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Original Lights Out header art

The Lights Out Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Lights Out

Our original Lights Out .mp3 cover art
Our original Lights Out .mp3 cover art


NBC Blue Key Station WENR, Chicago, produced and broadcast Lights Out! throughout the Wyllis Cooper-written run.
NBC Blue Key Station WENR, Chicago, produced and broadcast Lights Out! throughout the Wyllis Cooper-written run.

Betty Winkler cowers before Ted Maxwell's clutched hand.
Betty Winkler cowers before Ted Maxwell's clutched hand.


Background

From the August 10th 1935 issue of Radio Guide:

38-08-10 Radio Guide Inset

LIGHTS OUT, Everybody." A deep voice speaks softly.
     Thirteen chimes . . . Evil omen.
     Wind rising to a crescendo and fading . . . ominous--forboding.
     GONG!
     By the time this much of the Lights Out program has gone out over the air hundreds of thousands of listeners, literally in the four corners of the country, are sitting in the dark, nerves taut in anticipation.
     Then the play.  Whatever its story, it must be gory, blood-curdling, terrifying.  It had better be, or Willis Cooper, creator and author of the program and Western NBC continuity editor, will be deluged with letters calling him "sissy."
     Lights Out fans want their horror undiluted.  And they get what they want--or else. Which means that by letter, phone and telegram they shout long and loudly until they do get what they want.  NBC found that out when the program was taken off the air last Winter.

THE program started as a novelty--an experiment.  Its immediate, overwhelming success probably will make it Exhibit A for all those who insist that listeners do know what they want from their radios, and will emphatically voice their approval when given an incentive.
     About a year and a half ago it occurred to Willis Cooper that a great many listeners might welcome a dramatic show late at night as relief from the constant song of dance ballads.  Being an avid reader of mystery and horror stories, especially as relaxation after a hard day's work, he decided quite naturally that midnight and ghastly stories would make a grand combination for night-owl listeners.
     Whereupon Mr. Cooper spent a few evenings giving himself the jitters by writing tales of horror intead of reading them.  That's no gag.  With that vivid imagination of his . . . you know he has to have one to write those chilling tales . . . he sometimes scares himself so he has to stop writing in the middle of a story, and finish it the next day.  Especially is this so of ghost stories.  Bill is scared to death of ghosts; so much so that often he refuses to listen when one of his ghost stories is being broadcast.  "I just can't take it," he admits.
     He presented his scripts and suggestions for midnight dramas to NBC's program board. Only mildly interested, the others on the board--Cooper himself is one of them--bowed to their continuity editor's enthusiasm and decided the idea was worth giving a trial.
     Without ballyhoo of any kind, Lights Out was presented for the first time over WENR on a Wednesday at midnight early in January, 1934.
     The studio personnel, accustomed to all types of programs and therefore generally indifferent to all, started staying up late on Wednesday nights.  A few radio editors paid tribute to something new on the air.  Letters from listeners startted to come in, slowly but surely increasing in number each week.  It was evident that Lights Out was a successful experiment.  But no one, not even Willis Cooper, imagined that it was a sensation.

THAT amazing revelation came months later.  As continuity editor, Bill had a great deal of work to do.  He decided he needed for his other work the time it took to write Lights Out.
     One night last January the announcer ended the program with a simple announcement: "This is the last of the series of Lights Out programs."
     Then came the deluge.  From North, East, South and West came letters, phone calls, telegram, petitions--some signed by as many as 200 people.  Radio editors were swamped with protesting mail from their readers.  The mailing room was flooded.  "Put Lights Out back on the air!" was the cry.  It wasn't a plea.  It was a demand.  "You can't take Lights Out away from us" was the ultimatum laid down by the worlds greatest dictator--the public.
     Sweet music to an author's ears.  Pleasant surprise for the network.
     With such acclaim, Cooper didn't care how much extra work he had to do.  What writer would?

THREE weeks later, Lights Out was back on WENR each Wednesday at midnight.  And shortly afterward, yielding to the demands of station managers whose listeners were clamoring for Lights Out, the program was scheduled for the entire network.  To save Eastern listeners the necessity of staying up all night to hear the program--blase New York had been particularly emphatic in demanding the thriller for its supposedly sated listeners--the program is now being broadcast half an hour earlier, at 12:30 a. m. EDT.
     Watching a Lights Out broadcast is an experience in itself.  As the opening words are spoken, all studio lights are extinguished.  Working in utter darkness excepting the pin point of light that enables the actors to see their scripts, and another in the control room so they can watch the program's producer, everyone becomes tense.  A huge studio in almost total darkness and silence is not the most cheerful place to be, even if you know it is just a play going on.
     At a sign from the production man, the play starts.  You keep reminding yourself that this is only a radio program, try to force yourself to be cool and unconcerned.  After all, it's only a play and there are the actors in front of you; but so realistic is the acting--the atmosphere--the sounds--that cold chills insist upon running up and down your spine.
     The program is over.  Lights go on.  With a sigh of relief you silently breathe thanks that no one was around to see you jitter.  It seems silly to get scared watching a broadcast.

BUT it isn't silly.  It is a great tribute to those who are responsible for the program--the production man, the actors, the engineer and the sound men.  Under the sensitive dircction of Ted Sherdeman, the program's producer, the actors actually live the experiences written in Cooper's lines; sound and action are so real that one loses all sense of listening to a program; one seems actually to be witnessing a living drama.  So intensely real is the drama that it sends shudders through thousands of people many miles away, and keeps the illusion of reality even in the studio.  Audiences are not permitted at Lights Out broadcasts; but unlike many programs, it would spoil no listener's illusions if they were.
     Some of Chicago's finest actors and actresses take part in the Lights Out shows.  Betty Winkler and Bernardine Flynn share the feminine parts; Arthur Jacobson, Don Briggs, Sydney Ellstrom, Phillip Lord, Ted Maxwell and Butler Mandderville are the stock group from which each weeks male cast is chosen.

LIGHTS OUT mail is prohably the most interesting received by any program.  From all walks of life, from nearly every state in the Union, and from half a dozen countries, it pours in every week.  So varied is its source, seemingly encompassing every type and class of people, that one is struck by the thought that if there is such a thing as a universal type of entertainment . . . a type to please all tastes . . . Lights Out is it.
     There are at least 200 Lights Out clubs, composed of from four to as many as fifty members.  They meet each Wednesday evening to play cards or dance until time for the program's broadcast.  Each of these, as well as hundreds of other listeners sends in a weekly comment.  "And woe is me," says Bill, "if the story has been even a litlle milder than usual. Those blood·thirsty fans pounce on me like some of my characters do their victims.  Gives me nightmares."
     But don't take that too seriously.  Actually, Bill gets a kick out of writing his Lights Out--and a real thrill from those fan letters.
          Lights Out may be heard Wednesday over an NBC-WEAF network at 12:30 a. m. EDT (11:30 p.m EST; 11 :30 CDT; 10:30 CST; 9:30 MST; 8:30 PST).


Lights Out! Director Art Jacobsen instills the perfect emotional frame for another Wyllis Cooper script performed by Betty Winkler, Sid Ellstrom and Helen Fox.
Lights Out! Director Art Jacobsen instills the perfect emotional feeling for another Wyllis Cooper script performed by Betty Winkler, Sid Ellstrom and Helen Fox.

Forrest Lewis, Betty Winkler, Sidney Ellstrom, Art Jacobson, Ted Maxwell, Helen Fox and Harold Peary at the NBC mike for Lights Out!, circa 1936
Forrest Lewis, Betty Winkler, Sidney Ellstrom, Art Jacobson, Ted Maxwell, Helen Fox and Harold Peary at the NBC mike for Lights Out!, circa 1936

From the March 25th 1938 edition of the Tonawanda Daily News:

Boris Karloff, Best of the Bogeymen To Appear on 'Lights Out' Show

      Let's all sit down and have a good scare.  At exactly half an hour past midnight (EST), tonight, lights will be dimmed in innumerable homes throughout the nation, armchairs will be dragged closer to radios, books and papers will be laid aside, and a shudder will pass over the face of the land, for Boris Karloff, the best known bogeyman in the movies, will be undertaking a role in "Lights Out"--the best known horror drama in radio.  His first midnight horror, tonight, will be "Cat-Wife," with Betty Winkler as the neurotic wife.
     Fear, you know, is a funny thing.  We talk bravely about rooting it out of our minds and banishing it from our lives, but the truth of the matter is that we probably wouldn't if we could, for we really enjoy it.  We have an appetite for fear.  Boris Karloff in his first appearance on the "Lights Out" show may be heard over station WBEN at 12:30 a.m.

