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Original Michael Shayne header art

The Michael Shayne: Private Detective Radio Program: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Michael Shayne: Private Detective

Original Mike Shayne movie Poster
Lloyd Nolan in Michael Shayne: Private Detective from 1940

Mike Shayne paperback illustration
Mike Shayne paperback illustration

October 30th 1944 spot ad for Mutual's Michael Shayne, Detective
October 30th 1944 spot ad for Mutual's Michael Shayne, Detective

Spot ad for November 27th 1944 episode of Michael Shayne, Private Detective highlights the show's first 'Phyllis,' glamorous Louise Arthur.
Spot ad for November 27th 1944 episode of Michael Shayne, Private Detective highlights the show's first 'Phyllis,' glamorous Louise Arthur.

Michael Shayne spot ad from Dec. 3, 1945
Michael Shayne spot ad from Dec. 3 1945


Casite Motor Oil and Additives sponsored the Mutual run of Michael Shayne
Casite Motor Oil and Additives sponsored the Mutual run of Michael Shayne

Radio's most enduring Michael Shayne was Wally Maher, here seen with lovely Cathy Lewis as Shayne's secretary Phyllis Knight.
Radio's most enduring Michael Shayne was Wally Maher, here seen with lovely Cathy Lewis as Shayne's secretary Phyllis Knight.

Illustrators of the caliber of Joe McGinnis graced the covers of many of the Michael Shayne paperbacks of the 50s and 60s
Illustrators of the caliber of Joe
McGinnis graced the covers of many
of the Michael Shayne paperbacks
of the 40s, 50s and 60s

 Michael Shayne spot ad from Nov. 10, 1946 featuring both Cathy Lewis and Wally Maher
Michael Shayne spot ad from Nov. 10 1946 featuring Cathy Lewis and Wally Maher

Michael Shayne spot ad for Hastings from November 19 1946

Veteran Film and Radio actor Edmund MacDonald filled in for Wally Maher during Maher's 1945 hospitalization.
Veteran Film and Radio actor Edmund MacDonald filled in for Wally Maher during Maher's 1945 hospitalization.

Jeff Chandler as Mike Shayne
Jeff Chandler as Mike Shayne

Donald Curtis as Michael Shayne
Donald Curtis as Michael Shayne

Robert Sterling as Michael Shayne
Robert Sterling as Michael Shayne

Vinton Hayworth as Michael Shayne
Vinton Hayworth as Michael Shayne

Richard Denning as Mike Shayne
Richard Denning as Mike Shayne

Union Oil ad promoting Michael Shayne Private Detective from January 7th 1945
Union Oil ad promoting Michael Shayne Private Detective from January 8th 1945

Michael Shayne spot ad from May 22, 1948
Michael Shayne spot ad from May 22 1948

Background

Davis Dresser's red-haired Irishman, Michael Shayne, weaved his way through several disconcerting incarnations over a twenty-seven year journey from pulp to paperback to feature Film to Radio, back to feature Film, back to Radio, to Film, then to Television.

Enroute, Davis Dresser leant his 'Brett Halliday' nom de plume to numerous ghost-writers--some good, some o.k., some not so much of either. Dresser himself apparently abandoned ole Mike Shayne sometime in the mid-1940s, reportedly done with crime fiction novels for good.

And, on his way up the popularity ladder, Mike Shayne got a boost from some of Film and Radio's finest, up and coming talent, as well as some of Radio and Film's most seasoned pros. The Michael Shayne feature films got their biggest boost from Lloyd Nolan's characterizations:

  • 1940 Michael Shayne: Private Detective
  • 1941 Sleepers West
  • 1941 Dressed To Kill
  • 1942 Blue, White and Perfect
  • 1942 The Man Who Wouldn't Die
  • 1942 Just Off Broadway
  • 1942 Time To Kill

Between the first seven Michael Shayne feature films and the last five feature fillms starring Hugh Beaumont [yes, that Hugh Beaumont, Beaver's Dad], Michael Shayne dippped his red-haired Irish toes into Radio for two years, listed simply as Private Detective, Michael Shayne, or Michael Shayne, Detective, and starring seasoned Film and Radio character actor, Wally Maher, with distaff support from Cathy Lewis. Thereafter, followed Hugh Beaumont's five more Film Michael Shaynes for PRC:

  • 1946 Murder Is My Business
  • 1946 Larceny In Her Heart
  • 1946 Blonde For A Day
  • 1947 Three On A Ticket
  • 1947 Too Many Winners

The best that can be said of the Hugh Beaumont renditions of Michael Shayne is that they gave Wally Maher a huge boost with his Michael Shayne character over Radio. Indeed, Davis Dresser himself, is reported to have enjoyed Wally Maher's portrayal of his two-fisted Irishman in favor of all other portrayals he'd seen and heard over Radio and Film. Mind you, that group eventually included Lloyd Nolan, Hugh Beaumont, Jeff Chandler, Donald Curtis, Robert Sterling, Vinton Hayworth and Richard Denning.

The geographic backdrops to Michael Shayne's adventures tended to migrate a bit over the years as well. Pulp's Michael Shayne tended to favor the Miami, Florida scene, whereas Michael Shayne of Film called New York his home. Over Radio, Michael Shayne first enjoyed California oranges over their Floridia cousins. And indeed, by the late 1940s, Michael Shayne picked up lock, stock, and barrel for New Orleans under Bill Rousseau's production and direction of The New Adventures of Michael Shayne and Broadcasters Guild syndication.

If you get the impression that Davis Dresser never really appears to have expressed any interest in maintaining a particular look, feel, or atmosphere for his premiere detective noir character, you've pretty much nailed it. Considering how far Michael Shayne--in all his numerous guises--eventually evolved, it's quite a tribute to the underlying character that he survived at all, embodied by so many disparate portrayals, and plopped down in so many unfamiliar surroundings.

About the only medium over which Dresser's publishers maintained a consistent 'look' or 'brand' to Michael Shayne was via print. Employing some of the era's finest illustrators--Joe McGinnis among them--the basic appearance of most of the Mike Shayne potboilers of the era gave a fairly uniform appearance through almost twenty years of publication and reprints.

Michael Shayne's Radio career

Wally Maher (center right) introduced Radio to Michael Shayne with a run of some 140 episodes of 'Michael Shayne, Detective' between 1944 and 1948. [Seen here are, left to right: Joe Forte as Lt. Farraday, Ruth Evans as the dead secretary, Cathy Lewis as Phyllis Knight, Wally Maher as Michael Shayne, and actors Richard de Graffe and Dave Taylor]
Wally Maher (center right) introduced Radio to Michael Shayne with a run of some 140 episodes of 'Michael Shayne, Detective' between 1944 and 1948. [Seen here are, left to right: Joe Forte as Lt. Farraday, Ruth Evans as the dead secretary, Cathy Lewis as Phyllis Knight, Wally Maher as Michael Shayne, and writer Richard de Graffe and producer Dave Taylor]

The feel of Michael Shayne over the years most noticeably evolved over Radio. Wally Maher's portrayal of Michael Shayne was not only the first over Radio, and the longest-running over Radio, but it was also the most fully developed over Radio. Aided by Cathy Lewis in her role of feisty bright Phyllis Knight, as well as by Joe Forte as Lieutenant Farraday, the family nature of the growing radio ensemble over the years put far more flesh on the bones of Brett Halliday's character than any other characterization that succeeded it. Maher's characterization of Shayne was so successful that for the remainder of Maher's career he actively kneaded Shayne's basic attributes into virtually every other detective or crime drama genre character Maher appeared in until his untimely death in 1951.

From the November 7, 1946 edition of The Cedar Rapids Tribune:

Wally Maher
Alias Michael Shayne

     The fellow who plays Michael Shayne every Tuesday night is no stranger to the role of crime fiction. Wally Maher figures he's been killed more times than any other actor working in radio. He's been chewed by alligators, attacked by vampires, gassed, shot and various other methods of elimination. Wally never played a tough guy until he came to California, his forte is light comedy. In only half a dozen out of 127 pictures has he played light comedy, the rest were heavies.
     After starting a radio career in his home town of Cincinnati, he went to New York where he won a host of theatrical roles. Then came Hollywood in 1935 where he continued his radio work and started on pictures. Wally likes comedy, so he likes Michael Shayne. He doesn't like to play tough guys so "Shayne" is as easygoing as a sleuth can be and still keep his self-respect.
     He likes to read detective stories, but his favoilte reading is American and Irish history, with, the accent on the latter. His grandparents on both sides came from Tipperary. He has three children, two girls and a boy. Two of the children look like their mother, who is of Italian decent, but Wally says all of them are Irish at heart.
     Wally can speak Italian, and when he was working as baggage clerk on the Southern Pacific, he used to go out and greet ths prisoner trains loaded with Italian PWs on their way through Glendale. He talked to them in Italian and used to get a kick out of watching their faces light up.
     With his extensive theatrical experience, Wally Maher is capably suited to the role of the "private eye," "Michael Shayne." His secretary-girl friend, Phyllis, is right in there pitching, too. For the best in mystery dramas, "Michael Shayne" is on the air Tuesday nights at 9 o'clock.


The last clip from the Radio Life photo-novella generously captures twelve members of the Michael Shayne ensemble cast
The last clip from the Radio Life photo-novella generously captures twelve members of the Michael Shayne ensemble cast---

Standing:
Ruth Evans, Dave Taylor, Richard de Graffe, Bernice Barrett, Wally Maher, Cathy Lewis Joe Forte;
Seated: Jack Edwards, Jr., Charlie Lung, Harry Lang, Virginia Gregg, Earle Ross.

Those who've had the chance to compare his characterization of Mike Shayne to, for example his Lieutenant Riley from Let George Do It, can't help but notice the similarities--and why not? If you've got a popular gig, let it ride. The public clearly couldn't get enough of it. Were it not for Maher's premature demise, one might easily imagine Wally Maher having evolved into one of the great, durable character actors of all time, much in the vein of Ken Christy for example.

As with many West Coast ensemble productions of the era, Michael Shayne: Private Detective soon evolved into a very secure set of well-explored character arcs, among which Cathy Lewis' character, Phyllis Knight, found herself more and more integrated into the scripts. Joe Forte's Lieutenant Farraday continued to grow into the role as well. If you're noticing a great many parallels between what you're reading--perhaps for the first time--about Michael Shayne, you might notice the increasing similarities to Let George Do It or Yours, Truly Johnny Dollar. Just as with a good gig, if a good formula is continuing to produce audience loyalty once you find the right ensemble/concept/scripting mix, then you'll naturally wish to milk it for all it's worth.

Freshness, innovation and novelty are the absolute life's blood of the entertainment industries. The true innovators of West Coast Radio were clearly onto something, as program after program, previously initiated on the West Coast, made the jump to full network exposure. The tight, clever, well-balanced ensemble productions emanating from the West Coast garnered previously unheard-of audience loyalty of the nature of that enjoyed by The Great Gildersleeve, Fibber McGee and Molly before it, and naturally Amos 'n' Andy and Lum 'n' Abner before them--but in a matter of months, and years, instead of decades or more.

All the above having been said, it was perhaps The New Adventures of Michael Shayne that was the most jarring of all Michael Shayne's incarnations. Bill Rousseau's image of Michael Shayne was more after the pattern of Jack Webb's characterizations of Pat Novak for Hire, or Johnny Madero, Pier 23--but amp'd up about 150% in the process. From some seventeen potential candidates, Rousseau felt that Jeff Chandler was the natural pick over his peers. Chandler could both amp up the electricity of Shayne's character and raise the introductory prologues about 10 decibels, as well as completely reinventing Michael Shayne in Chandler's own mold.

Chandler was aided by no less than Jack Webb himself, who'd already collaborated often with Bill Rousseau in several projects and who leant his talent to the New Adventures of Michael Shayne--entirely uncredited. Indeed, many of Webb and Rousseau's old friends, allies and peers alike, leant their considerable weight to The New Adventures of Michael Shayne over it's compartively short run.

But much like the Pat Novak, For Hire productions that competed with it, the important initial formula and ensemble cast, soon gave way to several other incarnations. Chandler left the production after some 26 performances, to be replaced, briefly, by Film actor, Donald Curtis for two broadcast episodes. Thereafter, Robert Sterling, best known for his work in Television's Topper as one of the ghosts with the most. And finally transitioning to Vinton Hayworth for the last twenty-five episodes of The Adventures of Michael Shayne. In even more of a transition, Michael Shayne returned to his roots in Florida for the last incarantion of Michael Shayne over Radio.

As with many of the more action-oriented genres from the Golden Age of Radio, The Adventures of Michael Shayne eventually made the jump to Television, albeit it a bit later than many of its predecessors--in 1961 in the guise of Richard Denning. Denning portrayed Michael Shayne as a far less emotional, far more calculating and far and away less 'Irish' than all of his precessors--combined. But the new formula held up for another thirty-two episodes. Based, as in its last Radio incarnation, in Miami, Phyllis Hamilton became 'Lois Hamilton' in the TV version, performed by two different actresses. Jerry Paris and Gary Clarke alternated in sidekick duties as Tim Rourke and Dick Hamilton, respectively. Not the franchise's greatest send-up by any means--one is reminded of "in like a lion out like a lamb." But it did, indeed extend the franchise to a total of almost 35 years. Not bad for a character its creator had all but abandoned for twenty of those years.

The specific varying flavors of the Michael Shayne incarnations over the years are also worth discussion. Wally Maher's original Michael Shayne over Radio was presented as a comedy-mystery. As such the interplay and byplay between Cathy Lewis as Phyllis Knight and Wally Maher as Michael Shayne, was often complimented by Joe Forte as Lieutenant Farraday. The dialogue wasn't as crisp as what one may have heard in a Film version of The Thin Man, for example, or even a Film version of Mike Shayne for that matter. But it was humorous, witty, ironic and pretty much what radio listeners had come to expect from a comedy detective mystery series.

