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Original Helen Hayes Theatre header art

The Helen Hayes Theatre Radio Program

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Lipton Tea brought Helen Hayes back to the air as the sponsor of Helen Hayes Theatre
Lipton Tea brought Helen Hayes back to the air as the sponsor of Helen Hayes Theatre

Spot ad for premiere of Helen Hayes Theatre on Sept. 29th 1940
Spot ad for premiere of Helen Hayes Theatre on Sept. 29th 1940


January 31st 1940 Chula Vista spot ad for Helen Hayes Theatre
January 31st 1940 Chula Vista spot ad for Helen Hayes Theatre

41-03-29 Mason City Globe Spot ad
41-03-29 Mason City Globe Spot ad for Helen Hayes Theatre


 Spot ad for 1941 Fall Season Premiere of Helen Hayes Theatre on October. 5th 1941
Spot ad for 1941 Fall Season Premiere of Helen Hayes Theatre on October. 5th 1941

41-11-19 Lipton's spot ad
41-11-19 Lipton's spot ad for Helen Hayes Theatre

41-12-13 Tovarich News Item
There was a very good reason why the December 7th 1941 'Tovarich' episode never aired. But trooper that Helen Hayes was, she performed the play for her in-studio audience anyway. 'Tovarich ultimately aired the following Sunday, December 14th.


Background

From the September 20, 1940 edition of The Harrisburg Telegraph:

40-09-21 Announcement

      Among this fall's outstanding events will be the opening of the "Helen Hayes Theatre" on September 29 over CBS network, when the great Helen will be heard in the first of a series of Sunday night dramas, specially chosen for their suitability to her talents. Also shown above are Maestro Mark Warnow whose orchestra will provide the musical background, and Announcer Harry Von Zell, one of radio's best-known voices. A tremendous success in her co-starring appearances with Orson Welles last year on the same network, Miss Hayes return to the air by popular demand and with the announced intention of appearing in roles she has always wanted to play.

From the September 28, 1940 edition of The Mason City Globe Gazette:

Helen Hayes Theatre Opens Sunday
Mark Warnow's Band Will Join Helen Hayes

Harry Von Zell Announces as First
Program Airs Sunday Night at 9:30

Helen Hayes, "First Lady of the American Theater," comes to radio by popular demand when she brings her own ''Helen Hayes Theater" to the CBS audience, including KGLO, in the premiere presentation Sunday at 9:30 p. m.
   Every Sunday night thereafter Miss Hayes will be heard on KGLO from 9:30 to 10 o'clock under the sponsorship of Lipton's tea.
   Miss Hayes is to be starred in plays which give her full opportunity to portray characters she has always wanted to play. Dramatic material is to be drawn from originals, motion pictures, stage plays, magazine stories and best sellers.
   Mark Warnow's orchestra, which for years has been a Columbia network symbol for "tops" in music will be a feature of the new series. Harry Von Zell, one of radio's best-known voices, will be the program's announcer.
   The great star whose stage career reached a glorious moment with "Victoria Regina," and who was awarded the coveted Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science's Award for her performance in "The Sin of Madelon Claudet," won the acclaim of the nation's listeners in 1939-40.
     Miss Hayes is to be starred in "Victoria and Albert" as the premier vehicle for the new series Sunday evening.
    Perhaps no drama will have as dramatic a background as this play.
     In the selection of "Victoria and Albert," Miss Hayes' first offers to a coast-to-coast network audience, a portrayal which has brought her international fame--Queen Victoria.
     Secondly, "Victoria and Albert" is a dramatic composite of stories, plays and excerpts from the diary of the great British ruler.  To get permission for the use of much of this material, Miss Hayes had to have the consent of Laurence Housman, author of "The Golden Sovereign," and "Victoria Regina."
     A cable to London arrived at the height of the "Battle of Britain" and while an earnest and efficient messenger service sought Houseman amid the dust, din and destruction, production time fast was slipping away in America.
     At Miss Hayes' behest, CBS officials resorted to the shortwave radio and asked Columbia's London correspondent, Edward R. Murrow, to seek out Author Housman.
     The cable service and the Columbia staff of correspondents went out among the Londoners--seeking through air-raid shelters, all known haunts and all possible havens.
     Murrow came up with Harold Pinker, the author's agent.
     The cable service came up with a belated reply from the author.
     Two messages reached Miss Hayes in America granting her use of the source material on the life of the queen whose empire now is struggling for its existence.
     Thus went into production "Victoria and Albert."


