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Original Mr. I A Moto header art

The Mr. I. A. Moto Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Mr. I. A. Moto

John P. Marquand's first Mr. Moto hardback fetches breathtaking prices today. As with this first edition of 1935's No Hero selling for as much as $3500 US
John P. Marquand's first Mr. Moto hardback fetches breathtaking prices today. As with this first edition of 1935's No Hero selling for as much as $3500 US.

Peter Lorre stars as Mr. Moto in one of eight Mr. Moto features between 1937 and 1939
Peter Lorre stars as Mr. Moto in the first of eight Mr. Moto features between 1937 and 1939

The Mysterious Mr. Moto  (1938) had Peter Lorre hopping around many scenes like a bullfrog (via the acrobatics of Harvey Parry)
The Mysterious Mr. Moto (1938) had Peter Lorre hopping around many scenes like a bullfrog (via the acrobatics of Harvey Parry)

Peter Lorre in Mr. Moto Takes A Chance from 1938
Peter Lorre in Mr. Moto Takes A Chance from 1938

Mr. Moto Takes A Vacation (1939) was the last of the 20th Century Fox Mr. Moto franchise. Peter Lorre had opted out of his contract with 20th Century Fox and his character opted out with him
Mr. Moto Takes A Vacation (1939) was the last of the 20th Century Fox Mr. Moto franchise. Peter Lorre had opted out of his contract with 20th Century Fox and his character opted out with him.

Mr. Moto spot ad from August 8, 1950
Mr. Moto spot ad from August 8, 1950

Background

The inscrutable Mr. I. A. Moto, John P. Marquand's famous little Japanese detective first appeared to American audiences in a series of Saturday Evening Post serial installments featuring Marquand's mysterious, secretive, multi-talented international agent with a talent for disguise, beginning with No Hero, in 1935. No Hero was subsequently published as the novel, Your Turn, Mr. Moto, later that year. Saturday Evening Post featured Marquand's Thank You, Mr. Moto in 1936, again as a serial installment, followed by the serialized Think Fast, Mr. Moto, in 1937 and Mr. Moto is So Sorry, in 1938.

Earl Derr Biggers had been the first to bring an Asian detective to life with his ubiquitous Charlie Chan character, beginning with a series of novels featuring the brilliant father of thirteen in Biggers' 1914 classic, Seven Keys to Baldpate, arguably the most reprised story of his prodigious output.

Both authors' characters were regularly serialized in Saturday Evening Post and Colliers, but their characters' true fame came from their Film renditions. Any attempt to contrast and compare the two Asian detectives would prove far too exhaustive in this format, but some obvious similarities and differences would seem prudent, to differentiate them a bit for this article.

Charlie Chan was of Chinese lineage, was a devoted family man (to say the least), and practiced his trade in an international setting, but for an American 'Secret Service' organization.

Mr. I. A. Moto, by contrast, was of Japanese lineage, was a life-long bachelor by all accounts, was apparently extremely athletic, skilled in several martial arts, employed a vast array of disguises, and served as an International agent for an 'Interpol-like' agency.

In Film, Charlie Chan's prodigious big screen output comprised some forty-five serial and feature films between 1926 and 1949, in addition to a Television series in 1957 and a 1981 reprise of the character, portrayed by Peter Ustinov, in Charlie Chan and The Curse of the Dragon Queen. Charlie Chan was earlier portrayed by George Kuwa, Sojin, E. L. Park, Warner Oland, Sidney Toler, and Roland Winters. Kuwa and Sojin were of Japanese descent, E.L. Park was of Korean descent, Warner Oland was of Swedish descent, and Sidney Toler and Roland Winters were born in the U.S.