What elevated it a bit above its peers of the day, were the talents of its stars, Wally Maher and Cathy Lewis. Wally Maher, as already reported above was a particular favorite of Brett Halliday. And of course Cathy Lewis was a brilliant, versatile, highly sympathetic and convincing actor in her own right. Joe Forte brought the weight of decades of Radio character acting behind him, and the Director for most of the Wally Maher run was Michael Raffeto, better known for his long running characters in One Man's Family and virtually all of Carleton E. Morse's adventure dramas of the era.

Bill Rousseau's interpretation of Michael Shayne was an almost 180 degree departure from all previous incarnations of the Florida-based detective. For one, he was plopped down in New Orleans for the transcribed, syndicated run under the Broadcasters' Guild. Another departure was the choice of Jeff Chandler as the protagonist, the elimination of a steady love interest or sidekick, and the introduction of stalwart contributors to Rousseau's other radio noir productions such as Jack Webb, William Conrad, Tudor Owen, and Raymond Burr. Michael Shayne became a clone of Pat Novak almost overnight. Chandler's twenty-six characterizations of Mike Shayne were punctuated by continual impending peril, a series of gunshots whizzing past his ears at most opening credits, or the intent to convey an omnipresent doom surrounding his character's every movement from episode to episode. The twenty-six scripts were as follows:

  • A Problem in Murder
  • The Man Who Lived Forever (a.k.a. Anthony Carrell; The Man Who Couldn't Die)
  • The Case of Tahlani's Tears
  • The Case of The Bayou Monster
  • The Case Of the Blood-Stained Pearls
  • The Case of the Borrowed Heirloom
  • The Case Of the Carnival Killer
  • The Case Of the Constant Companion
  • The Case of the Corresponding Corpse
  • The Case Of the Crooked Wheel
  • The Case of the Deadly Dough
  • The Case of the Eager Victim (a.k.a. The Case of the Willing Victim)
  • The Case of the Generous Killer
  • The Case of the Grey-Eyed Blonde
  • The Case of the High Priced Twins
  • The Case of the Hunted Bride
  • The Case Of the Left Handed Fan
  • The Case of the Mail Order Murders
  • The Case of the Model Murder
  • The Case of the Phantom Gun
  • The Case of the Phantom Neighbor
  • The Case of the Popular Corpse
  • The Case of the Purloined Corpse
  • The Case of the Wandering Finger Prints
  • The Hate That Killed
  • The Pursuit Of Death

That Chandler pulled it off for twenty-six episodes is itself a tribute to his talent. But as with all good things, Bill Rousseau's syndication of Michael Shayne ran its course after one short season of transcriptions were in the can. The series ran on in Canada, Jamaica, various parts of the U.S., and reportedly in Australia and Great Britain as well for the following three years, until ABC determined to take one final run at Michael Shayne.

ABC's take on Michael Shayne was not without its growing pains. ABC inaugurated their 1952 Run during the pinnacle of Election Year fever on October 7, 1952 (on the West Coast) or October 9, 1952 (on the East Coast). With Election Day only weeks away, The Adventures of Michael Shayne first aired with a placeholder in the role of the lead. Film actor Donald Curtis was brought in for the first two to four episodes to kick off the first ABC season. After only two broadcasts, the remaining two broadcasts were preempted in most parts of the country for either eleventh hour senatorial election appeals in prime time, or for the Election Results coverage itself.

By the time that ABC's Michael Shayne was gaining some traction, the network pulled Donald Curtis, citing 'other commitments' and installed future Topper Television co-star Robert Sterling in Curtis' place. Sterling portrayed Michael Shayne for ten episodes, to be replaced, yet again, by veteran Radio, Stage, Film and Television actor, Vinton Hayworth. Hayworth remained in the role from January 15, 1953 until the very last Adventure of Michael Shayne over Radio on July 10, 1953--a total of twenty-five episodes in the role.

ABC's conception of The Adventures of Michael Shayne was another jarring departure, compared to Bill Rousseau's syndicated send up starring Jeff Chandler. For the ABC run, Michael Shayne returns to his roots in Miami, Florida. Secretary Phyllis Knight from Cathy Lewis' characterization in the original series with Wally Maher returns to the format, but in the personage of Lucy Hamilton this time around and portrayed by Dorothy Donahue.

The ABC series, once it finally sorted out its cast, proved to be an adequate depiction of Brett Halliday's original character, albeit it of a somewhat less piquant variety. But the series held up well enough to last another 39 episodes over Radio. Not bad, considering that in the view of most Golden Age Radio historians, the Golden Age of Radio had passed the Golden mantel to Television by around 1951 or 1952. That Radio's smallest network--at the time--could relaunch and recapture a fourth major incarnation of Michael Shayne over Radio when everyone was making a mass exodus to Television remains an accomplishment in itself.

Michael Shayne faded off into the Radio sunset, except for seemingly endless repeats of the twenty-six, syndicated Jeff Chandler episodes that kept resurfacing well into 1954 during the era. Radio's last flirtation with Jeff Chandler's Michael Shayne would come during the 1968-1969 period with the AFRTS- denatured Bill Rousseau-syndicated run of twenty-six programs. The AFRTS transcriptions aired in Europe and Southeast Asia over the Armed Forces Network and Far East Network respectively.

But Radio wasn't quite the end of the line for durable Michael Shayne. Ida Lupino, Dick Powell, Charles Boyer and David Niven's Television upstart, Four Star Productions aired thirty-two, hour long broadcasts of "Michael Shayne" over the National Broadcasting Company in 1960 and 1961. Starring Richard Denning as Michael Shayne, the series brings back Lucy Hamilton from the last Radio rendition of Michael Shayne, as portrayed first by Patricia Donahue, then Margie Regan.

The Television series spawned a brief series of Dell Comic Book adventures of Mike Shayne, but it died with the Television series after a few issues based not on the TV program but some of Brett Halliday's earliest Michael Shayne novellas.

Michael Shayne's had quite a run at fame, fortune and notoriety through the years. As resilient as he's proven to be thus far, there's no reason not to imagine him resurfacing yet again in the near future. For the present we have twelve feature films, some 45 paperbacks and novellas, at least sixty circulating exemplars of his Radio incarnations, and we understand a full release of Michael Shayne's first and only Television season is on the horizon.

The red-haired Irishman lives on . . .

Dee-Tails: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies

Series Derivatives:

The Adventures of Michael Shayne, Private Detective; Michael Shane; Mike Shayne; The New Adventures of Michael Shayne; AFRS ''Michael Shayne''
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Mystery Dramas
Network(s): KHJ [Mutual--Don Lee]; MBS; ABC Blue Network [West]; The AFRS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 1944-46 KHJ [Mutual--Don Lee] Run:
44-10-30 01
Title Unknown

1946-1947 MBS Run:
46-10-08 01 The Nightmare Murder

1948 Summer MBS Run:
48-05-23 01
Title Unknown

1951 Winnipeg Run:
51-12-05 01 The Case of the Hunted Bride

1952-1953 ABC Run [East Coast] :
52-10-07 01
Title Unknown

1952-1953 ABC Run [West Coast] :
52-10-09 01
Title Unknown
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 1944-46 KHJ [Don Lee--Mutual] Run: 44-10-16 to 46-09-30; Don Lee-Mutual [KFRC]; One hundred and four, 27-minute programs; Tuesdays

1946-1947 MBS Run: 46-10-08 to 47-01-14; Fifteen, 28-minute programs; Thursdays

1948 MBS Run: 48-05-23 to 53-??-??; Syndicated; Twenty-six, 25-minute programs; Varying days and times.

1951 Winnipeg Run: 51-12-05 to 52-05-30; CJOB; Twenty-six, 25-minute programs;

1952-1953 ABC Run [East Coast] : 52-10-07 to 53-07-10; ABC; Thirty-nine, 28-minute programs; Tuesdays

1952-1953 ABC Run [West Coast] : 52-10-09 to 53-07-10; ABC; Thirty-nine, 28-minute programs; Thursdays

Syndication: The Broadcasters Guild, Inc. [BGI]; Searle & Parks, Inc.
Sponsors: Union Oil of Southern California; Casite Motor Oil [Hastings]; Patricia Stevens Finishing School; Barr's Shoes;
Director(s): Dave Taylor [Producer-Director]
Michael Raffetto; William P. Rousseau
Principal Actors: Wally Maher, Louise Arthur, Edmund MacDonald, Charlie Lung, Ruth Evans, Dave Taylor, Richard de Graffe, Bernice Barrett, Joe Forte, Jack Edwards, Jr., Harry Lang, Virginia Gregg, Earle Ross, Bernice Barrett, Jeff Chandler, Donald Curtis, Robert Sterling, Vinton Haworth, Cathy Lewis, Jack Webb.
Recurring Character(s): Michael Shayne [Wally Maher, Edmund MacDonald, Jeff Chandler, Donald Curtis, Robert Sterling, Vinton Hayworth]; Phyllis Knight [Louise Arthur, Cathy Lewis]; Lieutenant Farraday [ Joe Forte]; Police Sergeant [Charlie Lung]; Lieutenant LeFevre [Jack Webb];
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): Davis Dresser writing as Brett Halliday
Writer(s) Richard de Graffe, David Taylor, Robert Webster Light, Leonard St Clair, Jerome Epstein, Larry Marcus
Music Direction: Bernard Katz; Len Selbow, Johnny Duffy [Organ];
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): John Lang, Ben Alexander, Charles Arlington,
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
1944-46 KFRC Run: 103
1946-1947 MBS Run: 15
1948 MBS Run: 26
1951 Winnipeg Run: 26
1952-1953 ABC Run [East Coast] : 39
1952-1953 ABC Run [West Coast] : 39
Episodes in Circulation: 1944-46 KFRC Run: 21
1946-1947 MBS Run: 3
1948 MBS Run: 26
1951 Winnipeg Run: 26
1952-1953 ABC Run [East Coast] : 2
1952-1953 ABC Run [West Coast] : 2
Total Episodes in Collection: 1944-46 KFRC Run: 2
1946-1947 MBS Run: 3
1948 MBS Run: 26
1951 Winnipeg Run: 0
1952-1953 ABC Run [East Coast] : 0
1952-1953 ABC Run [West Coast] : 2

Provenances: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies

Billboard announcement of Don Lee's Michael Shayne to go out over the full MBS Network, from October 12 1946
Billboard announcement of Don Lee's Michael Shayne to go out over the full
national MBS Network, from October 12 1946


A timely teaser on Michael Shayne and The Falcon in the wake of the November 1946 elections which swept Republicans into Office across America--from November 16 1946
A timely teaser on Michael Shayne and The Falcon in the wake of the November 1946 elections which swept Republicans into Office across America--from November 16 1946. [Note: the article refers to the episode of November 5 1946, The Return to Huxley, which you can hear below]


Announcement of BGI Syndication of New Adventures of Michael Shayne from February 21 1948 issue of Billboard.

Contributor Jerry Haendiges.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspaper listings.


Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

Read this statement very carefully; all purported, separate 'rebroadcasts' of the Bill Rousseau-directed, Jeff Chandler episodes of 1948 were from a fixed, 26-episode, transcribed syndication. Every single one of those separate, twenty-six episodes were unique, to be sure, but there is one and only one transcription of each of the twenty-six scripts. Anyone who represents any more than twenty-six episodes of the Jeff Chandler run for sale is a charlatan. Only a fool would purchase--or collect--alleged 'rebroadcasts' of a transcribed, syndicated program when they're precisely, exactly, the same identical recording. Period. Q.E.D. Buyer beware. 'nuff said.

-->>Known Duplicate Alert<<--:

In addition to the above scam, these same commercial otr purveyors package (or repackage) several known duplicate episodes as separate titles. Among them are:

  • The Case of the Eager Victim and The Case of the Willing Victim [both the same]
  • Anthony Carrell, The Case of Anthony Correll, The Case of the Man Who Couldn't Die, and The Case of The Man Who Lived Forever [all one and the same]

Again, Buyer Beware.


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here's the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.

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Private Detective Michael Shayne [MBS] Program Log: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
44-10-09
--
--
44-10-09 Fresno Bee
KFRE--8:30 Point Sublime
44-10-16

1

Title Unknown
N
[ West Coast Premiere; Sponsored by Union Oil]

44-10-16 Fresno Bee
KFRE--8:30 Michael Shane
44-10-23
2
Title Unknown
N
44-10-23 Fresno Bee
KFRE--8:30 Michael Shane
44-10-30
3
Title Unknown
N
44-10-30 Fresno Bee
KFRE--8:30 Michael Shane
44-11-06
4
Title Unknown
N
44-11-06 Fresno Bee
KFRE--8:30 Michael Shane
44-11-13
5
Title Unknown
N
44-11-13 Fresno Bee
KFRE--8:30 Michael Shane
44-11-20
6
Title Unknown
N
44-11-20 Fresno Bee
KFRE--8:30 Michael Shane
44-11-27
7
Title Unknown
N
44-11-27 The Times
KFRC--8:30 "Michael Shayne"
44-12-04
8
Title Unknown
N
44-12-04 The Times
KFRC--8:30 "Michael Shayne"
44-12-11
9
Title Unknown
N
44-12-11 The Times
KFRC--8:30 "Michael Shayne"
44-12-18
10
Title Unknown
N
44-12-18 The Times
KFRC--8:30 "Michael Shayne"
44-12-25
11
Title Unknown
N
45-01-01
12
The Case of the Misplaced Corpse
N
45-01-01 Berkeley Daily Gazette
Detective Michael Shayne and his secretary, Phyllis, will solve
the "Case of the Misplaced Corpse," 8:30 p.m., KFRC

45-01-08
13
Title Unknown

Union Oil ad promoting Michael Shayne Private Detective from January 7th 1945
Union Oil ad promoting Michael Shayne Private Detective from January 8th 1945

N
45-01-07 Radio Life
MONDAY, January 8
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.

