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The NBC University Theater Radio Program

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NBC University Theater spot ad from June 18 1949
NBC University Theater spot ad from June 18 1949

The colleges and Universities that incorporated NBC University Theater broadcasts into their World Literature curricula were as follows:

  • University of Louisville Seal
    University of Louisville

  • Kansas State Teachers' College
  • University of Tulsa Seal
    University of Tulsa
  • Texas College of Arts and Industries post card
    Texas College of Arts and Industries
  • Brooklyn College seal circa 1942
    Brooklyn College
  • University of Arizona seal
    University of Arizona



























































































































































































































Spot article from May 23 1951 announcing the anticipated return of NBC Theater to the air.
Spot article from May 23 1951 announcing the anticipated return of NBC Theater to the air.







WYSR spot at from August 26 1951
WSYR spot ad for New Theater from August 26 1951



Background on "College by Radio"

Beginning in 1942, NBC had reinaugurated its concept of the NBC University of The Air and its companion NBC Inter-American University of The Air. Throughout the mid-1940s NBC produced some twenty-five productions specifically designed to both educate and entertain. Indeed, many of those programs were incorporated into the curricula of high schools, colleges and universities throughout the U.S. and Canada.

With the final episode of NBC University of The Air's production of The World's Great Novels in 1948, NBC reevaluated the NBC University of The Air concept and success over the past decade, determined to both continue the educational priorities of its NBC University concept, while at the same time developing further educational programming as equally entertaining as it was instructive. Indeed, NBC University Theater, after airing two 'semesters' and a 'Summer Schedule' of NBC University Theater, changed the title of NBC University Theater to simply, NBC Theater. As reported in Time Magazine, NBC executives felt that the presence of the word 'University' in the title of the program left the wrong impression with its listeners.

Irrespective of the title change, NBC University Theater continued to maintain the same high standards and continued to expand the number of colleges offering college credit for listening to and studying the program's offerings from the initial three institutions to six educational institutions by the series' end.

For the formal curricula offerings, NBC University Theater and NBC Theater referred to their regular season offerings as both 'seasons' and 'semesters', interchangeably. For the Summer seasons NBC University Theater referred to them as their 'Summer Schedules.' The University of Louisville, in Louisville, Kentucky was the first to collaborate with NBC Unversity in offering a formal 'College by Radio' course in 'American and British Fiction.' Other colleges and universities followed during the subsequent two years, as indicated in the sidebar at left. So successful were these programs that by the last season, some of the six participating institutions were offering a complete set of The Encyclopedia Britannica to students enrolled at each participating institution who submitted the most interesting paper during their coursework.

NBC University Curricula Details

For those listeners not enrolled in any of the formal college-supervised curricula, NBC University Theater regularly announced the 'theme' of each grouping of programs over the entire run. With the exception of the 'Summer Schedule' runs, they broke down as follows:

  • Five, full-hour Radioplays based on great American stories:
    • Sinclair Lewis' Main Street
    • Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell To Arms
    • John Dos Passos' Number One
    • Katherine Anne Porter's Noon Wine
    • Ellen Glasgow's The Romantic Comedians
  • Four half-hour radioplays based on the world's great "stories that live":
    • Voltaire's Candide
    • George Du Maurier's Peter Ibbetson
    • Edgar Allan Poe's The Purloined Letter
    • Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels
  • Fifteen full-hour dramatizations of outstanding works of modern American and British fiction:
    • Henry James' The American
    • Joseph Conrad's Lord Jim
    • Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy
    • H.G. Wells' The History of Mr. Polly
    • Ellen Glasgow's They Stooped to Folly
    • John Galsworthy's Justice
    • Sinclair Lewis' Arrowsmith
    • Somerset Maugham's Of Human Bondage
    • Ernest Hemingway's The Short, Happy Life of Francis Macomber
    • E. M. Forster's A Passage to India
    • John Dos Passos' Three Soldiers
    • Aldous Huxley's After Many A Summer Dies the Swan
    • John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath
    • Robert Penn Warren's All the King's Men
    • Graham Greene's The Ministry Of Fear
  • Eighteen full-hour classics of Anglo-American literature from Henry Fielding to Henry James:
    • Henry Fielding's Tom Jones
    • Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice
    • Sir Walter Scott's The Heart of Midlothian
    • Tales of Edgar Allan Poe
    • Selections from Charles Dickens' The Pickwick Papers
    • Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Marble Faun
    • William Thackeray's The History of Henry Esmond, Esquire
    • Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre
    • Herman Melville's Moby Dick
    • Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn
    • Samuel Butler's The Way of All Flesh
    • Thomas Hardy's The Mayor Of Casterbridge
    • Stephen Crane's The Red Badge Of Courage
    • Joseph Conrad's Heart Of Darkness
    • The Age of Innocence
    • Henry James' The Ambassadors
    • Ernest Hemingway's The Short, Happy Life of Francis Macomber
    • E. M. Forster's A Passage to India
  • Summer Schedule of twelve of "the most exciting books of our times."
  • Thirty-five Great Novels of American Literature
    • Booth Tarkington's Penrod
    • Henry James' The Portrait Of A Lady
    • Edith Wharton's The House Of Mirth
    • Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie
    • Ellen Glasgow's The Romantic Comedians
    • Sherwood Anderson's Dark Laughter
    • Sinclair Lewis' Dodsworth
    • F. Scott Fitzgerald's Babylon Revisited
    • Ernest Heminway's For Whom the Bell Tolls
    • J.P. Marquand's Point Of No Return
    • Willliam Faulkner's The Wild Palms
    • Thomas Wolfe's You Can't Go Home Again
    • Charles Dickens' Great Expectations
    • John Dos Passos' Manhattan Transfer
    • Thorton Wilder's The Ides Of March
    • Robert Penn Warren's At Heaven's Gate
    • Katherine Anne Porter's Pale Horse, Pale Rider and Flowering Judas
    • Walter Van Tilburg Clark's The Track Of the Cat
    • Rudyard Kipling's The Light That Failed
    • Joseph Conrad's Victory
    • John Galsworthy's The Patrician
    • H.G. Wells' Tono Bungay
    • Rebecca West's There Is No Conversation
    • J.B. Priestley Angel Pavement
    • E. M. Forster's Howard's End
    • Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway
    • Sholem Ashe's The Nazarene
    • Aldous Huxley's After Many A Summer Dies the Swan
    • James Joyce's A Portrait Of the Artist As A Young Man
    • D.H. Lawrence's Sons and Lovers
    • Graham Greene's England Made Me
    • Christopher Isherwood's Prater Violet
    • Elizabeth Bowen's The House In Paris
    • Arnold Bennett's Imperial Palace
    • H.M. Tomlinson's Gallion's Reach
  • Summer Season of fifteen "entertaining works"
  • Sixteen Great Works of World Literature
    • Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote
    • Henry Fielding's Jonathan Wild
    • Voltaire's Candide
    • Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey
    • Honore de Balzac's Pere Goriot
    • Stendahl's The Red and the Black
    • Victor Hugo's The Bishop's Candlesticks
    • Charles Dickens' The Baron Of Grogzwig
    • Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter
    • Herman Melville's Bartleby, the Scrivener
    • Flaubert's Madame Bovary
    • Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Gambler
    • Leo Tolstoy's The Kreutzer Sonata
    • Henry James' Daisy Miller
    • Mark Twain's The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg
    • Thomas Hardy's The Withered Arm

Apart from the obvious academic value of NBC University Theater's selections over the course of the series, it's clear that considerable thought--and daring--went into the selections as well. This was after all, the late 1940s and early 1950s. In spite of the hundreds of thousands of ex-G.I.s that were taking advantage of the nation's first G.I. Education Bill, there was rising hostility towards academics, purely intellectual pursuits, and the free exchange of philosophies in general. The ongoing "Great Debate" over America's isolationism during the post-World War II era in the wake of the Atomic Age was one of the most polarizing developments of the post-War years.

With the resurgence in college and university attendance, something of an 'intellectual vacuum' developed throughout American society at the turn of the fifth decade of the twentieth century. On the face of it, this would seem ironic, given the hundreds of thousands of ex-G.I.s pursuing higher education in one form or another. But as history would later reveal, the 'Great Debate' was being discussed and argued in a far different context in the world of Academia than it was being argued in the other public and private forums of the era--newspapers, Congress, and corporate boardrooms.