The Mr. Moto (Kintaro Moto in the films) character, by contrast, inspired:

  • Think Fast, Mr. Moto (1937)
  • Thank You, Mr. Moto (1937)
  • Mr. Moto's Gamble (1938)
  • Mr. Moto Takes a Chance (1938)
  • Mysterious Mr. Moto (1938)
  • Mr. Moto's Last Warning (1939)
  • Mr. Moto in Danger Island (1939)
  • Mr. Moto Takes a Vacation (1939)

Peter Lorre prominently starred in all of the original Mr. Moto films, followed only by Henry Silva in a reprise of Mr. Moto in The Return of Mr. Moto (1965). As Kintaro Moto, international secret agent, Peter Lorre, of Hungarian descent, brought the character to life in a more vivid and energetic manner than the comparitively sanguine characterizations of Charlie Chan in Film. Often romping around the sets of the various Mr. Moto films much like a circus acrobat (thanks to the brilliant work of stuntman, Harvey Parry), Mr. Moto's film character employed disquises almost as often as Sherlock Holmes. Moto's other marked characteristics were a Stanford education--where he was apparently an Olympic-class pole-vaulter as well, a background in archaeology, a connection to an international import-export firm in Japan, an extensive background in forensics (again, much like Charlie Chan), and a penchant for going deep undercover to catch his prey.

Mr. Moto comes to Radio with his original name

Charlie Chan had also beaten Mr. Moto to Radio, with Earl Derr Biggers' Charlie Chan in 1936. When it came time for Mr. Moto to make his Radio appearance in 1951, it was as Mr. I. A. Moto, John P. Marquand's original name for the character. Most other characteristics of Moto's back story remained similar to his Film depictions. NBC and producer Carol Irwin tapped Stage, Radio, Television and Film actor, James Monks, to portray Moto. Irwin and NBC's selection of Monks was in all likelihood in recognition of Peter Lorre's own strong identifcation in the role. James Monks was a distinguished actor in his own right by 1951, having already appeared in a series of Stage plays between 1936 and 1948. He'd also appeared in some 400 Radio productions beginning as early as 1938, many of them some of Radio's more prestigious productions, and often cast in an ethnic characterization of one form or another.

Carol Irwin would later go on to fame as the producer of the long-running and highly popular Mama, a CBS Television series, which had already begun airing in 1949. Indeed, due to Irwin's involvement with the increasingly successful Mama, her associate producer on Mama, Doris Quinlan, often filled in as the producer of Mr. I.A. Moto. James Monks, for his part, made his Film debut in How Green Was My Valley in 1942, to great critical acclaim, had appeared in one of Television's earliest variety programs, Hour Glass, in 1946, and later appeared again on the Broadway Stage opposite Rosalind Russell for 639 performances of Auntie Mame between 1956 and 1958. Canadian-born director, Harry W. Junkin, fresh from his extraordinary success with NBC's prestigious Radio City Playhouse, was tapped to both direct and write Mr. I. A. Moto. But the writer responsible for most of the Moto scripts was Robert Tallman of Cavalcade of America, Sam Spade, and Suspense fame. Jim Haines also penned a few of the scripts.

Originally ordered as twenty-six installments, it appears that only twenty-three programs ever made it to Air. We described the exceptional talent behind this production to underscore the difficulty of any Radio network during the early 1950s to launch an innovative, well-produced and well-written production during the waning days of The Golden Age of Radio. The surviving Mr. I. A. Moto exemplars in circulation are compelling, well acted, and well directed--easily the equal of some of the best exemplars of the detective genre that had ever aired previously. But NBC was forced to sustain the series for the twenty-three episodes that apparently aired. As we've related in other articles on these pages, NBC was absolutely ruthless with what we refer to as their 'foster children'--productions in search of a sponsor.

One can hear the deteriorating support NBC was giving the series with some of the subtle changes that it experienced after the first set of thirteen episodes. Fred Collins, one of NBC's finest announcers, gave way to Ray Barret. Carol Irwin's active involvement in the series gave way to her associate producer, Doris Quinlan. Promotional spot ads for the program began to disappear after the first thirteen episodes as well. And as was NBC's habit with their 'foster children', precious little in the way of synopses or teasers ever surfaced in the print media of the era.