45-01-15
14
Title Unknown
N
45-01-14 Radio Life
MONDAY, January 15
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.
45-01-22
15
Title Unknown
N
45-01-21 Radio Life
MONDAY, January 22
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.
45-01-29
16
Title Unknown
N
45-01-28 Radio Life
MONDAY, January 29
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.
45-02-05
17
Title Unknown
N
45-02-12
18
Title Unknown
N
45-02-19
19
Title Unknown
N
45-02-26
20
Title Unknown
N
45-03-05
21
Title Unknown
N
45-03-05 Hayward Review
8:30 p.m.--KFRC--Michael Shayne
45-03-12
22
The Disappearance of Michael Shayne
N
45-03-13 Berkeley Daily Gazette
The disappearance of "Private Detective Michael Shayne" provides an unusual beginning to the story on that series, 8:30 p.m., KFRC


45-03-19
23
Title Unknown
N
45-03-26
24
Title Unknown
N
45-04-02
25
The Newton Murder Case

Veteran Film and Radio actor Edmund MacDonald filled in for Wally Maher during Maher's 1945 hospitalization.
Veteran Film and Radio actor Edmund MacDonald filled in for Wally Maher during Maher's 1945 hospitalization.

Y
[ Ed MacDonald fills in for the hospitalized Wally Maher]

45-04-01 Radio Life
MONDAY, April 2
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.

a.k.a., 'Meet Me at Oakland Depot'
45-04-09
26
The Ghost of Mocassin Hill
Y
[ Wally Maher returns]

45-04-08 Radio Life
MONDAY, April 9
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.

a.k.a., 'Haunted House'
45-04-16
27
The Left-Handed Clue
Y
45-04-15 Radio Life
MONDAY, April 16
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.

a.k.a., 'Date at Cliff House'
45-04-23
28
The Body In The Trunk
Y
45-04-22 Radio Life
MONDAY, April 23
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.

45-04-30
29
Title Unknown
N
45-04-29 Radio Life
MONDAY, April 30
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.

45-05-07
30
Title Unknown
N
45-05-06 Radio Life
MONDAY, May 7
KHJ--8:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.

45-05-14
31
Title Unknown
N
45-05-21
32
Title Unknown
N
45-05-28
33
Title Unknown
N
45-06-04
34
Title Unknown
N
45-06-11
35
Title Unknown
N
45-06-18
36
Title Unknown
N
45-06-25
37
Title Unknown
N
45-07-02
38
Title Unknown
N
45-07-09
39
Title Unknown
N
45-07-16
40
Title Unknown
N
45-07-23
41
Title Unknown
N
45-07-30
42
Title Unknown
N
45-08-06
43
Title Unknown
N
45-08-13
44
Title Unknown
N
45-08-20
45
Title Unknown
N
45-08-27
46
Title Unknown
N
45-09-03
47
Title Unknown
N
45-09-10
48
Title Unknown
N
45-09-17
49
Title Unknown
N
45-09-24
50
Title Unknown
N
45-10-01
51
Title Unknown
N
45-10-08
52
Title Unknown
N
45-10-15
53
Title Unknown
N
45-10-22
54
Title Unknown
N
45-10-29
55
Title Unknown
N
45-11-05
56
Title Unknown
N
45-11-12
57
Title Unknown
N
45-11-19
58
Title Unknown
N
45-11-26
59
Title Unknown
N
45-12-03
60
Title Unknown
N
45-12-10
61
Title Unknown
N
45-12-17
62
Title Unknown
N
45-12-24
63
Title Unknown
N
45-12-31
64
Title Unknown
N
46-01-07
65
Title Unknown
N
46-01-14
66
Title Unknown
N
46-01-13 Radio Life
MONDAY, January 14
KHJ--8:00 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.
46-01-21
67
Title Unknown
N
46-01-20 Radio Life
MONDAY, January 21
KHJ--8:00 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.
46-01-28
68
Title Unknown
N
46-01-27 Radio Life
MONDAY, January 28
KHJ--8:00 p.m.--Michael Shayne, Private Detective.
46-02-04
69
Title Unknown
N
46-02-11
70
Title Unknown
N
46-02-18
71
Title Unknown
N
46-02-25
72
Title Unknown
N
46-03-04
73
Title Unknown
N
46-03-11
74
Title Unknown
N
46-03-18
75
Title Unknown
N
46-03-25
76
Title Unknown
N
46-04-01
77
Title Unknown
N
46-04-08
78
Title Unknown
N
46-04-15
79
Title Unknown
N
46-04-22
80
Title Unknown
N
46-04-29
81
Title Unknown
N
46-05-06
82
Title Unknown
N
46-05-13
83
Title Unknown
N
46-05-20
84
Title Unknown
N
46-05-27
85
Title Unknown
N
46-06-03
86
Title Unknown
N
46-06-10
87
Title Unknown
N
46-06-17
88
Title Unknown
N
46-06-24
89
Title Unknown
N
46-07-01
90
Title Unknown
N
46-07-08
91
Title Unknown
N
46-07-15
92
Title Unknown
N
46-07-22
93
Title Unknown
N
46-07-29
94
Title Unknown
N
46-08-05
95
Title Unknown
N
46-08-12
96
Title Unknown
N
46-08-19
97
Title Unknown
N
46-08-26
98
The Freeman Murder
Y
46-09-02
99
Title Unknown
N
46-09-09
100
Title Unknown
N
46-09-16
101
Title Unknown
N
46-09-23
102
Title Unknown
N
46-09-30
103
Title Unknown
N
46-xx-xx The Body In The Trunk
Y





The Michael Shayne: Private Detective [MBS] Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
46-10-01
--
--
46-10-01 Chicago Daily Tribune
7:00--W-G-N--Under Arrest [M]
46-10-08
1
The Nightmare Murder
N
[Nationwide Premiere; replaces "Under Arrest"; Sponsored by Hastings Casite]

46-10-06 Pulaski TImes
MICHAEL SHAYNE
PREMIERE ADVANCED
The premiere broadcast of "Private Detective, Michael Shayne," with Wally Maher playing the title role, has been advanced one week and wi ll be heard over the Mutual network Tuesday, October 8 (8 to 8:30 p. m., EST) instead of Tuesday, October 15, as previous ly announced. The role of Phyllis Knight, Mike's girl friend and companion, will be played by Cathy Lewis.
The new detective series, depicting the exciting adventures of the daredevil Irish sleuth, replaces "Under Arrest," formerly heard in this time period.

46-10-08 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WGN): new program, with Wally Maher as Private Detective Shayne, and Cathy Lewis as his girl friend; premier, "
The Nightmare Murder."

46-10-08 Portsmouth Times
THE premier broadcast of "Private Detective, "Michael Shayne," with Wally Maher playing the title role, will be aired tonight at 8 (Mutual). Michael will track down the villain with the traditional alertness and perception of the Irish aided by his enterprising young colleague, Phyllis, with Cathy Lewis playing the girl's role.

The premiere broadcast of "Private Detective Michael- Shayne," with Walley Maher playing the title role, will be heard over WILM and the Mutual network, at 3 p. m.
The role of Phyllis Knight, Mike's girl friend and companion, will be played by
Cathy Lewis
.

46-10-15
2
Murder In Arabic
N
46-10-15 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WGN): "
Murder in Arabic."

46-10-13 News and Tribune

Picking The Air Pockets

With RAY MANNING

...Speaking of "whodunits," don't miss the latest addition to our roster, "Detective Michael Shayne," a likeable Irishman who has taken over the 7:00 to 7:30 spot each Tuesday night.

46-10-15 Chester Times
Radio Ramblings
Tracking down the villain with the traditional alertness and perfection of the Irish, "Michael Shayne" and his enterprising young colleague, Phyllis, bring their engrossing adventues to WILM in tonight's episode at 8. Michael has been a regular on the west coast for several years.
This marks his east coast debut.
46-10-22
3
Experiment In Death
N
46-10-22 Lima News
A carefully-staged "
Experiment in Death" helps "Michael Shayne" to solve a baffling double murder, in the broadcast at 8 p.m. over MBS. Engaged to protect a nervous playboy who fears he is marked for murder, Shayne reports for work about an hour too late. Looking for his client's killer, he discovers another murder, and exposes the slayer of both as an unorthodox device.
46-10-29
4
Title Unknown
N
46-10-29 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WGN):
Interrupts his day at the beach to track down a murderer.
46-11-05
5
The Return to Huxley College

Y
46-11-16 Billboard Magazine
46-11-12
6
The Case of the Poisoned Fan
Y
46-11-19
7
The Missing Clue
N
46-11-19 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m--Michael Shayne (WIBU, WGN): "
The Missing Clue."
46-11-26
8
The Bouquet and the Clue.
N
46-11-26 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WIBU, WGN): "
Bouquet and the Clue."

46-11-26 Lima News
An antagonistic attitude on the part of home town neighbors of a suspected murderer poses new and unusual problems for "Private Detective Michael Shayne" as the Irish sleuth follows a trail of murder and threats of murder on the MBS show at 8 p.m.
46-12-03
9
The Finger of Death
N
46-12-03 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WGN):
is threatened with death.

46-12-03 Lima News
A stranger walks in Detective Michael Shayne's office, pulls a gun on him, and announces he is going to kill the Irish sleuth, during the broadcast at 8 p.m. on MBS. Shayne is saved, however, when the man drops dead at his feet, causing the detective to launch a hunt for an unknown killer.

46-12-03 Janesville Gazette
Michael Shayne
A stranger walks into Detective "Michael Shayne's" office, pulls a gun on him, and announces that he is going to kill the Irish sleuth, during the broadcast tonight at 7 o'clock, over WCLO.
Shayne is saved, however, when the man drops dead at his feet, causing the detective to launch a hunt for an unknown killer.
Wally Maher stars as Shayne.

46-12-10
10
One Piece Of Skull
N
46-12-10 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WGN): "
One Piece of Skull."

46-12-10 Lima News
"Michael Shayne," played by Wally Maher, becomes involved with a gangster, an unscrupulous surgeon, a shady lady and a graveyard as he tries to save the life of a man condemned to die in the gas chamber for murder when "
One Piece of Skull" puzzles the Irish sleuth during the broadcast at 9 p. m. over MBS.
46-12-17
11
Walter Halliday
N
46-12-17 Lima News
When Detective "Michael Shayne," starring Wally Maher, goes out for a stroll, he is clubbed by two thugs who warn him to stay clear of a certain "
Walter Halliday," a man Shayne has never heard of, during the mystery thriller at 9 p.m. Tuesday over MBS.

46-12-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WBBM):
helps a woman in distress, and gets a warning.
46-12-24
12
The Substitute Santa Claus
N
46-12-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WGN): "The
Substitute Santa Claus."
46-12-31
13
The Ghost Of Gordonville
N
46-12-31 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Michael Shayne (WGN): "
Ghost of Gordonville."
47-01-07
14
Title Unknown
N
--
47-01-14
15
Judge Thorman Shot
Y
47-01-14 La Crosse Tribune
MBS--7, Michael Shayne Finale.

47-01-14 Cumberland Evening Times
MBS--8 Michael Shayne
finale.

47-01-14 Evening Tribune
MBS 7 Michael Shayne
Finale.

47-01-21
--
--
47-01-21 Massillon Independent
DEVELOPMENTS FOR TONIGHT: MBS 8 another detective series, Scotland Yard, to replace Michael Shayne, with Basil Rathbone, who formerly played Sherlock Holmes when it was on this network in the lead.






48-03-07
--
--
48-03-14
1
Title Unknown
N
[Note: In Billboard article above, BGI announced the start of its New Adventures of Michael Shayne syndication as March 14, 1948; Jeff Chandler stars]
48-03-21
2
Title Unknown
N
48-03-28
3
Title Unknown
N
48-04-04
4
Title Unknown
N
48-04-11
5
Title Unknown
N
48-04-18
6
Title Unknown
N
48-04-25
7
Title Unknown
N
48-05-02
8
Title Unknown
N
48-05-09
9
Title Unknown
N
48-05-16
10
Title Unknown
N
48-05-23
11
Title Unknown
N
48-05-30
12
Title Unknown
N
48-06-06
13
Title Unknown
N
48-06-13
14
Title Unknown
N
48-06-20
15
Title Unknown
N
48-06-27
16
The Pursuit Of Death
Y
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 9]

48-06-26 Freeport Journal Standard
"
PURSUIT OF DEATH" Sunday Night 8 p.m. "Adventures of Michael Shayne--Detective".
48-07-04
17
The Case of the Crooked Wheel
Y
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 10]

48-07-03 Freeport Journal Standard
Sunday 7:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne, private detective--"
The Case of the Crooked Wheel."
48-07-11
18
The Case 0f Wandering Finger Prints
Y
Broadcasters Guild Transcription No. 11]

48-07-10 Freeport Journal Standard
Sunday 7:30 p.m.--Michael Shayne Detective: "
The Case of Wandering Finger Prints."
48-07-18
19
The Case of the Purloined Corpse
N
48-07-25
20
The Case of the Left Handed Fan
Y
48-07-24 Freeport Journal Standard
Sunday 8:00 p.m.--Michael Shayne: private detective solves the mystsery of the
"Left Handed Fan."
48-08-02
21
The Case of the Wandering Fingerprints
N
Broadcasters Guild Transcription No. 11]

48-08-09
22
Title Unknown
N
48-08-16
23
Title Unknown
N
48-08-23
24
Title Unknown
N
48-08-30
25
Title Unknown
N
48-09-06
26
Title Unknown
N
48-09-13
27
A Problem In Murder
N
Broadcasters Guild Transcription No. 17]

Aired over WSIX, Nashville
48-09-20
28
Title Unknown
N
48-09-27
29
Title Unknown
N
48-10-04
30
Title Unknown
N
48-10-11
31
Title Unknown
N
48-10-10 Kansas City Star
Two WHB mystery programs are scheduled at new times today. If there is no world series game, The Shadow will be heard at 2 o'clock and Michael Shayne will go into the 4 o'clock spot.

48-10-18
32
The Case of the Eager Victim
N
Broadcasters Guild Transcription No. 22]

Aired over WSIX, Nashville
48-10-25
33
The Case of the Corresponding Corpse
N
Broadcasters Guild Transcription No. 23]

Aired over WSIX, Nashville
48-11-01
34
Title Unknown
N
48-11-08
35
Title Unknown
N
48-11-15
36
Title Unknown
N
48-11-22
37
Title Unknown
N
48-11-29
38
Title Unknown
N
48-12-06
39
Title Unknown
N
48-12-13
40
Title Unknown
N
48-12-20
41
Title Unknown
N
48-12-27
42
Title Unknown
N
49-01-02
43
Title Unknown
N
49-01-09
44
Title Unknown
N
49-01-16
45
Title Unknown
N
49-01-23
46
Title Unknown
N
49-01-30
--
--
49-01-30 Kansas City Star
Boston Blackie, adventure program starring Richard Kollmar and Lesley Woods, will be heard at 4 o'clock today on WHB, a new time spot. It will replace Michael Shayne.