Series Derivatives:

None
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Thriller Dramas
Network(s): NBC Blue [WENR]; NBC Red; CBS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 34-01-03 01 Title Unknown
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 34-01-01 to 39-08-16; NBC Blue [WENR]; Two Hundred and Seventy-Four, 30-minute programs;
Syndication: NBC Red; NBC Blue ; CBS
Sponsors: Ironized Yeast; Eversharp Shick
Director(s): [Producer-Directors]

Ted Sherdeman, Wyllis Cooper, Arch ObolerAlbert Crews, Bill Lawrence, Herbert Swope Jr.

[Directors]

Art Jacobsen, Lou Robertson, Laurence Schwab Jr.
Principal Actors: Don Briggs, Forrest Lewis, Betty Winkler, Sidney Ellstrom, Art Jacobson, Ted Maxwell, Helen Fox, Harold Peary, Boris Karloff
Recurring Character(s):
Protagonist(s):
Author(s): None
Writer(s) Wyllis Cooper, Arch Oboler, Fred France, Paul Pierce, James Lee, Gelett Burgess, Hal Hackady, Jerry Hackady, Robert Henney
Music Direction:
Musical Theme(s):
Announcer(s): Bob Lemond, Byron Kane, Frank Martin, Bob Stevenson, Bob Murphy, Ken Niles
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
Episodes in Circulation:
Total Episodes in Collection:
Provenances:
.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspaper listings.

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[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







Lights Out Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
33-12-25
--
--
34-01-03
1
Title Unknown
N
[ Premiere, Wed. Midnight, over WENR, Chicago as 'Midnight Mysteries]

34-01-10
2
Title Unknown
N
34-01-17
3
Title Unknown
N
34-01-24
4
Title Unknown
N
34-01-31
5
Title Unknown
N
34-02-07
6
Title Unknown
N
34-02-07 Radio Guide
12:00 Mid.
WENR-Lights Out, mystery drama

34-02-07 Winnipeg Free Press
WENR-WLS. Chicago (870)
P.M..
12.00 — Lights Out! mystery drama.
. . . . Thanks are due Bill Cooper, who is the producer of those extraordinary Midnight Mysteries heard from WENR every Wednesday, at midnight. Lights out, everybody, torn guaranteed thrill!
34-02-14
7
Title Unknown
N
34-02-21
8
Title Unknown
N
34-02-28
9
Title Unknown
N
34-03-07
10
Title Unknown
N
34-03-14
11
Title Unknown
N
34-03-21
12
Title Unknown
N
34-03-28
13
Title Unknown
N
34-04-04
14
Title Unknown
N
34-04-11
15
Title Unknown
N
34-04-18
16
Title Unknown
N
34-04-25
17
Title Unknown
N
34-05-02
18
Title Unknown
N
34-05-02 Radio Guide
12:00 mid. EST---CST p.m.11:00
WENR-Lights Out
12:15 mid. EST---CST p.m.11:15
WENR-Seymour Simon orchestra
34-05-09
19
Title Unknown
N
[ Expands to 30 minutes from 15 minutes.]

34-05-09 Chicago Daily Tribune
Midnight--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
12:30--WENR, Seymour Simon's orchestra

34-05-09 Winnipeg Free Press
. . . . LIGHTS OUT!—Listen in the dark—If you dare!— to Bill Cooper's supernatural drama—Last time we mentioned it in this column, Lights Out was scaring folks lor only 15 minutss over WENR—Now you can be scared for a half-hour over a network of NBC stations!— at 11 p.m.
34-05-16
20
Title Unknown
N
34-05-16 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-05-23
21
Title Unknown
N
34-05-23 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-05-30
22
Title Unknown
N
34-05-30 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-06-06
23
Title Unknown
N
34-06-06 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-06-13
24
Title Unknown
N
34-06-13 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-06-20
25
Title Unknown
N
34-06-20 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-06-27
26
Title Unknown
N
34-06-27 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-06-30
27
Title Unknown
N
34-06-30 New York Times
8:30-WJZ--Lights Out--Sketch

34-06-30 Winnipeg Free Press
NO DOUBT A GOOD MANY readers of this column have become acquainted with Lights Out, the intriguing supernatural stuff that has been emanating from WENR Wednesday nights for several months past. If you haven't, you've been passing up one of the most cleverly produced dramatic shows on the air today.

34-07-04
28
Title Unknown
N
34-07-04 Chicago Daily Tribune
12:00--WENR, "Lights Out," drama.
34-07-11
29
Title Unknown
N
34-07-18
30
Title Unknown
N
34-07-25
31
Title Unknown
N
34-08-01
32
Title Unknown
N
34-08-08
33
Title Unknown
N
34-08-15
34
Title Unknown
N
34-08-22
35
Title Unknown
N
34-08-29
36
Title Unknown
N
34-09-05
37
Title Unknown
N
34-09-12
38
Title Unknown
N
34-09-19
39
Title Unknown
N
34-09-26
40
Title Unknown
N
34-10-03
41
Title Unknown
N
34-10-10
42
Title Unknown
N
34-10-17
43
Title Unknown
N
34-10-24
44
Title Unknown
N
34-10-31
45
Title Unknown
N
34-11-07
46
Title Unknown
N
34-11-14
47
Title Unknown
N
34-11-21
48
Title Unknown
N
34-11-28
49
Title Unknown
N
34-12-05
50
Title Unknown
N
34-12-12
51
Title Unknown
N
34-12-19
52
Title Unknown
N
34-12-26
53
Title Unknown
N
35-01-02
54
Title Unknown
N
35-01-09
55
Title Unknown
N
35-01-16
56
Title Unknown
N
35-01-23
57
Title Unknown
N
35-01-30
58
Title Unknown
N
35-02-06
59
Title Unknown
N
35-02-13
60
Title Unknown
N
35-02-20
61
Title Unknown
N
35-02-27
62
Title Unknown
N
35-03-06
63
Title Unknown
N
35-03-13
64
Title Unknown
N
35-03-20
65
Title Unknown
N
35-03-27
66
Title Unknown
N
35-04-03
67
Title Unknown
N
35-04-10
68
Title Unknown
N
35-04-17
69
Title Unknown
N
35-04-24
70
Title Unknown
N
35-05-01
71
Title Unknown
N
35-05-08
72
Title Unknown
N
35-05-15
73
Title Unknown
N
35-05-22
74
Title Unknown
N
35-05-29
75
Title Unknown
N
35-06-05
76
Title Unknown
N
35-06-12
77
Title Unknown
N
35-06-19
78
Title Unknown
N
35-06-26
79
Title Unknown
N
35-07-03
80
Title Unknown
N
35-07-10
81
Title Unknown
N
35-07-17
82
Title Unknown
N
35-07-24
83
Title Unknown
N
35-07-31
84
Title Unknown
N
35-08-07
85
Title Unknown
N
35-08-14
86
Title Unknown
N
35-08-21
87
Title Unknown
N
35-08-28
88
Title Unknown
N
35-09-04
89
Title Unknown
N
35-09-11
90
Title Unknown
N
35-09-18
91
Title Unknown
N
35-09-25
92
Title Unknown
N
35-10-02
93
Title Unknown
N
35-10-09
94
Title Unknown
N
35-10-16
95
Title Unknown
N
35-10-23
96
Title Unknown
N
35-10-30
97
Title Unknown
N
35-11-06
98
Title Unknown
N
35-11-13
99
Title Unknown
N
35-11-20
100
Title Unknown
N
35-11-27
101
Title Unknown
N
35-12-04
102
Title Unknown
N
35-12-11
103
Title Unknown
N
35-12-18
104
Title Unknown
N
35-12-25
105
Title Unknown
N
36-01-01
106
Title Unknown
N
36-01-08
107
Title Unknown
N
36-01-15
108
Title Unknown
N
36-01-22
109
Title Unknown
N
36-01-29
110
Title Unknown
N
36-02-05
111
Title Unknown
N
36-02-12
112
Title Unknown
N
36-02-19
113
Title Unknown
N
36-02-26
114
Title Unknown
N
36-03-04
115
Title Unknown
N
36-03-11
116
Title Unknown
N
36-03-18
117
Title Unknown
N
36-03-25
118
Title Unknown
N
36-04-01
119
Title Unknown
N
36-04-08
120
Title Unknown
N
36-04-15
121
Title Unknown
N
36-04-22
122
Title Unknown
N
36-04-29
123
Title Unknown
N
36-05-06
124
Title Unknown
N
36-05-13
125
Title Unknown
N
36-05-20
126
Title Unknown
N
36-05-27
127
Title Unknown
N
36-05-27 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30--NBC Lights Out
36-06-03
128
Title Unknown
N
36-06-03 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30--NBC Lights Out





