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The Hidden History Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Hidden History

41-09-08 Harrel Joins WBEN
Sept. 8th, 1941 article citing originator Charles T. Harrel's connections to both the Library of Congress and his new position on the staff of WBEN, Buffalo.


Background

From the June 8th, 1941 edition of the Buffalo Courier-Express:

41-06-08 Cherokee Strip head

     The Cherokee Strip, now near the heart of Oklahoma's Dust Bowl but only 48 years ago a fertile paradise where 10,000 settlers, gamblers, "sooners" and "jumpers" scrambled, fought and often died to obtain the last free government homestead land in the United States, will be the locale of a Library of Congress Hidden History drama over the NBC-Blue networks and WEBR today at 2 p.m.
     Senator Elmer Thomas of Oklahoma will be introduced at the beginning of the broadcast to describe the Strip as it was then and is now, and to set the scene for a true story based on diaries, personal letters and other documents in the Library of Congress.
               Charged Forward
     The epic race began at noon on that historic day in 1893 when a mile-long line of land-hungry men, women and children on horses, afoot, in carts, spring wagons and even on bicycles, charged forward with the starter's gun into the vast virgin territory which was being thrown open to homesteaders.
     Before the sun set most of the panting, dust-covered army had staked out more or less fertile stakes.  But many others had fallen by the wayside, unable to keep up the pace, or wounded and killed in pitched battles with the hated "sooners" who had sneaked ahead to lay claim to land before the mob arrived, or with "jumpers," who came late but tried to snatch the best homesteads from their legitimate owners.

From the June 17th, 1941 edition of the Niagara Falls Gazette:

41-06-17 Headline

     WASHINGTON, D.C.--Did Lincoln think his Gettysburg Address was a failure?  Why didn't the French finish the Panama canal?  Was there more than one Declaration of Independence?  Were the Rough Riders really as tough as they are painted?  Who was the first President of the United States?
     These and a host of other controversial or mysterious question marks in the development of other controversial or mysterious question marks in the development of America will be canvassed in "Hidden History", an unusually provocative series of 15-minute dramatizations presented by the National Broadcasting company in cooperation with the Library of Congress over the NBC-Blue network on Sundays at 2 p.m., EDST.
     Phil Cohen, of the library, will direct and Walter G. Preston, Jr., manager of NBC's Public Service division, will supervise the series.
     Prominent speakers, such as H.V. Kaltenborn, hard-hitting NBC news analyst, and Alexander Woollcott, who is inclined to think that history too often has been "made" by historians with axes to grind, will introduce each program and focus attention on some event about which the records are incomplete or in violent disagreement.
     At the close of each broadcast a request is to be made that listeners send in any information they possess concerning the event dramatized, such as material from old letters, diaries and books which have been out of print for generations.
     The plan is to rescue stories which are reaching the outer fringe of memory--eye-witness accounts as well as tales told by grandfathers and community patriarchs.  Any valuable data obtained will become part of the library's permanent collection.
     Archibald McLeish, librarian of the Library of Congress, introduced the first broadcast on May 18, which dealt with the various declarations of independence drawn up by widely scattered American communities in 1775.  He also explained the purpose and format of the series and told of the interesting circumstances which resulted in its organization.
     Future programs on "Hidden History" will be:  May 25--Lincoln at Gettysburg; June 1--The Diary of Michael Shiner;  June 8--The Hidden House; June 15--Opening of the Cherokee Strip; June 22--The Men Who Dug the Panama Canal; June 29--Ghost Towns; July 8--The Story of an Immigrant; July 13--The Underground Railway; July 20--Carrie Nation and Her Hatchet; July 27--Coxey's Army; August 3--Famous American Rumors; August 10--The Rough Riders.

From the August 17th, 1941 edition of the Buffalo Courier Express:

41-08-17 Dolly Madison head

     A typical day in the life of Dolly Madison, clever and diplomatic wife of President James Madison during that hectic period when the War of 1812 loomed over the United States, will be dramatized on the Hidden History program over the NBC-Blue network and WEBR today at 2 p.m.
     Produced under the direction of Arthur F. Hanna, the script has been written by Bernard Victor Dryer of the Library of Congress in Washington.
     Basing his sketch entirely on letters written by Mrs. Madison, Dryer shows that in those days the duties of the First Lady included providing lunch at the White House for a band of hungry Indians; preventing the resignation of the secretary of the treasury, and arranging a dinner for the President's worst enemies.