From November 1st, 1940 edition of the Eugene Guard:

Lipton's Tea spot ad for Helen Hayes Theatre
Lipton's Tea spot ad for Helen Hayes Theatre

From November 14th, 1940 edition of the Boyden Reporter:

40-11-14 Boyden Reporter spot article

     Moments left to relax before the start of her demanding autumn season of work are few for Helen Hayes, shown here in the living room of her Victorian home in Nyack, N.Y.
     The petite "First Lady of the American Theatre" is soon to start her heaviest season.  It will embrace a Sunday night radio series, "The Helen Hayes Theatre," which starts over the Columbia Network on September 29, sponsored by Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., in behalf of Lipton's Tea, in addition to a legitimate stage engagement in "Twelfth Night".
     Material for her Sunday microphone series will be the star's own choosing, including her favorite stage roles and parts from other productions which she has always wanted to play.
     Radio is not a new medium to Miss Hayes, who is well remembered for her many guest star appearances on outstanding air shows.  However, this will mark the first time she has had her own radio theatre, in which she will be active both as star and producer.
     Miss Hayes began her professional career shortly before her fifth birthday.  At twelve she was playing with John Drew, and by the time she was nineteen, her own name was in lights on Broadway as a star.  "Coquette," "What Every Woman Knows" and her recent "Victoria Regina" are only three of the many plays that won for Miss Hayes the title of "First Lady of hte American Theatre."  Though motion pictures run third to the stage and radio in her affections, she scored in such films as "The Sin of Madelon Claudet" and "Farewell to Arms."
     With her radio theatre originating from New York, Miss Hayes will be able to rejoin her family and her husband, Charles MacArthur, the author, at their suburban home in Nyack after two seasons on the road.


From the January 10th 1942 edition of The Harrisburg Telegraph:

42-01-10 Harrisiburg Telegraph article

          Helen Hayes, star of her own radio theatre on WHP and the Columbia Network, takes time out from her duties as wife and mother in her Nyack, N.Y., home, to study the script for her next Sunday drama in the "Helen Hayes Theatre." Miss Hayes is the wife of the newspaperman - playwright Charles MacArthur. She chooses each play in her radio series and supervises casting and directing of each performance.


Series Derivatives:

None
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Dramas
Network(s): CBS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 40-09-29 01 Victoria and Albert
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 40-09-29 to 42-02-01; CBS [WABC]; Fifty-six, 30-minute programs;
Syndication: CBS; Young & Rubicam
Sponsors: Lipton Tea
Director(s): Helen Hayes [Producer]
Adrian Samish [Director]
Principal Actors: Herbert Rudley, Raymond Massey, Burgess Meredith, Brian Aherne, John Beal, Les Tremayne, Wally Maher, Paul Henreid, Leif Erickson, Harry von Zell, Martin Gabel, Henry Hull
Recurring Character(s):
Protagonist(s):
Author(s): Rose Wilder Lane, Booth Tarkington, Pearl S. Buck, Edith Wharton, Charles Klein, Eugene O'Neill, Clarence Dane, Ethel Lina White, Charlotte Bronte, Christopher Morley, Sir James Barrie, Frederick Lonsdale, Sinclair Lewis, Therese Lewis, Reginald Berkeley, Daniel Tohtheroh, George Brewer, Dorothy Brandon, Bertram Block, Relta Lambert, Robert Sherwood, Ernest Hemingway, Ben Hecht
Writer(s) John Houseman, Therese Lewis [Adapters]
Maxell Anderson
Music Direction: Mark Warnow
Musical Theme(s):
Announcer(s): Harry von Zell, George Bryan
Bill Adams [Commercial Spokesman]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
56
Episodes in Circulation: 4
Total Episodes in Collection: 4
Provenances:
Contributor Jerry Haendiges.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspaper listings.

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Helen Hayes Theatre Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
40-09-22
--
--
40-09-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 9:30--Bob Crosby Orch.--WBBM WCCO
40-09-29
1
Victoria and Albert
N
40-09-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): opens her series with "Victoria and Albert."

40-10-03 Bernardsville News - Since the inception of "The Helen Hayes Theatre" over the Columbia network, Miss Hayes and her staff have read sixty-one plays, twelve unpublished novels, eighteen original magazine stories and twenty-seven radio scripts. They've also screened nineteen pictures in their search for unique vehicles to use on the radio theatre.

40-09-20 Harrisburg Telegraph - Announcer Realizes Goal to Become Actor--Just as every comedian wants to be tragedian, every radio announcer wants to be an actor, and Harry von Zell will realize that ambition for he has been signed to act as well as announce on "The Helen Hayes Theatre" when the actress starts the new series over the WABC-Columbia Network, Sunday, September 29, at 8 p.m. Von Zell served as announcer for The First Lady of the Theatre during her two previous radio series. During the ensuing time Miss Hayes heard the rotund announcer do comedy roles in skits presented by "We, the People," Fred Allen, Stoopnagle and Budd, and Phil Baker. Convinced that Harry would make an excellent comedian in straight comedy-dramas, Miss Hayes requested that he be given a two-way contract for her own theatre of the air.

40-09-20 Harrisburg Telegraph - Writer Offers Original Play For Broadcast--Maxwell Anderson Submits One-Act Drama to Miss Hayes--Maxwell Anderson, noted playwright who wrote Helen Hayes' successful stage play, "Mary of Scotland," will write an original one-act drama for Miss Hayes' new radio series over the Columbia network, starting Sunday, September 29, at 8:00 p.m. Following the theory that successful theatre makes for successful radio, Miss Hayes prevailed upon Anderson to leave his usual medium of hte stage for once in order to write a special play adaptable to radio. Winner of hte Pulitzer prize for "Both Your Houses" and the Critics' prize for "Winterset," Anderson first won attention for his play, "What Price Glory." This was written in collaboration with Laurence Stallings. Some of Anderson's other hits include "Saturday's Children," "Elizabeth the Queen," Valley Forge," and "Knickerbocker Holiday." Along with original stories written by famed literary figures, The First Lady of the Theatre will present radio adaptations of her favorite motion pictures, plays, novel and magazine stories on "The Helen Hayes Theatre."

