Click to go to Digital Deli Too Home Page blank head
Preserving the Golden Age of Radio for A Digital Age
Explore Our Golden Age Radio Research Pages Click here to learn about our approach to Golden Age Radio Preservation [Under Development] Click to go to Our Radio Articles Page This Feature Is Currently Not Available
 
This will take you to our Numeric Radio logs
This will take you to our A Series Radio logs This will take you to our B Series Radio logs This will take you to our C Series Radio logs This will take you to our D Series Radio logs This will take you to our E Series Radio logs This will take you to our F Series Radio logs This will take you to our G Series Radio logs This will take you to our H Series Radio logs This will take you to our I Series Radio logs This will take you to our J Series Radio logs This will take you to our K Series Radio logs This will take you to our L Series Radio logs This will take you to our M Series Radio logs
This will take you to our N Series Radio logs This will take you to our O Series Radio logs This will take you to our P Series Radio logs This will take you to our Q Series Radio logs This will take you to our R Series Radio logs This will take you to our S Series Radio logs This will take you to our T Series Radio logs This will take you to our U Series Radio logs This will take you to our V Series Radio logs This will take you to our W Series Radio logs This will take you to our X Series Radio logs This will take you to our Y Series Radio logs This will take you to our Z Series Radio logs This will take you back to our Text List of Radio logs




The Hollywood Mystery Time Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Hollywood Mystery Time

Billboard Magazine article from July 22 1944 announcing the start of Hollywood Mystery Time for Jergens premiering on July 20 at 9:00 p.m
Billboard Magazine article from July 22 1944 announcing the start of Hollywood Mystery Time for Jergens premiering on July 20 at 9:00 p.m.

Some lucky markets got five minutes of Louella Parsons' Hollywood Gossip as an introduction to each week's Hollywood Mystery Time installment
Some lucky markets got five minutes
of Louella Parsons' Hollywood Gossip
as an introduction to each week's Hollywood Mystery Time installment

Hollywood Mystery Time spot ad from January 27, 1945
Hollywood Mystery Time spot ad showcasing Gloria Blondell, from January 27, 1945

Spot article announcing Dennis O'Keefe to replace Carleton Young as Ted Lawton, from  July 8, 1947
Spot article announcing Dennis O'Keefe
to replace Carleton Young as Ted Lawton, from July 8, 1945

Woodbury sponsored Hollywood Mystery Time with Louella Parsons

Background

Andrew Jergens first began airing Hollywood Mystery Time, starring Carleton Young and Gloria Blondell, on July 20, 1944 over CBS's Pacific Net station, KQW, a Summer run of only ten [not fourteen] episodes. The only surviving episode from the first airing of Hollywood Mystery Time is purported to be part of the AFRS Mystery Playhouse canon, dated August 1, 1944.

There appear to have been two distinct 'flavors' of The Blue Network's Hollywood Mystery Time which began airing on October 15, 1944:

  • Hollywood Mystery Time in its 'full' 21-minute mode, which aired as the second half of the Louella Parsons Woodbury Double Feature program
  • Hollywood Mystery Time [Lite] in its abridged, 15-minute mode which aired throughout the midwest as a stand-alone, Woodbury-sponsored program.

If this seems confusing, we have just three words for you--The Blue Network. As with much of the jumble of programming that The Blue Network aired after its vivisection from the National Broadcasting Company--but prior to its adoption of the name, American Broadcasting Company--there was precious little advance promotion, and even less concurrent promotion, during those two teething years. Exceptions were long-running programs that began airing well prior to the NBC-Blue/NBC-Red breakup mandated by the FCC. Early Blue Network [ABC] programmers were famous for 'counter-programming strategies. Their notion was that scheduling programs to 'counter' targetted competing programming from NBC and CBS would both dilute the competing networks' market share as well as providing alternatives to popular competing network programming with compelling niche programming from ABC. ABC might schedule a crime drama anthology counter to competing networks' situation comedies or variety programming. Then simply duke it out to see if ABC's gambit would dilute their competing networks' market share. ABC had nothing to lose during those first few years of its attempts at market penetration, and the gambit often worked to their favor--with the proviso that their counter programming remained compelling enough to poach listeners from other networks.

Andrew Jergens' second run at Hollywood Mystery Time was an example of ABC's counter-programming tactics. Depending on the market, ABC would 'bundle' either/both five minutes of Walter Winchell and/or five minutes of Louella Parsons with either 21-minutes of Hollywood Mystery Time or 15-minutes of Hollywood Mystery Time, again apparently depending on the market. Some outlets got Winchell and Parsons back to back, followed by a Hollywood Mystery Time segment. Others would get Winchell, then Hollywood Mystery Time, then Louella, or the reverse order.

Still, though somewhat sketchy, we do have a fairly good framework of details for the program. The Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street had been a long-running, popular program for NBC's Blue Network since 1940. It had aired for two seasons over the recently broken up--or broken off--The Blue Network which was in the process of evolving into the American Broadcasting Company. In the Fall of 1944, The Woodbury Soap Company in their infinite wisdom decided to jettison the highly popular--but expensive--Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street in favor of a never before heard detective mystery program named Hollywood Mystery Time.