Radio talent of the era was in abundance throughout the series. With Mason Adams, Julie Stevens, Bill Conrad, Alice Frost, John Larkin, Frank Silvera, Ross Martin, Bernard Grant, Bill Lipton, Ralph Bell and Connie Lemke, the series consistently attracted West Coast Radio's best and brightest. But alas, after only five months of broadcasts, NBC pulled the series. Had the series aired even three or four years earlier, there's no question it would have found a sponsor. Monks' characterization of Mr. Moto was spot-on, Robert Tallman and Harry Junkin's scripts were taut, clever, and innovative. Junkin's direction was crisp, fast-paced and consistent. And of course the aforementioned acting support was as good as Radio had to offer in 1951.

The series' signature elements are also of note. Beginning with a brief background on the case, Mr. Moto launched into sufficient exposition to suspensefully frame the ensuing script. Most broadcasts announced the cast and the production to come, and Mr. Moto would end most broadcasts with haiku-like homily or poem--Americanized for its audience.

Woulda-coulda-shoulda--the bane of most of the novel, well-produced, well-written Radio series' launched in the early 1950s. Golden Age Radio was on its way out, Golden Age Television was well on its way in. It probably shouldn't have been a 'zero-sum game' but that's precisely how it played out. Television was the networks' darling. Fine Radio drama--what was left of it--slowly dwindled into obscurity by 1957.

The exemplars that survive in circulation appear to be fairly representative of the entire series. One of three probable rehearals survives, as well as some of the better preserved exemplars of the tail-end of the series. The surviving exemplars are also highly literate and intriguing as representative mystery and epsionage genre programs of the era. Their scarcity also adds to their value in any collection.

Mr. Moto enters the 21st Century as compelling and innovative as he was in 1935. This is a tribute to John P. Marquand's gifted concept as much as it is to the well-developed aural and visual characterizations of Mr. Moto's genius as interpreted by Peter Lorre and James Monks over the years. With eight great feature films and some fourteen representative Radio interpretations, Mr. Moto endures as a fully-formed, fascinating character from the annals of fine American detective fiction
.

Series Derivatives:

None
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Mystery Dramas
Network(s): NBC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 51-05-20 01 A Force Called XO7
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 51-05-20 to 51-10-20; NBC; Twenty-six, 30-minute programs; Sundays, 7:30 p.m.
Syndication: NBC
Sponsors: Sustaining
Director(s): Arthur Hannah, Harry W. Junkin
Carol Irwin, Doris Quinlan [Producers]
Principal Actors: James Monks, Mason Adams, Julie Stevens, Bill Smith, Gene Gillespie, Frank Silvera, Dan Ocko, William Conrad, Alice Frost, John Larkin, Eileen Eckart, Brad Barker, Ross Martin, Rita Lind, Lyle Sudrow, Bernard Grant, Hadley Rainey, Bill Lipton, Ian Martin, Scott Tennyson, Connie Lemke, Ralph Bell, Edwin Bruce, Bob Haig, Gavin Gordon, Peter Cappell
Recurring Character(s): Mr. I. A. Moto, International secret agent.
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): John P. Marquand
Writer(s) Robert Tallman, Jim Haines, Harry W. Junkin
Music Direction:
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): Fred Collins, Ray Barret
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
26
Episodes in Circulation: 13
Total Episodes in Collection: 13 (Includes one rehearsal)
Provenances:
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the radioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


Existing, utterly unprovenanced logs of Mr. I. A. Moto have so confused the Radio collecting community at large, that virtually all of the errors and inconsistencies in those logs have entered wider dissemination, widely accepted as fact.

Weighing in on Mr. I. A. Moto was an understandably daunting proposition. The commercial otr community has tried for almost forty years to assign some order and chronology to this series. Sadly, the one thing they overlooked in their efforts was actually listening to their wares. Most of the clues to point them in the right direction were, for the most part, contained within the surviving recordings themselves.

OTRisms:

We invite you to compare our research with the Mr Moto log from the '1,500 expert researchers' at the OTRR. We've therefore provided a screen shot of their current log for comparison, HERE to protect our own ongoing due diligence and intellectual property.