The growing belief that intellectualism somehow fostered communism or socialism grew to a crescendo, fueled by the more reactionary and fascist elements of Atomic Age America. Against this backdrop, NBC University Theater and NBC Theater still managed to mount some of the more controversial works of modern literature. Authors such as Tolstoy, Dosteyevsky and even Henry James and Aldous Huxley were widely labeled as toxic by the prevailing 'red-baiters' and 'commie-outers' of the era. Librarians across the country found themselves defending their own library holdings against the more reactionary forces of the day. Book-banning and book-burning movements--the very antithesis of what millions of our G.I's had fought for four years to combat--were beginning to take root throughout the country.

These were the very real forces that caused NBC University Theater to change its name to NBC Theater, and undoubtedly also resulted in the premature demise of what had been a remarkably well intentioned and educational production by a major network.

Here's a John Crosby review of NBC University Theater from the December 17, 1948 edition of the Portsmouth Times:

 
Radio In Review
 By JOHN CROSBY
 University Of the Air
 
     THE planting of Aldous Huxley, the intellectual ascetic from England, in the over-ripe soil of California, was a daring agricultural experiment and it has produced some weird fruit, including his novel, "After Many a Summer Dies the Swan."
     The book, which is rich in calcium and irony and rather deficient in humanity, was dramatized last Sunday on NBC's University of the Air program (Sundays 2:30 p.m.).
     It's an excellent example of the bold optimism that characterizes that program, since I can think of a few more difficult things to put on the air.
     "After Many a Summer Dies the Swan" is the story of an enormously rich man named Stoyte, a thinly-disguised version of William Dandolph Hearst, who fears death.
 
     HIS MANIC TERROR, I gather is prompted not so much by reluctance to depart this splendid orb (which doesn't afford him much pleasure) as by a childlike fear that he is going to get his bottom paddled in the hereafter.
     Stoyte lives in a Gothic castle, "more medieval than any building of the 13th century", in California, surrounded by an appalling litter of people.
     Along with his Flemish paintings and Fra Angelico murals, the fearful millionaire has collected Dr. Obispo, a sardonic, wholly-unscrupulous doctor whose mission is to keep Stoyte alive forever; Jerry Pordage, an intellectual weasel who functions as a librarian; and Virginia Maunciple, a beautiful babe with no mind to speak of whose function...well, never mind.
     There are some other unedifying specimens, but we shall refrain from listing them.
 
     ANYWAY, PORDAGE, the librarian, stumbles on some astonishing experiments in the field of longevity made by the fifth Earl of Gonister in the 18th century and turns them over to the contemporary longevity expert, Obispo.
     The malevolent doctor straight-away hustles his protector to England where they discover the fifth Earl still alive and roaring after 200 years.
     Regrettably, the Earl has degenerated through some process of reverse mutation into a foetal ape.  I didn't understand Huxley's scientific reasoning in the book and I didn't understand it in the radio version either, so I can't elaborate any further.
 
     IT DOESN'T MATTER.  At the end of the novel and of the radio play too, Stoyte, after only a momentary hesitation, decides it's infinitely better to become a biggering baboon than to face his Maker.
     This dismal perpetuity is the cream of the jest and the whole tale is decidedly odd to hear on the radio.
     On the whole, Ernest Kinoy did a fine job of translating Huxley's semi-religious treatise into intelligible radio.
     The Huxley novel is a fine sample of the unusual literature they're doing on University of the Air.  The show has been kicked all over NBC at various times and I'm happy to report is now on at a fairly listenable hour.
(Copyright.  1948, New York Tribune)

NBC University Production Details

Though the format tended to expand and contract with alternating full-hour and 30-minute productions over the series' runs, NBC University Theater's overarching goal was to present the production's selections as both entertainment and education. Whenever the format or script permitted, guest commentators were given an opportunity to frame the episode's production in the context of the literary history of the presentation's author or work. This also contributed to the underlying value of the college-supervised curricula the series provided for the three to six colleges and universities that offered such extension programs. The commentators' observations provided an educational context not completely available from the scripted production itself.

As outlined above, the curricula offered by the participating colleges and universities varied between World Literature, Anglo-American Literature, Anglo-American Fiction, and Great Novels of American Literature. Though we don't know the full details, we can imagine that as much as two to three credit hours were granted upon the successful completion of any of these college-supervised 'semesters' of Radio-assisted instruction. This was undoubtedly a great benefit to many of the G.I. Bill students who'd experienced breaks of as much as five to twelve years between their high school years or interrupted higher education. The chance to acquire as many as ten to fifteen semester hours of credit for Literature classes had to have been very attractive to tens of thousands of matriculating ex-G.I.s.

The productions themselves began--and remained--absolutely top-notch. With adapters of the quality of George Lefferts, David Driscoll, Virginia Wells, Max Erlich and Ernest Kinoy, NBC ensured the highest quality possible in interpreting the widlely varying works of the authors selected. When appropriate, specialist adapters were enlisted to interpret some of the more esoteric or less widely known works presented during the series.

The predominantly West Coast pool of talent supporting NBC University Theater over the years represented some of the most familiar names in Radio, Stage and Film history. This was, afterall, a network-sustained production. The responsibility of presenting dramatizations worthy of supporting college curricula also demanded the finest possible interpretations of these one-hundred and twenty-three productions. It's safe to say that NBC both met and exceeded its stated goals. It's also apparent that the quality of the presentations met with the approval of the participating educational institutions as well.

Andrew C. Love was responsible for the direction of the overwhelming majority of the productions with help from Max Hutto and Bill Karn, with Warren Lewis later taking the helm. Morris Mamorsky provided the majority of the scoring and musical composition for the productions, with help from Henry Russell, later of The Halls of Ivy fame, and Albert Harris. Don Stanley was the most familiar 'voice' of the NBC University Theater for most of the run.

The commentators for the series were often the real 'stars' of the productions. Whenever practical the authors themselves provided the commentary. When that proved impractical or impossible, some of America's finest drama and literary critics provided the academic or historical backdrop for the productions. The more important commentators heard during the series were:

  • Norman Cousins commenting on Main Street, Thomas Wolfe, and Aldous Huxley
  • Malcolm Coley commenting on Ernest Hemingway
  • Clifton Fadiman commenting on Katnerine Anne Porter, Theodore Dreiser, and Somerset Maugham
  • Dr. Harvey C. Webster commenting on Joseph Conrad, H.G. Wells, Edgar Allan Poe, Mary Webb, Sherwood Anderson, John Dos Passos, H.M. Tomlinson, and Ernest Hemingway
  • Harrison Smith commenting on Ellen Glasgow
  • Granville Hicks commenting on Sinclair Lewis, Thomas Hardy, and Robert Penn Warren
  • Ralph Bates commenting on E. M. Forster, Theodore Dreiser, and Ernest Hemingway
  • J. Donald Adams commenting on John Dos Passos, Henry Fielding, William Makepeace Thackeray, Samuel Butler, Booth Tarkington, and John Steinbeck
  • W. H. Auden commenting on Graham Greene
  • I.A.R Wylie commenting on Jane Austen
  • Amy Loveman commenting on Sir Walter Scott
  • Mark Van Doren commenting on Charles Dickens, Stephen Crane, and Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • James Hilton commenting on Charlotte Bronte, Arnold Bennett, and George Orwell
  • Dr. John W. Taylor commenting on the over 5,000 students who'd taken advantage of the University of Louisville College By Radio program, alone
  • Bennett Cerf commenting on Edith Wharton
  • E.M. Forster commenting on Henry James and his own A Passage to India
  • Dr. Beaumont Bruestle commenting on Thornton Wilder
  • Hugh J. Coleridge-Mackarness commenting on James Hilton
  • Edward Weeks commenting on J.P. Marquand and Thornton Wilder
  • Dr. Beaumont Bruestle commenting on Richard Llewellyn
  • Orville Prescott commenting on F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Diana E. Trilling's comments on Elizabeth Bowen (read by Don Stanley)
  • Bernard De Voto commenting on A.B. Guthrie
  • Isabel Bolton's comments on Edith Wharton (read by Don Stanley)
  • Irwin Edman commenting on Sinclair Lewis, Christopher Isherwood, and Katherine Anne Porter
  • Media critic, John Crosby, commenting on F. Scott Fitzgerald and Joseph Conrad
  • Diana E. Trilling commenting on Ernest Hemingway and D.H. Lawrence
  • John F. Kieran commenting on J.P. Marquand, E.M. Forster, and J.B. Priestley
  • Robert Penn Warren commenting on William Faulkner
  • Edward Weeks commenting on Thornton Wilder
  • Bruce Bliven commenting on Walter Van Tilburg Clark
  • Margaret Webster commenting on John Galsworthy, Miguel de Cervantes, and Graham Greene
  • Hamilton Basso commenting on H.G. Wells
  • Katherine Anne Porter commenting on Rebecca West and Virginia Woolf
  • Thomas Quinn Curtiss commenting on James Joyce
  • Elizabeth Bowen commenting on her own The House in Paris

As with many of NBC's more prestigious dramatic undertakings around the turn of the decade of the 1950s, NBC University Theater "came in like a lion and went out like a lamb." Apparently NBC's bean-counters and more politically pliable network executives felt it was politically safer to let its tamer NBC Theater version of NBC University Theater simply die a quiet death. What had been an extraordinarily educational, high-profile production eventually died a death of a thousand cuts. It was first reduced to simply, NBC Theater, then NBC began monkeying with its scheduling and format, finally reducing the production to 30-minutes and eliminating the fascinating commentaries altogether. The better to fend off the reactionary, right-wing commie-hunters of the era, looking for pinkos under every college and university desk across the U.S..