The basic Hollywood Mystery Time premise had a Hollywood Movie Producer-Director, Ted Lawton, operating as a part-time gentleman detective, accompanied by his Girl Friday and secretary and lady detective, Gloria Dean. Hence, we derive the 'Hollywood' [ Lawton is a Hollywood producer] 'Mystery' [each installment is a self-contained mystery in itself] 'Time' [which in this case can vary between 11 minutes of script to 17 minutes of script, depending on which Hollywood Mystery Time you were hearing.] The Hollywood Mystery Time also segued nicely from/to the Louella Parsons' Hollywood bits tacked onto the beginning of the more robust version of Hollywood Mystery Time packaged as The Woodbury Double Feature. The Woodbury Double Feature basically netted Woodbury a full two minutes more of commercial message with each 30 minute program. Woodbury netted an intro and outro for the 6-minute Louella Parsons segment, then a full minute commercial, followed by three more spots before, during and after the 20-minute Hollywood Mystery Time segement. So yes, if you do the math it was a double feature for Woodbury, to be sure, but not so much for the listener.

As must be obvious, throughout the two teething years of The Blue Network/ABC the inmates were pretty much running the asylum, as witnessed by Woodbury pretty much running amok with their sponorship of this otherwise very promising program.

The original program starred Radio legend Carleton Young as Ted Lawton and Radio and Film actress Gloria Blondell as Gloria Dean. By the Summer of 1945 Woodbury had replaced Carleton Young with Film star Dennis O'Keefe in his first lead role over Radio as Ted Lawton and Gloria Blondell with gorgeous Film star Constance Moore as Gloria Dean. An unlikely pairing on the face of it, it's useful to remember that the combination of O'Keefe and Moore were concurrently starring together in Earl Carroll's Vanities (1945) and still in the midst of cross-country promotion of the popular movie. Something of a pity, since it's clear that the program was really written for Young and Blondell. But given the light comedy nature of the program and Constance Moore's demonstrated extraordinary range, the O'Keefe/Moore chemistry jells very nicely by the end of the run.

Given the cross-country rivalry between Walter Winchell and Louella Parsons, the format was actually quite brilliant--for the sponsor and network alike. Broadcasts from the West Coast got the Woodbury Double Feature, which contained five minutes of Louella and eighteen minutes or so of Hollywood Mystery Time's latest murder. The regional affiliates that opted for Hollywood Mystery Time 'Lite' got Walter Winchell for fifteen minutes followed by the fifteen minute version of Hollywood Mystery Time. Even better, for the true gossip mavens, in several parts of the country you could get Winchell for 15 minutes, Parsons for 5 minutes and the next installment of Hollywood Mystery Time, back to back for forty-five minutes. Even more ironic, The Andrew Jergens Company ultimately brought both Louella Parsons and Walter Winchell--often back to back--into America's parlors for almost five years, with a convenient, twenty to thirty minute block of scrumptious Hollywood skinny--just long enough for the average woman to lotion her hands, legs, and face. Viewed in that light it's clear that the format was developed for the broadest possible appeal for every part of the country. Pretty clever programming for a relatively new network. But undoubtedly more Woodbury's brainstorm than ABC's.

As with most sponsored programs, when the run reaches a point between 4-6 weeks from the end, the promotional copy flow to the newspapers effectively dries up. Hence we have no provenances for the titles of the last five programs of the run. Apparently pride in one's product extended to the board rooms of 1940s Corporate America about as much as it does to 2009 Corporate America--that is to say, nada, nichts, zippity-doo-da, etc. .

Series Derivatives:

Woodbury Double Feature; Hollywood Mystery Theater; Hollywood Mystery Time; Mystery Time
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Mystery Dramas
Network(s): Blue Network [West], ABC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 44-07-20 01 [Unknown ]
44-10-15 01 The Case Of the Piece of Burned String
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 44-07-20 to 44-10-13; CBS Pacific Net [KQW]; Ten, 30-minute programs, Thursdays, 9:00 p.m.
44-10-15 to 45-12-23; Blue Network; Sixty-three, either 15-minute or 23-minute programs, depending on outlet; Sundays, 9:15 p.m.
Syndication: None
Sponsors: Woodbury Soap
Director(s):
Principal Actors: Carleton Young, Constance Moore, Dennis O'Keefe, Joan Blondell, Gerald Mohr, Jay Novello, Bea Benadaret.
Recurring Character(s): None
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s) Unknown
Music Direction: Charles Hathaway
Musical Theme(s): "Lovely to Look At"
Announcer(s): Jim Doyle
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
63
Episodes in Circulation: 2
Total Episodes in Collection: 3
Provenances:

Billboard Magazine article from October 21 1944 announcing addition of Louella Parsons to Hollywood Mystery Time for Jergens
Billboard Magazine article from October 21 1944 announcing addition of Louella Parsons to Hollywood Mystery Time for Jergens

Wisconsin State Journal, 'The Directory of The Armed Forces Radio Service Series'.

Notes on Provenances:

All above cited provenances are in error in one form or another. The most helpful provenances were newspaper listings.


Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


What remains most unclear is whether there were any clear guidelines on which markets received the 30-minute Hollywood Mystery Time and which markets received only the 15-minute installments. We're convinced it was a market-driven decision, but we have yet to determine a pattern.