They cite the implausible West Coast/East Coast issue we address below. They also title the The Karilov Paper [singular] as The Kuriloff Papers [plural]. In the clearer circulating recordings of The Karilov Paper, there's no mistaking that the name, Karilov has no 'u' in it. It's also quite clear that the plot revolves around a single paper, referred to as The Karilov Paper [singular]. We raise these issues for a few reasons:

  • The script for The Karilov Paper addresses only one piece of paper.
  • It's quite clear that the name is either Karilov or Kariloff. We hear Karilov. But it's certainly never been either Kuriloff or Kurilov.
  • 'Sabatoge' seems purely a simple misspelling error, naturally.
  • Persisent 'otr lore' referring to a mysterious West Coast/East Coast rendition of the same plot, that we address below.

With the wider availability of electronic newspaper archives, we can now fairly well reconstruct the chronological broadcast dates, which were, for the most part, consistent across the U.S.

'Otr lore' has long maintained a fanciful--albeit implausible--explanation for The Karilov Paper and The Baziloff Paper as being either 'east and west' versions of the same script, or even widely broadcast--though unscheduled--airings of the same, slightly altered script. In the final analysis, it would seem that David Goldin's surmise in his radioGOLDINdex is probably the most likely answer--The Karilov Paper was a rehearsal for The Baziloff Paper. In listening to both programs, it seems obvious that they're the exact same story line. The only thing altered between them are the surnames of the professor and his daughter, around whom the two scripts revolved. The differentiating elements between the two are the absence of the customary close in The Karilov Paper, including the sequence of cast, and next program announcement. The 'rehearsal' runs almost 31 minutes. The Baziloff Paper has all of the customary elements in their correct sequence, as well as accurately identifying the following broadcast, The Gleason Case (or The Victim) and is the expected length.

This was a sustaining NBC production. NBC was far from generous with their unsponsored programming; moving them all over the schedule, yanking them at the last moment in favor of a sponsored program, passing almost no details to the print media, and generally letting the production fend for itself if it failed to attract a sponsor by the thirteenth episode. It is therefore highly implausible that NBC, of all networks, would produce one version of one episode of a 26-episode series for the East Coast, titled The Baziloff Paper, and another version of that episode for the West Coast as The Karilov Paper. Nor was The Karilov Paper the only rehearsal of the run. David Goldin makes a persuasive case for his recording of Assignment: Rome as a rehearsal for Escape!. There may well be at least one more.

The premiere program announces "A Flight From Istanbul" as the following program. Goldin cites yet another program, "The Stolen Necklace" in that same approximate chronological timeframe. We believe they were either: a.) yet another rehearsal and production broadcast of the same story line, or b.) two separate production broadcasts.

The order of the last five programs of the run are clearly provenanced from the preceding broadcasts themselves. What remain at issue are the broadcast titles and order of broadcasts of the episodes that actually aired between Episode No. 11, The Wheel of Life, and Episode No. 19, The Schraum Method. This should be a total of no more than seven, unaccounted-for episodes. We'll address the recently circulating titles of the missing episodes:

  • The Yellow Robe (or the Lama's Amah)
  • The Voronzoff Necklace
  • Waltzing Matilda
  • The Beauty and the Avenger
  • The Shen Tsung Fan
  • The Three Numbers
  • The Unhappy Firebug
  • The Blue Cigarettes
  • The Kants of Kailuaneohe

The only one we might challenge out of hand is the title referred to as The Kants of Kailueneohe. Kailua and neohe are two words in the Hawaiian language. If that title is representative, then it might probably be The Kants of Kailua Neohe.

We provide the above information simply to disclose its existence.

The OTRCat site, for example, touted its set of what it calls 'Mr. Moto' as comprising a program with the unlikely title, 'Assignment G31' [until it corrected its errors after consulting our site--without attribution, naturally]. The show he called 'Assignment G31' is actually The Gleason Case, a.k.a., The Victim. Apparently the OTRCat site felt that two copies of The Victim were better than just one, so it generously provided a duplicate version that OTRCat retitled 'Assignment G31'.