40-10-06
2
Love From A Stranger
N
40-10-06 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Radio Western (WBBM): "Love From a Stranger," a death-dodging heroine is tamed.

40-10-13
3
Farewell To Arms
N
40-10-13 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes in "There's Always Juliet." WBBM

40-10-13 New York Times
Play: "Farewell to Arms," With Helen Hayes--WABC 8-8:30.

40-10-12 Harrisburg Telegraph
"Farewell to Arms" Stars Helen Hayes--The poignant love story of "Farewell to Arms" is to be Helen Hayes' third starring vehicle on Sunday evening, in her own "Helen Hayes Theatre" over the Columbia Broadcasting System and WHP, 8 to 8:30 p.m. The "First Lady of the American Theatre" responds to the demands of thousands of fans in reenacting the role of the English nurse, Catharine Barkley, which she played with such outstanding success in the motion picture with Gary Cooper as her leading man. It is thus virtually a command performance for Miss Hayes. The radio adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's great story is the work of John Houseman, of Mercury Theatre fame, and it highlights the romance of the nurse and an American volunteer in the Italian ambulance corps during World War I. Battlefield scenes in the novel are to be subordinated to the gripping love story, building up to the moving tragic climax. Portions of the play relating to the war are to be interpreted by Mark Warnow and his orchestra rather than through dialogue. Harry von Zell is to set the various scenes for Miss Hayes as well as announcing the program.

40-10-20
4
There's Always Juliet
N
40-10-20 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m..--Helen Hayes (WMMB): in "There's Always Juliet."

40-10-20 New York Times
Helen Hayes in Play: "There's Always Juliet"--WABC, 8-8:30. 40-10-19 Elwood Call-Leader - Helen Hayes will present on the "Helen Hayes Theatre" this Sunday "There's Always Juliet." This long popular comedy was first enacted on the stage in 1931 by Herbert Marshall and Edna Best, and revived for radio in 1939 by the same team on "Hollywood Playhouse." It's at 9:30 over WFBM.

40-10-27
5
Let the Hurricane Roar
N
40-10-27 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): Rose Wilder Lane's "Let the Hurricane Roar," a pioneer novel.

40-11-03
6
Alice Adams
N
40-11-03 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): Booth Tarkington's "Alice Adams."

40-11-08 Harrisburg Telegraph
Charles MacArthur refuses to attend his distinguished wife's Sunday night broadcast. Instead, he listens to the Helen Hayes Theatre over the air the better to judge her performance, andoffer criticisms fro mthe standpoint of the listener.

40-11-10
7
Joan Of Arc
N
40-11-10 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Joan of Arc."

41-11-09 Harrisburg Telegraph
Helen Hayes Drama, 'Joan Of Arc,' Based on Facts--Helen Hayes stars in a part she has long wanted to play--Maid of Orleans in "Joan of Arc"--in the seventh presentation of the First Lady of the American Theatre in her own "Helen Hayes Theatre" on the Columbia Network and WHP on Sunday evening, 8:00 to 9:30 p.m. Nine microphones, four sound men, twelve actors and two assistant producers are to be employed by Adrian Samish, the director, in the difficult production task. The radio adaptation was written by John Houseman from original historical sources, including the records of the trial available in the French of Jules Quicherat and in the English of W. P. Barrett, both of which cast doubt upon the trial procedure. Miss Hayes is to deliver the same words spoken by the 19-year-old daughter of a Domremy farmer at her trial. Joan, born in 1412, heard "voices" at an early age and when she was 16, these "voices" urged her to aid the dauphin, Charles VII, then kept from the French throne by the English. Supplied with troops, she relieved Orleans and defeated the English at Patay. Joan stood beside the dauphin at his coronation. Miss Hayes' role also takes her into Joan of Arc's later life when she was tried for heresy and sorcery, condemned to life imprisonment and, finally, burned at the stake. Mark Warnow conducts the music and Harry von Zell is announcer.

40-11-17
8
Other Gods
N
40-11-17 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): in Pearl Buck's "Other Gods."

40-11-23 Harrisburg Telegraph
The Man Upstairs--For her leading man in the "Helen Hayes Theatre" production of "Other Gods" heard recently over the Columbia network, Miss Hayes chose young Lief (pronounced "life") Erickson. During rehearsal, Mr. Erickson developed a crick in his back from having to lean over to speak into Miss Hayes' microphone, so the engineer was finally forced to give him a mike of his own. Lief is over 6'5: tall, while Miss Hayes barely tops 5 feet.

40-11-24
9
Pride and Prejudice
N
40-11-24 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Pride and Prejudice."

40-12-01
10
The Outsider
N
40-12-01 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): the star as the crippled daughter of "The Outsider."

40-12-08
11
Michael and Mary
N
40-12-08 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): Raymond Massey takes the other lead role in A.A. Milne's "Michael and Mary."

40-12-15
12
Nine Pine Street
N
40-12-15 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): "Nine Pine Street," a murder mystery.

40-12-22
13
Can We Forget?
N
40-12-22 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): Burgess Meredith in "Can We Forget," a story of second marriage.