We can however demonstrate that there were indeed at least two different versions of this program; The 30-minute format with the Louella Parsons lead and the 15-minute version with simply an abridged Hollywood Mystery Time adventure. Thus far it appears that it has only been the Woodbury Double Feature exemplars that have made it into circulation.

Virtually all other significant details regarding this program as posted in all other log sources are in error. We won't belabor the issue by posting an episode by episode correction. We've posted the actual newspaper listing comments adjacent to all program entries we could substantiate.


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here's the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







Hollywood Mystery Time Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
44-07-20
1
Title Unknown
N
[Premiere Episode; CBS [KQW]; 9:00 p.m.]

44-07-20 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-07-27
2
Title Unknown
N
44-07-27 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-08-01
--
The Willard Dexter Case
N
[AFRS Mystery Playhouse only]
["
Willard is an army hero who reported a German agent and is about to get married. Just as the spy is being executed, Dexter is murdered in a crowded cocktail lounge "]
44-08-03
3
Title Unknown
N
44-08-03 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-08-10
4
Title Unknown
N
44-08-10 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-08-17
5
Title Unknown
N
44-08-17 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-08-24
6
Title Unknown
N
44-08-24 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-08-31
7
Title Unknown
N
44-08-31 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-09-07
8
Title Unknown
N
44-09-07 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-09-14
9
Title Unknown
N
44-09-14 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-09-21
10
Title Unknown
N
44-09-21 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW, Mystery Time
44-09-28
--
--
N
44-09-28 Hayward Daily Review
9:00 P. M.— KQW,
Suspense
44-10-06
--
--
N
Mystery To Replace
Basin Street Series
New York, Oct. 6—(AP)—Basin Street, the Blue's "dignified" comedy music series, which with the cooperation of Milton Cross, opera announcer, has been presenting' popular tunes much the same as a symphony concert for four and a half years,
will have its final Blue broadcast Sunday night. The sponsor has decided to replace it with Hollywood Mystery Time, detective drama in which Carleton Young will have the lead.





Hollywood Mystery Time [Woodbury] Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
44-10-15
1
The Case Of the Piece Of Burned String
N
[ Woodbury Premiere ];
Blue Network; Sundays, 9:15 p.m. Eastern

8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
new program starring Gloria Blondell and Carlton Young; premiere drama, "
The Case Of the Piece Of Burned String."
44-10-22
2
The Case Of the Heavenly Twins
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
Gloria Blondell and Carleton Young find double trouble and triple murder in "
The Case of the Heavenly Twins."
44-10-29
3
The Case Of the Missing House
N
8:15 p. m — Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
The Case of the Missing House."
44-11-05
4
The Case Of the Horse Who Loved Music
N
8:15 p. m. — Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
The Case of the Horse Who Loved Music."
44-11-12
5
The Case Of the Typical Gangster
N
8:15 p. m.,—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
The Case of the Typical Gangster."
44-11-19
6
The Case Of the Canned Murder
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
The Case of the Canned Murder."
44-11-26
7
The Case Of the Finish Line Murder
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
Case of the Finish Line Murder."
44-12-03
8
The Case Of the Errant Spouse
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
The Case of the Errant Spouse."
44-12-10
9
The Case Of Too Many Santas
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
The Case of Too Many Santas."
44-12-17
10
The Case Of the Shooting Star
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
'
The Case of the Shooting Star," in which a corpse talks back.
44-12-24
11
Murder On the Christmas Tree
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
Murder on the Christmas Tree."
44-12-31
12
The Case of Room Service With Murder
N
44-12-31 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR):
"The Case of Room Service With Murder."
45-01-07
13
The Case of Room Service With Murder
N
45-01-07 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 p.m.--Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR): "Room Service With Murder."
45-01-14
14
Death Stares In the Mirror
N
45-01-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:15 p.m.--Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR): "Death Stares in the Mirror."
45-01-21
15
The Trumpet Blows Murder
N
Jim Lawton and Gloria Dean, Hollywood Mystery Time sleuths, haven't a ghost of a chance avoiding a murder case when they accompany an eccentric musician friend to a spiritualistic seance as "The Trumpet Blows Murder" tonight over the Blue network. Carleton Young and Gloria Blondell will star in the thriller.
45-01-28
16
The Case Of the Massacred Mahatma
N
"Louella Parsons famed Hollywood gossip opens HOLLYWOOD MYSTERY TIME with five minutes of breezy news from there you head straight into CRIME Ted Lawton and his Girl Friday Gloria Blondell manage to get entangled in MURDER every Sunday night It's a real creeping mystery touched up HOLLYWOOD style for you who clamor for glamour. Add it to your list of hot Sunday night programs Hollywood Mystery Time at p.m GLORIA BLONDELL ALL THIS AND THESE TOO SUNDAY NIGHT ON THE BLUE"

45-01-28 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 p.m.--Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR): "
The Massacred Mahatma."
45-02-04
17
Death Plays the Lead
N
8:15—Hollywood Mystery Time,
"Death Plays the Lead,"
Blue

"Death Plays the Lead" about murder on a movie set, is on Hollywood Mystery Time starring Gloria Blondell and Carlton Young over the Blue network tonight