49-07-29 49-07-29 Hanover Evening Sun
"The Damon Runyon Theater," a dramatic series based on the best of Runyon's short stories, will start over WOR Saturdays at 2:30 p.m. It will replace "Murder By Experts" which moves to Sundays from 10 to 10:30 p.m., effective Sunday.
At it's new time, "Murder By Experts" will be heard instead of "Michael Shayne, Private Detective."






49-09-10
1
The Case of the Purloined Corpse
N
49-09-10 Winnipeg Free Press
At 6 p.m., on the same station Michael Shayne handles with distinction
The Case of the Purloined Corpse.
49-09-17
2
The Case of the Left-Handed Fan
N
49-09-17 Winnipeg Free Press
CKRC's Sunday budget of entertainment includes: at 6 p.m., Michael Shayne in
The Case of the Left-Handed Fan.
49-09-24
3
Title Unknown
N
49-10-01
4
Title Unknown
N
49-10-08 Title Unknown
N
49-10-15 Title Unknown
N
49-10-22 Title Unknown
N
49-10-29 Title Unknown
N
49-11-01 Title Unknown
N
49-11-08 Title Unknown
N
49-11-15 Title Unknown
N
49-11-22 Title Unknown
N
49-11-29 Title Unknown
N
49-12-06 Title Unknown
N
49-12-13 Title Unknown
N
49-12-20 Title Unknown
N
49-12-20 Olean Times Herald
Mutual 8:00 New Adventures of Michael Shayne
49-12-27 Title Unknown
N
50-01-06 Title Unknown
N
50-01-06 Olean Times Herald
Mutual 8:00 New Adventures of Michael Shayne
50-01-13 Title Unknown
N
50-01-13 Olean Times Herald
Mutual 8:00 New Adventures of Michael Shayne





The Michael Shayne: Private Detective [1951 Canadian Run over CJOB] Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
51-11-28
--
--
51-11-28 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9.30 p.m.--Damon Runyan Theatre

51-12-05

1
The Case of the Hunted Bride
N
[Canadian Premiere; Replaces Damon Runyon Theatre; Searle & Parks Transcription No. 2]

51-12-05 Winnipeg Free Press
A mystery programme. The New Adventures of Michael Shayne,
begins Wednesday at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB with the Case of the Hunted Bride.

51-12-12

2
The Man Who Couldn't Die
N
51-12-12 Winnipeg Free Press
The Man Who Couldn't Die, featuring Michael Shayne, will be heard at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.

51-12-19

3
The Case of the Phantom Gun
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 4]

51-12-19 Winnipeg Free Press
While clearing himself of a murder charge Michael Shayne unravels a blackmail plot in
The Case of the Phantom Gun to he heard at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.
51-12-26
4
The Hate That Killed
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 5]

51-12-26 Winnipeg Free Press
Wednesday --
The Hate That Killed is the Michael Shayne adventure at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.
52-01-02
5
'The Case of the Grey Eyed Blonde
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 6]

52-01-02 Winnipeg Free Press
'
The Case of the Gray-Eyed Blonde will be the Michael Shayne adventure at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.

52-01-09

6
The Case of the Model Murder
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 7]

52-01-09 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of the Model Murder will be heard on the Michael Shayne adventure series at 9.30 p.m.
52-01-16
7
The Case of the Generous Killer
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 8]

52-01-16 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of the Generous Killer will be heard in the Michael Shayne adventure series at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.
52-01-23
8
The Pursuit of Death
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 9]

52-01-23 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB WInnipeg (1340)
9:30--Paul Cresney Orch.
52-01-30
9
The Case of the Crooked Wheel
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 10]

52-01-30 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of the Crooked Wheel will be the Michael Shayne adventure «t 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.
52-02-06
--
--
[For all-day coverage of the Death of King George VI]

52-02-13

10
The Case of Wandering Finger Prints
N
52-02-13 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of the Wandering Fingerprints featuring Michael Shayne will be heard on CJOB at 9.30 p.m.

52-02-20

11
The Man Who Lived Forever
N
52-02-20 Winnipeg Free Press
The Man Who Lived Forever, featuring Jeff Chandler, will be heard in the New Adventures of Michael Shayne at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.
52-02-27
12
The Case of the Purloined Corpse
N
52-02-27 Winnipeg Free Press
Jeff Chandler will star as Michael Shayne in The Case of the Purloined Corpse to be heard at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB
52-03-05
13
The Case of the Left-Handed Fan
N
52-03-05 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of the Left-Handed Fan featuring Michael Shayne will be heard on CJOB at 9.30 p.m.
52-03-12
14
Title Unknown
N
52-03-12 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9:30--Hockey Playoff.
52-03-19
15
Title Unknown
N
52-03-19 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9:30--Hockey.

52-03-26

16
The Case of The Bayou Monster
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 16]

52-03-26 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of The Bayou Monster featuring Michael Shayne will be heard at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.

52-04-02

17
A Problem in Murder
N
[Broadcasters Guild Transcription No. 17]

52-04-02 Winnipeg Free Press
A Problem in Murder, featuring Michael Shayne, will be heard on CJOB at 9.30 p.m.
52-04-09
18
Title Unknown
N
52-04-09 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9:30--Dance Orch.
52-04-16
19
Title Unknown
N
52-04-16 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9:30--Adventures of PC 49
52-04-23
20
Title Unknown
N
52-04-23 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9:30--Hockey.

52-04-30

21
The Case of the Borrowed Heirlooms
N
52-04-30 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of the Borrowed Heirlooms will be heard on the adventures of Michael Shayne on CJOB at 9.30 p.m.
52-05-07
22
Title Unknown
N
52-05-07 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
8:30--Memorial Cup Finals.

52-05-14

23
The Case of the Corresponding Corpse
N
52-05-14 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of the Corresponding Corpse will be heard on the new adventures of Michael Shayne on CJOB at 9.30 p.m.
52-05-21
24
The Case of The Mail Order Murders
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 24]

52-05-21 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9:30--Adventures of PC 49
52-05-28
25
The Case of the Phantom Neighbor
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 25]

52-05-28 Winnipeg Free Press
The new adventures of Michael Shayne starring Jeff Chandler will spotlight
The Case of the Phantom Neighbor at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB

52-05-28 Winnipeg Free Press
CJOB Winnipeg (1340)
9:30--Adventures of PC 49
52-05-30
26
The Case of Tahlani's Tears
N
[Searle & Parks Transcription No. 26]

52-05-30 Winnipeg Free Press
The Case of Tahlanis' Tears will
be heard on the new adventures of Michael Shayne at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB





53-02-09 The Case of the Deadly Dough
N
53-02-09 Winnipeg Free Press
Michael Shayne solves
The Case of the Deadly Dough at 11.30 p.m. over CKRC.





52-10-07
--
Title Unknown
N
52-10-07 Big Spring Daily Herald
MICHAEL SHAYNE
The adventures of Michael Shayne starring the famous detective created by Brett Halliday, will he heard over KBST and the ABC network in a series starting Tuesday. It will be heard at 7 p.m. each week.

52-10-07 Syracuse Herald Journal
A new series, the Adventures of Michael Shayne. will be heard at 8 tonight on WAGE.
Movie actor Donald Curtis will play the title role in the series that was created in books by novelist Brett Halliday and has been dramatized in 12 motion pictures.
52-10-09
1
Title Unknown
N
52-10-09 Long Beach Press-Telegram

Detective to Debut

Michael Shayne, the famous detective created by Brett Halliday in a series of 30 books and 12 motion pictures, makes his radio debut tonight in the first of a series of weekly dramas to be aired on station KECA at 8 p.m.

52-10-16
2
Title Unknown
N
52-10-23
3
Title Unknown
N
52-10-30
--
Preempted
N
For Senatorial speeches
52-11-04
--
Preempted
N
Election Returns in Michael Shayne time slot in most parts of the country
52-11-06
4
Title Unknown
N
[ Robert Sterling replaces Donald Curtis as Michael Shayne]

52-11-06 Long Beach Press-Telegram
"The Adventures of Michael Shayne" unfold at 8 with actor Robert Sterling replacing Donald Curtis who was forced to leave the show because of other commitments.
52-11-13
5
Title Unknown
N
52-11-20
6
Title Unknown
N
52-11-27
7
Title Unknown
N
Walter Winchell 53-11-26:
''"The Adventures of Michael Shayne" (staring Robert Sterling) is unusual sleuth stuff. Sounds like it was written — not mimeographed . . . ''
52-12-04
8
Title Unknown
N
52-12-11
9
Title Unknown
N
52-12-18
10
Title Unknown
N
52-12-25
11
Title Unknown
N
53-01-01
12
Title Unknown
N
53-01-08
13
Title Unknown
N
53-01-08 Lowell Sun
MICHAEL SHAYNE SKETCH: Detective drama starring Robert Sterling; WLAW, 9.30.
53-01-15
14
Title Unknown
N
[New Lead (Vinton Hayworth)]

53-01-15 Lowell Sun
MICHAEL SHAYNE DRAMA: Vinton Hayworth takes over title role in private detective series; WLAW, 9.30.
53-01-22
15
Title Unknown
N
53-01-22 Lowell Sun
MICHAEL SHAYNE SKETCH: Private eye series starring Vinton Hayworth; WLAW, 9.30.
53-01-29
16
Title Unknown
N
53-01-29 Lowell Sun
MICHAEL SHAYNE SKETCH: Private detective series starring Vinton Hayworth; WLAW, 9.30.





53-02-06
17
Title Unknown
N
[New Day (Friday), Time (7 p.m.)]

53-02-01 Big Spring Daily Herald
The Adventures of Michael Shayne, mystery-action leries featuring fast-moving criminal investigations, moves from Thursday at 8:30 p.m., to Friday at 7 p.m., starting Feb. 6. The program is one of KBST's features
from ABC.
Michael Shayne leads off in this important new time period with
a spine-tingling drama in which murder stalks a widow and her child In a lonesome Florida house. Our famous private-eye answers her call for help. He locks himself into the house with the woman and her child to await the arrival of the police ... while two gunmen prowl around the grounds and through the darkened rooms with
intent to kill. How the super sleuth manages to outwit the marauders and trap them before the police arrive makes for suspense that mounts to a nerve-shattering climax
.

53-02-06 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday)

Hard-Boiled Private Shamus Stalks Murderers on TV

By JOHN FREDERICK
Michael Shayne, a hard-boiled private eye who loves peanuts and excitement, shifts Into the 8 p. m. spot on KECA tonight, and Dan Dodge, another sleuth, follows at 8:30 p. m. replacing "This Is Your FBI.". .
Radio listeners and lovers of mystery fiction are familiar with Mike Shayne. His first adventure on a Friday night finds him with a widow and her child in an isolated house in Florida. They await the arrival of the police while two k i l l e r s lurk about the premises ready to murder. . . Vinton Hayworth is- starred as Shayne in the series.

53-02-13
18
Title Unknown
N
53-02-20
19
Title Unknown
N
53-02-27
20
Two Hours to Live
N
53-02-27 Brainerd Daily Dispatch
7 Michael Shayne, "
Two Hours to Live.''
53-03-06
21
Title Unknown
N
53-03-13
22
Title Unknown
N
53-03-13 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
Michael Shayne, peanut-eating private eye, almost becomes an accessory to murder during his adventure in crime on KECA at 8 p. m.
53-03-20
23
Title Unknown
N
53-03-20 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
Private Eye Michael Shayne, who has put many a man in jail, is faced with the problem of getting out one out on his show KECA at 8 p. m.
53-03-27
24
Title Unknown
N
53-03-27 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
Sleuth Michael Shayne has his hands full when a client asks him to ''call off '' a hired killer. The action is on KECA at 8 p. m.
53-04-03
25
The Case of the Queen of Narcotics
Y
53-04-03 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
"Michael Shayne" deals with
narcotics peddlers
during his KECA adventure at 8 p.m.
53-04-10
26
Title Unknown
N
53-04-10 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
Michael Shayne has to talk fast to prevent a murder on his adventure over KECA at 8 p. m.
53-04-17
27
Title Unknown
N
53-04-24
28
Title Unknown
N
53-04-24 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
Michael Shayne runs afoul of some teen-age- pickpockets on KECA at 8 p. m.
53-05-01
29
Title Unknown
N
53-05-08
30
Title Unknown
N
53-05-15
31
Title Unknown
N
53-05-22
32
Title Unknown
N
53-05-22 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
"Michael Shayne" is kidnapped and forced to take part in a bank robbery on KECA at 8 p. m.
53-05-29
33
Title Unknown
N
53-05-29 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
Michael Shayne proves that you get nothing for nothing on his KECA show at 8 p. m.
53-06-05
34
Title Unknown
N
53-06-05 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
Michael Shayne solves a pyromaniac case on KECA at 8 p. m.
53-06-12
35
Title Unknown
N
53-06-12 Long Beach Press-Telegram
(Friday) --
A backwoods community of Tennessee thinks it has a witch in the town but Michael Shayne dissuades them from murder on KECA at 8 p. m.
53-06-19
36
Title Unknown
N
53-06-26
37
Title Unknown
N
53-07-03
38
Title Unknown
N
53-07-10
39
Title Unknown
N
[Last Broadcast]





The Michael Shayne: Private Detective Pacific Stars and Stripes [FEN] Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
69-05-08
1
Title Unknown
N
Thursdays, 8:30 p.m.
69-05-03 Pacific Stars and Stripes
THURSDAY: At 8:30 p.m. dial in to the. "Adventures of Michael Shayne" starring the late Jeff Chandler
69-05-15
2
Title Unknown
N
69-05-22
3
Title Unknown
N
69-05-29
4
The Case of the Borrowed Heirlooms
N
69-05-24 Pacific Stars and Stripes
THURSDAY: At 8:30 p.m. the gripping adventures of Michael Shayne will be heard in "The Case of the Borrowed Heirlooms."
69-06-05
5
Title Unknown
N
69-06-12
6
The Case of the Willing Victim
N
69-06-09 Pacific Stars and Stripes
THURSDAY: Tonight's edition of "The Adventures of Michael Shayne" will feature "The Case of the Willing Victim," a chilling detective yarn set in old New Orleans.
69-06-19
7
Title Unknown
N
69-06-26
8
Title Unknown
N
69-07-03
9
Title Unknown
N
69-07-10
10
Title Unknown
N
69-07-17
11
Title Unknown
N
69-07-24
12
Title Unknown
N
69-07-31
13
The Case of the Bayou Monster
N
69-07-26 Pacific Stars and Stripes
T H U R S D A Y : "Michael Shayne" chases ghosts through the swamps at 8:30 p.m. in "The Case of the Bayou Monster."
69-08-07
14
Title Unknown
N
69-08-14
15
Title Unknown
N
69-08-21
16
The Case of the Mail Order Murders
N
69-08-21 Pacific Stars and Stripes
THURSDAY: "The Case of the Mail Order Murders" confronts private detective Shane on "The New Adventures of Michael Shane" at 8:30 p.m.
69-08-28
17
Title Unknown
N
69-09-04
18
Title Unknown
N
69-09-11
19
Title Unknown
N
69-09-18
20
Title Unknown
N
69-09-25
21
Title Unknown
N
69-10-02
22
The Case of The Blood Stained Pearls
N
69-09-27 Pacific Stars and Stripes
THURSDAY: Radio detective drama is long a thing of the past in Stateside radio but FEN continues to present what used to be the most popular form of radio entertainment, the "who dunits" and "the mysteries."
Hear the case of the blood stained pearls on "The Adventures of Michael Shane," private eye at 8:30 p.m.