36-06-10
1
Burial Service
N
36-06-17
2
Cat Wife
N
36-06-24
3
The Dictator
N
36-07-01
4
Midnight Flame
N
36-07-08
5
Title Unknown
N
36-07-15
6
The Flame
N
36-07-22
7
Title Unknown
N
36-07-29
8
The Sea
N
36-08-05
9
Money, Money, Money
N
36-08-12
10
Across the Gap
N
36-08-19
11
Invitation to a Fly
N
36-08-26
12
Danse Macabre
N
36-09-02
13
The Last War
N
36-09-09
14
The Author and the Thing
N
36-09-16
15
The Sea
N
36-09-23
16
Blue Beard and the Harp
N
36-09-30
17
Black Pirate
N
36-10-07
18
Eagle's Return
N
36-10-14
19
The Fast One
N
36-10-21
20
The ThIng That Crept
N
36-10-28
21
Halloween Horror
N
36-11-04
22
Death Prayer
N
36-11-11
23
Crime Clique Of Croesus
N
36-11-18
24
Alter Ego
N
36-11-25
25
Tong
N
36-12-02
26
War Horse
N
36-12-09
27
Nobody Died
N
36-12-16
28
Poltergeist
N
36-12-23
29
Afternoon Of a Faun
N
36-12-30
30
Murder Below
N
37-01-06
31
Sir Rat
N
37-01-13
32
Devil In White
N
37-01-20
33
Beast Of the Shamo
N
37-01-27
34
Big Sock
N
37-02-03
35
The Honeymoon
N
37-02-10
36
Acrophobia
N
37-02-17
37
Cat Wife (Repeat)
N
37-02-24
38
Buried In 1826
N
37-03-03
39
SakhalIn
N
37-03-10
40
Chicken Heart
N
37-03-17
41
State Executioner
N
37-03-24
42
The Thirteenth Corpse
N
37-03-31
43
Homus Primus
N
37-04-07
44
Ivan, the Terrible
N
37-04-14
45
The Little People
N
37-04-21
46
Ghost Party
N
37-04-28
47
The NInth Life
N
37-05-05
48
I, Madman
N
37-05-12
49
Organ
N
37-05-19
50
Mad World
N
37-05-26
51
Until Dead
N
37-06-02
52
Snake Woman
N
37-06-09
53
Forty Seventh Street Precinct
N
37-06-16
54
Meteor Man
N
37-06-23
55
Happy EndIng
N
37-06-30
56
The Cave
N
37-07-07
57
Brain Wave
N
37-07-14
58
Lord Marley's Guest
N
37-07-21
--
--





37-09-22
--
--
37-09-22 Chicago Daily Tribune
11:00--WENR--Henry Busse's orchestra; WMAQ--King's Jesters.
37-09-29
59
Glacier Woman
N
37-09-29 Chicago Daily Tribune - 11:30--WMAQ--Lights Out--"Glacier Woman."
37-10-06
60
The Escape
N
37-10-06 Chicago Daily Tribune - 11:30--WENR--Lights Out--"The Escape."
37-10-13
61
Black Zombie
N
-
37-10-20
62
The Deep
N
-
37-10-27
63
Pyramid
N
-
37-11-03
64
Four Husbands
N
37-11-03 Chicago Daily Tribune - 11:30--WENR--Lights Out--"Four Husbands."
37-11-10
65
Compound Interest
N
-
37-11-17
66
Little Old Lady
N
37-11-17 Chicago Daily Tribune - 11:30--WCFL--Lights Out: "Little Old Lady."
37-11-24
67
Tin Soldier
N
37-11-24 Chicago Daily Tribune - 11:30--WCFL--Lights Out--"Tin Soldier."
37-12-01
68
Death Pit
N
37-12-01 Chicago Daily Tribune - 11:30--WCFL--Lights Out--"Death Pit."
37-12-08
69
The Flame
N
-
37-12-15
70
Studio Appartment
N
-
37-12-22
71
Uninhabited
N
37-12-22 Chicago Daily Tribune - 11:30--WCFL--Lights Out--"Uninhabited."
37-12-29
72
The Dark
N
-
38-01-05
73
Ghengis Khan
N
38-01-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Ghengis Khan."
38-01-12
74
Title Unknown
N
38-01-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-01-19
75
The Seven Women
N
38-01-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): dramatizes Arch Oboler's "The Seventh Woman", a tale of a hotel room.
38-01-26
76
Oxychloride X
N
38-01-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-02-02
77
Death Letter
N
38-02-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): "Death Letter."
38-02-09
78
Screen Test
N
38-02-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): story of movie actor, seven mysterious old women in out-of-the-way hotel.
38-02-16
79
Murder Castle
N
38-02-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): Chicago's murder castle.
38-02-23
80
Chicken Heart
N
38-02-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): story of a world-dooming "Chicken Heart."
38-03-02
81
Mother-In-Law
N
38-03-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Mother-in-Law." 38-03-03 Saratoga Springs Saratogian - Boris Karloff, eerie actor of the screen, now is to become a "horror" actor of the microphone. Effective Mar. 23 he is to join the Lights Out mystery thrillers of WEAF-NBC for a series of five appearances. Arch Oboler, author of the mystery tales, is writing special scripts for Karloff. "Lights Out" is now in its fifth year.
38-03-09
82
The Ball
N
38-03-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): weird adventures of two boys in Paris.
38-03-16
83
Super Feature
N
38-03-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Super Feature"--tale of a killer and his dupe.
38-03-23
84
The Dream
N
[ Boris Karloff begins a series of five consecutive, starring roles in Lights Out!]

38-03-23 Wisconsin State Journal
11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): Boris Karloff in "The Dream."

38-03-23 North Tonawanda News
Boris Karloff, Best of the Bogeymen, To Appear on 'Lights Out' Show - Let's all sit down and have a good scare. At exactly half an hour past midnight (EST), tonight, lights will be dimmed in innumerable homes throughout the nation, armchairs will be dragged closer to radios, books and papers will be laid aside, and a shudder will pass over the face of the land, for Boris Karloff, the best known bogeyman in the movies, will be undertaking a role in "Lights Out"--the best known horror drama in radio.

His first midnight horror, tonight, will be "
Cat-Wife," with Betty Winkler as the neurotic wife. Fear, you know, is a funny thing. We talk bravely about rooting it out of our minds and banishing it from our lives, but the truth of the matter is that we probably wouldn't if we could, for we really enjoy it. We have an appetite for fear. Boris Karloff in his first appearance on the "Lights Out" show may be heard over station WBEN at 12:30 a.m.