Amateur Detective Jim Lawton, who also produced Grade B thriller films, tries to step out of his class to make a Grade A movie and finds that.
Death Plays the Lead," on "Hollywood Mystery Time." tonight at (1:15 o'clock over the Blue and WHMA. Carleton Young and Gloria Blondell star in the mystery series.
45-02-11
18
The Case Of the Punctured Pug
N
"The Case Of the Punctured Pug"
finds death the victor in a prize Fight ring on "Hollywood Mystery Time," co-starring Gloria Blondell and Carlton Young over the Blue network tonight.
45-02-18
19
Title Unknown
N
45-02-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:15 p.m.--Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR): "Legacy for a Corpse."
45-02-25
20
The Case Of the Pie-Eyed Parrot
N
"The The Case Of the Pie-Eyed Parrot" confronts Gloria Blondell and Carleton Young on "Hollywood Mystery Time" over Blue tonight.
45-03-04
21
Murder Is A Cinch
N
8:15—Hollywood Mystery Time :
"
Murder Is a Cinch," Blue
45-03-11
22
The Case Of the Deadly Heir
N
8:15—Hollywood Mystery Theater
"
The Case of the Deadly Heir," Blue
45-03-18
23
The Case of the Missing Fingerprints
N
8:15 — Hollywood Mystery Theater:
"
The Case of the Missing Fingerprints,"
Blue
45-03-25
24
The Case Of the Punctured Pug
N
8:15 — Hollywood Mystery Time:
"
The Case of the Punctured Pug."
45-04-01
25
The Case Of the Floating Feather
N
45-04-08
26
The Case Of the Foggy Actor
N
"Blackmail is the motive for murder, in "The Case of the Foggy Actor," the "Hollywood Mystery Time" thriller to be broadcast over Station WJZ, Sunday at 8:15 p. m. The plot revolves around a friend of Jim Lawton (Carelton Young) who gets mixed up in a $25,000 blackmail plot with two shyster lawyers. One of the conspirators is killed in a mysterious manner, and the evidence points to Jim, his secretary, Gloria Dean (Gloria Blondell) and their friend as the likely killers. Jim and Gloria follow a dangerous trail to the real murderer, in an unexpected climax."
45-04-15
27
The Case of the Sabotaged Soprano
N
45-04-15 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:15 p.m.--Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR): "The Case of the Sabotaged Soprano."
45-04-22
28
Title Unknown
N
45-04-22 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-04-29
29
Title Unknown
N
45-04-29 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-05-06
30
Title Unknown
N
45-05-06 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-05-13
31
Title Unknown
N
45-05-13 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-05-20
32
The Case of the Glowing Eyes
Y
45-05-20 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-05-27
33
Title Unknown
N
45-05-27 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-06-03
34
Title Unknown
N
"Mystery Time thriller dramas heard Sundays via the Blue Network is requiring its writers on the show to spend at east one day going through the Los Angeles police department crime laboratory files studying crime detection methods"

45-06-03 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-06-10
35
Title Unknown
N
45-06-10 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-06-17
36
Title Unknown
N
45-06-17 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-06-24
37
Title Unknown
N
45-06-24 Wisconsin State Journal
8:15 Hollywood Mystery Time, WENR
45-07-01
38
Room Service With Murder
N
45-07-08
39
Title Unknown
N
45-07-15
40
The Case Of the Crystal Ball
N
8:15 p. m. Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR): with Constance Moore and Dennis O'Keefe as new stars: "The Case of the Crystal Ball."
45-07-22
41
Title Unknown
N
45-07-29
42
Hot and Low Down
Y
45-08-05
43
Title Unknown
N
Lovely Constance Moore, the screen star, has been given the leading lady role of the sleuthing secretary to "Jim Lawton" In Hollywood Mystery Time, Sundays over the American network. Dennis O'Keefe plays "Lawton," a mystery-solving movie producer.
45-08-12
44
Title Unknown
N
45-08-19
45
Murder by Coincidence
Y
45-08-26
46
Title Unknown
N
45-09-02
47
Title Unknown
N
45-09-09
48
Title Unknown
N
45-09-16
49
Title Unknown
N
45-09-23
50
Title Unknown
N
Things start happening when an accountant disappears and the police suspect embezzlement. To add to the excitement there is a missing body and a surprising climax. Dennis O'Keefe and Constance Moore star in the mystery show
45-09-30
51
Title Unknown
N
45-10-07
52
The Case of the Fidgety Fiddle Player
N
8:15 p. m. Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"The Case of the Fidgety Fiddle Player."
45-10-14
53
Title Unknown
N
45-10-21
54
Title Unknown
N
45-10-28
55
Title Unknown
N
45-11-04
56
Title Unknown
N
45-11-11
57
The Case of the The Scarlet Letter
N
8:15 p. m. Hollywood Mystery
Time (WENR):
"
The Scarlet Letter."
45-11-18
58
The Case of the Hubba-Hubba Girl
N
8:15 p. m.—Hollywood Mystery Time (WENR): "Case of the Hubba-Hubba Girl."
45-11-25
59
Title Unknown
N
45-12-02
60
Title Unknown
N
45-12-09
61
Title Unknown
N
45-12-16
62
Title Unknown
N
45-12-23
63
Title Unknown
N
[ Last Episode ]