40-12-29
14
Mayerling
N
40-12-29 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): with Brian Aherns in "Mayerling."

41-01-05
15
Strange Victory
N
41-01-05 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): in "Strange Victory."

41-01-12
16
The Age Of Innocence
N
41-01-12 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): as Ellen Olenska in Edith Wharton's novel, "The Age of Innocence."

41-01-19
17
Within the Law
N
41-01-18 Wisconsin State Journal
Sunday
9:30--Helen Hayes WBBM WCCO KMOX

41-01-18 Connellsville Daily Courier - Sunday 8:00--Helen Hayes Theatre, Within the Law.

41-01-26
18
Bid For Happiness
N
41-01-25 Wisconsin State Journal
Sunday
9:30--Helen Hayes WBBM WCCO KMOX

41-01-26 New York Times - Helen Hayes in Play, "Bid for Happiness"--WABC, 8-8:30.

41-02-02
19
Distant Drums
N
41-02-02 Wisconsin State Journal
Sunday
9:30--Helen Hayes WBBM WCCO KMOX

41-02-02 New York Times - Helen Hayes in Play, "Distant Drums"--WABC, 8-8:30.

41-02-09
20
Third Degree
N
41-02-09 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): in Charles Klein's "Third Degree."

41-02-16
21
Another Language
N
41-02-16 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): with John Beal in "Another Language," marriage in an imaginative family.

41-02-23
22
Bachelor Mother
N
41-02-23 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): in the role of Ginger Rogers in "Bachelor Mother."

41-03-02
23
Prison Without Bars
N
41-03-02 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Prison Without Bars," a story of a matron of an English girls reformatory.

41-03-09
24
Comstock Queen
N
41-03-09 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Comstock Queen," the story of mining Nevada.

41-03-16
25
The Straw
N
41-03-16 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): Eugene O'Neill's emotional love story, "The Straw."

41-03-23
26
A Little Journey
N
41-03-23 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "A Little Journey," happiness discovered by work after life of luxury.

41-03-30
27
Stolen Life
N
41-03-30 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Stolen Life," the story of twins.

41-03-29 Harrisburg Telegraph - 'Stolen Life' Adapted By Helen Hayes--Helen Hayes plays an exacting dual role in a radio adaption of the English motion picture, "Stolen Life," in her own radio theatre on WHP and the Columbia network Sunday, 8 to 8:30. Miss Hayes' versatility is demonstrated in her portrayal of twin sisters, in which she brings to the characterizations a clear differentiation by means of her voice. This role was played by Elizabeth Bergner on the screen. Identical, the twins, Sylvina and Martina, are involved in a rather complicated love story which forms the basis of the drama. Martina meets and falls in love with a young man, Alan, but will not permit him to call on her at home. Meantime, Alan meets the other twin, Sylvina, who encourages his attentions and soon they are married. An original music score has been provided by Mark Warnow, conductor for the "Helen Hayes Theatre."

41-04-06
28
The Doctor Takes A Wife
N
41-04-06 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "The Doctor Takes a Wife," a romance.

41-04-13
29
A Bill Of Divorcement
N
41-04-13 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): Clarence Dane's "A Bill of Divorcement."

41-04-20
30
Manslaughter
N
41-04-20 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Manslaughter," the wealthy and justice.

41-04-27
31
The Lady With A Lamp
Y
[ WBBM Air Check]

41-04-27 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): as Florence Nightingale in "The Lady with a Lamp."

41-04-26 Harrisburg Telegraph
Helen Hayes as Florence Nightingale--Helen Hayes is to be heard in the role of Florence Nightingale, who was "lit up from within by a kind of radiance," when she stars in a radio adaption of Reginald Berkeley's play, The Lady With a Lamp," in the "Helen Hayes Theatre" on WHP and Columbia network Sunday 8 to 8:30 p.m. Miss Hayes, as the noted British nurse, feels she has a mission to improve nursing and hospital conditions and her spirit and determination win her the support of wealthy friends. Henry Tremaine is in love with her, but she puts her work ahead of her personal life and leaves to nurse the wounded in the Crimean War. Tremaine enlists and is wounded. The thread of the love story is woven with the highlights of Florence Nightingale's career. Miss Hayes personally chose this play and the role of Florence Nightingale because it fulfills her ambition to portray in drama the lives of the three women in history she most admires--Queen Victoria and Joan of Arc being the other two. Following the broadcast of the play, Miss Hayes is to be presented with a plaque by Movie-Radio Guide as radio's best actress inits 1941 Star of Stars Poll.

41-05-04
32
Some Must Watch
Y
41-05-04 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): in Ethel Lina White's "Some Must Watch," the story of prowlings, murders.

41-05-11
33
Dark Victory
N
41-05-11 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): six months to live in "Dark Victory."