38-03-23 Radio Guide
Boris Karloff ... monsterman
"Lights Out"-NBC-Red, 12:30 a.m. EST.
(For the West, 10:30 p.m. PST.) Kadoff, best known for his "monster" roles in the movies. begins a five-week series of broadcasts as star of radio's greatest horror show-"Lights Out:' His first horror program will be "
Cat-Wife," with Betty Winkler as the neurotic wife.
38-03-30
85
Valse Triste
N
38-03-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Valse Triste," with Boris Karloff.
38-04-06
86
Cat Wife
N
38-04-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): Boris Karloff in "Cat Wife."
38-04-13
87
Three Matches
N
38-04-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Three Matches."
38-04-20
88
Night On the Mountain
N
38-04-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): Boris Karloff in "Night on the Mountain."
38-04-27
89
They Died
N
38-04-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): Arch Oboler dreams "They Died" so you can go to bed and have nightmares.
38-05-04
90
Devil's Island
N
38-05-04 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "Devil's Island."
38-05-11
91
It Happened
N
38-05-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "It Happened" in the sewers of Paris (on WIBA at 10:35).
38-05-18
92
Good, Bad, Indifferent
N
38-05-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "Good, Bad, Indifferent."
38-05-25
93
Mrs Crazy
N
38-05-25 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "
Mrs. Crazy."
38-06-01
94
Scoop
N
38-06-01 San Antonio Light
The Arch Oboler Lights Out drama is titled
"Scoop" (WOAI--10:30.)
38-06-08
95
Spider
N
38-06-15
96
The Thirteenth Corpse
N
38-06-22
97
Bon Voyage
N
38-06-29
98
The Chest
N
38-07-06
99
Gevancenpoort
N
38-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-07-13
100
The Peacock Shrieks
N
38-07-13 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-07-20
101
The Hounds Of War
N
38-07-20 Wisconsin State Journal
10:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-07-27
102
Title Unknown
N
38-07-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-08-03
--
--
38-08-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--NBC Deacon Moore





38-10-05
--
--
38-10-05 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 11:30--NBC Savoy Ballroom Orchestra; WMAQ Earl Hines Orch.
38-10-12
103
Homecoming
N
38-10-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): returns with "Homecoming."
38-10-19
--
--
[ Pre-empted]

38-10-19 Wisconsin State Journal - One of the most solemn moments of the current eucharistic congress in New Orleans, the holy hour and benediction of the blessed sacrement, will be broadcast at 11 tonight by NBC-WIBA. The mediations will be given by Archbishop John Murray, St. Paul, and the benediction will be celebrated by the Most Rev. Stephen Donohue, administrator of the archdiocese of New York.
38-10-26
104
Ghost Operator
N
38-10-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): "Ghost Operator."
38-11-02
105
Living Death
N
38-11-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): the story of "Living Death" in a coffin.
38-11-09
106
The Legion Of the Dead
N
38-11-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): "The Legion of the Dead" for Armistice day memories.
38-11-16
107
The Ring
N
38-11-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-11-23
108
The Hand Of Eternity
N
38-11-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-11-30
109
The Bride Of Madness
N
38-11-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
38-12-07
110
Battle Of the Magicians
N
38-12-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out, WMAQ.
38-12-14
111
Queen Cobra
N
38-12-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): "Queen Cobra", the story of a scientist who goes to India.
38-12-21
112
Hindu Revenge
N
38-12-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): a story of re-incarnation during the war.
38-12-28
113
The Theater
N
38-12-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "The Theater", a story of inheritance.
39-01-04
114
The Cat Pit
N
39-01-04 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "The Cat Pit."
39-01-11
115
Reunion
N
39-01-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--Lights Out--WMAQ
39-01-18
116
The Stage Is Set For Murder
N
39-01-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "The Stage Is Set for Murder," melodrama about a mad magician.
39-01-25
117
Two Voices Has the Devil
N
39-01-25 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--Lights Out--WMAQ
39-02-01
118
Bark Of a Dead Dog
N
39-02-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ, WIBA): an unannounced thriller.
39-02-08
119
The Living Dead
N
39-02-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "The Living Dead."
39-02-15
120
Jericho
N
39-02-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Jericho," the tale of the stolen disintegrator.
39-02-22
121
The Survivor
N
39-02-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "The Survivor"--story of sailor who survives a fire at sea.
39-03-01
122
Satan's Orchid
N
39-03-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Satan's Orchid."
39-03-08
123
One Day It Rained Blood
N
39-03-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "One Day It Rained Blood," the story of the last man on earth.
39-03-15
124
Profits Unlimited
N
39-03-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--Lights Out--WMAQ
39-03-22
125
Dilu
N
39-03-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Dilu"--a play of the spirit world.
39-03-29
126
WanderIng Egyption
N
39-03-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--Lights Out--WMAQ
39-04-05
127
The Blood Of the Gorilla
N
39-04-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--Lights Out--WMAQ
39-04-12
128
Fear
N
39-04-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--Lights Out--WMAQ
39-04-19
129
The Phantom Meteor
N
39-04-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30--Lights Out--WMAQ
39-04-26
130
The Devil's Due
N
39-04-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): June Travis in "The Devil's Due."
39-05-03
131
The Retribution of Edward Scurr
N
39-05-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
39-05-10
132
The Curse Of the Kiba
N
39-05-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
39-05-17
133
Title Unknown
N
39-05-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--NBC Lights Out Drama
39-05-24
134
Beetles
N
39-05-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Beetles"--as large as men.
39-05-31
135
Title Unknown
N
39-05-31 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--Lights Out Drama
39-06-07
136
Vendetta
N
39-06-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--Lights Out Drama
39-06-14
137
Alley Cat
N
39-06-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): with Betty Winkler as the voice of an alley-cat.
39-06-21
138
Title Unknown
N
39-06-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--NBC Lights Out
39-06-28
139
Macbeth
N
39-06-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "Macbeth."
39-07-05
140
Through A Murderer's Eyes
N
39-07-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--Lights Out Drama
39-07-12
141
The ChIna Doll
N
39-07-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--Lights Out Drama
39-07-19
142
Murder Mind
N
39-07-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): results of a collego boy's prank.
39-07-26
143
The Giggler
N
39-07-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "The Giggler," storyof insane man who, by surgery, changes enemies' characteristics.
39-08-02
144
Title Unknown
N
39-08-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--Lights Out Drama
39-08-09
145
Serenade Of Death
N
39-08-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 10:30--Lights Out Drama
39-08-16
146
The Day Of Four
N
39-08-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 11:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA, WMAQ): "The Day of Four," story woven around Aztec ruins.
39-08-23
--
--
39-08-23 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 11:30--NBC Fats Waller Orchestra; WMAQ--Rap Wilds Orchestra





42-09-29
--
--
42-09-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Missing Heirs WBBM WCCO
42-10-06
1
What the Devil
N
42-10-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): Arch Oboler's series, opening with "What the Devil"--story of two runaways blocked by a dynamite truck.
42-10-13
2
Revolt Of the Worms
N
42-10-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Revolt of the Worms."
42-10-20
3
Poltergeist
N
42-10-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): story of a "poltergeist." 42-10-20 New York Times - Lights Out Drama: "Poltergeist"--WABC, 8-8:30.
42-10-27
4
Mungahra
N
42-10-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Lights Out--WBBM WCCO 42-10-27 New York Times - Lights Out Drama: "Mungahra"--WABC, 8-8:30.
42-11-03
5
Across the Gap
N
42-11-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Across the Gap," glimpse of the future.
42-11-10
6
Bon Voyage
N
42-11-10 New York Times - Lights Out Drama: "Bon Voyage"--WABC, 8-8:30.
42-11-17
7
Come To the Bank
N
42-11-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Come to the Bank."
42-11-24
8
Chicken Heart
N
42-11-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Chicken Heart," story of heart in a glass case.
42-12-01
9
Mister Maggs
N
42-12-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Mr. Maggs," who finds a coffin in his garden.
42-12-08
10
Scoop
N
42-12-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): columnist commits suicide, returns to haunt his publisher. 42-12-08 New York Times - Lights Out Drama: "Scoope"--WABC, 8-8:30.
42-12-15
11
A Knock At the Door
N
42-12-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Knock at the Door," in which a corpse refuses to stay dead.
42-12-22
12
Meteor Man
N
42-12-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Miracle." 42-12-22 New York Times - Lights Out Drama: "Meteor Man"--WABC, 8-8:30.
42-12-29
13
Valse Triste
N
42-12-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Valse Triste."
43-01-05
14
The Fast One
N
43-01-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Fast One," story of a criminal who moves with the speed of light.
43-01-12
15
The Mirror
N
43-01-12 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Mirror," defense of movie press agent.
43-01-19
16
Cat Wife
N
43-01-19 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): spiteful woman becomes a cat. 43-01-19 New York Times - Lights Out Drama: "Catwife"--WABC, 8-8:30.
43-01-26
17
The Projective Mr Drogan
N
43-01-26 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Projective Mr. Dorgan," who finds himself a miracle man
43-02-02
18
Until Dead
N
43-02-02 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Until Dead" starring Nancy Carroll's daughter, Patricia Kirkland.