The Michael Shayne: Private Detective Biographies: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies




Walter 'Wally' Maher
(Michael Shayne)

Radio, Stage, and Film Actor
(1908-1951)
Birthplace: Cinncinati, Ohio, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1936 The Lux Radio Theatre
1943 The Cavalcade of America
1943 Tommy Riggs and Betty Lou
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1944 Main Line
1944 Suspense
1945 The Eddie Bracken Show
1945 Arch Oboler's Plays
1946 Michael Shayne, Private Detective
1946 The Whistler
1948 Let George Do It
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 The Adventures of Philip Marlowe
1950 Family Theatre
1950 Night Beat
1950 The Line-Up
Wally Maher's comparitively sparse entry from the October 1940 edition of Lew Lauria's Radio Artists Directory
Wally Maher's comparitively sparse entry from the October 1940 edition of Lew Lauria's Radio Artists Directory

Wally Maher as a court clerk preparing to pass around Bob Hope's late alimony payments to his three ex-wives in The Big Broadcast of 1938
Wally Maher as a court clerk preparing to pass around Bob Hope's late alimony payments to his three ex-wives in The Big Broadcast of 1938


Wally Maher as pilot Cliff Parsons in 1939's Nick Carter, Master Detective
Wally Maher as pilot Cliff Parsons in 1939's Nick Carter, Master Detective.

Wally Maher spot promotion for 1943's Tommy Riggs and Betty Lou
Wally Maher spot promotion for 1943's Tommy Riggs and Betty Lou

From the November 7, 1946 edition of The Cedar Rapids Tribune:

Wally Maher
Alias Michael Shayne

The fellow who plays Michael Shayne every Tuesday night is no stranger to the role of crime fiction. Wally Maher figures he's been killed more times than any other actor working in radio. He's been chewed by alligators, attacked by vampires, gassed, shot and various other methods of elimination. Wally never played a tough guy until he came to California, his forte is light comedy. In only half a dozen out of 127 pictures has he played light comedy, the rest were heavies.
After starting a radio career in his home town of Cincinnati, he went to New York where he won a host of theatrical roles. Then came Hollywood in 1935 where he continued his radio work and started on pictures. Wally likes comedy, so he likes Michael Shayne. He doesn't like to play tough guys so "Shayne" is as easygoing as a sleuth can be and still keep his self-respect.
He likes to read detective stories, but his favoilte reading is American and Irish history, with, the accent on the latter. His grandparents on both sides came from Tipperary. He has three children, two girls and a boy. Two of the children look like their mother, who is of Italian decent, but Wally says all of them are Irish at heart.
Wally can speak Italian, and when he was working as baggage clerk on the Southern Pacific, he used to go out and greet ths prisoner trains loaded with Italian PWs on their way through Glendale. He talked to them in Italian and used to get a kick out of watching their faces light up.
With his extensive theatrical experience, Wally Maher is capably suited to the role of the "private eye," "Michael Shayne." His secretary-girl friend, Phyllis, is right in there pitching, too. For the best in mystery dramas, "Michael Shayne" is on the air Tuesday nights at 9 o'clock.


Wally Maher had a solid movie career under his belt long before he lent his unmistakable voice talent to Radio. Indeed his filmography reads as long as his radiography. His stocky build and expressive face provided him with regular work as a character actor, but it was his highly distinctive voice that set him apart. Though from Ohio, his uncanny ability to project a gruff, irascible, but humorous East Coast--or West Coast--'tough' earned him countless roles in Radio as a hard-boiled thug, police detective, or adventurous sidekick.

He was a pretty straight foil for Bill Johnstone in The Line-Up, but his wonderfully animated role as George Valentine's nemesis, Lieutenant Riley, in Let George Do It, was in this author's humble opinion, some of Mr. Maher's most satisfying and entertaining work.

Destined to be often confused with Herb Butterfield or Wilms Herbert, Wally Maher's distinctive chortles and grunts usually made the identification of his voice unimpeachable. He debuted as the lead in The Adventures of Michael Shayne, and would have been just as enjoyable as Jeff Chandler, had he secured that role for the entire run of the program. Indeed, the series' creator, Brett Halliday, reportedly preferred Wally Maher's depiction of his protagonist.

Sadly, Wally Maher was hospitalized while appearing in The Line-Up and Let George Do It. He'd had a lung removed shortly before the beginning of the The Line-Up, with Raymond Burr often filling in for him near the end. He passed away December 27, 1951 at St. Vincent's Hospital, in Los Angleles at the age of 43, after an all too brief career of 22 years in Stage, Film and Radio.

It's the wonder of Golden Age Radio that preserves his memory for most of us . . . and what wonderful memories they are.




Cathy Lewis
(Phyllis Knight)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress
(1916-1968)

Birthplace: Spokane, Washington, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1942 Lights OUt
1943 Suspense
1944 Lux Radio Theatre
1944 Four For the Fifth
1944 The Rudy Vallee Show
1945 Theater Of Famous Radio Players
1945 Wonderful World
1945 The Whistler
1945 The Eddie Bracken Show
1945 Arch Oboler Plays
1945 Twelve Players
1945 Rogue's Gallery
1945 Pacific Story
1945 Theatre Of Romance
1946 Marcus O'Connor, Detective First Class
1946 Hollywood Star Time
1946 Encore Theatre
1946 Songs By Sinatra
1946 Michael Shayne, Private Detective
1946 Columbia Workshop
1947 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1947 Voyage Of the Scarlet Queen
1947 My Friend Irma
1947 The Man Called X
1948 Escape
1948 The Adventures Of Sam Spade
1948 Two Lines
1949 Philip Morris Playhouse
1949 This Is Your FBI
1949 The Great Gildersleeve
1950 The Harold Pery Show
1950 Broadway Is My Beat
1950 The New Adventures Of Nero Wolfe
1951 Make Believe Town
1952 On Stage
1954 Saturday Theatre
1955 The Bob Hope Show
1956 Romance
1958 Whispering Streets
The Clock
Hollywood Star Playhouse
Here's To Veterans
The Cases Of Mr Ace
Cathy Lewis entry from the October 1940 edition of Lew Lauria's Radio Artists Directory
Cathy Lewis entry from the October 1940 edition of Lew Lauria's Radio Artists Directory

Marie Wilson and Cathy Lewis as Irma and Jane from My Friend Irma (1948)
Marie Wilson and Cathy Lewis as Irma and Jane from My Friend Irma (1948)

Inset of Cathy Lewis  Jane from My Friend Irma (1948)
Inset of Cathy Lewis Jane from My Friend Irma (1948)


Cathy Lewis as Deirdre Thompson  in Hazel from 1965
Cathy Lewis as Deirdre Thompson in Hazel from 1965


From the Galveston Daily News, March 22, 1953:

Versatile Thespian Cathy Lewis Reached Star Level as Jane of 'My Friend Irma'

      Cathy Lewis has been a successful vaudeville performer, a band singer, a motion picture, stage and radio actress.  But not until television did the versatile thespian attain the "star" level she had been seeking since her theatrical debut as the "Jazz Baby" of 1924.
     Cathy's rich, throaty voice that for years made her one of radio's most popular personalities combined with her undisputed ability as a stage actress to make her a "big timer," as sarcastic Jane Stacey on CBS Television Network's "My Friend Irma."
     It's fun to step into a cab," Cathy says, "and get that raised eye-brow of recognition from the driver.  It happens in restaurants, on the street, in theatres.  I love it--but of course all hams do."
       Cathy, who was born in Spokane, Wash., on Dec. 27, 1917, got what she calls a "late start in the entertainment biz."  She was seven when she was hired by the Jensen Von Herberg chain of theatres as the "Jazz Baby," singer and dancer.
       According to Cathy, the sight of her on stage in long curls, ruffles and patent leather slippers, singing the praises of Barney Google and his goo-goo-googly eyes, put her family on the move.  The move took them to St. Paul, Minn., where the erstwhile "Jazz Baby" was enrolled in the Nativity Parochial School.
     Here, and later at St. Joseph's Academy, her dramatic talent qualified her for leads in student productions and appearances with the St. Paul Civic Repertory Group.
     Before she had finished school, Cathy had appeared as guest vocalist with Ben Pollack, Herb Stern, Red Nichols, Johnny Davis and Glenn Gray.  After doing a guest spot with Kay Kyser in Chicago, Cathy decided to try her luck in Hollywood.
     She came to the West Coast in 1935, sang with Ray Noble's band, landed a leading role with the Ben Bard Players.  She appeared in Pasadena Playhouse productions, free-lanced at Warner Brothers and Universal, then joined the West Coast company of "The Man Who Came To Dinner," hoping to troupe her way to New York City.  Instead, after six months, the company disbanded in San Francisco when Alexander Woolcott died.
     She was signed to an MGM contract, screen-tested with Stuart Erwin, taken to lunch with Robert Taylor, played one brief scene with Spencer Tracy in "Fury," and then sat by waiting for her next part.  When weeks had ticked by and nothing happened, she asked for her release and got it.  Free lancing, she was more successful.  She worked with Laraine Day in five "Dr. Kildare" pictures, did "Escape" for Mervyn LeRoy, appeared with Dick Powell in "Model Wife," with Van Heflin in "Kid Glove Killer," and with Ann Sheridan and Dennis Morgan in "Shadow of Their Wings."
     "About this time," Cathy said, "I heard about the great opportunities in radio.  I went into it and loved every minute of it--and now, the monster video, which I love even more."
     She is married to CBS Radio producer-director Elliott Lewis.  They met in 1941 when they worked a radio show together and were married on April 30, 1943, a union which required no name change for Cathy since her maiden name was also Lewis.
     The Lewises have often collaborated at the microphone.  Together they have written several outstanding radio shows and have written and recorded two Columbia albums, "Happy Anniversary" and "Happy Holiday," in which they narrate a story and Cathy sings.
     Born in Spokane, Wash., Cathy is 5 feet 4 1/2 inches and weighs 125 pounds.  She has auburn hair and brown eyes.

From the March 5, 1951 edition of the Portsmouth Herald:

In Hollywood

by Erskine Johnson
 
     HOLLYWOOD (NEA)--It pains me to tattle-tale, but I'm letting all movie queens know that some of their leading men are faithless, sniping low-lifes behind their backs.
     Give them a microphone, an air version of last year's movie and a radio actress who's pinch-hitting for a Hedy or Greer and, the skunk pattern down their spines lights up like a pinball machine.
     Oooh, what those profile boys say about their celluloid co-stars!
     Cathy Lewis, the CBS Bernhardt, unzipped the bag and let the cat out for me.
     The minute the studio audience files out, Cathy gets this from the boys:
     "Don't breathe this to a soul honey, but I wish you had been in the movie with me instead of that silly, hammy dame who calls herself an actress.  Maybe the picture wouldn't have laid such an egg."
     It's embarrassing as all get-out, to Cathy and sometimes she's  right glad that she's not a movie doll.
     She came close to it once when MGM put her under contract and she sat around for months with another discouraged Actress named Greer Carson waiting for a role.

     CATHY'S THE RED-HAlRED, big-eyed queen bee in the American Federation of Radio Artists hive and when Loretta Young breaks a leg or the budget won't allow for Ida Lupino, she's right there to wham over the lines that Loretta and Ida once spoke.
     The mike's nothing but a metal contraption to Cathy, but she let me know that most movie stars get the jitters, when they see the "On the Air" sign.
     Here's how they look, fearless or jittery, to Cathy:
     Gregory Peck: "He's fine, but he's very nervous."
     Joan Crawford: "She's sure of her talent in radio, but audiences terrify her."
     June Havoc: "On her first 'Suspense' show, she was so scared that she had to leave the studio."
     Humphrey Bogart: "During rehearsals, he doesn't give a thing.  But once you're on the air with him, Bogey's just fine."
     Joseph Cotten: "He kept saying, 'Why am I here? What am I doing here? This is murder."