And so it was that network Radio's last truly uplifting and educational programming experiment from The Golden Age of Radio ended. By the program's end, NBC University Theater and its College by Radio initiative resulted in the granting of college credit to an estimated 43,000 undergraduates of the era. Not an insignificant contribution by any measure. But one can't help but wonder how far the series--or the associated educational initiative--could have gone in a more balanced political environment. It's not hard to envision a series of historical dramatizations that could have also been tied to College by Radio curricula, with commentaries by historians of the era.

NBC produced Eva Le Galliene's New Theater during the Summer of 1951 in a further attempt to sustain prestigious dramatic presentations of historic and educational importance. Indeed, NBC teased Le Galliene's New Theater [left sidebar] as "the return of NBC Theater" to the newspapers of the era. NBC later presented its Best Plays as a sponsored series from 1952 to 1953, with occasional brief commentaries by John Chapman. Under the "NBC Presents:" banner, NBC followed through with programming such as Short Story, the last hurrah of it's decade-long, various NBC University of The Air series' of the 1940s. 1951 was NBC's Silver Anniversary year and while one might have expected NBC to mount several high-profile educational or prestige productions to mark the occasion, NBC was then focused almost exclusively on its budding NBC Television successes, their Radio history pretty much taking a back seat in marking the year-long celebration.

But irrespective of how far NBC University Theater might have gone, what endured out of the effort are some of Radio's finest dramatizations of world literature, highlighted by some of the most informative commentaries on the authors and their works ever before heard over Radio. Indeed, the commentaries by the authors themselves are some of Radio history's rarest examples of these authors. In all, a fine programming effort that came at precisely the right time in Radio history to benefit not only struggling G.I. Bill students, but might well have helped to ease thousands of fence-sitting potential college students into the decision to undertake higher education. If NBC University Theater had accomplished nothing more, it would remain one of the brightest moments in NBC Radio History.

Series Derivatives:

NBC University of The Air; NBC Inter-American Univerity of The Air; NBC Theater; New Theater; AFRS 'Bookshelf of The World'

Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Dramas
Network(s): NBC; AFRS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 48-07-30 01 Main Street
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 48-07-30 to 51-02-14; NBC [Radio City, Hollywood]; One-hundred twenty-three, 30-minute and 60-minute programs; Fridays, then Sundays, then Saturdays, then Sundays
Syndication: NBC Orthacoustic; AFRS
Sponsors: Sustaining
Director(s): Andrew C. Love, Max Hutto, Bill Karn, Warren Lewis
Principal Actors: Vanessa Brown, Leon Ames, John Beal, Georgia Backus, Jack Edwards, Jr., John Lund, Joseph Vitale, Lurene Tuttle, Marion Richman, Paul Marion, Rolfe Sedan, Sidney Miller, Barry Sullivan, Bob Bruce, Charles Seel, Dan Riss, Doris Singleton, Frank Gerstle, Marvin Miller, Ralph Moody, Shepard Menken, Tom Charelsworth, Truda Marson, Wally Maher, Willilam Lally, Bert Holland, Beulah Bondi, Clarke Gordon, Clifton Webb, Earl Lee, Jerry Farber, John Lake, Lou Merrill, Matt Twombley, Russel THorson, Theodore Von Eltz, Albert Dekker, Lynn Allen, Noreen Gamill, Gloria Ann Simpson, Alec Herford, Bill Shaw, Eddie Bracken, Hal K. Dawson, Hans Conried, Herb Lytton, June Foray, Richard Warner, Anne Whitfield, Barbara Fuller, Charlie Lung, Ina Ronsley, John McGovern, Joseph Schildkraut, Lester Schott, Peter Rankin, Rudolph Anders, Adolph Menjou, Byron Kane, Clarice A. Ross, Theodore Von Eltz, Howard Jeffrey, John Ramsay Hill, John Newland, David Wolfe, Alma Lawton, Francis Pasco, Gale Gordon, Henry Hull, Jack Carroll, Jack Kruschen, Ken Christy, Si Stevens, Stanley Farrar, Brian Aherne, Donald Morrison, Jerome Sheldon, Joseph Granby, Maya Gregory, Norman Field, Paul McVey, Vic Perrin, Bob Bruce, Clark Cluney, Dick Anderson, Earl Keene, George Montgomery, Gloria Grant, Grace Lenard, Hugh Thomas, James Nusser, Jean Layton, John Dehner, Lawrence Dobkin, Lynn Allen, Lynn Whitney, Noreen Gamill, Paul Frees, Tony Barrett, Arthur Q. Bryan, Ben Wright, Boris Karloff, Constance Cavendish, Donald Morrison, Grey Stafford, Marlene Ames, Monty Margetts, Naomi Stevens, Terry Kilburn, Jack Edwards, Jane Webb, Steven Chase, Crauford Kent, Dan O'Herlihy, Eric Snowden, John Hoyt, Nigel Bruce, Tom McKee, Clark Cluney, Edith Tackna, Jan Arvan, Jerome Sheldon, Joe Forte, Lois Corbett, Sarajane Wells, Van Heflin, Angela Lansbury, Brian Aherne, Parley Baer, Raymond Lawrence, Dane Clark, Inge Jollos, Robret North, Tom CXharlesworth, Scott Elliott, Lou Krugman, Don Diamond, June Martell, Earl Keen, Paul Henreid, Ralph Montgomery, Dinah Shore, Don Messick, Margaret Brayton, Jacqueline DeWitt, Sarah Selby, Gwen Delano, Howard McNear, June Martell, Monty Margetts, Charles Dean, Alec Harford, Barry Drew, George Pirrone, Eda Reiss Merin, Leslie Dennison, Eileen Erskine, Norma Varden, Pat Aherne, Naomi Stevens, Evan Thomas, Gloria Ann Simpson, Grey Stafford, Phillip Friend, Doris Lloyd, George Pembroke, Maureen O'Sullivan, Walter Scott, Whitfield Connor, Berry Kroeger, Steven Chase, Miriam Jay, Margaret Brayton, Booth Coleman, Carl Harbord, Charles COburn, John Frasier, Nelson Welch, Queenie Leonard, Lynn Bari, Edmond O'Brien, Deborah Kerr, Phyllis Morris, Felix Nelson, Gail Bonney, Guy Bellis, Tom Conway, Margaret Brewster, Reginald Gardiner, Tudor Owen, John Agar, Lee Miller, Jerome Sheldon, Lynn Allen, Roy Engel, Carlton Carpenter, Florence Rabenal, Frederick Tozair, Gloria Ann Simpson, Gretchen North, John Sutton, Charles Seel, Henry Daniell, Preston Foster, Gayne Whitman, Richard Stapley, Doris Singleton, Billy Hammond, Henry Blair, Herbert Marshall, Kent Smith, Lois Corbett, Margaret Brayton, Gloria Grant, Guy Madison, Peter Rankin, Dennis Hoey, Jack Carrington, Jack Carroll, Joseph Granby, June Martell, Robert Hutton, Cesar Romery, Ken Christy, Stan Waxman, George Pembroke, Tom Dillon, Edwin Mills, Eleanor Audley, GeGe Pearson, H.B. Barnum, Jeffrey Silver, Johnny McGivern, Junius Matthews, Margie List, Michael Ann Barrett, Norman Field, Alice Backes, Eve McBeagh, Virginia Gregg, Kay Stewart, Paul McVey, Dick Ryan, Walter Burke, James Nusser, Jean Tatum, Ralph Montgomery, Gloria Hunter, Vivi Janis, Don Randolph, Nestor Paiva, Vansuela Young, John Kiernan, Glen Dinning, Helen Andrews, Bruce Payne, Lillian Buyeff, Louis Kebbee, Betty Nigis, Michael Chapin, Lynn Milland, Herbert Rawlinson, John Crosby, Marla Caneely, Patrick White, Nan Boardman, Gilbert Fry, Virginia McDowell, Pamela Henderson, Don Stanley, George Pembroke, Gerald Cleveland, Leonard Mudie, Robin Hughes, Peter McCabe, David McMahon, Lawrence Craigar, Sean McClory, Tom Dillon, David McCann, Marty Warren, Robert Boone, Fritz Feld, John Dodsworth, Helen Andrews, Pedro De Cordoba, Paul Dubov, Kay Stewart, Don Randolph, Dawn Bender, Gloria McMillan, Henry Blair, Jeanine Roos, Virginia Christine, Eddie Firestone, Jean Young, Otler Naysmith, Jay Novello, Joan Banks, Sam Edwards, Barbara Eiler, Lucille Alex, Marty Warren, Elizabeth Harrower, Constance Crowder, Kay Stewart, Scott Forbes, Joe Forte, Betty Harford
Recurring Character(s): Varied from production to production
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): Katherine Anne Porter, Ellen Glasgow, Voltaire, George Du Maurier, Edgar Allan Poe, Jonathan Swift, Joseph Conrad, Theodore Dreiser, H.G. Wells, John Galsworthy, Sinclair Lewis, W. Somerset Maugham, Ernest Hemingway, E.M. Forster, Lewis Carrolll, John Steinbeck, Graham Greene, Henry Fielding, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Makepeach Thackeray, Herman Melville, Charlotte Bronte, Mark Twain, Thomas Hardy, Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, Thornton Wilder, Richard Llewellyn, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Elizabeth Bowen, A.B. Guthrie, Stephen Himes, George Orwell, Mary Webb, Booth Tarkington, Henry James, Sherwood Anderson, Milton Wayne, Robert Penn Warren, Thomas Wolfe, John Dos Passos, Rudyard Kipling, Rebecca West, Virginia Wolfe, Shalom Asch, James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, H.M. Tomlinson, Maurice Cloche, William Faulkner, Moliere, Jean-Paul Sartre, Robert Lewis Stevenson, E.C. Bentley, Richard Hughes, Henrik Ibsen, Anatole France, Charles Morgan, Miguel de Cervantes, Henry Fielding, Stendahl, Victor Hugo, Gustave Flaubert, Fyodor Dostoyevsky
Writer(s) Ernest Kinoy, John Dos Passos, Frank Wells, George Lefferts, Milton Wayne, Edgar Marvin, Elizabeth Bowen
Adapters: John C. Wilson, Clarice A. Ross, Ernest Kinoy, Agnes Eckhardt, Morton Wishengrad, Richard Allen Simmons, George Lefferts, William Hodapp, Richard E. Davis, Virginia Wells, Morton Friedman, Frederick Schlick, Max Erlich, Brainard Duffield, Emerson Crocker, Leslie Reid, Alan Circle, Emerson Crocker, Alan Sergal, Mary Stewart Garden, Robert Gray, Horton Heath, Earl Hamner, James Speed, Vincent McConnor, Frank Wells, Irving Gloucester, David Driscoll
Music Direction: Morris Mamorsky [Composer]
Henry Russell, Albert Harris [Composer/Conductors]
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): John Milton Kennedy, Don Stanley, Hy Averback, Hal Gibney, Don Rickles
Commentators: Norman Cousins, Harvey C. Webster, Hanson Smith, James Hilton, J. Donald Adams, Clifton Fadiman, W. H. Auden, Mark Van Doren, Granville Hicks, I.A.R. Wylie, Amy Loveman, Henry Sidell Canby, Margaret Webster, Beaumont Bruestle, Hugh J. Coleridge-Mackarness, Edward Weeks, Orville Prescott, Diana Trilling, Henry Outland, Isabel Bolton, Ralph Bates, Edward Weeks, Hamilton Basso, Katherine Anne Porter, John Kieran, Thomas Quinn Curtis
Narrators: Theodore Von Eltz, John Lake, Ramsay Hill, Hy Averback, Bennett Cerf, Gayne Whitman
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
126 scripts (123 actually broadcast)
Episodes in Circulation: 112
Total Episodes in Collection: 114
Provenances:
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the radioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