43-02-02 Buffalo Courier Express
DON TRANTER
Announcing . . . Arch Oboler's Lights Out starts the ball rolling at 8 o'clock over WKBW, tonight's play being Until Dead, wherein a husband tries to avenge the murder of his wife. The Oboler plays are easily the wildest fantasy to be heard on the air, but are so marked by good production and performance as to be most entertaining.
43-02-09
19
He Dug It Up
N
43-02-09 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "He Dug It Up"--a charming old pre-war Englishman finds a coffin in his garden.
43-02-16
20
Oxychloride X
N
43-02-16 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Oxychloride X," in which a trivial event changes history.
43-02-23
21
They Met At Dorset
N
43-02-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "They Met at Dorset," the attempt of two Nazis to rescue Rudolph Hess.
43-03-02
22
The Sea
N
43-03-02 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Lights Out--WBBM WCCO 43-03-02 Lowell Sun - LIGHTS OUT Drama: "The Sea," :WEEI, 8 to 8:30.
43-03-09
23
The Ball
N
43-03-09 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Ball," tale of two college sophomores looking for the Paris of artists and models.
43-03-16
24
The Dream
N
43-03-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Dream," a fantastic story of a dream within a dream.
43-03-23
25
The Flame
N
43-03-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Flame," the relation of a match flame to the death of two men.
43-03-30
26
Money, Money, Money
N
43-03-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Money, Money, Money," tale of two men, one who wanted money for unselfish reasons and the other who wanted money for its own sake.
43-04-06
27
Superfeature
N
43-04-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Superfeature."
43-04-13
28
Archer
N
43-04-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Archer," three kidnapers and a girl.
43-04-20
29
Kill
N
43-04-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Kill," a dramatic probe into the subconscious.
43-04-27
30
Execution
N
43-04-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Lights Out--WBBM WCCO LIGHTS OUT DRAMA: "Execution," anti-Nazi play; WEEI, 8 to 8:30.
43-05-04
31
Heavenly Jeep
N
43-05-04 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Heavenly Jeep," a ride through Tunisian minefields.
43-05-11
32
Murder In the Script Department
N
43-05-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:15 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Murder in the Script Department."
43-05-18
33
The Spider
N
43-05-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Spider."
43-05-25
34
Little Old Lady
N
43-05-25 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Little Old Lady"--dead three years.
43-06-01
35
The Ugliest Man In the World
N
43-06-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Ugliest Man in the World."


39-03-25 Lima News
Boris Karloff, Frankenstein monster of the screen, was the inspiration for "The Ugliest Man In the World," premiere production of Arch Oboler's Plays, new series of original dramas of the fantastic and of hte imagination to be produced by NBC. The play will be broadcast over WEAF Saturday at 10 p.m. Two years ago Karloff and Oboler were drawn together in NBC's Midnight thrillers, "Lights Out." Karloff was starring in the spine-tingling productions and Oboler was then writing them. One day the two sat down at lunch and discussed the many distorted-faced characters Karloff had portrayed on the screen. "That was the beginning of 'The Ugliest Man in the World'," Oboler explained. "But don't misunderstand me. Boris himself is one of the handsomest men in the world in a virile way, but these ugly monster roles set me to thinking. What would happen to the man who was so ugly that children would scream in fright when they saw him, who was such a shocking spectacle that even his mother's life became unbearably unhappy? How would such a man react to people and to love? What childhood would he have?"

43-06-08
36
Organ
N
43-06-08 New York Times - Lights Out Drama: "Organ"--WABC 8-8:30.
43-06-15
37
Screen Test
N
43-06-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Screen Test," a Hollywood story.
43-06-22
38
Nature Study
N
43-06-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Nature Study," thrilling adventures of a botany class.
43-06-29
39
The Dictator
N
43-06-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): attempt of a scientist to murder a dictator in a diving bell. 43-06-29 New York Times- Lights Out Drama: "The Dictator"--WABC, 8-8:30.
43-07-06
40
The Cliff
N
43-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Lights Out--WBBM WCCO
43-07-13
41
Visitor From Hades
N
43-07-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Visitor from Hades."
43-07-20
42
Profits Unlimited
N
43-07-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Lights Out--WBBM WCCO
43-07-27
43
Little People
N
43-07-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Little People," story of professor who murdered and mummified victims in South American jungle heat-shrinking process.
43-08-03
44
Murder Castle
N
43-08-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Lights Out--WBBM WCCO
43-08-10
45
Sakhalin
N
43-08-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Sakhalin."
43-08-17
46
State Executioner
N
43-08-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:00 Lights Out--WBBM WCCO 43-08-17 Tucson Daliy Citizen - What makes a hangman tick and what makes him get genuine enjoyment out of his chosen life work is the subject of "State Executioner" on "Lights Out" presented by Arch Oboler tonight. The hair-raiser has, as its leading character, a man who did the execution work for George the Third of England back in the dark days when heads fell hither and thither from the chopping block. King George's executioner relished his job and it will all be told as only Oboler could tell it. KTUC, 6 o'clock.
43-08-24
47
Sub-Basement
N
43-08-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Sub-Basement."
43-08-31
48
Immortal Gentleman
N
43-08-31 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Immortal Gentleman."
43-09-07
49
Lord Marley's Guest
N
43-09-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "Lord Marley's Guest."
43-09-14
50
V-Day
N
43-09-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "V-Day," story of German youth.
43-09-21
51
The Producer and the Thing
N
43-09-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): "The Producer and the Thing." 43-09-21 San Antonio Light - LIGHTS OUT (7-7:30)--"The Producer and the Thing" is the Arch Oboler hair-raising drama. It concerns a girl script writer preparing a horror scenario, who finds the monster her brain conceived has come to life.
43-09-28
52
The Author and the Thing
N
43-09-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Lights Out (WBBM): Arch Oboler as himself in "The Author and the Thing."
43-10-05
--
--
43-10-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Big Town (WBBM): starring Edward Pawley and Fran Carlon in "Voices of Destruction," story of crusading managing editor who smashes Nazi rumor ring.





'Fantasies from Lights Out' Radio Program Log [ written by Wyllis Cooper ]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
45-07-07
--
--
45-07-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Prof. Llewellyn Pfankuchen (WIBA): discusses "Making a Charter for the United Nations," under auspices of League of Women Voters.
45-07-14
1
Story About Two Safe Crackers
N
45-07-14 Oelwein Daily Register - 7:30 Fantasies from Lights Out. 45-07-14 Daily Mail - A Revival of Lights Out at 8:30 tonight for the vacationing Truth Or Consequences. 45-07-14 The Capital - A revival of Lights Out at 8:30 tonight for the vacationing Truth Or Consequences. 45-07-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): series returns after several years' absence.
45-07-21
2
Reunion After Death
Y
45-07-21 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 7:30 NBC Fantasies from Lights Out
45-07-28
3
The Rocket Ship
N
45-07-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): "The Rocket Ship" by Wyllis Cooper.
45-08-04
4
The Lady From the Lake
N
45-08-04 New York Times - 8:30-9--Lights Out Fantasie: "Lady From the Lake"--WEAF.
45-08-11
5
Did the Murder Happen?
N
45-08-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 7:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): "Did the Murder Happen?"
45-08-18
6
Title Unknown
N
45-08-18 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 7:30 NBC Fantasies from Lights Out
45-08-25
7
The Man In The Middle
N
45-08-25 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 7:30 NBC Fantasies from Lights Out
45-09-01
8
Lights Out
N
45-09-01 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 7:30 NBC Fantasies from Lights Out
45-09-08
--
--
45-09-08 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 7:30 NBC Truth Or Consequences