CLARK CABLE IS CATHY'S IDEA of a movie giant who shrinks to midget size when his moustache is level with a microphone instead of Ava Gardner's lips.
     "He won't appear before a radio audience," she said.  "My husband, Elliott Lewis, worked with him when Clark did 'Command Decision' on the air.  Know how it was done?  It was taped one night, with Clark reading his lines and Elliot reading his lines and Elliot reading the lines of every other character.
     "The next night, Elliot taped another version, but this time he read Gable's lines and the AFRA actors gave the lines he had done the night before.  Then Gable's voice was spliced in place of Elliot's and that's how it went over the air."
     Cathy's the Jane Stacy of CBS' "My Friend Irma" with Marie Wilson.  But nobody even said "Come on over for a screen test" when Hal Walls began to film the "Irma" series.
     But does Cathy give a hoot?
     "I used to have feelings about it," she told me. "Then I saw Diana Lynn in the picture. She was cute, refreshing and young—too young.  I'm glad I didn't play the part."
     Then Cathy added:
     "Jane, as we do her in radio, is really the show's director and producer, the guy who dreamed up Irma—Cy Howard.  It's just that Cy wrote a woman's part for himself.  He's Jane Stacy, inside, I mean.  Everything that Jane says or thinks reflects the real Cy.

From the 52-03-02 Oakland Tribune:

Irma's Girl Friend Scores Smash Hit--and Doesn't Like It

   By HAL HUMPHREY
 
   HOLLYWOOD, March 1.
--Despite her current success on the TV version of "My Friend Irma," Cathy Lewis is fed up with being just Jane Stacy.
   "Don't get me wrong," says Irma's girl friend on both the radio and TV "Irma" shows.  "I am amazed and very happy over the marvelous public acceptance I have had since the TV show began.  Nothing like this has ever happened to me before.
   "But why did it have to be as Jane Stacy?  I don't want to be Jane.  I want to be Cathy Lewis, actress," says pert, auburn-haired Cathy.
   To understand the irony in Cathy's attitude, it's necessary to know that she's been "doing"
Jane on the "Irma" radio show for five years, and doesn't believe that the part is worth what
she has put into it.
   Fans of the new TV show undoubtedly would disagree with her on this point, because Cathy
in many respects has emerged as the star of CBS video "Irma."
   But while this success came as a surprise to the viewers, it meant only one thing to Cathy--she is still just Jane Stacy.  And for her, this seems a hollow victory after more than 15 years of acting.
   Cathy hit Hollywood in 1935 as a singer with Ray Noble's band.  Soon after that she got a screen contract at M-G-M, and between this and some free-lance roles at other studios, Cathy played in more than 20 feature
pictures.
   Later, she joined the road company of "The Man Who Came to Dinner," but the company was disbanded in San Francisco upon the death of the star, the late Alexander Woollcott.
   Cathy came back to Hollywood and took up radio acting, and in 1943 married Elliott Lewis, producer-director of CBS' "Suspense" and "Broadway's My Beat" programs.  This was one time when a gal didn't have to change her maiden name after marriage.
   Her problem now is what to do about being identified as Jane Stacy.  Cathy's ambition is to become an honest-to-goodness actress and have dramatic roles on such TV shows as "Studio One."
   In other words, she wants to prove that she is an actress and not just Irma's roommate.  "When they first started talking about putting Marie Wilson and me on an 'Irma' TV show, there were big plans to make us a couple of real gals living in a brownstone-front flat," Cathy recalls.
   "But after a few conferences with the sponsor, it was decided that what was needed was some sure-fire gags and situations, and to h___ with the slice-of- life stuff.
   "I don't have to tell you what followed.  You've seen the old, broken-down couch, and the time we put pots on our head. I told anyone who would listen that the day they put a pie in my face, I'm through.  This isn't acting, it's markmanship."
   However, with all of these drawbacks, Cathy is thrilled that she is building a whole new set of fans.  And her success has caused no strain between her and Marie, with whom she has worked all these years on the radio "Irma."
   "If Marie is concerned about the TV show, she has never said so, or used it against me," emphatically states Cathy.
   "Marie is a real nice dame, and nobody could have a problem with her."
   Copyright, 1952, for The Tribune

Catherine Lewis was born and raised in Spokane, Washington. After appearing in a couple of local dramatic productions and outings as a local band singer, Cathy Lewis struck out on her own, landing first with Ray Noble's Orchestra in 1935, then with Kay Kyser and Herbie Kay.

Cathy had first migrated to Chicago while pursuing work in the entertainment industry. Between singing gigs, Cathy Lewis did a bit of Radio acting, which eventually persuaded her to emigrate to Hollywood and all the opportunities the area presented. Not long after moving to Hollywood, M-G-M signed Lewis to a two-year contract, introducing her to short features in its Crime Does Not Pay series. As she indicates in her Lew Lauria listing to the left, she'd already appeared in eight M-G-M pictures in 1940 alone.

It soon became apparent to Cathy Lewis that her talents were far better utilized in Radio. She continued to appear in an occasional feature film but by the mid-1940s Cathy Lewis' star was rising rapidly in the Radio industry.

Identified as something of an item with Laird Kregar for several years, Cathy Lewis ultimately married Elliott Lewis (no blood relation) in 1943 and the couple were soon appearing together in hundreds of Radio's most successful programs. By 1944, Cathy Lewis began co-starring with character actor Wally Maher in the first incarnation of Private Detective Michael Shayne, as Mike Shayne's secretary and love interest, Phyllis Knight.

A popular west coast Don Lee-Mutual production for two years, the Private Detective Michael Shayne program went national in October 1946 as Michael Shayne: Private Detective. The program aired nationally for another fifteen episodes before ending in January 1947. Both Maher and Lewis were gaining numerous obligations in West Coast Radio by then and the move proved the right one for both of them.

After Elliott Lewis' return to civilian life [he'd worked for the Armed Forces Radio Service for three years during World War II], he and his wife Cathy undertook an ambitious array of Radio projects--both separately and as a couple.

By 1947, Cathy Lewis was again co-starring in a major network hit, My Friend Irma with Marie Wilson as Irma and Cathy Lewis in the role of Jane Stacey, Irma's long-suffering roommate. Having built a highly successful Radio career through the 1940s, she made the jump to Television with the transition of her Jane Stacey character on Radio to the small screen for a season of My Friend Irma (1952) for TV.

1953 found her again co-starring in Radio with her husband, Elliott Lewis in their critically acclaimed tour de force, Cathy and Elliott Lewis On Stage (1953-54), which ran for a year and a half for CBS. Elliott Lewis and Cathy Lewis separated during the mid-1950s and eventually divorced in 1958.

By then moving comfortably between Radio and Television, 1959 found Cathy Lewis again co-starring in yet another Radio export to Television, as Molly McGee in Television's Fibber McGee and Molly (1959). 1961 brought several recurring appearances in Television's popular Hazel (1961-1966), as Deirdre Thompson.

Throughout the 1960s, Cathy Lewis continued her work in Television, both as a voice talent and as an actress, in Film, overdubbing for several prominent actresses of the era, and occasional return appearances over Radio.

Cathy Lewis was stricken with cancer during her recurring appearances in Hazel and eventually succumbed to cancer in 1968 at the age of only 52, still one of Radio's most successful character actresses to make a successful transition to Television.

With well over 3,000 Radio appearances to her credit, some twenty feature and short films, and at least 100 appearances in Television, it's safe to say that Cathy Lewis remains one of the most distinguished performers from The Golden Age of Radio. Often portraying as many as three to five characters in a single Radio production, Cathy Lewis is considered one of Radio's finest, most versatile actresses in History.




Jeff Chandler [Ira Grossel]
(Michael Shayne)

(1918-1961)
Radio, Television, Film and Stage Actor, Singer

Birthplace: Brooklyn, NY

Education:
Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn, NY

Radiography:
1946 Academy Award
1946 Suspense
1946 Cavalcade of America
1946 The Casebook of Gregory Hood
1947 The New Adventures of Michael Shayne
1947 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1947 Lux Radio Theatre
1947 Mr President
1947 Family Theatre
1947 Stars Over Hollywood
1947 The Private Practice of Dr Dana
1948 Damon Runyon Theatre
1948 Voyage of the Scarlet Queen
1948 Ellery Queen
1948 Escape
1948 Our Miss Brooks
1948 Let George Do It
1948 Jeff Regan, Investigator
1948 Hallmark Playhouse
1948 The Whistler
1948 Sealtest Variety Theatre
1948 Duffy's Tavern
1949 Proudly We Hail
1949 The Railroad Hour
1949 The Adventures of Philip Marlowe
1949 The Anacin Hollywood Star Theatre
1949 Four Star Playhouse
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1950 Frontier Town
1950 Adventure Is Your Heritage
1950 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 Guest Star
1951 O'Hara
1952 The Martin and Lewis Show
1954 Bud's Bandwagon
1954 San Francisco Final
1959 Hollywood Salutes the National Guard
Here's To Veterans
Voice of the Army
The New National Guard Show
Stand By For Music
The Cases Of Mr Ace

Jeff Chandler, ca. 1944
Jeff Chandler, ca. 1944

Jeff Chandler as Mike Shayne
Jeff Chandler as Mike Shayne

Jeff Chandler, ca. 1950
Jeff Chandler, ca. 1950

Jeff Chandler had been visibly scarred in an automobile accident in the early 1940s, almost losing an eye
Jeff Chandler had been visibly scarred in an automobile accident in the early 1940s, almost losing an eye.

Jeff Chandler at the mike with Talullah Bankhead for Screen Director's Playhouse on NBC, Nov. 16, 1950
Jeff Chandler at the mike with Talullah Bankhead for Screen Director's Playhouse on NBC, Nov. 16, 1950

Esther Williams with Jeff Chandler, ca. 1958
Esther Williams with Jeff Chandler, ca. 1958

From the January 4, 1953 Ogden Standard-Examiner:

Behind Scenes at Hollywood

by Alice West

     "I don't like to work too hard," is what Jeff Chandler told me on Universal - International location set, where he was making "Sioux Uprising."  "I like to take things easy." 

     And that's just the way he impresses you as you talk to him.  The handsome six-foot-four New Yorker obviously lacks that highstrung, nervous temperament that is so apparent with most movie actors. He is very soothing. 

     He was in Western regalia for this picture. 

     "I'm not in an Indian rig-out this time," he said smiling, "and everyone asks me why.  It seems good to get in some real clothes for a change."  His eyes seem to envelope you in a warmth of friendliness as he talks.  "You know, I've been playing the same guy in most of my pictures all along, although they have been different characters in different stories." 

Likes Role With Loretta

     He especially liked the one he had just finished with Loretta Young — "Because of You." (It will be in Ogden soon). 

     "That was a wonderful part for me," he said. "I loved it.  It gave me my first chance to do a parlor play — and then — I enjoy acting with Loretta Young so much.  She's magnificent! 

     He said he had always wanted to be an actor, since he was big enough to set his stakes.  Even while in high school he was disappointed because he could never take the parts that were offered him, because he had to help at his mother's small candy and stationery store. 

     For a year after finishing school, Jeff worked as a cashier In several different restaurants in which his father had interests.  It cost $500 to enroll in a dramatic school and it seemed he could never get that much together.

     Later he asked for a scholarship at the Feagin School of Dramatic Art in New York for doing a certain amount of work around the school which culminated in his getting a job with a Long Island Stock Co., as a stage hand. He was graduated into acting for his first role in Christopher Morley's "Trojan Horse."

Advises Stock Acting

     "One of the best ways for a young actor to get recognition is to get in stock companies," he said.  "An actor friend and I started our own company and were going fine until the war came along and we enlisted.  I always feel as if I got a good deal out of that venture," he continued, grinning broadly, "I met my wife.  She was the former Marjorie Hoshelle and was appearing in another company in the same neighborhood.  I've never regretted that move."

     They have two sons, Jamie and Dana.

     As soon as Jeff got out of the army, he took his savings of $3,000 and bought $1,000 worth of clothing and lived on the rest for the six months it took him to get a job in a radio show.  This really started his career and he was called upon steadily from then on. He appeared on one of Dick Powell's radio shows and Dick liked him and asked for him to be in his picture, "Johnny O'clock."  Then came weekly radio features, including 26 shows of "Michael Shayne, Detective," and later Eve Arden's boy friend in "Our Miss Brooks" program which he still does.  Of course the movies eventually put him under contract and he has made 14 pictures since.

     Jeff's ambition is to play Moses.

     "They are looking for a good Biblical film for me and I think Moses can't be beat," he said. 

Enjoys Indian Films

     In speaking of his Indian films, Jeff said: "It's interesting working with Indians.  Some tribes are very well educated and others are not.  Now, in the picture we made before this last one, the Indians spoke no pigeon English at all — and yet with the one before that, a number of them spoke it.  Many have college educations." 

     He went on to explain that many of them will not live in the homes provided for them by the Government.

     "They put the cattle in the homes and live in the tents," he said.  "They stay to themselves quite a bit and don't like to mingle with the whites.  Then, of course, there are other tribes who get along fine with the whites."

     Jeff has a strange philosophy.  "I think the smartest thing for a person to do is to find the difference in what he needs and what he wants," he says.  "You can go on wanting things all your life maybe, and become terribly frustrated about something you find you have never needed anyway." 

Likes To Make Furniture

     He spends his spare time making things for the house.  Tables, chairs and other articles. 

     "I'm afraid I'll never get caught up on the things my wife has ordered," he said, laughing. 

     He feels that baseball is still good material for many pictures yet to come and thinks it is excellent for the public.  He used to play baseball at school and would like to do it before the camera some day.


Born to a Jewish family in Brooklyn, New York, Chandler attended Erasmus Hall High School, alma mater to many stage and film personalities of the era. A childhood friend and next door neighbor was Susan Hayward. Young Susan Hayward appeared with young Master Grossel in an elementary school production of 'Cinderella in Flowerland'. Ira took some drama courses and worked in stock companies to sharpen his skills, then spent two years in stock companies before serving in World War II as an officer.

Upon his discharge from the Army, he returned to Drama, undertaking a busy career in Radio over a wide range of genre. He was as easily adept at straight dramatic roles, as in comedy, radio noir, and westerns such as Frontier Town. Indeed, in Frontier Town he was credited as 'Tex' Chandler, rather than Jeff Chandler. Two of his most popular roles were as Professor Boynton in Our Miss Brooks, and as Michael Shayne in the New Adventures of Michael Shayne.