OTRCat frequently corrects its numerous errors by consulting our logs and articles--without ever attributing the source of its corrections; entirely consistent with its long history of deceptive practices. Its solution to covering its tracks is to deny access to its OTRCat.com main site from any sites it's poached [poaching] from. Very clever when you think about it--just not clever enough, obviously. Other sites being routinely victimized by OTRCat are advised to look for its Overland Park, KS addesses in their web statistics or Google Analytics.

The Internet Archive's old time radio 'Mr. Moto' page also asserts the implausible 'east-coast west-coast version' of The Karilov Paper and The Baziloff Paper in their authoritative collection, although referring to the two titles as "The Kuriloff Papers" and "The Bazaloff Papers", even though there was only one paper at issue in either script.

Any internet search engine search will yield the usual otr misinformation in response to the following 'quoted' searches:

  • "The Kuriloff Papers"
  • "The Bazaloff Papers"
  • "A Force Called X07"
  • "The Schramm Method"

What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here's the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







The Mr. I. A. Moto Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
51-05-20
1
A Force Called XO7
Y
51-05-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ): new mystery series starring James Monks.

Announces
A Flight from Istanbul.
51-05-27
2
A Flight From Istanbul
N
51-05-27 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ)
The Stolen Necklace
N
51-06-03
3
The Smoke Screen
Y
51-06-03 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m.—Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.

Announces
Blackmail.
51-06-10
4
Blackmail
Y
51-06-09 Capital Times
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ)

51-06-10 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m.—Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks as Japanese detective
51-06-17
5
The Dead Land
N
51-06-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m.—Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.
The Karilov Paper
Y
[Rehearsal for The Baziloff Paper. The episode runs 30:57 and provides no announcement of the following episode]
51-06-24
6
The Baziloff Paper
Y
51-06-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m.—Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.

Announces
The Gleason Case: The Victim.
51-07-01
7
The Victim
Y
51-07-01 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m.—Mr. Moto (WMAQ):
James Monks as Japanese detective.

Announces
Project 77.
51-07-08
8
Project 77
Y
51-07-08 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m — Mr. Moto (WMAQ): with James Monks.

Announces
Sabotage.
51-07-15
9
Sabotage
Y
51-07-15 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. —Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.

Announces
Escape!.
51-07-2?
10
Assignment: Rome
N
[Rehearsal for Escape!]
51-07-22
10
Escape!
Y
51-07-22 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. —Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.

Announces
The Wheel of Life.
51-07-29
11
The Wheel of Life
N
51-07-29 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. —Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.
51-08-05
12
Waltzing Matilda
N
51-08-05 The Capital Times
7:30 p. m. —Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.
51-08-12
13
The Beauty and the Avenger
N
51-08-12 The Capital Times
7:30 p. m. —Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.
51-08-19
14
The Shen Tsung Fan
N
51-08-19 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ): detective story with James Monks
51-08-26
15
The Three Numbers
N
51-08-26 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ): detective story with James Monks
51-09-02
16
The Unhappy Firebug
N
51-09-09
17
The Blue Cigarettes
N
51-09-09 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ): detective story with James Monks
51-09-16
18
The Kants of Kailua Neohe
N
51-09-16 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ): detective story with James Monks as Oriental sleuth
51-09-23
19
The Schraum Method
Y
51-09-23 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WMAQ): detective story with James Monks as Oriental sleuth

Announces
The Crooked Log.
51-09-30
20
The Crooked Log
Y
51-09-30 Racine Journal Times
9:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (NBC)

51-09-30 Syracuse Herald Journal
9:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WSYR)

51-09-30 The Paris News
8:30 p. m. — Mr. Moto (WFAA)

Announces
The Case of The Stolen Convertible.
51-10-07
21
The Case of The Stolen Convertible
N
51-10-07 Long Beach Press-Telegram
7:00-KFI—Mr. Moto
51-10-13
22
The Strange Elopement of Professor Sloan
Y
[Saturdays at 9:30 p.m.]

51-10-13 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p. m.—Mr. Moto (WMAQ): starring James Monks.

Announces
The Case of A Dry Martini.
51-10-20
23
The Case of The Dry Martini
Y
[Probable last episode]

51-10-20 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p. m.—Mr. Moto (WMAQ): mystery story with James Monks.