46-06-29
--
--
46-06-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:00 Judy Canova--WMAQ
46-07-06
1
The Seven Plovers
N
46-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): return of series, dramatizing legendary tale of the young Jew who scoffed at Christ at the crucifixion and who was doomed to wander the world forever.
46-07-13
2
The CoffIn In Studio B
N
46-07-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "Coffin in Studio D."
46-07-20
3
The Haunted Cell
Y
46-07-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "The Haunted Cell."
46-07-27
4
The Battle Of the Magicians
N
46-07-27 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "The Battle of the Magicians."
46-08-03
5
Hindu Revenge
N
46-08-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "Hindu Revenge."
46-08-10
6
The Ghost In the Newsreels
N
46-08-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WMAQ): "The Ghost in the Newsreels."
46-08-17
7
A Case Of Self-Conviction
N
46-08-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): "A Case of Self-Conviction," story of a fugitive who seals his own doom.
46-08-24
8
The Signalman
N
46-08-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 8 p.m.--Lights Out (WIBA): Nelson Olmsted in Dickens' "The Signal Man."
46-08-31
--
--
46-08-31 Wisconsin State Journal - WIBA 8:00 Judy Canova Show





Lights Out Rebroadcasts Program Log [featuring Boris Karloff]

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
47-07-09
--
--
47-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 Henry Morgan WENR
47-07-16
1
Death Robbery
Y
47-07-16 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WENR): returns to the air with Boris Karloff.
47-07-23
2
Cat Wife
Y
47-07-23 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WENR): tale of a vampire.
47-07-30
3
The Ring
N
47-07-30 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Lights Out (WENR): Boris Karloff and a disappearing hand.
47-08-06
4
Title Unknown
N
47-08-06 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 Lights Out WENR
47-08-13
5
Title Unknown
N
47-08-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 Lights Out WENR
47-08-20
6
Title Unknown
N
47-08-20 Hutchinson News-Herald - ABC 8:30 Lights Out
47-08-27
7
Title Unknown
N
47-08-27 Hutchinson News-Herald - ABC 8:30 Lights Out
47-09-03
8
Title Unknown
N
47-09-03 Hutchinson News-Herald - ABC 8:30 Lights Out
47-09-10
--
--
47-09-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 Henry Morgan WENR





AFRS 'Lights Out' Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
42-11-17 Come To the Bank
Y
43-07-13 The Visitor From Hades
Y
45-08-25 The Man In the Middle
Y






Lights Out Radio Program Biographies




Willis Oswald 'Bill' Cooper [Wyllis Cooper]
(Writer/Director)

Stage, Radio, Television and Film Writer, Producer, Director, and Actor
(1899-1955)

Birthplace: Pekin, Illinois, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1929-31 Empire Builders
1932 Tales of the Foreign Legion
1933 Desert Guns
1933 Fifty-Fifty
1933 Armistice Day Program
1934-36 Lights Out!
1934 Hello, America
1934 Daffy-Dilly Christmas
1935 Immortal Dramas
1935-36 Flying Time
1935-36 Betty and Bob
1944 Arthur Hopkins Presents
1945 Lights Out
1947 Crime Club
1947 Quiet Please
1948 Radio City Playhouse
1950 Cloak and Dagger
1951 Living 1951
1951 Philip Morris Playhouse
1951 Scotland Yard
1951 WHItehall 1212
Wyllis Cooper at work in Hollywood ca. 1947
Wyllis Cooper at work in Hollywood ca. 1947

U.S. Army Signal Corps Emblem
U.S. Army Signal Corps Emblem
1st Batallion, 131st Infantry Coat of Arms
1st Batallion, 131st Infantry Coat of Arms.

Original Light's Out cover art

Willis Cooper (1935)
Willis Cooper (1935)

Arthur Hopkins Presents spot ad from 1944
Arthur Hopkins Presents spot ad from 1944

Willis Cooper was born in 1899 in Pekin, Illinios, to Charles Edgar and Margaret (Oswald) Cooper. He was joined a year later by his younger brother Harry Edgar Cooper.

Upon graduating from Pekin High School, he entered the the U.S. Cavalry, serving initially as a Sergeant patrolling the U.S. border with Mexico. By 1917 he was in the Army Signal Corps as a member of the Allied Expeditionary Forces until 1919, at which time he returned to Illinois. His three years in the Army were far from uneventful. He'd chased Mexican Bandits on the border, he'd shipped overseas with the 131st Infantry, suffered a head injury from a German shelling in Germany, and he'd been gassed in the Argonne Forest. He continued to serve with the Illinois National Guard, as a Captain of the 31st Infantry. Cooper retained his commission from 1923 through 1933, serving the last five years of his commissioned service with the U.S. Cavalry Reserve.

When not serving on active duty between 1919 and 1929, Cooper found several writing positions with Advertising concerns. Throughout that period he'd been employed variously as a photographer and ad copywriter in various places between Santa Monica, California, to Chicago, Illinois. He'd reportedly started his own advertising company while in Santa Monica. He'd married his first wife Beatrice shortly upon returning to civilian life. And by 1929 he'd apparently divorced his first wife and married the former Emily Beveridge in Chicago.

Willis Cooper began writing for CBS some time around 1931, as a continuity editor until 1933, at which time he took a position with NBC as a continuity editor. He apparently worked as a free-lancer, since he was writing for NBC's Empire Builders (1929-1931) while reportedly working for CBS at the same time. In any case, Cooper left NBC in 1935 to devote his full interest to Lights Out!.

Apparently he was simply hedging his bets, since 1935 found him writing for Betty and Bob for WGN, Chicago before leaving Illinois for Hollywood, California to work as a screenwriter for the 20th Century Fox, Universal and Paramount studios. He tried to keep his hand in Lights Out! from L.A., but by 1936 he was notified that Arch Oboler had been contracted to take over Cooper's writing duties with Lights Out!.

Between 1936 and 1939, Cooper received screen credits for Think Fast Mr. Moto (1937), Thank You Mr. Moto (1937), Mr. Moto Takes A Chance (1938), Son of Frankenstein (1939) and the serial, The Phantom Creeps (1940) with Bela Lugosi. Some time around 1940, in response to a request from his wife--an ardent numerologist--Willis changed his name to Wyllis with a 'y'.

A prolific writer for Radio, Cooper wrote almost all of the 1934-36 scripts for Lights Out!, at least eight more Lights Out! scripts post-1945, all of the scripts for Quiet Please!, and of course the 500+ other scripts he penned before lending his hand to screenwriting in Hollywood.

Television was a natural extension for both his writing and producing talents. Wyllis Cooper contributed to many of Television's earliest dramas, including his own short-lived Volume One (1949) and Stage 13 (1950), Escape (1951), Lights Out! (1951), Tales of Tomorrow (1951) and CBS's prestigious drama anthology, Studio One (1951).

Cooper was not without his severest critics, the curmudgeonly Radio critic, John Crosby among them, from his Radio In Review columns:

From the September 5th 1949 edition of the Oakland Tribune: 

Writer Puts Unique
Tone In Air Plays
 By JOHN CROSBY
 
   Wyllis Cooper, who looks like a cross between a gnome and Alexander Woollcott, is an arresting and, in one respect, almost unique figure in radio.  He is one of the few writers whose own personality is impressed on listeners more vividly than that of the actors.
   He is the author of "Quiet Please," now off the air, and of a short-lived television program.  Any single drama on either of those programs was instantly recognizable as the handiwork of Cooper, whose mind works in strange ways.  In almost all Cooper scripts a sense of dread, or imminent catastrophe, hangs over the characters from the outset to about one minute before the closing commercial.  Yet nothing much happens in the half hour.  There are long, long pauses, so long sometimes you wonder if your radio has gone on the blink.  Networks are horrified at the amount of dead air they purchase along with Cooper.  (A half hour Cooper script played at ordinary tempo would run about 11 minutes.)
 