From the February 25th 1950 edition of the Long Beach press Telegram:

Actor Gets in Right
Places at Right Time

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 25. (AP)
      Jeff Chandler, who's well established in radio and is coming up fast in pictures, says there's a good deal in being at the right place at the right time.
      One example was a double-date he was on in New York a few years ago. He and a pal took their girls to a drama-school play. Jeff went backstage, met the manager, and shortly afterward got a scholarship there. He didn't mind that it involved sign painting, cleaning up the premises and licking thousands of envelopes containing invitations to performances.
      Jeff came to Hollywood after his Army discharge, having served two years as a lieutenant in the Aleutians. While he made the radio-producer rounds, his money ran out. He got his first radio job the day he was to have taken a counter job in a hamburger joint.
      Four months after his arrival here, he played opposite Olivia de Havilland in a radio version of "Cheers for Miss Bishop." On the island of Shemya in the Aleutians, when Olivia had made an entertainment tour there, Lt. Chandler was assigned to be her escort.
      Jeff now plays Eve Arden's boy friend, Biology Professor Philip Boynton, on the "Our Miss Brooks" air show. Jeff describes the character as "a shy jerk." As radio's Dr. Dana he is "Sam Spade with a scalpel." Twenty-six transcriptions he made as private eye Michael Shane are still heard on various stations.


In the 15-minute weekly radio show That's a Good Idea, Jeff played as many as eight parts in one show, receiving excellent training in versatility. He possessed a highly adaptable voice and a knack for mimicry. Indeed, he could do spot-on impressions of many prominent voices, among them, Clark Gable, James Stewart, and James Cagney. With over 600 radio credits and a highly respected--and popular--radiography it's safe to say that Jeff Chandler fans will be listening to his work in Radio for generations to come.

His debut in Film was Johnny O'Clock (1947). Throughout the 1950s, Chandler became a star in western and action movies. His first important role was in Sword In The Desert (1948), as an Israeli freedom fighter. He was nominated for an Academy Award for his role as Cochise in Broken Arrow (1950). The first of three screen appearances as the legendary Apache chief, Chandler repeated the role in The Battle Of Apache Pass (1952) and Taza, Son Of Cochise (1954).

During the latter part of the 1950s until his untimely death, Chandler became a top leading man. His sex appeal, prematurely gray hair, and tanned, rugged features got him into several drama and costume movies. His films during this period were Foxfire (1955), Away All Boats (1956), Toy Tiger (1956), Durango (1957),
The Tattered Dress (1957), Man In The Shadow (1957), A Stranger In My Arms (1959), The Jayhawkers! (1959), Thunder In The Sun (1959), and Return to Peyton Place (1961).

Jeff Chandler's leading ladies included June Allyson, Joan Crawford, Rhonda Fleming, Maureen O'Hara, Jane Russell, Esther Williams, and his Brooklyn friend Susan Hayward. When his friend Sammy Davis Jr. lost an eye in an accident and was in danger of losing the other, Chandler offered to give Davis one of his own eyes. Chandler himself had nearly lost an eye and had been visibly scarred in an auto accident years earlier.

Chandler had a concurrent career as a singer and recording artist, releasing several albums and playing nightclubs. Jeff Chandler had a superb singing voice, recording several successful albums for Liberty Records. He wrote music, played violin and owned Chandler Music, a publishing company.

Shortly after completing his role in Merrill's Marauders in 1961, he injured his back while playing baseball with U.S. Army Special Forces soldiers serving as extras. Chandler entered a Culver City hospital and had surgery for a spinal disc herniation on May 13, 1961. There were severe complications, an artery was damaged and Chandler hemorrhaged. In a seven and a half hour emergency operation over and above the original surgery, he was given 55 pints of blood. Another operation followed, date unknown, where he received an additional 20 pints of blood. He expired June 17, 1961, at the age of 42 and nearing the pinnacle of his acting career.

His death was deemed malpractice, resulting in in a large lawsuit and settlement for his two children. Tony Curtis and Gerald Mohr were among the pallbearers at Chandler's funeral. He was interred in the Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, California.




Vinton Hayworth
[Jack Arnold | Vinton Haworth | Vinton Hayworth Sr. ]
(Michael Shayne)
Stage, Screen, Radio and Television actor
(1906-1970)

Birthplace: Washington D.C., U.S.A..

Radiography:
1937 John Barrymore Theatre
1945 The Adventures Of Father Brown
1945 Lights Out
1946 Murder At Midnight
1947 Quiet, Please
1948 Romance
1948 The Adventures Of Archie Andrews
1949 Cavalcade Of America
1950 MGM Theater Of the Air
1950 Meet Me In St Louis
1950 The Big Story
1951 Now Hear This
1951 It's Higgins, Sir
1951 American Portraits
1952 Tom Corbett, Space Cadet
1952 The Chase
1953 The New Adventures of Michael Shayne
Caption: Vinton Haworth, who causes feminine hearts to flutter, played Jack Arnold, Marge's love interest, in Myrt and Marge (1936)
Caption: Vinton Haworth, who causes feminine hearts to flutter, played Jack Arnold, Marge's love interest, in Myrt and Marge (1936)

Vinton Hayworth with actress Donna Dameril circa 1936
Vinton Hayworth with actress Donna Dameril circa 1936

Vinton Hayworth as Gen. Winfield Schaeffer in I Dream of Jeannie (1970)
Vinton Hayworth as Gen. Winfield Schaeffer in I Dream of Jeannie (1970)

Vinton Hayworth as Genl. Winfield Schaeffer from I Dream of Jeannie (1970)
Vinton Hayworth as Gen. Winfield Schaeffer from I Dream of Jeannie (1970)

From the It Happened Last Night column by Earl Wilson from the January 26, 1951 Terre Haute Star:

IT HAPPENED LAST NIGHT

By Earl Wilson

HE'S REALLY THE UNCLE OF BOTH RITA AND GINGER

     I proudly present--the only man who can make both Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers say uncle.  Vinton J. Hayworth, the radio and television after, proudly states that he's uncle of both—and also of Mrs. Bennett Cerf.  He proudly states too, that he's the uncle of Aly Khan.  He doesn't proudly state, though, that he's the ex-uncle of Orson Welles.
     Hayworth's handsome, mustached and fortyish.  He's one of the TV's iron men.
     For a year he's averaged one TV dramatic performance a week—a lot of memorizing. 
     "I used to baby-sit for Rita out in Woodside when she was so little she looked like a Japanese doll." he told me over at the Lambs Club.
     "From a baby, she was a magnet for men.
     "Her father used to go with her when she had a date, sitting in the car and waiting for her.
     "He had the duenna idea."

     Rita's real name was Margarita Carmencita Cansino.  Her mother, Volga Hayworth, was Vinton's sister.  He's an uncle-by-marriage to Ginger.  Her mother, Leilah, is the sister of his wife, Jean.
     But carry on, there's still more men.  Vinton Jr., 15, his son, is a cousin of both Ginger and Rita, and the only male in the world,
related, by blood, to both dolls.
     When Margarita took her mother's maiden name, she shortened Margarita to Rita. Got it now?

     "I had a fight with her once, he said.  "Her father wanted me to give her some diction lessons.  She didn't know how to read lines.
     "She said, 'Oh, what do you know about it, father?"  Well, I let her have it."
     "She didn't need any diction, he says now,

     "When she was married to Welles, I never met him.  We were in an elevator once.  He didn't speak.  He was lost in the depth of
his genius."
     Rita, now the perfect niece, invited him to her wedding.  Ginger, a perfect niece too, has been very kind and has given him presents and three ex-nephews, including Lew Ayres.
     "It's curious," ' he says, that when Rita was three, my father wrote a poem, which he called "To My Little Princess."
     "He used to tell her that some day a prince would carry her away.  He called her Princess Margarita"
     Maybe Rita doesn't even remember it—but today her formal name is "Princess Margarita."

     Hiya, Terre Haute!  The Vinton Hayworth of this story was the son of Allyn Hayworth, who was born in Terre Haute a lot of years
ago, and went to Washington, D.C. where he became a publisher and printer.  Undoubtedly there are Hayworths around Terre Haute
who are related—somewhat distantly—to Vinton Hayworth, and thus—more distantly—to Rita.


Born and raised in the Washington, D.C. Metro area, handsome, multi-talented young Vinton Hayworth was appearing in several local high school dramatic productions as early as 1922--and obtaining respectable notices in the process. Hayworth's grandfather, Joseph Hayworth, had been a celebrated Shakespearean actor in his own right. The Hayworth family could also lay claim to no less than Rita Hayworth [the former Margarita Carmencita Cansino] who was Vinton Hayworth's niece.

Young Hayworth continued acting in and directing local theatre productions through the 1920s. According to the April 20, 1924 edition of the Washington Post:

"Mrs. Pat and the Law" will be directed by Vinton Hayworth, who will be assisted by Andrew Allison and Amila Peters."

By 1932, Vinton Hayworth was appearing at New York's Ambassador Theatre in a revue entitled Chamberlain Brown's Scrap Book as a sketch performer in a Myrt and Marge sketch. Hayworth's next major foray onto the Broadway Stage would come ten years later in 671 performances as Tom Dillon in George S. Kaufman production of The Doughgirls (1942-44) at the Lyceum Theatre.

Vinton Hayworth married Jean Owens, in 1935. Jean Owens was the sister of actress Lela E. Rogers [Leilah Owen], who was the mother of Ginger Rogers. (Thus, Vinton Hayworth could later refer to both Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers as nieces.)

Vinton Hayworth began his Radio career in the New York area, appearing regularly in several east coast programs from 1935, forward. One of Radio's most successful character actors, Hayworth found himself cast as the lead in several Radio productions, among them, the head of the Roberts family in Its Higgins Sir (1951), and Michael Shayne in the 1953 ABC incarnation of The Adventures of Michael Shayne (1952-1953).

With Radio winding down and Television ramping up, Hayworth made a highly successful jump from Radio to Television, with over 100 television appearances between 1952 and 1970. That, added to fifty feature films, several local, regional and Broadway Stage plays, and some 700 appearances over Radio and you have the makings of one of the acting profession's great success stories.

After Vinton's passing in 1970, his wife Jean Hayworth continued acting in her own right, once appearing as Ginger Rogers' mother in the mid-1970s (remember that Jean Hayworth was Ginger Rogers' real-life aunt).

With much of Vinton Hayworth's radio work surfacing in circulation each passing year, the majority of his Film appearances already in circulation and most of his Television appearances now circulating, almost anyone can reacquaint themselves with Vinton Hayworth's natural charm, winning personality and versatility as a character actor.




Davis Dresser
[Brett Halliday]
(Author)
Novelist
(1904-1977)

Birthplace: Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Education: Tri-State College of Engineering, Angola, Indiana, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1946 Michael Shayne, Private Detective
1947 The New Adventures Of Michael Shayne
1948 Suspense
1949 Murder By Experts

David Dresser as Brett Halliday circa 1944
David Dresser as Brett Halliday circa 1944

Two-fisted Mike Shayne, Davis Dresser's most famous detective protagonist, downed a bottle of Martell cognac a day, according to his author. Shayne was reportedly  simply emulating his  successful author's real-life drinking habits
Two-fisted Mike Shayne, Davis Dresser's most famous detective protagonist, downed a bottle of Martell cognac a day, according to his author. Shayne was reportedly simply emulating his successful author's real-life drinking habits.

Mike Shayne paperback illustration
Mike Shayne paperback illustration


Illustrators of the caliber of Joe McGinnis graced the covers of many of the Michael Shayne paperbacks of the 50s and 60s
Illustrators of the caliber of Joe McGinnis graced the covers of many of the Michael Shayne paperbacks of the 40s, 50s and 60s


Brett Halliday's Mike Shayne novella, In A Deadly Vein for Dell, circa 1943
Brett Halliday's Mike Shayne novella, In A Deadly Vein for Dell, circa 1943


Dresser's publishing house was named after his pet terrier
Dresser's publishing house was named after his pet terrier Torquil.

Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine from 1984
Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine from 1984


From the June 17th 1951 edition of the Springfield Sunday Republican:

Noted Author Couple Take Up Residence in Conway head

     Conway, June 16--This town, and particularly the vicinity of Reed's Bridge, should enjoy complete immunity from crime, for the areasis now under the capable protection of Michael Shayne, red-headed, two-fisted, cognac-drinking private detective, who has solved hundreds of criminal dilemmas since he was first introduced to an enthusiastic detective mystery reading public by the distinguished crime author, Brett Halliday, some 10 years ago.