From the August 24th, 1941 edition of the Buffalo Courier Express:

41-08-24 Voyage Traced head

     The log of the U.S. brigantine Hope, painstakingly compiled by Capt. Ingraham during a glob-encircling trip back in 1790, will be dramatized as another Hidden History Program over the NBC-Blue network and WEBR today at 2 p.m.
     The story tells, in simple yet stirring terms, of Capt. Ingraham's unhappy encounter with a British slave ship; of his discovery of a group of South Sea Islands which he claimed as American territory and named Washington, Adams, Hancock and Franklin; of his battle with a Kanaka chieftain who wanted to add to his prize collection of human heads, and of his celebration of the Fourth of July on another island upon which no white foot had previously stepped.
     Hidden History is presented weekly by the Library of Congress for the purpose of acquainting listeners with little-known aspects of their country's development.  Today's program was written by Oscar Saul and Joseph Liss.

From the October 18th, 1941 edition of The Sacramento Bee:

41-10-18 With Her Little Hatchet


A "CARRIE NATION Hatchet"--not the kind the famous prohibitionist used to smash saloon bars and mirrors, but the miniature emblem she pinned on the coat lapels of faithful supporters--is among the interesting and valuable bits of Americana which have been contributed to the Library of Congress at Washington since the start of that organization's Hidden History broadcasts over KFBK Sundays at 8:15 A.M.
     Other contributions, sent in by listeners all over the country as the result of the library's request for material illuminating little known phases of America's past have included Civil War diaries and letters; first hand accounts of the march on Washington made by Coxey's Army; contemporary newspaper clippings about the activities of the Underground Railway; the original telegram sent to Pittsburgh by Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton and containing a flat order for the recruiting of several thousand men into the Union Army, and a trunk full of phonographs taken during the construction of the Panama Canal.
     The diamond and mother of pearl Carrie Nation hatchet was sent to the library by Clay F. Gaumer, former member of the Illinois Legislature and last year the Prohibition Party candidate for governor of that state, after he had heard a Hidden History broadcast dealing with Mrs. Nation.
     "She was not winsome in appearance but she certainly was in dead earnest," wrote Gaumer in a letter which accompanied his gift.  "When she pinned that hatchet on my lapel after we had spoken on the same platform at Watseka, Ill. in 1905, she said:  'I have always wanted to meet a real, live prohibition legislator.  In return for that privilege I present to you this little hatchet.  On its handle is my name, Carrie A. Nation.  And that is just what I am doing and will continue to do until the curse of liquor is driven from our land.'"
     The emblem, believed to be the only one of its kind now in existence, has been turned over to the Smithsonian Institute in Washington and soon will be on public display there.

Series Derivatives:

None
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Dramatized Documentaries
Network(s): NBC Blue
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 41-05-18 01 The Declaration Of Independence
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 41-05-18 to 41-11-09; NBC Blue; Twenty-six, 13-minute programs;
Syndication: NBC Blue; In coordination with the Library of Congress
Sponsors: Sustaining
Director(s): Phil Cohen,Charles Warburton [Directors]
Walter G. Preston, Jr. [Series Supervisor]
Charles T. Harrell [Originator]
Principal Appearances: Archibald McLeish, H.V. Kaltenborn, Alexander Woollcott, Senator Elmer Thomas, Raymond Massey, Louis Adamic
Recurring Character(s):
Protagonist(s):
Author(s): William Foster May
Writer(s) Bernard Victor Dryer, Oscar Saul, Joseph Liss,
Arthur F. Hanna [Script Supervisor]
Music Direction:
Musical Theme(s):
Announcer(s):
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
26
Episodes in Circulation: 2
Total Episodes in Collection: 2
Provenances:
.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspaper listings.

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[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







Hidden History Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
41-05-11
--
--
41-05-11 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Poetry Pilgrimage (WENR): about Benjamin Franklin.

41-05-24 Gloversville Morning Herald - Sunday NBC Blue 1 P.M., Hidden History series, Lincoln at Gettysburg.
41-05-18
1
The Declaration Of Independence
N
41-05-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 12 m.--Hidden History (WENR): the Declaration of Independence.
41-05-25
2
Lincoln At Gettysburg
N
41-05-25 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m. An effort to sift the truth from scores of conflicting eyewitness accounts about what actually happened when Presdient Abraham Lincoln went to Gettysburg battlefield to deliver his famous address will be made on the Hidden History program over WENR at noon today.