ALWAYS SURPRISE END
 
   A Cooper story always ends with a surprise, a twist of some sort, many of them unexplained.  The supernatural figures strongly, though in strange ways.  Supernatural characters in Cooper's dramas are not terribly sinister.  Many of them are more likeable than the humans in the script and some of them are just ridiculous and a little poignant.  They are likely to pop in unexpectedly.  You'll see (or hear of) a couple of guys at a bar drinking beer and suddenly become aware that one of them has four arms and hails from the moon.
   A Cooper story starts so slowly you can hear your heart beat, sometimes with a satiric twist right at the beginning.  There was one about a private eye to whom nothing had ever happened.  He'd had no adventures at all.  And his secretary was no glamor girl, but a battleaxe, roughly 112 years old.  Then a man walked in to discuss a murder.  "Who was murdered?" asked the private eye.
   "I was," said the man, rather aggrieved about it.
 
EXCELS IN CHARACTER
 
   Some of these twists are little too elfin to stand analysis, but then Cooper is not long on plot anyhow.  His gift is for mood and character.  The listener gets so wrapped up in a Cooper character, wondering who he is, what he's doing there, and how its all going to come out, he'll sit on the edge of his chair for half an hour.  And at the end of half an hour, he may still be pretty fuzzy about what happened depending on how explanatory pending on how explanatory Cooper feels at the moment.
   Like Henry Morgan, Cooper has no respect for or interest in listeners who are doing the dishes or who drop out to the icebox for a beer during his stories.  He never repeats himself.  "Why should I make concessions to the audience that doesn't pay attention?" he says.  As a matter of fact, he doesn't make very many concessions to the people who do pay attention.  At the end of half an hour they may be just as baffled as the dishwashers.
   Cooper's Holinshed, at least his principal one, is the  Bible.  "Quite a source book," he explains.  Cooper loves to lift stories from the Bible and then wait around for the mail to see how many people recognized the source.  Biblical stories are put into modern dress and sometimes re-arranged rather drastically to suit Cooper's peculiar point of view.  In the Cain and Abel story, for example, it was all Abel's fault.  Abel was such a nasty character he provoked his brother into what Cooper considered justifiable homicide.  (A lot of people wrote in to say they agreed.)
 
USES NARRATIVE FORM
 
   There are few characters in any Cooper script, two or three or sometimes just one, and he uses more straight narrative than almost anyone.  Besides insisting--against all the rules--on long stretches of silence.  Cooper frequently has two people talking at once--again against all radio rules.  In ordinary conversation, says cooper, everyone talks at once and they appear to understand one another, so why not in radio?
   While unquestionably a rare and entertaining writer, Cooper has some strong faults.  He avoids cliches with such intensity that he's creating his own.  Some of his characters, surprising as they are, bear as much resemblance to human beings as a baby in a bottle at Harvard.  His tricky but obscure endings sometimes seem an easy way for a writer to get out of a bad hole.
   In his single invasion of television Cooper's crotchets were as individual and startling as they were in radio.  But that will have to wait until tomorrow.
   Copyright, 1949, for The Tribune

From the September 7th 1949 edition of the Portsmouth Times: 

'You Can't Do That!' 

By JOHN CROSBY
    Wyllis Cooper, a writer of eerie, sometimes incomprehensible though remarkably literate radio and television dramas looks as if he'd stepped out of one of his own scripts.  He's a short, bespectacled man, broad of brow and sweeping of girth.  His double chin is an expanse of incomparable grandeur.  He works, hunched over a typewriter like an intelligent spider, in a large office in the Hotel Brittany behind drawn blinds.  The drawn blinds, he explains, are to protect him from street noises, which is the sort of contradiction he loves to use in his radio plays.   After his single brush with television, a six-program series on ABC-TV entitled characteristically Volume 1 (Nos. 1 to 6), he is brimming with theories about television, most of them heretical.  Television, he says, is neither a movie nor an illustrated radio show.  Too much television, he feelsl, is just a bad adaptation of Hollywood techniques with cameras running wild all over the place.

WINDOW IN ROOM
    Television, says Cooper, is really a window in your living room and should be treated that way.  In his own series, Cooper tried to get the home audience to forget all about the cameras, to become eavesdroppers.  The audience was told in the first of the plays, that it was seated behind a mirror.  The audience could see every move of the characters; the characters, of course, could see only their own reflections in the mirror.   Into the room--a hotel room--crept a man and a woman who had just robbed a bank and were using the place as a hideout.  The camera never budged throughout the half hour.  The woman would tidy her hair in front of the mirror--which was your television screen--then walk away.  The man would stamp out a cigarette on an invisible bureau over which the mirror hung.  An ordinary kitchen chair was the only prop.  There was no scenery.  The room was black as a cave except for spots illuminating the actors.     Gradually, the couople became aware there was something very fishy about the hotel room.  The bellhop, the only other character, seemed to know all aobut their crime and to pity them for it.  Their money disappeared.  They couldn't get food or, a more desperate need, cigarettes.  And they couldn't get out of the room.  Finally--if my interpretation of the convolutions of Cooper's brain is correct, and I wouldn't swear to it--they realized they were doomed to spend eternity in that hotel room with a neon light flashing off and on, off and on, outside the window and a jukebox playing the same dreary tune down stairs.  It's a torment I wouldn't wish on my worst enemy.

TYPICAL OF STORIES
    That is typical of the stories Cooper tells and also of this methods.  He used no scenery in four of his six plays and only rudimentary scenery in the other two.  The purpose was not to save money.  The televisionscreen is so small, he says, that the viewer can't absorb the scenery and also see what the people are doing.  He uses small casts because he thinks too many characters clutter up the action.  As in radio, he was spate with dialogue.  Cooper feels there is too much chatter in television.  Yet the first script totaled 74 pages, two-thirds the length of a two-and-a-half housr play.  Most of it was stage directions.    Cooper is trying to establish on television the intimacy that was radio's peculiar distinction among dramatic forms.  He admits it's difficult, but he says that the imitation of movie technique is the wrong way to go about it.    "The movies can go into great detail," he points out.  "In television, we can't.  We haven't the time, the clarity, the size, or the Audience stimulation."  (Audience stimulation:  people in an audience stimulate one another.  Two people in a living room don't vary much.)   On the other hand, television has an urgency and a freshness that can't be duplicated by the movies.  Cooper used to writer his little vignettes and throw them in front of the camera--three one-hour reading periods, six hours for rehearsals--before he had time to grow cold on the.

 PROVED THEORIES
 
   HE STILL INSISTS his series was not experimental and was wildly indignant when ABC press releases listed them as such.  "I had some theories about television and I proved them--to my satisfaction at least.   The main rule, says Cooper:  "Don't try to do what you can't do.  You can't do 'Gone with the Wind' on television.  Why does anyone want to do it anyway?"   His brief experience with television left him unbowed--he'll undoubtedly be back--but he admits it wilted him a little.   " I never heard 'You can't do that' so many times in my life," he says.
   Copyright, 1949, The Tribune




Archibald Oboler
(Writer, Director, Producer)

Stage, Screen, Radio and Television Writer, Director, Producer; Playwright; Mineralogist
(1907-1987)

Birthplace:
Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1934 Grand Hotel
1935 Welch Presents Irene Rich,
1936 Royal Gelatin Hour
1937 Magic Key of RCA.
1937 Your Hollywood Parade
1937 Lights Out
1937 The Chase and Sanborn Hour
1938 The Royal Desserts Hour
1938 Good News
1938 The Rudy Vallee Hour
1938 Texaco Star Theatre
1938 Your Hollywood
Parade
1938 Columbia Workshop
1939 Curtain Time
1939 Arch Oboler's Plays
1940 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 Everyman's Theatre
1941 The Treasury Hour
1942 Cavalcade Of America
1942 Hollywood March Of Dimes Of the Air
1942 Plays For Americans
1942 Keep 'Em Rolling
1942 To the President
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1943 Free World Theatre
1944 Everything For the Boys
1944 The First Nighter Program
1944 The Adventures Of Mark Twain
1944 Four For the Fifth
1945 Weird Circle
1945 Chicago, Germany
1945 Wonderful World
1945 Radio Hall Of Fame
1945 The Victory Chest Program
1946 The AFRA Refresher Course Workshop Of the Air
1953 Think
1956 Biography In Sound
1970 The Devil and Mr O
1972 Same Time, Same Station
1979 Sears Radio Theatre
Drop Dead!
Arch Oboler Drama
AFRTS Playhouse 25
The Joe Pyne Show
Treasury Star Parade
Hollywood Calling
I Have No Prayer
Yarns For Yanks
Arch Oboler goes over The Hollywood March Of Dimes Of The Air script with emcee Tommy Cook at the NBC mike (1942)
Arch Oboler goes over The Hollywood March Of Dimes Of The Air script with emcee Tommy Cook at the NBC mike (1942)