Hollywood Mystery Time Radio Program Biographies




Carleton G. Young
(Ted Lawton)

Stage, Screen, Radio and Television actor
(1907-1971)

Birthplace: Fulton, New York, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1937 Columbia Workshop
1937 On Broadway
1938 Silver Theatre
1940 George E. Sokolsky
1940 Great Plays
1941 Lincoln Highway
1942 This Is Our Enemy
1943 The Adventures Of Ellery Queen
1943 Treasury Star Parade
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1943 Cavalcade Of America
1945 Arch Oboler's Plays
1945 Hollywood Mystery Time
1946 Strange Wills
1946 Hollywood Star Time
1948 Lux Radio Theatre
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1949 This Is Your FBI
1949 Family Theaatre
1949 The Count of Monte Cristo
1950 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1951 This Is Our Heritage
1951 Hallmark Playhosue
1951 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1951 The Man Called X
1951 The Whisperer
1951 The Railroad Hour
1952 The Pendleton Story
1952 Hollywood Sound Stage
1952 Stars In the Air
1952 The Roy Rogers Show
1954 The Six-Shooter
1955 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
Duel of Destiny

Carleton Young, ca. 1939
Carleton Young, ca. 1939


Our Gal Sunday article from 37-07-11 with Carleton Young and Dorlothy Lowell
Our Gal Sunday article from 37-07-11 with Carleton Young and Dorlothy Lowell


Carleton G. Young, ca. 1953
Carleton G. Young, ca. 1953


Carleton G. Young, ca. 1958
Carleton G. Young, ca. 1958

Carleton G. Young was one of Radio's most successful and busy actors for over twenty years--and some 8,000 to 10,000 appearances in Radio. Destined to be forever confused with or mistaken for Carleton Scott Young another successful Film, Stage, Radio and Television actor, Carleton G. Young nevertheless clearly set himself apart in both Radio and Television.

Both possessed of very distinctive deep baritone voices, the confusion between the two Carleton Youngs is perhaps forgiveable, and yet there are several notable differences in their repsective careers that certainly set them on separate paths. For one, Carleton G. Young's physical appearance was more polished and clean cut than the Film actor Carleton Young. The Film actor was more a character actor. Carleton G. Young was certainly star material, and indeed played the lead in several Radio programs during his 20-year career in Radio. His most vocal fans would probably cite his year-long portrayal of Ellery Queen (1943), a Radio program that's taken on almost cult status and which remains very rare to this day.

Others might cite his nine-year portrayal as the Count of Monte Cristo in the Radio program of the same name (1949). Still others might more animatedly recall his long running appearance as John Galt in Radio's The Whisperer (1951) another Radio cult favorite of tens of thousands of Radio fans. He also played the lead role of Producer-Director Ted Lawton in some thirty-nine episodes of Hollywood Mystery Time (1945).

Carleton G. Young's truest fans will recall his extensive body of work spanning some 350+ separate Radio productions over his Radio career. During that time, Carleton Young lent his amazing voice to every dramatic Radio format imaginable, portraying a bewildering array of characters with equal ease. From detective dramas to adventures to straight dramatic roles to even the over-the-top melodrama of his role as Philip Galt, The Whisperer, Carleton Young's unmistakeable diction, polished delivery, and highly distinctive baritone promised a Radio adventure to remember, and he never failed to deliver on that promise.

Indeed as Radio's Golden Age waned, Carleton G. Young made a smooth transition to The Golden Years of Television with equal aplomb. From Television's earliest Superman adventures through fifteen years of significant contributions to Television's wonderful Drama anthologies, Carleton G. Young was one of those male actors blessed with both the looks and air of a more and more distiguished gentleman the more he physically aged. Adding another 200+ appearances to his Television resume, Carleton G. Young's Stage, Screen, Radio and Television career ultimately spanned over forty-five years before passed on the Acting baton to his son Tony Young, another distinguished Film and Television actor in his own right.

Carleton G. Young passed away in 1971 at the age of 64, but not before seeing his own son embark onto a versatile, successful Entertainment career of his own. A fitting postscript to the life of an actor who met every new role and every new challenge with equal excellence. The Golden Age of Radio may have waned, but interest in Carelton G. Young's body of work over Radio is as intense as it's ever been. A fitting and well-deserved tribute to one of Radio's most memorable--and durable--voices.



Gloria Blondell
Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1915-1986)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1940 I Love A Mystery
1941 Lux Radio Theatre
1942 Plays For Americans
1942 Lights Out
1944 Four For the Fifth
1944 Results, Inc.
1945 Arch Oboler's Plays
1945 Hollywood Mystery Time
1945 G. I Journal
1945 You Were There
1946 The Jack Kirkwood Show
1946 Hollywood Star Time
1946 The Casebook Of Gregory Hood
1947 Holiday Wilde
1947 The Story Of Holiday Wilde
1947 The Sweeney and March Show
1947 Stars Over Hollywood
1947 The Charlie McCarthy Show
1947 All-Star Western Theatre
1947 Voyage Of the Scarlet Queen
1948 Family Theatre
1948 Diary Of Fate
1948 Let George Do It
1948 Hallmark Playhosue
1948 Escape
1948 Jeff Regan, Investigator
1948 The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe
1949 The Lum and Abner Show
1949 Hallmark Playhouse
1949 The Green Lama
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1949 Our Miss Brooks
1949 The Adventures Of Frank Race
1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1950 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1950 The Adventures Of the Saint
1951 Rocky Jordan
1952 The Great Gildersleeve
The Cases Of Mr Ace
Your Movietown Radio Theatre