41-06-01
3
The Diary Of Michael Shiner
N
41-06-01 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): story of pre-Civil war days in Washington dramatized from poetry of Michael Shiner, slave.

41-05-31 Schenectady Gazette - Sunday NBC-Blue--2 p.m., Hidden History, "Diary of Michael Shiner."
41-06-08
4
The Opening Of the Cherokee Strip
N
41-06-08 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): the story of Cherokee Strip in the Oklahoma dust bowl.
41-06-15
5
Coxey's Army
N
41-06-15 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): the semi-tragic, semi-comic story of Coxey's army.

41-06-14 Schenectady Gazette - Sunday NBC-Blue--2 p.m., Hidden History "Coxey's Army."
41-06-22
6
The Long Haul
N
41-06-22 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): Panama during the digging of the "Big Ditch."
41-06-29
7
Ghost Towns
N
41-06-29 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): the rebuilding of the dust bowls.
41-07-06
8
Follow the Drinking Gourd
Y
41-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): the story of the "Underground Railroad" of slavery days.
41-07-13
9
The Story Of An Immigrant
Y
41-07-13 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): Louis Adamic in "The Story of An Immigrant."
41-07-20
10
Carrie Nation and Her Hatchet
N
41-07-20 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): "Carrie Nation and Her Hatchet."
41-07-27
11
After the Chicago Fire
N
41-07-27 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): the Chicago fire.

41-07-26 Poughkeepsie New Yorker
PAGING MRS. O'LEARY . . . A story of America's great city of Chicago will serve as a message of courage to London, Madrid, Warsaw and the other of today's bombed cities on "Hidden History," tomorrow afternoon at 2 over WKIP. "After the Chicago Fire" will be the subject for dramatization. Speaking for Chicago, a voice will re-tell the story of the disaster of 1871 and how, with unquenchable determination, the people of Chicago built a greater and more prosperous city on the ruins of the old.
41-08-03
12
Rumors In War Time
N
41-08-03 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): a man who says he won the World war single handed.

41-07-31 Washington County Post
Can a single man be credited with winning the first World War for the Allies? Could it be possible that one man turned the tide of victory? The story of an unknown Englishman who claimed that distinction; who believed that it was he who broke the last German resistance in Flanders, will be told by H.V. Kaltenborn, veteran NBC news analyst, on "Hidden History", Sunday August 3, at 2:00 P.M. over WTRY in a dramatization titled "Rumors in War Time". Kaltenborn will also discuss the means of sifting rumor from fact during the turbulent days of war. He will tell the story of the false armistice reports in the World War and similar rumors in this war. "Hidden History", based on diaries, documents and personal letters in the Library of Congress, is presented by the NBC-Blue Network in collaboration with the Library.

41-08-10
13
The Story Of the Arkansas Traveler
N
41-08-10 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): "Story of the Arkansas Traveler."
41-08-17
14
A Day In the Life Of Dolly Madison
N
41-08-17 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): a day in the life of Dolly Madison.
41-08-24
15
Capt Ingraham's 1790 Voyage
N
41-08-24 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m..--Hidden History (WENR): Capt. Ingraham's globe-circling voyage of 1790.
41-08-31
16
Radio's Horse and Buggy Days
N
41-08-31 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): radio's "horse and buggy" days.
41-09-07
17
Seward's Folly
N
41-09-07 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): story of Secretary of State William Seward's oratory in putting through the Alaska purchase.

41-09-06 Poughkeepsie New Yorker - SEWARDS FOLLY . . . Some of America's most flowery political oratory was spouted by WILLIAM SEWARD, LINCOLN's secretary of state in order to "put over" the purchase of Alaska for "the staggering sum of $7,200,000," it will be shown during the "Hidden History" program at 2 tomorrow afternoon through WKIP.

41-09-14
18
The Legend Of the Bell Witch
N
41-09-14 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): "The Legend of the Bell Witch," the story of the haunting of a Tennessee mountain farmer.