No following episode announced.
51-10-27
24
Title Unknown
N
51-10-27 Hagerstown Daily Mail
10:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc
51-11-03
25
Title Unknown
N
51-11-03 The Bradford Era
10:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc

51-11-03 The Daily Messenger
10:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc
51-11-10
26
Title Unknown
N
51-11-10 The Bradford Era
10:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc
51-11-17
27
Title Unknown
N
51-11-17 The Bradford Era
10:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc
51-11-24
28
Title Unknown
N
51-11-24 The Bradford Era
10:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc
51-12-01
29
Title Unknown
N
51-11-30 The Paris News
9:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc

51-12-01 Abilene Reporter-News
9:30 — Mr. Moto Drama — nbc






The Mr. I. A. Moto Radio Program Biographies




James Monks
(Mr. I. A. Moto)

(1913-1994)

Birthplace: Pleasantville, New York, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1942 This Is Our Enemy
1943 Treasury Star Parade
1944 We Came This Way
1944 Words At War
1945 War Town
1945 Theater Of Romance
1945 Theater Guild On the Air
1945 Treasury Salute
1945 This Is Hollywood
1946 Grand Central Station
1947 The Clock
1947 Quiet Please
1947 The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes
1948 The Big Story
1948 The Aldrich Family
1948 Young Doctor Malone
1949 You Are There
1949 Cavalcade Of America
1949 Radio City Playhouse
1950 The Eternal Light
1951 Mr I.A. Moto
1951 American Portraits
1952 Tom Corbett, Space Cadet
1952 The Chase
1953 Rocky Fortune
1954 Inheritance
1956 X Minus One
1956 Official Detective
1960 The Right To Happiness
1962 Suspense
1964 Theater Five
James Monks with Paul Douglas on the set of Hour Glass circa 1946
James Monks with Paul Douglas on the set of early Television's variety program, Hour Glass circa 1946

James Monks with Rosalind Russell
James Monks with Rosalind Russell in the Broadway Stage production of Auntie Mame (1956)
James Monks was born in 1913, in Pleasantville, NY, into an artistic family. His older brother, John, became a playwright, Stage director, producer and actor. His sister, Rhoda, performed in local community theatre productions for much of her life. James Monks first appeared on the Broadway Stage in his brother's 1936-1938 production of Brother Rat.

After his debut in Film, with 1942's popular and critically acclaimed, How Green Was My Valley, Monks appeared in another six Broadway Stage productions between 1942 and 1958, culminating in 639 performances opposite Rosalind Russell in Auntie Mame (1956-1958).

James Monks had been peforming in Radio since the late 1930s in the New York area. Between 1938 and 1965, Monks appeared in an estimated 500 radio productions while continuing to work on the stage. Known for his versatility in performing ethnic characterizations, Monks seemed a natural for his leading role as Mr. I. A. Moto in the series of that name that ran over NBC during the Summer and Fall of 1951.

James Monks entered Television in 1946, appearing in one of Television's earliest variety-sketch drama productions, Hour Glass, with Paul Douglas. Monks continued to appear occasionally in Television until the mid-1950s, devoting the remainder of his career to the Stage.

All told, James Monks spent over forty years on the American Stage, some twenty-six years in Radio and eight years in Television. His characterization of Mr. I. A. Moto, remains his most remembered role, despite the numerous far weightier dramatic roles he enjoyed throughout his career.

Though his older brother, John, tended to experience far more critical acclaim, James Monks left his own, unmistakeable mark in the media arts. And for-dyed-in-the-wool Mr. Moto fans, James Monks will always be remembered as the only Mr. Moto to air during The Golden Age of Radio.



John Phillips Marquand
(Author)

Writer, novelist
(1893-1960)

Birthplace: Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.