41-05-10 Harrisburg Telegraph - 'Dark Victory' Is Sunday Hayes Play--Helen Hayes stars in one of the most stirring roles of her career when she portrays a girl who has only six months to live, in an adaptation of the play "Dark Victory" in her own radio theater over HP and the Columbia network Sunday, 8 to 8:30 p.m. Miss Hayes is to be heard as Judith Traherne, a wealthy and spirited girl. Judith had complained of severe headaches and her family doctor finally persuaded her to let him call in a specialist, Dr. Frederick Steele. Dr. Steele, young and brilliant, decides to operate when he finds Judith is suffering from a brain tumor. Theoperation is successful. Judith and Steele fall in love, but in the midst of their wedding plans, she learns she has only six months to live. She orders the doctor away, thinking that his love grew out of pity. She returns to her reckless friends, hoping to find happiness in her last days. But it doesn't work, and Judith returns to the doctor to await the end. The play was adapted for radio by Therese Lewis. It was taken from an original by George Brewer, Jr., and Bertram Block. Music for the "Helen Hayes Theatre" is directed by Mark Warnow.

41-05-18
34
The Late Christopher Bean
N
41-05-18 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "The Late Christopher Bean," the story of a maid-of-all-work.

41-05-25
35
Lady Of Letters
Y
[ Close truncated]

41-05-25 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Lady of Letters," author by proxy.

41-06-01
36
Farewell To Arms
N
41-06-01 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): repeats "Farewell to Arms."

41-06-08
37
To the Ladies
N
41-06-08 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "To the Ladies," the means to success.

41-06-15
38
Love Affair
N
41-06-15 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "Love Affair," a ship romance.

41-06-14 Harrisburg Telegraph - 'Love Affair' Is Sunday Hayes Show--"Love Affair," one of the most successful motion pictures in recent years, comes to the Helen Hayes Theatre in a special radio adaptation on Sunday, at 8 p.m., over WHP and the Columbia Network, with Miss Hayes in the starring role as Terry McKay. "Love Affair" is the story of a romance that begins on board a ship en route to New York from Rio de Janeiro. The film version co-starred Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer and was an outstanding entertainment and box-office success. Terry McKay, played by Miss Hayes, is a young New Yorker returning from Rio to marry her boxx. Michael Marney is returning for a similar reason--to marry a socially prominent and extremely wealthy New York debutante. In this manner he hopes to continue his career as a playboy who despises work.

41-06-22
39
Victoria and Albert
N
41-06-22 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): the concluding play of the series as Queen Victoria in "
Victoria and Albert."

41-06-29
--
--
41-06-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--CBS Workshop (WBBM): "Old Salt," the ancient mariner and his Paul Bunyan exploits.






41-09-28
--
--
41-09-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 9:30 Daron Elliott Orch.--WBBM

41-10-05
40
Jane Eyre
N
41-10-05 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre."

41-10-12
41
The Young In Heart
N
41-10-12 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): "The Young in Heart," the practical member in a family of irresponsibles.

41-10-19
42
Let the Hurricane Roar
Y
41-10-19 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): "Let the Hurricane Roar," an epic of western love.

Announces
Kitty Foyle as next
41-10-26
43
Kitty Foyle
N
41-10-26 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): in Christopher Morley's "Kitty Foyle."

41-10-25 Harrisburg Telegraph - Helen Hayes To Present "Kitty Foyle"--Helen Hayes will star in the title role of "Kitty Foyle" in a radio version of Christopher Morley's best-selling novel and the popular motion picture on the Helen Hayes Theatre Sunday, over WHP and the Columbia Network, at 8 p.m. The First Lady of hte Theatre will be heard in the role Ginger Rogers created on the screen. The story begins when Kitty Foyle is fifteen. Her family is poor and from the wrong side of the tracks. But Kitty manages to marry a rich young man, Wyn Strafford, whose socially prominent family causes her to get a divorce. Kitty moves to New York City and becomes a member of the vast army of "white collar workers". Here she meets Dr. Mark Eisen, a solid and reliable young man, and becomes engaged to him. Her former husband tries to induce Kitty to break the engagement and return to him. But Kitty realizes she will find real happiness with the steady young doctor and becomes his wife.

41-11-02
44
The Old Lady Shows Her Medals
N
41-11-02 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): in Sir James Barrie's "The Old Lady Shows Her Medals," adoption of a son for the army.

41-11-01 Harrisburg Telegraph - Helen Hayes Plays Role of "Mrs. Downey"--Helen Hayes has the leading role as the middle-aged charwoman, Mrs. Downey, in a radio adaptationof James M. Barrie's celebrated story, "The Old Lady Shows Her Medals," on the Helen Hayes Theatre, Sunday, 8:00 to 8:30 p.m., over WHP. Special permission was obtained from London by cable for production of the radio version of Barrie's story. This marks Miss Hayes' first appearance in the role of an older woman in the series of radio dramas inwhich she has starred. However, she made a spectacular success in such a role as the great queen in "Victoria Regina" on the stage. Mrs. Downey's regret during the first World War is that she has no son at the fighting front. But in a listing of membres of the Black Watch, she finds a soldier named Downey. She sends him presents and writes him letters. Later, home on leave, he objects to her deception but finally accepts it as an old woman's whim. The soldier returns to the front and is killed in action. Mrs. Downey is given the medals won by her "son" who, without her knowledge, has named her as his "next of kin." Scenes in the drama lead to a climax which only the author of such classics as "Peter Pan" and "The Admirable Crichton" could write. Mark Warnow directs the music.

41-11-09
45
The Last Of Mrs Cheyney
N
41-11-09 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): the society crook in Frederick Lonsdale's "The Last of Mrs. Cheyney.