41-09-13 Poughkeepsie New Yorker - SCARY STORY . . . As scary a ghost story as you're likely to hear in six states and seven counties will be told by "Hidden History" when it presents "The Legend of hte Bell Witch" over WKIP at 2 p.m. tomorrow. Taken from among the distinctive American folk tales collected by the Library of Congress and adapted for radio by BERNARD VICTOR DRYER, the story has overtones of homespun humor which only heightens its suspense.

41-09-21
19
Across the Nation By Rail
N
41-09-21 Wisconsin State Journal
12 p.m.--Hidden History (WENR): across the nation by rail in 1870.
41-09-28
20
Great American Fall Guys
N
41-09-27 Hagerstown Daily Mai
Sunday NBC-Blue--11:15 a.m. Hidden History, "Great American Fall Guys."
41-10-05
21
Carrie Nation and Her Hatchet
N
41-10-05 Wisconsin State Journal
10:15 a.m.--Hidden History (WENR): the emblem of Carrie Nation, prohibitionist--a hatchet.
41-10-12
22
Buffalo Bill Disremembers
N
41-10-12 Wisconsin State Journa
10:15 a.m.--Hidden History (WENR): "Buffalo Bill Disremembers."
41-10-19
23
Chief Little Turtle Gets Vaccinated
N
41-10-19 Wisconsin State Journal
10:15 NBC Hidden History

41-10-19 Bluefield Daily Telegraph
The almost-forgotten story of how Thomas Jefferson induced Chief Little Turtle to be vaccinated against smallpox so the latter's suffeing tribesmen might be encouraged to follow his example will for the climax of a "Hidden History" program to be presented over the NBC-Blue Network and WHIS today at 11:15 a.m., EST.
The drama, written by Bernard Victor Dryer and directed by Charles Warburton of the NBC Production Division, is based primarily on correspondence between President Jefferson and Benjamin Waterhouse, discoverer of the pinciple of vaccination.

41-10-26
24
The Long Haul
N
41-10-26 Salt Lake Tribune
9:15--NBC--Hidden History--"The Long Haul," a dramatization.

41-10-26 Anniston Star
"The Long Haul," a poignant story of the last day of the old Erie Canal, when the new fangled railroads were almost literally drying up "The Big Ditch," will be dramatized by "Hidden History" over hte Blue Network and WHMA today at 10:15 a.m. Based on eyewitness descripotions of trips on the canal, which are now on file at the Library of Congress, the story has been written by Bernard Victor Dryer and will be directed by Charles Warburton of the NBC Production Division. Music for the program will consist of canal boat tunes taken from the archive of American folk songs in the library and from the famous collection of Captain Pearl. R. Nye.

41-10-25 Lockport Union-Sun
"The Long Haul," a poignant story of hte last day of the old Erie canal, when the new-fangled railroads were almost literally drying up "the big ditch" will be dramatized by "Hidden History" on WHAM and N.B.C.- Blue at 11:15 tomorrow morning.

41-11-02
25
Title Unknown
Yankee Doodle Goes To Town
N
41-11-02 Wisconsin State Journal
10:15 NBC Hidden History
41-11-09
26
Parade of American Heroes
Yankee Doodle Goes To Town
N
41-11-09 Capital Times
Legendary Wisconsin Hero On Hidden History

HIDDEN HISTORY
A parade at American heroes, both real and legendary, will pass through the 26th and final Hidden History program presented by the Library of Congress, over WIBA at 10:15 a. m. today. Among them will be Paul Bunyan and Babe, the Blue Ox, telling how they used an iceberg to scoop cut the Mississippi river. Mike Fink, Ohio River keelboatman who made the sad mistake telling one tale too many, and Johnny Appleseed, who was real enough despite his peaked cardboard cap, coffee sack cloak and leather sack, as any resident of Ohio or Indiana n tell you.

41-11-09 Salt Lake Tribune
9:15--NBC--Hidden History--"Yankee Doodle Goes to Town."

41-11-09 Wisconsin State Journal
10:15 a.m.--Hidden History (WIBA): final program featuring told stories of American, from Paul Bunyan to Johnny Appleseed.

41-11-16
--
--
41-11-16 Portsmouth Daily Times
WJZ 10:15 Paul Laval Or.