Education: Harvard University

Radiography:
1939 Information Please
1942 Lux Radio Theatre
1949 NBC University Theatre
1949 MGM Theater Of the Air
1951 Mr I.A. Moto
John Phillips Marquand circa 1943
John Phillips Marquand circa 1943

John P. Marquand poses with his second wife Adelaide Hooker circa 1944
John P. Marquand poses with his second wife Adelaide Hooker circa 1944
Writer and novelist John Phillips Marquand was born in 1893 in Wilmington, Delaware. Marquand spent most of his formative years in Rye, New York, and Newburyport, Massachusetts, living mostly with his three eccentric aunts.

John Marquand studied at Harvard University on the strength of a scholarship he'd earned in high school, graduating in 1915.
After college, Marquand worked as Assistant Magazine Editor for the Boston Transcript before serving in the U.S. Army during World War I. He served in the First World War for two years. While a student at Harvard, Marquard had joined Battery A of the Massachusetts National Guard. His unit was activated and in July 1916 Marquard was sent to the Mexican border.

Returning home, he worked for a journalist and a copywriter. The success of his first novel, The Unspeakable Gentleman (1922), allowed him to devote himself to his creative writing pursuits, including short stories. His stories as well as serializations of his novels appeared in numerous magazines, including The Saturday Evening Post and Cosmopolitan.

Marquand's first Mr. Moto mystery, No Hero, was published in 1935. Throughout the series, Mr. Moto was portrayed as a member of the Japanese aristocracy, but with a marked talent for espionage. His books became so popular that Film offers soon followed. The Charlie Chan franchise had already been growing in popularity and--at least prior to World War II--America seemed equally intrigued with the notion of a brilliant Japanese secret agent as much as Charlie Chan had captured their imagination.

By the end of the 1930s, Marquand began satirizing New England's upper crust with such works as The Late George Apley (1937), the work that earned him his first Pulitzer Prize in 1938. Other well-known works by Marquand include H. M. Pulham, Esquire (1941) and Sincerely, Willis Wade (1955).

Married twice, Marquand had a son and a daughter with first wife Christina Sedgwick. In 1936, he married his second wife Adelaide Hooker. The couple had two sons and a daughter together, but divorced about two years before his death. John P. Marquand died of a heart attack on July 16, 1960, at Newburyport, Massachusetts.




Harry W. Junkin
(Writer/Director)

Radio, Television, Film and Stage Writer, Screenwriter, Director
(1919 - ?)

Birthplace: Winnipeg, Canada

Radiography:
1948-1950
Radio City Playhouse
1949
Big Town
1950
Top Secret
1951
Mr. I. A. Moto
1952
The Chase
1952
Mr. District Attorney

Harry Junkin ca. 1947
Harry Junkin, ca. 1947
Harry W. Junkin ca. 1970
Harry W. Junkin, ca. 1970
Harry W. Junkin, a Canadian-born screenwriter, did most of his work from the late 1940s through the 1950s in the U.S., and from the 1960s to the 1970s in Great Britain. While attending school in Winnipeg, Junkin became interested in the entertainment industry.

He tried acting while attending the University of Manitoba in the late 1930s. After service in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II, he went to work in advertising, first in Montreal and later in New York, before he decided to try writing scripts.

Initially, his work was limited to writing commercials, through which he also picked up experience as a producer. By the end of the 1940s, however, Junkin had graduated to authoring dramatic scripts and also producing radio shows, among them Radio City Playhouse from 1948-1949, Mr. I.A.Moto, Mr. District Attorney, Big Town, and Mr. Keen, Tracer of Lost Persons.

He made the leap to television in the early 1950s, and by the end of the decade had over a thousand radio shows to his credit as a writer, producer, or director, and 700 teleplays, for such series' as Studio One, Kraft Television Theatre, Lux Video Theatre, and Philco Television Playhouse, as well as the daytime drama Love of Life and network crime shows such as M Squad. Junkin also authored the screenplay to the MGM drama Slander (1956).

He moved to England at the end of the decade, and in the early 1960s served as script supervisor on the British television series' The Saint and Gideon's Way. He contributed scripts or served as a production executive on such subsequent series' as Department S and The Persuaders, and wrote the script for the two-part color Saint episode "Vendetta for the Saint," also released as a feature film. Junkin retired in the 1970s.



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