               Will Live in Town
     Michael Shayne took up permanent residence in the quiet suburbs of Conway on May 17 when the Davis Dressers--better known to some 10,000,000 detective thriller fans as Brett Halliday and Helen McCloy--brought him along when they established residence in a 200-year-old former mill-house which overlooks a tumbling mountain stream on the outskirts of the sleepy little town.
     The Dressers are convinced that they have found a perfect permanent home.  Its seclusion will give them the opportunity to work out the intricate counterpoint of mystery plots with little interruption by an inquisitive outside world.  It will give them the first home they have really been able to call their own since they were married at Islip, Long Island, in 1946.
     The Dressers' new home will also provide a permanent hearthstone for their three-year-old daughter Chloe who is as delighted as any small fairy with her new romping grounds.  So much so that she never fails to say "good morning, Mr. River" to the merry mountain stream which capers along beside the house before she does anything else when she awakes in the morning.
               Prolific Writers
     Diminutive Chloe certainly has a distinguished mother and father.  Her daddy has authored some 75 novels under a dozen different pseudonyms.  Her mother is considered one of the outstanding mystery writers in her field and has penned a dozen highly successful novels since she wrote her first best-seller "Dawns of Death," published in 1938.  Mrs. Dresser--Helen McCloy--produces one book and one novelette each year.  Mr. Dresser--Brett Halliday--turns out a much heavier volume of work in order to keep up with the demands of millions of fans all virtually interested in the adventures and future of red-headed Shayne, the enduring hero of his mystery tales.
     Shayne enthusiasts will be interested to know that the fast-moving provate eye is not entirely a figment of Mr. Dresser's imagination.  The author actually met the original Michael Shayne several years ago in a Tampico bar where he and a group of sailor companions became embroiled in a waterfront brawl.  The then as yet unrecognized budding author was slugged on the head with a gun butt and lay helpless under a table when a very real Michael Shayne came to his rescue.  As Dresser tells it:
     "Suddenly there was a crash; a big red-headed Irishman who had been sitting alone watching the battle between frequent drinks of tequila chased down with ice-water, unexpectedly leaped from his chair and joined in the battle.  Half a dozen men fell before his accurate fists before he reached me and heaved me bodily through the door.  He remained inside, fighting alone."
               Second Meeting
     It was many years later before Mr. Dresser saw the competent fighting man again.  On this second occasion, broke and jobless, he had wandered into a New Orleans Rampart St. bar to seek shelter from the cold.  The first person he laid yes on in the room was the same burly character who had probably saved his life in hte Tampico brawl of many years before.  The setting was almost exactly the same.  The only difference being that the rangy Irishman was drinking cognac instead of tequila.
     Dresser introduced himself to his former benefactor who immediately recalled the T ampico incident and insisted on staking the youth to a good meal and a night's lodging.  It was then that Dresser discover that Connor Michael Shawn was the Irishmen's proper name.
     It was a name he never forgot.  Shortened to "Michael Shayne" it became the symbol of diamond-in-the-rough gallantry and efficiency to millions of Mr. Dresser's readers.  It is also a familiar name to followers of the Michael Shayne movie series and plans are afoot for its presentation to television audiences.
               Choice of Pen Name
     Dresser selected the pen name of Brett Halliday as the result of his first mystery novel published by Stokes in 1936.  The hero of that first novel was called "Matt Halliday", a name which the publisher considered to be too mundane.  But it had particular appeal for Mr. Dresser and he chose it as a pseudonym when the first Michael Shayne mystery appeared on the mystery market.  He substituted the name "Brett" for "Mark", however, in tribute to Brett Stokes, son of the publishing executive, wom he considered to be his best friend.  Brett Stokes has since passed away but Mr. Dresser says he will never forget the comradship and encouragement proffered by the personable young man.
     Writing is hard work.  A glance at the struggles of Dresser will prove the point.  Born in Chicago, he moved to Texas when he was six where he led a comparatively uneventful youth until he falsified his age to join the Rrmy at the age of 14.  He was accepted and assigned to the 5th U.S. Cavalry, where he became an expert horseman--an interest which he carries on to this day--until his military career was cut short when the War Department became aware of his tender years.
     But he had managed to put in 15 months of service and considered the knowledge of horsemanship he had acquired well worth the fabricating of what he terms "a white lie" concerning his age.
               Studied Engineering
     Upon his discharge from the Army, Mr. Dresser knocked around for a bit before resuming his schooling.  He finally decided that civil engineerng offered the most potentialities to a young man with ambition and entered the Tri-State College of Engineering in Angola, Indiana.
     The field had definite appeal to him and he eventually turned his formal education into practical advantage on engineering jobs in various sections of the country.  In fact, he owned his own engineerng firm at the ripe old age of 22, but shortly thereafter was wiped out of business by the complicated problems of overhead and the circumstance that job assignments were exceedingly hard to come by during depression days.
     Mr. Dresser wrote his first novel under rather strange circumstances in California in 1927.  Lack of job opportunities forced him to take anything that came along and he was then employed as a part-time dishwasher in a restaurant.  Often on the verge of starvation, things were at their very blackest when he came across the announcement of a first novel contest calling for entries by unpublished authors.  Contest rules called for manuscripts of 60,000 words or more and the deadline was less than 30 days away.
     "That's for me", Mr. Dresser thought.  So he chucked his job and settled down to work in a furnished room.  He completed the novel in time to enter it but it didn't win a prize.
               Decided to Be Author
     "The experience taught me that I could actually put words together," Mr. Dresser said.  "Right then and there I decided that I wanted to be an author."
     Since that time Mr. Dresser has turned out 75 novels, writing as many as eight complete books in one year.  Twenty of these were westerns and the others with the exception of the Michael Shayne series, were written mostly for the drugstore bookshelf trade.  Some of the pseudonyms he used include Anthony Scott, Elliot Storm, Peter Shelley, Jerome Shard, Kathryn Culver and Sylvia Carson.
     Mr. Dresser is living proof that the old saying "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again" is pretty good advise.  The first Michael Shayne novel went to 22 different publishers before it was finally accepted.  It was faborably reviewed but its immediate successor, "The Private Practice of Michael Shayne", was the one that really rang the bell.  It established both its hero and its author as top-notchers in the highly competitive field of detective fiction.
     Mrs. Dresser is as well known as her famous husband.  She has 12 popular mystery novels to her credit and as many novelettes published in leading periodicals.  And small wonder?  Her father, William Conrad McCloy, was managing editor of the New York Evening Sun in the days when its columns were avidly ready by an appreciative public during a golden age of journalism.  The first reporter Mr. McCloy ever hired was a man named Richard Harding Davis.
     Mrs. Dresser inherits literary talent from her mother's side of the family, too.  Her mother was Helen Worrell Clarkson, who wrote a daily column for the Sun for over 20 years, in a time when women journalists were rare.
               Was Art Critic
     When Mrs. Dresser was attending lectures at the Sorbonne, Paris, she was art critic for "International Studio", a fabulous slick publication which was an art oracle of its day.  She served, at the same time, as art correspondent for the New York Times.
     The Dressers write independently.  They never interfere with each other's style of ideas, beyond a detached discussion stage with the result that neither's ideas influence the writings of the other.  The system has resulted in individual recognition of their talent for fresh, independent style.
     Mr. Dresser likes to pound out copy in the early hours of morning but, like Mrs. Dresser, he usually writes when and if he feels in the mood.  Interruptions and noise bother Mr. Dresser not a whit, but Mrs. Dresser is the exact opposite.  She must have complete quiet to be at her literary best.  Writing comes fairly easily to her.  She sold her first literary venture to the Boston Transcript at the age of 14 and vividly remembers the thrill she received when she was paid the sum of $5 for the article which was entitled "The New Literary Form."
               Many Other Interests
     Outside of hatching a maze of mystery and detective plots for Michael Shayne and Mrs. Dresser's variety of key characters, the Dressers maintain a host of other outside interests.  They are both members of hte board of directors of "The Mystery Writers of America", and Mrs. Dresser last year completed a term as the only woman president the organization has ever elected.
     In addition, the two authors are currently editing an anthology entitled "Great Tales of Murder" which will be published by Random House this fall.  The task is a volunteer one, inasmuch as all proceeds will go to "The Mystery Writers of America" fund which offers valuable services to struggling authors.  All story material has been contributed, too, and will include tales by such masters of suspense as John Dickson Carr and Hugh Pentecost.
     The Dressers are happily settled in their Conway home.  It is a charming old residence which contains many rare antiques which have been in Mrs. Dresser's family since pre-Revolutionary War days.  The beauty of the old mill-house is further enhanced by outstanding examples of art which adorn the walls of the spacious living rooms.  Original illustrations by Howard Pyle, John Bennett, Stephen Ferris and other notables lend an aura of natural good taste to the well-appointed homestead.
               "Good Neighbor Policy"
     Residents of Conway have already established a "good neighbor policy" in their attitude toward the Dresser family.  They understand that the hard-working author couple has settled there to enjoy the peace and seclusion that only a New England town can offer.  They have warmly welcomed the Dressers as permanent guests of the community who can be sure that they may work and live without undue interference from a curious outside world.
     As small Chloe Dresser says, "daddy has Mike Shayne, Mother has her books and I've got Mr. River."  Which all adds up to good writing and happy living.
 
BRIAN F. KING

From the Long Beach Independent-Telegram of September 29, 1960:

Author Too Busy to Write Mike Shayne TV Episodes

By JACK GAVER

     NEW YORK (UPI)--You may wonder why many a big-name author sells an outstanding property to television but doesn't do what seems logical by going along to write the scripts from material that he knows better than anyone else.
     In the case of Brett Halliday, the reason is simple.
     "They didn't ask me." he explained.
     Halliday is the creator of a tough-fibred private eye named Michael Shayne who has been a best-selling hero of 38 full-length mystery novels since 1939.  A one-hour weekly filmed series with his name for title makes its bow at 10 p.m. Friday on the NBC
network.

     "ACTUALLY, of course," Halliday pointed out, "it would be impossible for one person to turn out a 60-minute script each week.  You simply have to bring in outside writers. 
     "I did write the pilot film used to sell the series to sponsors, and I have been working closely with Four Star Productions in Hollywood most of this year getting the series ready."
     Although Halliday's episode will be used in the series, it will not be the first one on the air. 

     "Of course," Halliday "I own part of the program, and I am the story supervisor.  That means that stories screened by Four Star and deemed by them to be usable are sent along to me in my Connecticut home for approval.
     "I would like to write an occasional script for the show, and maybe I will, but I'm committed to turning out three Shayne novels a year, I run a book-publishing company, and I put out the Michael Shayne mystery magazine once a month.  That doesn't leave much lime for television writing."

     THE AUTHOR pointed out, however, that the first season's product of some 30 episodes will be almost pure Halliday in that the great majority of them will be adaptations of his books and various shorter pieces about Shayne.  Often TV will buy a property or name and proceed to pay little attention to source material beyond using the title.
     "I gather that there will be more violence in the TV shows than in the books." the author continued.  "I don't particularly care for that, especially a lot of gun play.  But I suppose it is necessary to meet the competition.
     "In the books Shayne doesn't carry a gun at all.  He's a hard-fisted mixer when necessary, but there have been two or three books in a row at times in which he didn't kill anyone.  Richard Denning has the role of Shayne, and those whose TV viewing goes way back will find him familiar in the role of sleuth.  He was the husband half of the "Mr. and Mrs. North" mystery series, which lasted for several semesters.

     "I'M NOT much of a TV fan," Halliday said, "but I guess I'll have to go down to the basement recreation room where my daughter does her viewing and watch this show every Friday night.  I saw some of the six completed episodes when I was in Hollywood, but they were not in finished form except for the pilot."
     Halliday isn't the only prominent mystery writer in his family.  His wife is Helen McCloy whose series of books features a hero named Dr. Willing.  The author's real name, by the way, is Davis Dresser.

Davis Dresser was born Chicago, but raised for the most part in West Texas. An accident with a length of barbed wire took the sight of his left eye when he was just a boy. Dresser reportedly ran away from home at the age of 14, enlisted in the U.S. Cavalry [the 5th Cavalry Regiment] at Fort Bliss, and was subsequently stationed on the U.S.-Mexico border following the Rio Grande river for the following year. Upon completing his military service, he reportedly returned to Texas to finish high school.

Davis subsequently toured the Southwest taking adventurous odd-jobs whereever he found them, ranging from muleskinner to short-order cook and everything in between. He apparently attended the Tri-State College of Engineering, gaining a Civil Engineering degree, after which he worked as a surveyor for several years.

Davis Dresser was certainly a colorful character in any case--perhaps not quite the equal of his various western and detective noir genre protagonists, but certainly a character in his own right.

Dresser reportedly began writing in earnest in 1927, learning his craft, accepting the rejection slips as they came, and starting a young family with his first wife, Kathleen Rollins and her two daughters by a previous marriage. Those first eight years of attempting to be a successful writer ultimately paid off in 1935, with the printing of Dresser's first Michael Shayne novel.

Written under the nom de plume, Brett Halliday, Dresser's dashing dark looks, and eye patch in place on the back cover of many of his novels clearly created the aura of mystery that Dresser hoped might be associated with all of his Michael Shayne mysteries.

Dresser's Mike Shayne character was soon translated to the big screen with an initial seven Michael Shayne films starring Lloyd Nolan. Thereafter, followed a Radio version of Michael Shayne over the Don Lee-Mutual West Coast network, starring Wally Maher as Shayne and Cathy Lewis as Phyllis Knight, the Radio version of Brett Halliday's own Phyllis Shayne (Michael Shayne's wife in the earliest paperback novellas).

The Radio arm of the Michael Shayne franchise ran from 1944 through 1953, over a total of four distinct and separate incarnations and five separate actors in the lead role. In between the inauguration and end of the Radio runs, PRC rolled out another five Michael Shayne feature films starring Hugh Beaumont in the lead.

Dresser continued to actually pen some of the Michael Shayne stories and novellas until about 1958, by which time Dresser stopped writing as Brett Halliday altogether, leaving that end of the franchise to a long line of ghost-writers. Indeed, when the 1960 Television series became a viable project, as indicated in the article above, Davis Dresser was happy to invest in the productoin and maintain story supervision, but that's where his interest in the Television incarnation began and ended.

Dresser married the equally successful fiction writer, Helen McCloy [Dresser's second marriage] in 1946. McCloy eventually served as the President of the Mystery Writers of America for two years. By the mid-1960s Davis Dresser became a successful publisher in his own right, semi-retired, first to The Berkshires on the east coast, then to Montecito on the west coast.

Also a highly successful Western author, it's estimated that Davis Dresser was responsible for over 130 originally published works over his fifty-year writing and publishing career.

From the February 7, 1977 Berkshire Eagle:

Brett Halliday, author of
Shayne novels, dies

SANTA BARBARA, Calif.
(UPI) — Davis Dresser, who wrote the Michael Shayne detective novels under the name Brett Halliday, has died of cancer at his Montecito home. He was 72. His family announced the death Saturday and said no funeral services would be planned.
Born in Chicago in 1904, Dresser worked as a farmhand, mule skinner, gravedigger, oil tanker deckhand and shortorder cook throughout the South before beginning his writing career in 1930.
His first Shayne novel, there were 50, was written in 1935 and rejected by 22 publishers before it finally was printed. Each novel sold more than a million copies and was translated into eight to 12 languages for distribution abroad.
Dresser also wrote about 60 other novels using 12 different pen names. He later became a publisher.
Dresser leaves his widow, Mary Savage, also a novelist; a son, Halliday, and a daughter, Chloe Johnson.




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