We invite you to compare our fully provenanced research with the NBC University Theater of The Air log from the '1,500 expert researchers' at the OTRR, which they claim to be correct according to their 'OTTER log' that they represent as the "most authoritative and accurate vintage Radio database in the world":

OTRRpedia

Quite simply, the OTRR's NBC University Theater of The Air log is a work of incomplete fiction. We've also provided a screen shot of their current log for comparison, HERE, to protect our own further due diligence.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

As wonderful as this series was to listen to and catalog, the experience was somewhat marred by the realization that commerical otr skulduggery was yet again visited upon this prestigious series of programs.

There are two widely circulating references to the premiere title, Main Street, and an alleged repeat performance of Main Street. The circulating Trent's Last Case also contains an entirely different introduction, theme music and format, so both the 'premiere' Main Street rendition and the Trent's Last Case exemplar may be from a separate, perhaps academic, set of the NBC transcription series of the NBC University Theater canon. In any case, the issues with the two circulating episodes of Main Street are as follows:

  • They can be differentiated by the difference in the narrators: Ted Von Eltz narrates the presumed premiere broadcast of Main Street and Gayne Whitman narrates--and is audibly credited with the narration of--the second rendition of Main Street.
  • Unfortunately, the circulating alleged premiere recording of Main Street bears no resemblance to any of the other performances in the NBC University Theater canon other than the performed script:
    • The intro and exit music are entirely different
    • The script has the announcer stating that Main Street is "another in the series of" NBC University Theater presentations.
    • A person or persons unknown deleted both the outro and the entire Norman Cousins intermission narrative in an apparent effort to destroy the provenances inherent in the recording.
  • In the case of the alleged Episode No. 21 or 22 of the canon:
    • The recording is unquestionably a different performance of Main Street.
    • The date and sequence cited for the episode are impossible. The preceding epsiode, Alice In Wonderland, specifically states that NBC University Theater will return to the air in "exactly two weeks", hence the 9th of January 1949. And yet the date and sequence cited for the circulating repeat performance of Main Street has it dated January 2, 1949, as either Episode 21 or 22.
    • To further confuse the issue, some person or persons altered the intro of the second performance of Main Street to have it announce itself as "bringing you the third in our series of full-hour dramatizations of modern American and British fiction." But neither of the circulating renditions of Main Street were the 'third in a series' of anything.
    • If the second performance of Main Street had actually been part of, for example, a college or university-distributed transcription set containing a second performance of Main Street it could only have been either the 13th or 14th in the "series of full-hour dramatizations of modern American and British fiction." It certainly wouldn't have been recorded as the third in that series. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to understand why this must be. This series was not only a network Radio program, it had a college and university level lesson plan behind it. Indeed, a lesson plan that necessarily required tightly structured coordination and planning with the participating colleges and universities behind each and every episode--with the possible exception of the Summer Seasons.
    • Indeed, the only recording in the canon that contains that precise, very specific intro--verbatim--is Episode No. 12, An American Tragedy, which is unquestionably the recording from which the bogus intro to the circulating repeat performance of Main Street was derived.
    • There was no intermission narrative scripted for that performance. The only break is a station identification break.
    • In the Canadian-recorded rendition of that circulating recording, a station CHRE aircheck is heard and the credits are clipped and replaced by the exiting station identification for CHRE.

In addition, the circulating alleged exemplar of Episode No. 85, After Many a Summer Dies the Swan, isn't from the NBC University Theater canon at all. It's from NBC's New Theater canon.

Nor was the widely cited performance of "Great Expectations" part of the NBC Theater canon. It was a Hallmark Playhouse episode that aired on November 9, 1950 over an entirely different network--CBS. Naturally, the commercial otr vendors perpetuating this fraud artfully clipped all references to CBS from the recording. That's how they cover their tracks. Their unbounded arrogance in mounting these frauds is founded on their belief--fully justified in many cases--that 'otr collectors' never actually listen to what they collect in the first place. On the rare possibility that some actually do, the fraud artists simply monkey with the recordings to disguise or alter the provenances.