Gloria, Katie and Joan Blondell, ca. 1933
Gloria, Katie and Joan Blondell, ca. 1933

Eric Linden escorts Gloria Blondell to the Academy Awards at the Ambassador Hotel's Cocoanut Grove, ca. 1933
Eric Linden escorts Gloria Blondell to the Academy Awards at the Ambassador Hotel's Cocoanut Grove, ca. 1933

Gloria Blondell with cast of I Love A Mystery, ca. 1940
Gloria Blondell with cast of I Love A Mystery, ca. 1940

Gloria Blondell on I Love Lucy from 1952
Gloria Blondell on I Love Lucy
from 1952


Gloria Blondell, ca. 1952

Gloria Blondell from one of 1961's Thriller episodes
Gloria Blondell from one of 1961's Thriller episodes.

Gloria Blondell was born in New York City to Vaudeville players Eddie and Kathryn Blondell. Her parents, known as "Blondell and Company," travelled throughout the world performing in the US, Europe and the Far East. Her older sister, Rose Joan, had performed on Stage with their parents. Rose Joan is also known to many as Joan Blondell, famous Stage, Film, Radio and Television actress.

Raised mostly in Dallas, Texas, her older sister had won the Miss Dallas beauty title then left on her own by joining a stock company at age 17. By the 1930s her sister's Broadway, Radio and Film success had taken the family to Hollywood, where young Gloria Blondell began her own tuteledge in Drama with some of Hollywood and New York's finest voice and drama coaches.

By the time Gloria Blondell was 25 her sister had already starred in over 60 films and 25 stage plays. But Gloria soon found herself in one of Radio's most popular adventure programs, Carlton E. Morse's legendary I Love A Mystery (1940). Her auspicious start in Radio eventually took her on to a fifteen year career in Radio which found her performing in most of Radio's most popular adventures, thrillers, detective dramas and comedies of The Golden Age of Radio. Looking and sounding so much like her older sister didn't hurt her career in the least. Producers found they could get Joan Blondell's voice and character in the guise of the relatively bargain price of her sister, Gloria.

Before long, Gloria Blondell was commanding her own price built on her own growing popularity as a Radio and Film actress. In the meantime, she'd met and married legendary movie producer 'Cubby' Broccoli of both the vegetable [his family invented the high sulphur content legume] and future James Bond fame. Though the marriage lasted only six years, they were six very productive years for Gloria Blondell.

Having co-starred in several of Radio's most popular adventure programs she seemed a natural to co-star as Carleton Young's Girl Friday in the Blue Network's Hollywood Mystery Time (1945), portraying Gloria Dean, sidekick, amateur detective, and secretary to Carleton Young's Ted Lawton, Hollywood Producer-Director-amateur sleuth. Performing with Young in the first thirty-nine episodes, her marital difficulties and a film opportunity for Carleton Young saw both the co-stars depart the relatively popular mystery program in the Summer of 1945. Gloria Blondell was always wonderful in adventure and detective dramas and eventually starred in her own detective drama, Holiday Wilde in 1947, laying the groundwork for the popular Candy Matson series of lady detective programs that followed Holiday Wilde in 1949.

After Gloria Blondell's divorce from Cubby Broccoli she found herself in even more demand on Radio, appearing in over 800 more appearances in Radio before her Television career took off in the 1950s. As resilient and versatile on Television as in Radio, Gloria Blondell soon found herself appearing in several of early Television's most successful situation comedies and dramas. She even dabbled in Animation, voicing 'Daisy' Duck for The Walt Disney Studios.

Most famously remembered as 'Honeybee' Gillis, the wife of Chester A. Riley's best friend and next-door neighbor, Jim Gillis, on Television's The Life of Riley (1957). Gloria Blondell continued to appear in guest-starring roles on Television until 1964.

Gloria Blondell retired from Entertainment in 1965 to spend more time with her family and friends. She passed away in 1986 from natural causes.

Remembered for her remarkable range of female foils, heroines and villainesses alike, Gloria Blondell's appearances over Radio were some of The Golden Age of Radio's most memorable. Her appearances in virtually every popular, surviving program from the era ensure that her thousands of existing fans will continue to be augmented by thousands more as more examples of her Radio work enter circulation.



Constance Moore
Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress
(1921-2005)
Birthplace: Sioux City, Iowa, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1940 Who's In Town Tonight
1943 Ceiling Unlimited
1945 The Harold Lloyd Comedy Theatre
1945 Hollywood Mystery Time
1946 The March Of the Movies
1946 Command Performance
1947 Lux Radio Theatre
1949 The Bob Hope Show
1950 Starlight Operetta
Personal Albulm
Salute To Reservists


Constance Moore, ca. 1943



Constance Moore glamour photo, ca. 1939


Constance Moore, ca. 1946
Constance Moore, ca. 1946



Constance Moore with Hollywood Mystery Time co-star Dennis O'Keefe in 1940's La Conga Nights



Constance Moore publicity shot from 1943


Constance Moore promoting 1945's Delightfully Dangerous
Constance Moore promoting
1945's Delightfully Dangerous


Earl Carroll Vanities Songbook cover from 1945
Earl Carroll Vanities Songbook cover from 1945

Constance Moore was born in the midwest to Francis Richard Moore and her mother, Constance Houghton of Dallas, Texas. Her father was heir to a candy factory, grocery chain and the Crystal Ice Company, all quite successful enterprises in Texas. Constance was later joined by her brother Oliver, not long after which their parents divorced and 'Connie' moved to Dallas with her mother and brother.