Arch Oboler with Raymond Edward Johnson rehearsing at the MBS Mike
Arch Oboler with Raymond Edward Johnson rehearsing at the MBS Mike

Arch Oboler goes over a script with Nazimova circa 1940
Arch Oboler goes over a script with Nazimova circa 1940

Arch Oboler gives direction to Nazimova circa 1940
Arch Oboler gives direction to Nazimova circa 1940

Arch Oboler with Norma Shearer conferring on Escape (1940)
Arch Oboler with Norma Shearer conferring on Everyman's Theater (1940)

Oboler's post-Apocalyptic film Five (1951)
Oboler's post-Apocalyptic film Five (1951)

Arch Oboler on the set of Five circa 1951
Arch Oboler on the set of Five circa 1951

Perky piece punctuates penta-psychodrama proposing pitiful post-pandemic panic.
Perky piece punctuates penta-psychodrama proposing pitiful post-pandemic panic.

Oboler's F.L.Wright-designed beachhouse was used as the final location for his movie Five (1951)
Oboler's F.L.Wright-designed beachhouse was used as the final location for his movie Five (1951)

The gatehouse of Oboler's Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home in Malibu Canyon
The gatehouse of Oboler's Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home, 'Eaglefeather,' in Malibu Canyon.

Arch Oboler's Twonky (1953)
Arch Oboler's Twonky (1953)

Oboler's Bwana Devil boasted its claim as the first feature length 3-D film
Oboler's Bwana Devil (1952) boasted its claim as the first feature length 3-D film

As late as 1962, Arch Oboler and Capitol Records teamed to create a fascinating compilation of Oboler's scarier productions.
As late as 1962 Arch Oboler and Capitol Records teamed to create a fascinating compilation of Oboler's scarier productions.
5'1" tall Arch Oboler, pound for pound, inch for inch one of Radio history's scariest writers/directors--ever--was born in 1909, in Chicago. He was also, by most accounts, one of Radio's most sensitive, introspective writers, and a giant by virtually any conventional measure of the industry.

ARCH OBOLER, WROTE THRILLERS FOR RADIO IN 1930'S AND 40'S

By WILLIAM G. BLAIR
Published: Sunday, March 22, 1987

Arch Oboler, who enthralled listeners with his tales of suspense and horror in the golden age of radio in the 1930's and 40's, died Thursday of heart failure at the Westlake Community Hospital in Westlake, Calif. He was 79 years old and lived in Malibu.

Although Mr. Oboler was perhaps best known as the writer of a series of nighttime radio dramas that were broadcast under the name ''Lights Out,'' he also wrote for screen and stage.

The ''Lights Out'' programs, delightfully chilling fare to many now over the age of 50, began with these words:

''These stories are definitely not for the timid soul. So we tell you calmly and very sincerely, if you frighten easily, turn off your radio now. Lights out, everybody!'' 'I Wrote About Human Beings'

The rights to rebroadcast and distribute many of the ''Lights Out'' thrillers were acquired from Mr. Oboler late last year by Metacom, a Minneapolis-based concern that specializes in the distribution of old radio shows.

In an interview with The New York Times in October, Mr. Oboler said he had turned down offers to sell his radio stories to television in the 1950's because ''basically, I think TV talks too much and shows too much.''

Mr. Oboler said he believed his thrillers had not lost their ability to terrify because ''I wrote about human beings, not special effects.''

''What we fear most is the monster within - the girl who lets you down, the husband who is unfaithful,'' he said. ''The greatest horrors are within ourselves.''

In movies, he first made a name for himself as the writer of the 1940 screen version of ''Escape,'' the anti-Nazi best-selling novel by Ethel Vance, that starred Norma Shearer and Robert Taylor.

Three-Dimensional Movie

More than a decade later, he wrote, directed and produced the first three-dimensional movie, ''Bwana Devil,'' which had moviegoers in special eyeglasses ducking when African spears and lions appeared to be flying off the screen directly at them.

In the mid-1950's, Mr. Oboler turned to Broadway. He wrote ''Night of the Auk,'' a science-fiction drama set aboard a spaceship. The show, produced by Kermit Bloomgarden and directed by Sidney Lumet, ran for eight performances and was briefly revived in 1963.

From the 1960's on, as head of Oboler Productions, he continued to write for radio, movies and the theater. In 1969, he wrote a book called ''House on Fire'' that a reviewer for The Times described as ''pretty much what Mr. Oboler used to terrify America with.''

He is survived by his wife, the former Eleanor Helfand, and a son, Dr. Steven Oboler of Denver. A private funeral is planned.

Between 1936 and 1944, Arch Oboler either conceived or participated in an ambitious undertaking of both brief and long-running dramatic series':

  • 1936 Lights Out!
  • 1939 Arch Oboler's Plays
  • 1940 Everyman's Theater
  • 1942 Plays for Americans
  • 1942 This Is Our America
  • 1942 To The President
  • 1943 Free World Theatre
  • 1944 Four for The Fifth (with William N. Robson)
  • Drop Dead!: An Exercise In Horror (1962 Capitol Records LP)
  • The Devil and Mr. O (a 1970s revival series)

Arch Oboler's Plays was Oboler's breakout dramatic showcase over Radio. Everyman's Theater further established Oboler's versatility and range, while underscoring Oboler's growing appeal to a far wider audience than he'd already established with Lights Out!. Though eight years his senior, the diminutive Oboler, while never as widely popular as Orson Welles, invites comparison to the other great young playwright-actor-director. Their skills were clearly each other's equal, their versatility had already been amply demonstrated by 1940, and their genius was indisputable. It's also clear that both Wyllis Cooper and Norman Corwin served to influence and inform Oboler's growing, wider appeal.

The reach and effect of Arch Oboler's writing style, subject matter, and point of view remain significant influences to this day. Indeed a world of imitators, 'hat tippers', homages, and unabashed worshippers of his style have sprung up every year since the mid-1950s. And for good reason. Devising new ways to scare the be-jee-zuzz out of people has become something of a cottage industry at various times during the past 60 years.

Thillers sell when the public is in the mood for them. And when the public is in the mood for them, they tend to be insatiable for them.

Wyllis Cooper and Arch Oboler were arguably the two of the most significant influences in supernatural thrillers over Radio, of the 20th Century. Virtually every modern fiction writer of the past seventy years cites both Cooper and Oboler as influences.

Arch Oboler's fortunes waned with the waning of The Golden Age of Radio. His solo Film projects were, while revolutionary in many respects, not nearly up to the standards of his Radio work. His Five (1951) was a rather overly contrived, over-ripe, and self-important opus about a post-apocalyptic world and its five widely differing survivors. Filmed around his property and home in Malibu Canyon, it's become more of a cult flick than a representative Atomic Age sci-fi drama.

Bwana Devil (1952) was the first feature-length film to be produced in 3-D, yet another of Oboler's signature--albeit eccentric--innovations. Historic for only its innovative technology, the film, while popular as a novelty, was a stinker in every critically measurable way.

His Twonky (1953), starring pal, Hans Conreid, was a fascinating concept, somewhat frivolously executed. It featured a television set with a mind of its own, purportedly receiving direction from an alien force in geoconcentric orbit around Earth. This was highly reminiscent of the CBS Radio Workshop program, The Enormous Radio (1956), wherein a similar problem surfaces with a Radio set.

Oboler later released the Capitol LP, Drop Dead!: An Exercise In Horror (1962), reprised many of his Arch Oboler's Plays with the 1971 revival series The Devil and Mr. O, and in 1969, employed his 3-D production skills in another first, Stewardesses, a soft-core porn feature he wrote and directed for 3-D, under the pseudonym, 'Alf Silliman.'

Arch Oboler spent much of the remainder of his life attending to the various elements of his Oboler Productions company and the various writing, Film, Radio and Television projects Oboler managed through it.




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