As to why these commercial otr charlatans would go to such absurd lengths in the first place, one must understand how competitive the tawdry world of commercial otr has been from its inception. By inserting one--or more--bogus exemplars of a specific canon than actually exist, they can fraudulently tout a larger--albeit fraudulent--number of episodes in their specific collection than in those of their perceived competitors. This is the same sleazy reasoning behind the absurd 'East Coast and West Coast' collections of exact same transcribed, syndicated, previously recorded episodes for sale from questionable otr vendors. It's also the reasoning behind failing to disclose AFRS or AFRTS-denatured recordings in a collection: to persuade unwitting collectors that the vendor possesses more circulating as-broadcast exemplars than his competitors. If you've got more of something, you're perceived as being better--or so the faulty belief goes. The fact that the 'more' is simply more erroneous, inaccurate crap doesn't seem to dissuade the buying--or downloading--public, so the immoral practice persists--and quite lucratively, so it seems.

This wide-spread commercial otr fraud mars the enjoyment of an otherwise fascinating pastime--for everyone. And in this instance, especially, given the historic importance of the NBC University Theater canon, such outright fraud simply forecloses any possibility of accurately and completely documenting and cataloging the series for posterity.

Sadly, the bottom line here is that anyone or any group that cites an Episode No. 21 or 22, Main Street, dated January 2, 1949, or an episode from the NBC University Theater canon titled and dated Great Expectations, 50-11-09, is simply a liar, a cheat and a fraud. There's no place in this historic pastime for this kind of nonsense. Any person--or any group--that perpetuates or condones this commercial fraud is as bad as the initial perpetrators.


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here are the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.

[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







The NBC University Theater Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
48-07-23
--
Giant On A Rack
Y
48-07-23 New York Times
11:30-12 World's Great Novels: "Giant on the Rack," by Thomas Wolfe WNBC.

48-07-23 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30 p.m.--Great Novels (WMAQ): "Giant on the Rack," study of Thomas Wolfe.
48-07-30
1
Main Street
Y
[Premiere; Fridays]

48-07-30 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): "
Main Street," with Vanessa Brown and Leon Ames (on WIBA at 8).

48-07-30 La Crosse Tribune - UNIVERSITY THEATER, a new program designed to bring the best stories of our language to the American people, will open on the WKBM stations tonight at 8 with Sinclair Lewis' "
Main Street." The story centers about theeffort of a doctor's wife to adjust herself to or escape from the small town in Minnesota where her husband practices. The series of hour-long dramatic broadcasts will continue for five weeks as part of NBC's experiments with a new education by radio plan. Under the plan, listeners who complete suggested background reading would be given regular college credits.
48-08-06
2
A Farewell To Arms
Y
48-08-06 Syracuse Herald Journal
AN HOUR-LONG dramatization of Ernest Hemingway's "
A Farewell to Arms" generally considered one of the highwater marks of contemporary American fiction, will be aired at 9 o'clock tonight over WSYR on NBC University Theater. Leading roles will be played by John Lund, Lurene Tuttle and John Beal. The novel is characterized by sharp talk, fast-moving action and a realistic attitude toward war. Setting is the Italian front in World War I; the theme is the love story of an American ambulance driver and a British nurse.
48-08-13
3
Number One
Y
48-08-13 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): John Dos Passos' "
Number One," picture of a demagog, with Barry Sullivan (on WIBA at 8).
48-08-20
4
Noon Wine
Y
48-08-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Beulah Bondi, John Beal in "
Noon Wine"; Clifton discusses work of Katherine Anne Porter (on WIBA at 8).
48-08-27
5
The Romantic Comedians
Romantic Comedians
Y
48-08-27 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Ellen Glasgow's "
The Romantic Comedians" (on WIBA at 8).
48-09-03
6
Candide
Y
[Changes to 30-minute format]

48-09-03 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Voltaire's "
Candide" (on WIBA at 8).
48-09-10
7
Peter Ibbetson
Peter Ibbertson
Peter J Biton
Y
48-09-10 Morning Herald
Joseph Schildkraut out of Hollywood is to have the lead when "
Peter Ibbetson" comes to life in the University theater of NBC at 9.
48-09-17
8
The Purloined Letter
Y
48-09-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Adolphe Menjou in "
The Purloined Letter" (on WIBA at 8).
48-09-24
9
Gulliver's Travels
Y
48-09-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Henry Hull in "
Gulliver's Travels" (on WIBA at 8).

Don Stanley announces
"the next productions will be a full hour in length. The first production will be 'The American'."
48-09-26
10
The American
Y
[Moves from Fridays to Sundays and changes to 60-minute format]

48-09-26 New York Times
2:30-:30-University Theatre: "
The American," with Alan Hale, Others-WNEC

48-09-26 Syracuse Post-Standard
2.30 p. m, WSYR— University theater presents Henry James' "
The American", with Alan Hale.

48-09-26 Amarillo Sunday News-Globe
     The NBC University Theater will be expanded into a full-hour Sunday afternoon feature starting today (1:30-2:30 PM on KGNC) and will be devoted to a dramatic survey of contemporary US and British literature. 
     Leading film players will take the chief roles in the hour-long dramatizations, which will originate in Hollywood.  The series will be the core of a home study literature course in the NBC college-by-radio plan.  The first bill will be a dramatization of the Henry James novel, "The American," with Clifton Fadiman as intermission commentator.  Subsequent broadcasts will treat British and American writers alternately.  Many of the works adapted for the series will be heard on radio for the first time.
     The list of British authors whose works are tentatively scheduled includes Joseph Conrad, H. G. Wells, John Galsworthy, W. Somerset Maugham, E.M. Forster, Aldous Huxley and Graham Greene.  American writers expected to be taken up in the series are Theodore Dreiser, Sherwood Anderson, Ellen Glasgow, Sinclair Lewis, Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, John Steinbeck and Robert Penn Warren. 
48-10-03
11
Lord Jim
Y
48-10-03 Abilene Reporter-News
1:30 University Theater "
Lord Jim."
48-10-10
12
An American Tragedy
Y
48-10-10 Mexia Daily News
1:30 University Theater: T. Dreiser's "
An American Tragedy."
48-10-17
13
The History Of Mr Polly
History Of Mr Polly
Y
48-10-17 Hutchinson News Herald
1:30 P.M. KWBW University Theatre (
History of Mr. Polly)
48-10-24
14
They Stooped To Folly
Y
48-10-24 Abilene Reporter-News
NBC--1:30 University Theater "
They Stopped to Folly."
48-10-31
15
Justice
Y
48-10-31 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Nigel Bruce in "
Justice," by John Galsworthy.
48-11-07
16
Arrowsmith
Y
48-11-07 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Van Heflin in "
Arrowsmith"; Granville Hicks speaks.
48-11-14
17
Of Human Bondage
Y
48-11-14 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "
Of Human Bondage," with Brian Aherne and Angela Lansbury; Clifton Fadiman, intermission speaker.
48-11-21
18
The Short Happy Life Of Francis Macomber
Short Happy Life Of Francis Macomber
Y
48-11-21 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--Preston Foster (WIBA): Ernest Hemmingway's "
The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber."
48-11-28
19
A Passage To India
Y
48-11-28 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Joseph Schildkraut in E.M. Forster's "
A Passage to India."
48-12-05
20
Three Soldiers
Y
48-12-05 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Dane Clark in "
Three Soldiers."
48-12-12
21
After Many A Summer Dies the Swan
Y
48-12-12 La Crosse Tribune
UNIVERSITY THEATER, a new hour-long NBC dramatic feature, makes its debut in the WKBH area at 1:30 this afternoon. First performance of the new series is a dramatization of Aldous Huxley's contemporary novel "
After Many a Summer Dies the Swan."

Announced as the
twelfth in the series
48-12-19
--
No Broadcast
--
[No Broadcast]

48-12-19 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 1:30
Today's Ch'ren.

48-12-19 New York Times
2:30-3:30--
Documentary: "Mother Earth," with Eddie Albert, Narrator, Others--WNBC.
48-12-26
22
Alice In Wonderland
Y
[Special Holiday Presentation]

48-12-26 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Diana Shore as "
Alice in Wonderland."

Announces "
Next week, NBC University Theater will take a one-week holiday"
49-01-02
--
No Broadcast
Main Street
Y
[No Broadcast]

49-01-02 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--Best Stories of '48 (WIBA): The 10 best news stories of the year are dramatized.