41-11-16
46
Arrowsmith
N
41-11-16 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): Sinclair Lewis' "Arrowsmith."

41-11-23
47
This Is Our Destiny
N
41-11-23 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes Theater (WBBM): "This Is Our Destiny," a father waits for his daughter at 4 a.m.

41-11-22 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Hayes Stars in "This Is Our Destiny"--Helen Hayes is starred in her own radio production of a modern love story, "This Is Our Destiny," adapted from a magazine story titled "Deep Down Inside Me," in the Helen Hayes Theater over KGLO-CBS Sunday from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Miss Hayes had planned to use the magazine title for her radio version, but later decided upon "This Is Our Destiny." The story was written by Relta Lambert and was published in Good Housekeeping Magazine. The star is heard in the role of Mona, daughter of a strict father. Mona and a young man feet and fall in love at a cocktail bar. He escorts her home at 4 o'clock in the morning and finds her father waiting. Mona, not knowing her escort's name, is unable to introduce him to her father, and there is a scene in which the father is fatally stricken with apoplexy. Mona's stepmother blames her for the death and Mona is sent to the country. A doctor falls in love with her, but when she tells him that she still loves Tom, the man she met at the cocktail bar, but whose last name she does not know, he undertakes to help her find Tom. The search proceeds to a climax which gives Miss Hayes another dramatic opportunity.

41-11-30
48
A Star Is Born
N
41-11-30 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "A Star is Born" from rags to riches in Hollywood.

41-11-29 Harrisburg Telegraph - Helen Hayes Presents 'Star Is Born' as Sunday Drama--Helen Hayes plays the dramatic role of a movie-struck waitress who achieves screen stardom when she presents her radio version of the hit film, "A Star Is Born," on the Helen Hayes Theatre" Sunday, 8 to 8:30 p.m., over WHP. The film story, written by Ben Hecht, was adapted for radio by Therese Lewis. Miss Hayes is heard as Esther Blodgett, a small-town girl who goes to Hollywood for a movie career. While working as a waitress at a theatrical party, she attracts the attention of Norman Maine, film star. Norman arranges a screen test for Esther and soon they are co-starred. After a whirlwind courtship, they are married. Then Esther, known as Vicky Lester, soars to popularity while Norman's fame steadily fades. He takes to drink and gets into situatinos from which Esther is compelled to extricate him. Finally, Esther decides to give up her career and devote her entire time to Norman and help him regain his health. He overhears her discussing her plan and finds another solution of their troubles which brings the dramatic climax. Mark Warnow directs the musical backgrounds.

41-12-07
--
Pre-Empted
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41-12-07 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "
Tovarich," nobility after the war.

41-12-06 Harrisburg Telegraph - Helen Hayes stars in her own production of "Tovarich," a pre-war drama of intrigue, in her theatre of the air Sunday 8 to 8:30 p.m., over WHP. The play was adapted for radio performance from Robert Sherwood's drama. In the motion picture version, Claudette Colbert and Charles Boyer were co-starred, and it is the role created by Miss Colbert which Miss Hayes portrays in the radio production. In the story of "Tovarich," Tina and Michael are Russian exiles living a penurious life in Paris despite the fact they have a large sum of money. They are saving that money for the hoped-for day of their return to the Russia of the Imperial Court. The pair work as servants, resisting efforts of others to persuade them to turnovre their funds for various purposes. The play approaches its climax, however, when they make a deal under which they part with their wealth to save the great Dakoura oil fields for their beloved country.

41-12-14
49
Tovarich
N
41-12-14 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): the post-war story of Russian exiles in France, "
Tovarich."

41-12-13 Harrisburg Telegraph - WAR NEWS DELAYS "TOVARICH" DRAMA ONE WEEK--"Tovarich," which was scheduled for the "Helen Hayes Theater" last Sunday, is heard on Columbia network and WHP tomorrow with Helen Hayes in the leading role (8 to 8:30 P.M.) This is a "repeat" presentation of "Tovarich" for Helen Hayes, although not for the CBS network. She relinquished her air time Sunday, December 7, to allow war news to be broadcast, but, not wanting to disappoint the studio audiences, went through both the early and repeat broadcasts just as though they were being carried by the network.

41-12-21
50
The Lady With A Lamp
N
41-12-21 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): as Florence Nightingale in "The Lady With a Lamp."

41-12-28
51
The Lady Eve
N
41-12-28 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "The Lady Eve."

42-01-04
52
The Outsider
N
42-01-04 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 Helen Hayes--WBBM WCCO

42-01-04 New York Times
8:00-WABC--Play--The Outsider, With Helen Hayes

42-01-11
53
The Brave Die Once
N
42-01-11 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 Helen Hayes--WBBM WCCO

42-01-11 New York Times
8:00-WABC--Play--The Brave Die Once, With Helen Hayes

42-01-18
54
Accent On Youth
N
42-01-18 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 Helen Hayes--WBBM WCCO

42-01-18 New York Times - 8:00-WABC--Play--Accent on Youth, With Helen Hayes

42-01-25
55
Night Raid
N
42-01-25 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): in "Night Raid."