Miss Moore attended Miss Gray’s Day School in Dallas while beginning to consider a career in Entertainment. She hadn't yet acquired the acting bug but she had definitely acquired a passion to become a singer. In 1936 she debuted over Radio, singing on the local CBS affiliate, KRLD, sponsored by her Uncle Jack Marvin of the local Marvin Drugstores chain. Fortunately for both young Connie and the network, Connie Moore's voice and delivery so pleased the station management that they decided to keep her on.

And so Connie Moore began to commute to a Radio station via streetcar each morning at 7 a.m.--before attending her high school. Upon each day's closing high school bell, Connie raced back to the Radio studio for another hour-long broadcast at 5 p.m. daily. Upon graduation from high school, the station hired her to sing with its studio band and she began to undertake her first series of Night Club engagements as the chanteuse for the Ken Meyers Orchestra. A Universal Pictures, talent scout heared Connie Moore on the local radio station and offered Connie a contract. Over her mother's initial objections, Universal upped the ante to $125.00/week and it was time to "move to Be-ver-lee. . . .Hills that is, swimmin' pools, movie stars . . . " and all.

She stayed with family and in 1937 she was thrown into a series of low-budget, Universal B-Movie potboilers and budget musicals. Universal signed her to a long-term contract and had her bleach her natural brunette hair blonde. Still somewhat midwest naieve, upon signing the longer contract with Universal she asked her recruiter: "Everybody asks me who my agent is. Do I need an agent?" Still all of only 16 years of age she was nonetheless already taking singing engagements with local Los Angeles swing bands while balancing her time on Universal's sound stages.

Her Film breakthrough was a series of Buck Rogers serial films in 1939, starring young Buster Crabbe. The collaboration worked quite successfully, and by the Summer of 1939 she eloped to Nevada with Talent Agent Johnny Maschio--chaperoned by her mother. Constance Moore, 19, now Mrs. Constance Maschio returned from her honeymoon in time for her Universal reporting date of May 1, 1939.

One of Hollywood's more successful marriages, Johnny Maschio gave up his talent agency to become a highly successful real estate broker and the couple became very successfully involved in Conservative California politics, supporting George Murphy, and later Ronald Reagan, and their bids for both Union and State politics.

She first performed on Radio with Dennis O'Keefe in 1940, a professional relationship that would last over ten years in Radio and Film. She appeared in the World War II drama I Wanted Wings (1941) on location in San Antonio, which gave her an opportunity to visit with family once again. Though pregnant throughout the filming, the movie was one of 1941's successes--for Veronica Lake, especially.

Constance Moore gave birth to her daughter, Mary Constance, in the Fall of 1941. After recovering, Connie undertook an extended USO tour, playing the camps along the northern tier, while young Judy Garland did the camps along the southern route. Both tours ended in New York, where Constance Moore was approached with a musical version of Tobacco Road. The play ran sixteen months before Constance Moore opted to leave it for another Film opportunity, starring with fellow Iowan MacDonald Carey in Take a Letter, Darling (1942).

1943 brought her another Radio triumph with Mercury Theatre alumni Joseph Cotten and Orson Welles in Ceiling Unlimited. Her 1945 Film, Earl Carroll Vanities was nominated for Oscars for both Best Music and Best Song, Constance Moore's "Endlessly." Starring with Dennis O'Keefe--another Iowan--the two are again paired on Radio with 1945's Hollywood Mystery Time, replacing Carleton Young and Gloria Blondell as Ted Lawton and Gloria Dean.

A year later she became a part of Aviation History when Howard Hughes' TWA Lockheed Constellation took off from Burbank Airport to set a new transcontinental non-stop commercial speed record--with Howard Hughes at the controls.

By 1947, Constance Moore had pretty much retired from Film and Radio. With both a daughter and son to raise and a husband to devote her life to, she simply felt her family needed her more than Hollywood did--and vice versa. Constance Moore continued to do some occasional Summer Stock and Television appearances through the mid-1950s, playing The Stork Club in New York, The Cocoanut Grove in Los Angeles and Chicago's Drake Hotel in between.

After a ten-year hiatus 1964 found Constance Moore replacing Irene Hervey on Television's The Young Marrieds. In 1967 Constance Moore made her last Film appearance in the cult film Las Vegas By Night, with Jayne Mansfield and Mickey Hargitay--her husband was the Producer.

In 1998 her husband of 59 years, Johnny Maschio, passed away at the age of 95. Following a long, debilitating series of illnesses, Constance Moore Maschio passed away herself at the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in the Fall of 2005, of heart failure.