49-01-02 New York Times - 2:30-3:30--Drama: "
The Ten Best News Stories of 1948;" Robert Trout, Narrator--WNBC.





49-01-09
23
The Grapes Of Wrath
Y
49-01-09 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "
The Grapes of Wrath," with Jane Darwell as Ma Joad.

Announced as the
fifteenth in the series
49-01-16
24
All the King's Men
Y
49-01-02 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Wayne Morris in "
All the King's Men."
49-01-23
25
The Ministry Of Fear
Ministry of Fear
Y
49-01-12 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Alan Mowbray in "
Ministry of Fear," spy story.





49-01-30
26
Noon Wine
N
[Mid-Term Production, by popular demand; a rebroadcast of Noon Wine]

49-01-30 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "
Noon Wine," with Beulah Bondi, John Beal.

49-01-30 New York Times
2:30-3:30--University Theatre: "Noon Wine," with Beulah Bondi--WNBC.
49-02-06
27
Gulliver's Travels
Y
[Mid-Term Production, by popular demand; a rebroadcast of Gulliver's Travels]

49-02-06 Kingsport Times-News
English and American novels, from Jonathan Swift to Henry James, will be brought to life on the NBC University Theater program during the coming 17 weeks. In the first broadcast of the new series, to be heard over WKPT this afternoon from 2:30 to 3:30, Henry Hull will play the leading role in Swift's "
Gulliver's Travels." At intermission time, critic Mark Van Doren will comment on the novel. On succeeding Sunday afternoons, dramatizations will be presented of works by Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Herman Melville, and Thomas Hardy...to name only five of the 17 authors. Each week a noted Broadway or Hollywood personality will be starred and intermission commentators will include James Hilton, I.A.R. Wyliel, Henry Scidel Canby, and J. Donald Adams.





49-02-13
28
Tom Jones
Y
[New Semester Begins]

49-02-13 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "Tom Jones."
49-02-20
29
Pride and Prejudice
Y
49-02-20 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "Pride and Prejudice," with Angela Lansbury.
49-02-27
30
The Heart Of Midlothian
Heart of Mid-Lothian
Y
49-02-27 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Maureen O'Sullivan in "The Heart of Midlothian."

49-03-06
31
Tales of Edgar Allan Poe
Tales of Edgar Allen Poe
Y
49-03-06 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): three Edgar Allen Poe tales; Joseph Schildkraut, narrator.
49-03-13
32
The Pickwick Papers
Y
49-03-13 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Charles Coburn in "Pickwick Papers."
49-03-20
33
The Marble Faun
The Marble Fawn
Y
49-03-20 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "The Marble Faun," with Lynn Bari; Mark Van Doren, intermission speaker.
49-03-27
34
The History of Henry Esmond, Esquire
Henry Esmond
Y
49-03-27 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Edmond O'Brien in "
Henry Esmond."
49-04-03
35
Jane Eyre
Y
49-04-03 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Deborah Kerr in "Jane Eyre."
49-04-10
36
Moby Dick
Y
49-04-10 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "
Moby Dick," with Henry Hull; commencement exercises with Pres. J.W. Taylor, University of Louisville.
49-04-17
37
Huckleberry Finn
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Y
49-04-17 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Dean Stockwell in "
Huckleberry Finn."

Announces
The Way of All Flesh as next
49-04-24
38
The Way of All Flesh
Y
49-04-24 Wisconsin State Journal
12:30 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Tom Conway in "
The Way of All Flesh" (on WIBA at 1:30).
49-05-01
39
The Mayor of Casterbridge
Y
49-05-01 La Crosse Tribune
UNIVERSITY THEATER will present an hour-long dramatization of Thomas Hardy's "
Mayor of Casterbridge." The story concerns a self-made man who is haunted by the knowledge that he sold his family into slavery before his good fortune began.
49-05-08
40
The Red Badge of Courage
Y
49-05-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): "The Red Badge of Courage."
49-05-15
41
Heart Of Darkness
Y
49-05-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Briane Aherne in "Heart of Darkness," by Joseph Conrad.
49-05-22
42
The Age of Innocence
Y
[Program skips at close]

49-05-22 New York Times - 2:30-3:30--University Theatre: "
The Age of Innocence," with John Sutton--WNBC.
49-05-29
43
The Ambassadors
Y
49-05-29 Wisconsin State Journal
1:30 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): Henry Daniell in "
The Ambassadors," by Henry James.
49-06-05
44
The Short, Happy Life of Francis Macomber
Y
[Repeat Performance]

49-06-05 Democrat And Leader
1:30 O'CLOCK, NBC University Theater -- "
The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"--WOC.
49-06-12
45
A Passage To India
Y
49-06-12 New York Times
2:30-3:30 University Theatre: "
A Passage to India"--WNBC.





49-06-18
46
What Makes Sammy Run
N
[Beginning of Summer Schedule; Moves to Saturdays]

49-06-18 New York Times
6:30-7:30--University Theatre: Lionel Barrymore and Nancy Davis, guests--WNBC.
49-06-25
47
Brighton Rock
N
49-06-25 Wisconsin State Journal
4:30 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): "
Brighton Rock;" Margaret Webster, intermission speaker.
49-07-02
48
The Ides Of March
Y
49-07-02 Morning Herald
The University Theater, now at 6:30, will have for NBC the story of "
The Ides of March" with Henry Hull playing the lead.
49-07-09
49
Goodby, Mr Chips
Y
49-07-09 New York Times
6:30-7:30--University Theatre: "
Goodbye, Mr. Chips," with Herbert Marshall; Hugh J. Coleridge Mackarness, Speaker--WNBC.
49-07-16
50
Point Of No Return
Y
49-07-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 4:30 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Kent Smith in "Point of No Return;" Edward Weeks, commentator.
49-07-23
51
How Green Was My Valley
Y
49-07-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 4:30 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): Donald Crisp in "How Green Was My Valley."
49-07-30
52
This Side Of Paradise
Y
49-07-30 New York Times - 6:30-7:30--University Theatre: "This Side of Paradise," With Guy Madison--WNBC.
49-08-06
53
The Death Of the Heart
Y
49-08-06 New York Times - 6:3007:30--University Theatre: "The Death of the Heart," With Maureen O'Sullivan--WNBC.
49-08-13
54
The Big Sky
Y
49-08-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 4:30 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): "The Big Sky," with Robert Hutton.
49-08-20
55
The Crusaders
Y
49-08-20 New York Times - 6:30-7:30--University Theatre: "The Crusaders," With Cesar Romero; Prof. Harry C. Webster, Comments--WNBC.
49-08-27
56
1984
Y
49-08-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 4:30 p.m.--University Theater (WMAQ): David Niven in George Orwell's "1984."
49-09-03
57
Precious Bane
Y
[End of Summer schedule]

49-09-03 New York Times - 6:30-7:30--University Theatre: "
Precious Bane," With Maureen O'Sullivan and Dan O'Herlihy; Harvey C. Webster, Comments--WNBC.

Don Stanley announces that "
With today's broadcast of "Precious Bane" the NBC University Theater concludes its Summer schedule and departs for a two-week vacation. We'll be back three weeks from now. Your local newspaper will list the day and time. "





49-09-25
58
Penrod
Y
[Begins the Autumn Semester and name changes to NBC Theater]

49-09-25 Wisconsin State Journal
1:00 p.m.--University Theater (WIBA): returns to the air with Booth Tarkington's "
Penrod."
49-10-02
59
The Portrait Of A Lady
Y
49-10-02 New York Times
2-3--University Theatre: "
Portrait of a Lady"--WNBC.
49-10-09
60
The House Of Mirth
Y
49-10-09 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "The House of Mirth"--WNBC.
49-10-16
61
Sister Carrie
Y
49-10-16 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "Sister Carrie"--WNBC.

Time Magazine - Monday, Oct. 17, 1949
Radio: Alias
For more than a year NBC's University Theater (Sun. 2 p.m.) has been dramatizing important works of modern literature, e.g., Forster's A Passage to India and Huxley's After Many a Summer Dies the Swan, with casts including such important movie stars as Herbert Marshall and Deborah Kerr. The program was a cultural hit; six U.S. universities have offered home-study courses in conjunction with the show. But it was no big-audience hit.

