Gallienne's TV appearances were restricted to some of the finest and most prestigious playhouse-drama anthologies to air during the Golden Age of Television. Ranging from The Ford Theatre Hour to Playhouse 90 and Play of the Week, Eva Le Gallienne's rare appearances on Television were met with great fanfare and advance promotion and were invariably great critical successes. Her last Television appearance was in the Emmy-winning St. Elsewhere episode The Women, from 1984, in which she portrayed Evelyn Milbourne.

Among her many awards, she won The Pulitzer Prize for her production of Alison's House by Susan Glaspell; the National Medal of Arts from President Reagan, and the Norwegian Grand Cross for her furthering the presentation of plays by Henrik Ibsen.




Ernest Kinoy
(Adapter/Writer)

Author; Playwright; Director; Social Activist; Screenwriter; President, Writers Guild of America--East
(1925 - )

Birthplace: Unkown

Education: Columbia University
Awards:

1963, 1964, and 1977
Emmy Awards for Best Screenwriter
1982
Writer's Guild Of America--East; Christopher Award
2000
Vermont Governor's Award for Excellence in the Arts

2007 Vermont Congressional Joint Resolution 133, commending Ernest Kinoy for his body of work

Radiography:
1941 The Story Of Franklin Delano Roosevelt
1946 The Columbia Workshop
1947 Nick Carter
1948 Radio City Playhouse
1948 The World's Greatest Novels
1948 NBC University Theatre
1949 The Eternal Light
1950 Living 1950
1950 Dimension X
1951 Short Story
1951 The New Theatre
1951 Barrie Craig, Confidential Investigator
1952 Best Plays
1953 The Marriage
1953 Rocky Fortune
1954 Dr Six-Gun
1954 Inheritance
1955 X Minus One
1973 Project 73
1973 Future Tense
1977 The Grip Of Terror
1990 Audition Theatre

Ernest Kinoy, c. 1955
Ernest Kinoy, c. 1955

Playbill for the Stage Version of Kinoy's 'Golden Rainbow'
Playbill for the Stage Version of Kinoy's 'Golden Rainbow'


Astounding Magazine ad for Dimension X episode
Astounding Magazine ad for Dimension X episode


Astounding Magazine ad for X Minus One on Radio
Astounding Magazine ad for X Minus One on Radio



Ernest Kinoy was one of the most prolific and respected writers of Stage, Screen, Television and Radio. Though most often associated with his Science Fiction radioplays, his Radio work spans the entire gamut of genres from The Golden Age of Radio. His Radio writing was perhaps overshadowed by his later fame as a screenwriter for Television, but it's his prodigious output throughout the Golden Age of Radio that has consistently reached the greatest number of ardent admirers.

The son of public school teachers, Kinoy's sense of both moral and social obligation were basic tenets of his upbringing, and are reflected over and over again throughout his body of work. Kinoy enlisted in the Army during World War II, and upon his return to civilian life became a staff writer for NBC. His career with NBC spanned over twelve years of The Golden Age of Radio, and the earliest years of The Golden Age of Television.

During his NBC years his talents were tapped for both radioplays and television screenplays. During his tenure with NBC, his prolific output and extremely fast script-writing served both parties well. Remembered most for his Science Fiction series', Dimension X and X Minus One, he was equally busy with straight radio drama, such as The Marriage for Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy and NBC University Theatre, westerns such as Doctor Six Gun, detective drama such Barry Craig and Rocky Fortune, and stage play adaptations such as NBC's Best Plays.

During his college years at Columbia University he met and married Barbara Powers, who eventually became a leading light in her own right as a Doctor of Psychotherapy specializing in Eating Disorders. Married in 1948, their marriage endured 59 years until Dr. Powers-Kinoy's passing in 2007 of protracted pneumonia. Both of the Kinoys were social activists and jointly and separately contributed much of their respective careers to addressing social injustice and mental health issues.

Ernest Kinoy's biography was by no means limited to his Radio work which, by itself, comprised well over 340 adaptations and original radioplays. His work in Television spanned the second half of his life and garnered him two Emmy Awards and three other Emmy nominations. Three of his books were also adapted to The Stage.

Despite a highly active professional life, he also found time to serve the Writers Guild of America--East, as their President for three years. He was also the recipient of three of the Guild's most prestigious writing awards.

Mr. Kinoy, now 83, and still one of Radio's treasures, remains actively semi-retired in Vermont.



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