Dennis O'Keefe [Edward Vance 'Bud' Flanagan ]
(Ted Lawton)
Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actor, Television Writer and Director
[Also credited under the following names: Al Everett Dennis, Bud Flanagan, Bud Flannagan, Jonathan Ricks, Jonathan Rix]
(1908-1968)

Birthplace: Fort Madison, Iowa, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1939 Good News Of 1939
1944 Lux Radio Theatre
1944 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1945 The Harold Lloyd Comedy Theatre
1945 Hollywood Mystery Time
1946 Encore Theatre
1947 Suspense
1948 Family Theatre
1949 Truth Or Consequences
1950 T-Man
1950 The Miracle Of America
1950 Guest Star
1951 Adventure Is Your Heritage
1952 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1952 Cavalcade Of America
The New National Guard Show

Dennis O'Keefe, ca. 1938
Dennis O'Keefe, ca. 1938


The rigors of being a perennial extra. Months of continual poker games with the likes of Virginia Bruce, who sits across from young 'Bud' Flanagan
The rigors of being a perennial extra. Months of continual poker games with the likes of Virginia Bruce, who sits across from young 'Bud' Flanagan, ca. 1937


Dennis O'Keefe publicity photo, ca. 1941
Dennis O'Keefe publicity photo, ca. 1941


Dennis O'Keefe, ca. 1948
Dennis O'Keefe, ca. 1948


Dennis O'Keefe incredulously inspects the damage to his neighbor across the street. His neighbor's house was one of those destroyed when Howard Hughes famously ran out of petrol over Brentwood in 1946.
Dennis O'Keefe incredulously inspects the damage to his neighbor across the street. His neighbor's house was one of those destroyed when Howard Hughes famously ran out of petrol over Brentwood in 1946.

Possibly one of Hollywood's most successful 'extras', the younger Dennis O'Keefe [or Al Everett Dennis, Bud Flanagan, Bud Flannagan, Jonathan Ricks, Jonathan Rix] appeared in no less than 150 feature films before his first fully credited appearance in Film. Durable to be sure, Edward Vance 'Bud' Flanagan was another Midwest product from Iowa.

O'Keefe acquired his earliest stage writing experience, while still a child, writing skits for his own family of traveling Irish Vaudevillians. O'Keefe began appearing in Film as an extra throughout the 1930s and appeared in numerous films under his real name, 'Bud' Flanagan.

A minor, but memorable role in 1937's Saratoga caught the attention of Clark Gable, who recommended O'Keefe to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. M-G-M signed Flanagan as a contract player in 1937, re-naming him Dennis O'Keefe. Appearing mostly in M-G-M's B-Movies, O'Keefe's first credited roles for the studio became more ambitious, beginning with The Bad Man of Brimstone (1938) and the lead in Burn 'Em Up O'Connor (1939).

Realizing the limitations of his contract, O'Keefe left MGM in1940, but found himself continuing to work in lower budget productions. As versatile as he was handsome, O'Keefe often found himself cast as archetypal film noir toughs in action and crime dramas like Lady Scarface (1941), The Leopard Man (1943), The Fighting Seabees (1944), The Story of Dr. Wassell (1944), T-Men (1947), and the film noir classic, Raw Deal (1948).

By the same token he was equally at ease in light comedies such as Topper Returns (1940), Weekend for Three (1941), Broadway Limited (1941), Abroad with Two Yanks (1944), Brewster's Millions (1945), The Affairs of Susan (1945), Getting Gertie's Garter (1945), and The Lady Wants Mink (1953). In fact his most ardent fans seemed to enjoy just about any role he found himself in.

That pretty much sums up how his Radio audiences felt about him as well. Equally at ease in comedies, adventures, detective dramas and melodramas, O'Keefe's range made him a frequent guest star in Radio, and on occasion, the lead, such as his starring performance as Ted Lawton, Hollywood B-Movie Producer-Director and detective in 1945's Hollywood Mystery Time, co-starring fellow Iowan and frequent screen co-star, Constance Moore.

As O'Keefe continued to mature as an actor, he acquired dramatic leads in Doll Face (1946), Dishonored Lady (1947), Abandoned (1949), Woman on the Run (1950), The Company She Keeps (1950), One Big Affair (1952), and Drums of Tahiti (1954). Finally proving his versatility and range, O'Keefe began a third career in Television; acting, directing and writing, and eventually starring in his own early Television program, The Dennis O'Keefe Show (1959) as bachelor father, Hal Towne, an L.A. based, syndicated journalist who pens the syndicated "All Around Towne" column.

Having matured into a highly versatile, multi-talented artist, Dennis O'Keefe continued to act in Film on occasion, with his last two appearances All Hands On Deck (1961) and Naked Flame (1964). But as with many of the attractive male actors of his era, Dennis O'Keefe ultimately succumbed to lung cancer in 1968.

One of Hollywood's somewhat under appreciated talents, with the release of more and more of his film noir movies and light comedies, as well as wonderful examples of his Radio talent, Dennis O'Keefe seems poised to finally achieve the repect in Death that he seems to have just missed in Life.

We're some of his greatest fans, so it comes as no surprise to us that his talent is finally coming into its rightful light. That light will only burn brighter now as more and more new fans see, hear and read the body of work he left for us to enjoy.




Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Hollywood Mystery Time