Last week the show got a change in name: this season it will be NBC Theater. Explained NBC's press department: "We thought the word 'university' was scaring listeners away."
49-10-23
62
The Romantic Comedians
Y
49-10-23 New York Times
2-3--NBC Theatre: "
The Romantic Comedians"--WNBC.
49-10-30
63
Dark Laughter
Y
49-10-30 New York Times
2-3--NBC Theatre: "Dark Laughter"--WNBC.
49-11-06
64
Dodsworth
Y
49-11-06 Wisconsin State Journal
1:00 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
Dodsworth."
49-11-13
65
Babylon Revisited
Babalon Revisited
Y
49-11-13 New York Times
2-3--NBC Theatre: "
Babylon Revisited"--WNBC.
49-11-20
66
For Whom the Bell Tolls
Y
49-11-20 Wisconsin State Journal
1:00 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
For Whom the Bell Tolls."
49-11-27
67
Point Of No Return
Y
49-11-27 Wisconsin State Journal
1:00 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "Point of No Return."
49-12-04
68
The Wild Palms
Y
49-12-04 Long Beach Press-Telegram
11:00--KFI--One of the rare radio adaptations of a major book by William Faulkner, "
The Wild Palms," will be presented on "NBC Theater." It is the story of a modern couple who volluntarily divorce themselves from home and custom in their search for freedom.

Don Stanley announces "
Next week, the NBC Theater makes this broadcast time available for a celebration of Human Rights Day, by the United Nations. " "Be with us again at the NBC Theater on December 12th."
49-12-11
-
No Broadcast
--
49-12-11 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--Human Rights Day (WMAQ): Boston Symphony orchestra under Leonard Bernstein; Yehudi Menuhin, violinist; Collegiate Chorale; Brig. Gen. Carlos P. Romulo, Mrs. Eleonar Roosevelt, and Trygve Lie, speakres; music include choral movement of Beethoven's ninth symphony, Copland's setting of UN "Declaration of Human Rights," Chausson's "Poeme for Violin and Orchestra," "United Nations Hymn."

49-12-11 New York Times
2:00-WNBC--Boston Symphony Orchestra, Leonard Bernstein, Conductor; Collegiate Chorale; Yehundi Menuhin, Violin (Record).
49-12-18
69
You Can't Go Home Again
Y
49-12-18 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
You Can't Go Home Again," by Thomas Wolfe.

Don Stanley announces "
Next week, the NBC Theater gives place to a special Christmas Day broadcast from The Vatican. We return again the following week with a New Year's Day production of Charles Dickens' 'Great Expectations'."
49-12-25
-
No Broadcast
--
49-12-25 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--Christmas in Rome (WIBA) description of ceremonies as Pope Pius proclaims start of Holy Year; "Cratorio de Natale," musical dramatization with orchestra and chorus of St. Cecilia academy. 49-12-25 New York Times - 2-3--From Rome: Opening of the Holy Year, Pope Pius XII, Others--WNBC.
50-01-01
70
Great Expectations

Y
50-01-01 New York Times
2-3--NBC Theatre: "
Great Expectations"--WNBC
50-01-08
71
Manhattan Transfer
Y
50-01-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "Manhattan Transfer," by John Dos Passos.
50-01-15
72
The Ides of March
Y
50-01-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): Thornton Wilder's "The Ides of March."
50-01-22
73
At Heaven's Gate
Y
50-01-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "At Heaven's Gate," by Robert Warren.
50-01-29
74
Pale Horse, Pale Rider - Flowering Judas
Y
50-01-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): Katherine Anne Porter's "Pale Horse, Pale Rider" and "Flowering Judas."
50-02-05
75
The Track Of the Cat
Y
50-02-05 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "The Track of the Cat"--WNBC
50-02-12
76
The Light That Failed
Y
50-02-12 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "The Light That Failed"--WNBC
50-02-19
77
Victory
Y
50-02-19 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "Victory"--WNBC
50-02-26
78
The Patrician
Y
50-02-26 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "The Patrician"--WNBC
50-03-05
79
Tono Bungay
Y
50-03-05 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "Tono Bungay"--WNBC
50-03-12
80
There Is No Conversation
There is No Convention
Y
50-03-12 New York Times - 2-3--NBC Theatre: "There Is No Conversation"--WNBC
50-03-19
81
Angel Pavement
Y
50-03-19 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
Angel Pavement."
50-03-26
82
Howard's End
Y
50-03-26 New York Times
2-3--NBC Theatre: "
Howard's End"--WNBC
50-04-02
83
Mrs. Dalloway
Y
50-04-02 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): Virginia Woolf's "
Mrs. Dalloway."
50-04-09
84
The Nazarene
The Nazarine
Y
50-04-09 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "
The Nazarene," based on Sholem Asch's novel.
50-04-16
85
After Many A Summer Dies the Swan
N
50-04-16 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
After Many a Summer Dies the Swan," by Aldous Huxley.
50-04-23
86
A Portrait Of the Artist As A Young Man
Portrait of The Artist as A Young Man
Y
50-04-23 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man," by James Joyce.
50-04-30
87
Sons and Lovers
Y
50-04-30 Wisconsin State Journal
12 m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "Sons and Lovers."
50-05-07
88
England Made Me
Y
50-05-07 Wisconsin State Journal
12 m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
England Made Me."
50-05-14
89
Prater Violet
Y
50-05-14 Wisconsin State Journal
12 m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
Prater Violet."
50-05-21
90
The House In Paris
Y
50-05-21 Wisconsin State Journal
12 m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
The House in Paris."
50-05-28
91
Imperial Palace
Y
50-05-28 Wisconsin State Journal
12 m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): Arnold Bennett's "
Imperial Palace"; James Hilton, commentator.
50-06-04
92
Gallions Reach
Gallion's Reach
Y
50-06-04 Wisconsin State Journal
12 m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "
Gallions Reach," by H.M. Tomlinson.





50-06-11
93
Monsieur Vincent
Y
[Final Summer Season presentations begins]

50-06-11 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): summer series opens with "
Monsieur Vincent."
50-06-18
94
The Wild Palms
Y
50-06-18 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "
The Wild Palms."
50-06-25
95
The Doctor In Spite of Himself
Y
50-06-25 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): Moliere's "
The Doctor in Spite of Himself."
50-07-02
96
The Chips Are Down
Y
50-07-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): Jean-Paul Sartre's "The Chips Are Down."
50-07-09
97
The Time Of Man
Y
50-07-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "The Time of Man."
50-07-16
98
The Treasure Of Franchard
Y
50-07-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "The Treasure of Franchard."
50-07-23
99
Huckleberry Finn
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Y
50-07-23 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "
Huckleberry Finn."
50-07-30
100
Trent's Last Case
Y
50-07-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "Trent's Last Case."
50-08-06
101
A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court
Y
50-08-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court."
50-08-13
102
The Track Of the Cat
Y
50-08-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "The Track of the Cat."
50-08-20
103
A High Wind In Jamaica
Y
50-08-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "A High Wind in Jamaica," by Richard Hughes.
50-08-27
104
Hedda Gabler
Y
50-08-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "Hedda Gabler."
50-09-03
105
The Crime Of Sylvestre Bonnard
The Crime Of Sylvester Bonnard
Y
50-09-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): Anatole France's "The Crime of Sylvestre Bonnard."
50-09-10
106
Lost Horizon
Y
50-09-10 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 1:00 NBC Theater
50-09-17
107
Portrait In A Mirror
Y
[Last Summer schedule broadcast]

50-09-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "Portrait in a Mirror."





50-09-24
108
Don Quixote
Y
[Begin Final University curricula Season: World Literature]

50-09-24 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "
Don Quixote;" Margaret Webster, intermission speaker.

50-10-01
109
Jonathan Wild
Y
[Changes to 30-minute format, one hour later]

50-10-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): Fielding's "
Jonathan Wild."
50-10-08
110
Candide
Y
50-10-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "Candide."
50-10-15
111
Northanger Abbey
North Anger Abby
Northanger Abby
Y
50-10-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): Jane Austen's "Northanger Abbey."
50-10-22
112
Pere Goriot
Y
50-10-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): Balzac's "Pere Goriot."
50-10-29
-
Preempted
-
[Preempted]

50-10-29 Wisconsin State Journal
1:00
Catholic Hour, 1:30 Voices and Events.

50-10-29 New York Times - WNBC 2:00
Catholic Hour, 2:30 Voices and Events.





50-11-02
113
The Red and the Black
Y
[Changes to Thursday, returns to 60-minute format]

50-11-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): on new schedule; "
The Red and the Black," Stendhal's story of youth who used love affairs to serve his ambition.