41-11-16 Wisconsin State Journal
10:05 NBC Sunday Down South

41-11-16 Salt Lake Tribune
Sunday Novemer 16th
9:15--NBC--Hidden History--"Yankee Doodle Goes to Town."







Hidden History Radio Program Biographies




Archibald MacLeish
(Narrator)

Poet, Author, Historian, Librarian of Congress, Activist
(1892-1982)

Birthplace:
Glencoe, Illinois, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1937 Columbia Workshop
1937 Shakespeare Cycle
1939 President Franklin Roosevelt
1940 I'm An American
1941 The Free Comopany
1941 Dinner For Edward R. Murrow
1941 Hidden History
1942 This Is War
1942 Archibald MacLeish's Address To Radio Stations
1942 United China Relief
1945 Building the Peace
1945 American School Of the Air
1945 Freedom Forum
1946 Beyond Victory
1946 Operation Crossroads
1947 Hollywood Fights Back
1948 The Son Of Man
1950 Art Education and the Creative Process
1954 Anthology
1957 CBS Radio Workshop
1965 Some Friends Of Stevenson
1969 Man At the Moon
1974 NASA Audio News Features
1975 Earplay

Archibald MacLeish circa 1935
Archibald MacLeish circa 1935
From the April 21, 1982 edition of The New Mexican:
 
MacLeish:  Poet, statesman,
3-time Pulitzer winner is dead
 
     BOSTON (AP) -- Archibald MacLeish, a poet, statesman, librarian of Congress, winner of three Pulitzer Prizes and composer of verses hailing Americans and the "stars and expectations" that guide them, is dead at 89.
     MacLeish helped plan the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; he worked as a soldier, lawyer, editor, professor at Harvard, dramatist and farmer.  He condemned McCarthyism, urged writers to rally against facism, and explored theological questions in "J.B.," a play that won the Pulitzer Prize.
     "There are all sorts of things I want to do that I haven't been able to," he said in his last published interview, which appeared six months ago.
     MacLeish, who lived in Conway, Mass., and retired in 1970 as Boylston professor of literature at Harvard University, died Tuesday night in Massachusetts General Hospital, which he entered March 20 for treatment of an undisclosed illness.  The cause of his death was not announced.
     "Down to about two years ago, I was working my head in the usual way," MacLeish told the Greenfield (Mass.) Recorder in an interview published last November.  "But I had a little heart business.  I've been a lot slower."
     In 1939 he published "America Was Promises," a strong and explicit social statement.  He wrote:
     "Tom Paine Knew.
     "Tom Paine knew the People.
     "The promises were spoken to the People. 
     "History was voyages toward the People.
     "Americas were landfalls of the People.
     "Stars and expectations were the signals of the People."
     MacLeish exhibited his usual sharp opinions in the Recorder interview.  He said President Reagan was "going to begin to think God talks to him," and aimed a dart at rock 'n' roll.  "I'd like very much never to have to hear it again," he said.
     MacLeish won a wide audience and his first Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for  "Conquistador," a poem based on his trek by pack mule along the trail of the soldiers who conquered Mexico.
     His second Pulitzer came in 1953 for "Collected Poems 1917-1952."  "J.B.," which won the Pulitzer drama award in 1959, was a play in verse based on the Book of Job.
     He spent much of his life on his 200-acre Uphill Farm in Conway, a small town in the Berkshire Hills of western Massachusetts where he lived with Ada, his wife of 65 years.
     Born in Glencoe, Ill., on May 7, 1892, MacLeish graduated from Yale University, where he won a Phi Beta Kappa key, and received a law degree in 1919 at the head of his class at Harvard Law School.  His schooling was interrupted by World War I, and he served in the field artillery, first as a private, then as a captain.
     MacLeish was a writer and later an editor with Fortune magazine for nine years during the Depression.  During World War II, he directed the Office of Facts and Figures and was assistant director of its successor organization, the Office of War Information.
     MacLeish served as head of the Library of Congress for five years beginning in 1939, then became assistant secretary of state for cultural affairs.
     Among his many awards were the Antoinette Perry Award in drama in 1959, the Bollingen prize in poetry and the National Book Award for poetry in 1953.
     In addition to his wife, MacLeish is survived by a son, William H. of Woods Hole, Mass.; a daughter, Mary H. Grimm of Kensington, Md.; a sister, Ishbel Campbell of Geneva, N.Y.; nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.



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