42-01-24 Harrisburg Telegraph - HELEN HAYES STARS IN HUSBAND'S STORY IDEA--Columbia's "Helen Hayes Theatre" for Sunday presents an original play written around a story idea conceived by Charles MacArthur, the famed playwright who is Miss Hayes' husband 8 to 8:30 p.m. over WHP. The play, "Night Raid," was written by Therese Lewis, story editor for the program, and offers Miss Hayes in the leading role.

42-02-01
56
What Every Woman Knows
N
42-02-01 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Helen Hayes (WBBM): "What Every Woman Knows."

42-02-08
--
--
42-02-08 Wisconsin State Journal - 9:30 They Live Forever WBBM WCCO






Helen Hayes Theatre Radio Program Biographies




Helen Hayes Brown
(Host--Narrator)

Stage, Screen, Television and Radio Actor
(1900-1993)

Birthplace: Washington, D.C., U.S.A.

Radiography:
1933 Fleischmann's Yeast Hour
1937 Monster Benefit For the American Red Cross
1937 NBC Presents Eugene O'Neill
1938 Rally For the National Foundation For Infantile Paralysis
1938 Silver Theater
1939 Campbell Playhouse
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 Cavalcade Of America
1940 Lux Radio Theatre
1940 Helen Hayes Theatre
1941 Young America Wants To Help
1942 Dear Adolph
1942 The March Of Time
1942 Treasury Star Parade
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1944 Something For the Girls
1945 Textron Theater
1946 Victory Clothing Collection
1946 Radio Reader's Digest
1946 Stars In the Afternoon
1946 These Are My People
1947 BOrn In A Merry Hour
1947 Theatre Guild On the Air
1948 Electric Theatre
1949 Voice Of the Army
1949 Ford Theatre
1950 You Can Be An Angel
1950 The Quick and the Dead
1951 I Took It Lying Down
1952 A Letter To Joan
1952 NBC Symphony Orchestra
1952 Best Plays
1953 This I Believe
1953 Medicine U.S.A.
1953 The Korea Story
1954 Anthology
1954 Hallmark Hall Of Fame
1954 Salute To Eugene O'Neil
1955 Biography In Sound
1955 The Tex and Jinx Show
1955 What Christmas Means To Me
1956 CBS Radio Workshop
1957 Recollections At Thirty
1959 Eleanor Roosevelt Diamond Jubilee
Adventures Of A Quarter
Helen Hayes with famed Stage actor William Gillette in 1918
Helen Hayes with famed Stage actor William Gillette in 1918

Helen Hayes circa 1928
Helen Hayes circa 1928

Helen Hayes with husband, playwright Charles MacArthur circa 1928
Helen Hayes with husband playwright Charles MacArthur circa 1928

Helen Hayes circa 1931
Helen Hayes circa 1931

Helen Hayes holding her first Oscar for The Sin of Madelon Claudet circa 1932
Helen Hayes holding her first Oscar for The Sin of Madelon Claudet circa 1932

Helen Hayes as a young Victoria Regina in the Hanna Theatre production of the same name (1937)
Helen Hayes as a young Victoria Regina in the Hanna Theatre production of the same name (1937)

Helen Hayes as an aged Victoria Regina in the Hanna Theatre production of the same name (1937)
Helen Hayes as an aged Victoria Regina in the Hanna Theatre production of the same name (1937)

Helen Hayes circa 1955
Helen Hayes circa 1955

Helen Hayes circa 1980
Helen Hayes circa 1980
From the September 18, 1993 Titusville Herald, Titusville, PA:

First Lady of the American Theater, Actress Helen Hayes, Dies at Age 92

     NYACK, N.Y. (AP) — Helen Hayes, who won the highest honors of stage, screen and television and was dubbed "First Lady of the American Theater," died Wednesday.  She was 92.
     Miss Hayes was brought to Nyack Hospital, in this New York suburb where she made her home, early last week suffering from congestive heart failure.  Her death was announced by hospital spokeswoman Nancy Kriz.
     Miss Hayes made her professional debut at age 5.  Her career spanned eight decades and roles ranged from Little Lord Fauntleroy to Queen Victoria to the cantankerous passenger in "Airport," for which she won an Oscar. 
     She received three Tonys and an Emmy as well as two Oscars, and in 1981 was awarded the Kennedy Center Honors for lifetime achievement.  In 1980, she was selected as one of 10 American artists to be commemorated on a gold medallion issued by the Treasury Department.
     Despite her size — she was 5 feet tall and weighed 100 pounds — she brought lofty command to historical roles, and she added grace and mischief to parts as ingénues and elderly sleuths.
     "Victoria Regina," in which Miss Hayes played 80 years of Queen Victoria's life in 2 1/2 hours, was among her greatest triumphs. It opened on Broadway in December 1935.  She starred in the role for 517 performances on Broadway, and played it more than 400 times more in a 1937-38 tour that grossed an unheard of $1.2 million at the box office.  "Even if you don't make it as an actor, it's an act of courage to try," she once said.
     Miss Hayes left the theater in 1971, after 66 years, because of allergies to dust that aggravated chronic bronchitis. But she always said the theater was still her first love.  "Sometimes the audience is annoying, sometimes they go to sleep and snore," she said. "But sometimes they're a true inspiration."
     "As a performer, I yearn for the personal connection with an audience, and the theater is the only place you can get it," she said.  After leaving the stage, she continued to work before the camera and was active in a number of causes, including the rights of the aged.
     She said she enjoyed old age, "the dividend, years," and joked that she expected to live to be 100.  "I came in with the century and I don't think it's polite to leave it without my escort," she said in 1987.
     Miss Hayes denied stardom meant greatness and poked fun at her fame. "When I get panicky at rehearsals," she said in 1966, "I reassure myself, 'No, they wouldn't dare fire me. It would be like spitting on the American Flag."'  Her first Tony Award came in 1947 for her performance in "Happy Birthday" and the second in 1958 for 'Time Remembered." The third, in 1980, was for lifetime achievement.
     Among other notable plays were "What Every Woman Knows" in 1926, "The Good Fairy" in 1931, "Mary of Scotland" in 1933, "Ladies and Gentlemen" in 1939, "Candle in the Wind" in 1941, 'The Wisteria Tree" in 1950 and "Mrs. McThine" in 1952.
     At age 55, she had a Broadway theater named for her, an honor accorded no other living actress except Ethel Barrymore. After a battle that went to the U.S. Supreme Court, the Helen Hayes was torn down in 1982 to make way for a hotel, but another theater was renamed in her honor.
     Miss Hayes made her first movie appearance, apart from an occasional silent film, in 1931 in 'The Sin of Madelon Claudet." The film, written by her husband, playwright Charles MacArthur, won Miss Hayes the Academy Award as best actress.  "Airport" won her a supporting actress Oscar in 1970.  She also appeared in "Arrowsmith," "A Farewell to Arms" and "Anastasia."  A television Emmy, in 1952, was for no specific performance, but followed a season in which she appeared in three live dramas on the "Schlitz Playhouse." In her 70s, she starred as a title character in the "Snoop Sisters" TV mysteries.  She also played the detective Miss Marple in TV movies in 1982 and 1983.
     The unlikeliest of her awards was a recording-industry Grammy in 1976 for a record on which she read the Bill of Rights. "Duller reading you never heard, but I was thrilled," she said. "I felt like a country and western singer."
     She was born Helen Hayes Brown on Oct. 10, 1900, in Washington, D.C., daughter of a wholesale butcher company manager, and was sent to dancing school to correct pigeon toes.  Lew Fields, a Broadway producer, saw her in a school play and told her mother to train her for the stage.
     In 1905, Miss Hayes debuted professionally as Prince Charles in a Washington stock company production of 'The Royal Family.'  A number of child roles followed in the capital before she made her Broadway bow at age 9 in Fields’ production of "Old Dutch."  Star billing came in 1920 in "Bab," subtitled 'The Sub-Deb." 
     She and MacArthur married in 1928, and the marriage lasted until his death in 1956. Miss Hayes insisted a responsibility of stardom was that "your personal life must be above reproach."  They had a daughter, Mary, in 1930. She died of polio at age 19, shortly before opening on Broadway in a play with her mother.  The couple also adopted a son, James, who became a movie and television actor known for his role in the 1970s detective series "Hawaii Five-0."  The family lived in Nyack, on the Hudson River 20 miles north of New York.


As is often the case, the above obituary failed to mention Helen Hayes' extraordinary Radio career. Contemporary journalists can, we suppose, be forgiven the oversight. But however the oversight occured, it doesn't discount Miss Hayes' extraordinary contributions to The Golden Age of Radio.

In addition to fifteen years of starring in her own radio programs between 1935 and 1950, Helen Hayes made frequent appearances in the finest, most prestigious dramatic programs of the era. Indeed, between 1933 and 1956 Helen Hayes made over 500 appearances over Radio. Given her extraordinary reputation, popularity and legendary acting talent, each of her appearances on Radio were met with considerable promotion and fanfare.

Among her many repeat performances over Radio, she compiled:

  • Four appearances on Silver Theatre
  • Eight appearances on Campbell's Playhouse
  • Seven appearances on Cavalcade of America
  • Six appearances on Hallmark Hall of Fame
  • Three appearances on Biography In Sound
  • Four appearances on Anthology

Her own drama anthologies over Radio comprised 240 appearances alone. She also appeared in all twelve episodes of the Orson Welles narrated Adventure of A Quarter, in addition to numerous other public service, war bond campaign and World War II patriotic anthologies.

The "First Lady of Theater" sobriquet was aptly applied to Helen Hayes throughout her long, highly productive, highly inspirational life. The sobriquet was as equally applied to her work on The Stage, the big screen, Television, and Radio. Her great legacy stands better represented over Radio than over any other medium she enhanced with her enormous talent and grace.

"We rely upon poets, the philosophers, and the playwrights to articulate what most of us can feel, in joy or sorrow. They illuminate the thoughts for which we only grope; they give us the strength and balm we cannot find in ourselves. Whenever I feel my courage wavering I rush to them. They give me the wisdom of acceptance, the will and resilience to push on."

"Every human being on this earth is born with a tragedy, and it isn't original sin. He's born with the tragedy that he has to grow up. That he has to leave the nest, the security, and go out to do battle. He has to lose everything that is lovely and fight for a new loveliness of his own making, and it's a tragedy. A lot of people don't have the courage to do it."

"Age is not important unless you're a cheese"
          ----- Helen Hayes




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