Don Stanley announces "
The next presentation of the NBC Theater will be heard a week from Sunday night. That is, Sunday night, November 12th"
50-11-09
--
No Broadcast
Great Expectations
--
[No Broadcast]

50-11-09 Wisconsin State Journal
9:00 WIBA Screen Director's Playhouse

50-11-09 Mason City Globe-Gazette
"Hallmark Playhouse" stars Richard Todd in "Great Expectations."
50-11-12
114
The Bishop's Candlesticks
Les Miserables
N
[Moves back to Sundays at 9:30 p.m. in a 30-minute format]

50-11-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 9:30 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "
The Bishop's Candlesticks," segment of "Les Miserables."
50-11-19
115
The Baron Of Grogzwig
The Baron Of Grogswig
N
50-11-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 9:30 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "The Baron of Grogswig," from "Nicholas Nickleby."
50-11-26
116
The Scarlet Letter
N
50-11-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 9:30 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "The Scarlet Letter."
50-12-02
117
Bartleby, The Scrivener
Barneby, the Scrivener
N
50-12-02 New York Times - 6:30-7--NBC Theatre: "Bartleby, the Scrivener"--WNBC.
50-12-09
118
Madame Bovary
N
50-12-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 5:30 p.m.--NBC Theater (WMAQ): "Madame Bovary."
50-12-16
--
Preempted
-
[Preempted]

50-12-16 Wisconsin State Journal
WMAQ 5:30
Voices and Events

50-12-16 New York Times
6:30-WNBC
Voices and Events
50-12-27
119
The Gambler
Y
50-12-27 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): Dostoyevsky's "The Gambler."
51-01-03
120
The Kreutzer Sonata
Y
51-01-03 Capital Times
9:30 p.m.--NBC Theater--WIBA.
51-01-17
121
Daisy Miller
Y
51-01-17 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--NBC Theater (WIBA): "Daisy Miller."
51-01-24
122
The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg
Y
51-01-24 Capital Times
9:30 p.m.--NBC Theater: "
The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg"--WIBA.

Don Stanley announces "Be with us again at the NBC Theater a week from tonight when we will bring you a dramatization of 'The Withered Arm'."
51-01-31
--
Preempted
-
[Preempted]

51-01-31 Capital Times
A DRAMA-documentary on the American Bill of Rights will be broadcast over WIBA and WIBA-FM at 9:30 tonight.
The program will occupy the time spot usually held by the "NBC Theater."
51-02-07
--
Preempted
-
[Preempted]

51-02-07 Long Beach Press-Telegram
7:30--KFI Dr. James B. Conant, president of Harvard University, will speak on "The Present Danger" in a special broadcast tonight.
This broadcast will replace "NBC Theater" which is normally heard at this time.
51-02-14
123
The Withered Arm
Y
[Last broadcast of NBC Theater]

51-02-14 New York Times
10:30-11--NBC Theatre: Thomas Hardy's "
The Withered Arm"--WNBC.

Don Stanley announces "Be with us this time next week as NBC will inaugurate a new series of broadcasts entitled '
NBC Presents Short Story'."





AFRS 'Bookshelf of The World' Radio Log






Date AFRTS No. Title Avail. Notes
50-04-25
--
For Whom the Bell Tolls
N
[AFRS-denatured NBC University Theater broadcast of November 30th 1949]

50-04-25 Pacific Stars and Stripes
8-9—Bookshelf of the World (
For Whom the Bell Tolls)
50-06-13
--
The Patrician
N
[AFRS-denatured NBC University Theater broadcast of February 26th 1950]

50-06-13 Pacific Stars and Stripes
8-9—Bookshelf of the World (
The Patrician)
50-09-03
--
Main Street
N
[AFRS-denatured NBC University Theater broadcast of July 30th 1948]

50-09-03 European Stars and Stripes
AFN MONDAY
2200 Bookshelf of the World: "
Main Street"
50-09-17
--
Point of No Return
N
[AFRS-denatured NBC University Theater broadcast of July 16th 1949]

50-09-10 European Stars and Stripes
AFN MONDAY
2200 Bookshelf of the World: "
Point of No Return"
50-10-01
--
Jane Eyre
N
[AFRS-denatured NBC University Theater broadcast of April 3rd 1949]

50-10-01 European Stars and Stripes
AFN MONDAY
2200 Bookshelf of the World: "
Jane Eyre"
51-03-20
--
The Baron of Grogzwig
N
[AFRS-denatured NBC University Theater broadcast of November 19th 1950]

51-01-27 Pacific Stars and Stripes
6- 7—NEWS, Robert Barren (or Club 15), Bookshelf of the World (
The Baron of Grogzwig)






The NBC University Theater Radio Program Biographies




Ernest Kinoy
(Adapter/Writer)

Adapter; Writer; Author; Playwright; Director; Social Activist; Screenwriter; President, Writers Guild of America--East
(1925 - )

Birthplace: Unkown

Education: Columbia University
Awards:

1963, 1964, and 1977
Emmy Awards for Best Screenwriter
1982
Writer's Guild Of America--East; Christopher Award
2000
Vermont Governor's Award for Excellence in the Arts

2007 Vermont Congressional Joint Resolution 133, commending Ernest Kinoy for his body of work

Radiography:
1941 The Story Of Franklin Delano Roosevelt
1946 The Columbia Workshop
1947 Nick Carter
1948 Radio City Playhouse
1948 The World's Greatest Novels
1948 NBC University Theatre
1949 The Eternal Light
1950 Living 1950
1950 Dimension X
1951 Short Story
1951 The New Theatre
1951 Barrie Craig, Confidential Investigator
1952 Best Plays
1953 The Marriage
1953 Rocky Fortune
1954 Dr Six-Gun
1954 Inheritance
1955 X Minus One
1973 Project 73
1973 Future Tense
1977 The Grip Of Terror
1990 Audition Theatre

Ernest Kinoy, c. 1955
Ernest Kinoy, c. 1955

Playbill for the Stage Version of Kinoy's 'Golden Rainbow'
Playbill for the Stage Version of Kinoy's 'Golden Rainbow'


Astounding Magazine ad for Dimension X episode
Astounding Magazine ad for Dimension X episode


Astounding Magazine ad for X Minus One on Radio
Astounding Magazine ad for X Minus One on Radio



Ernest Kinoy was one of the most prolific and respected writers of Stage, Screen, Television and Radio. Though most often associated with his Science Fiction radioplays, his Radio work spans the entire gamut of genres from The Golden Age of Radio. His Radio writing was perhaps overshadowed by his later fame as a screenwriter for Television, but it's his prodigious output throughout the Golden Age of Radio that has consistently reached the greatest number of ardent admirers.

The son of public school teachers, Kinoy's sense of both moral and social obligation were basic tenets of his upbringing, and are reflected over and over again throughout his body of work. Kinoy enlisted in the Army during World War II, and upon his return to civilian life became a staff writer for NBC. His career with NBC spanned over twelve years of The Golden Age of Radio, and the earliest years of The Golden Age of Television.

During his NBC years his talents were tapped for both radioplays and television screenplays. During his tenure with NBC, his prolific output and extremely fast script-writing served both parties well. Remembered most for his Science Fiction series', Dimension X and X Minus One, he was equally busy with straight radio drama, such as The Marriage for Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy and NBC University Theatre, westerns such as Doctor Six Gun, detective drama such Barry Craig and Rocky Fortune, and stage play adaptations such as NBC's Best Plays.

During his college years at Columbia University he met and married Barbara Powers, who eventually became a leading light in her own right as a Doctor of Psychotherapy specializing in Eating Disorders. Married in 1948, their marriage endured 59 years until Dr. Powers-Kinoy's passing in 2007 of protracted pneumonia. Both of the Kinoys were social activists and jointly and separately contributed much of their respective careers to addressing social injustice and mental health issues.

Ernest Kinoy's biography was by no means limited to his Radio work which, by itself, comprised well over 340 adaptations and original radioplays. His work in Television spanned the second half of his life and garnered him two Emmy Awards and three other Emmy nominations. Three of his books were also adapted to The Stage.

Despite a highly active professional life, he also found time to serve the Writers Guild of America--East, as their President for three years. He was also the recipient of three of the Guild's most prestigious writing awards.

Mr. Kinoy, now 83, and still one of Radio's treasures, remains actively semi-retired in Vermont.



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