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Original Harry Lime header art

The Lives of Harry Lime Radio Program: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> The Lives of Harry Lime

Lives of Harry Lime mp3 cover art
Lives of Harry Lime mp3 cover art


Carol Reed and Orson Welles confer on location in Vienna over key scene from Reed's The Third Man from 1950.
Carol Reed and Orson Welles confer on location in Vienna over a key scene from Reed's The Third Man from 1949 (the photo credit says April 1950 which would be impossible since it premiered during Sept. 1949).

Carol Reed's 1949 project, The Third Man was adapted from a Grahame Greene story of the same name.  The movie spun off a wildly successful sound-track, a Film sequel starring Joseph Cotten, a successful Radio program starring Orson Welles, and a successful 5-season Television program starring Michael Rennie as Harry Lime.

Carol Reed's 1949 project, The Third Man:

  1. was adapted from a Graham Greene story of the same name
  2. spun off a wildly successful sound-track (it went 'Gold' in 3 months)
  3. spun off a Film sequel starring Joseph Cotten
  4. spun off a successful Radio program starring Orson Welles
  5. spun off a successful 5-season Television program starring Michael Rennie as Harry Lime.

Key Laundry Soap's The Lives of Harry Lime Spot Ad from Sep 22 1952
Key Laundry Soap's The Lives of Harry Lime Spot Ad from Sep 22 1952



The Lives of Harry Lime first aired complete over 'pirate' Radio station Radio Luxembourg circa 1950
The Lives of Harry Lime first aired complete over 'pirate' Radio station Radio Luxembourg circa 1950


Mutual Broadcasting System aired twenty-six of The Lives of Harry Lime

Canada's CBC aired all fifty-two installments of The Lives of Harry Lime over two overlapping seasons
Canada's CBC aired all fifty-two installments of The Lives of Harry Lime over two overlapping seasons

The classic Third Man 'reveal' shot from the 1949 Film
The classic Third Man 'reveal' shot from the 1949 Film

Orson Welles in a deservedly avuncular mood following the runaway success of The Third Man 1950
Orson Welles in a deservedly avuncular mood following the runaway success of The Third Man 1950

Background: Golden Age Radio's First 'Pre-quel'

Graham Greene's The Third Man was a fascinating study of post-World War II Vienna. Tracing the wake of the ebbs and flows of intrigue that coursed through the great city for well into The Cold War Years made for a very compelling yarn, though perhaps not Vienna's finest public relations moment. Alexander Korda optioned The Third Man for his studios and the project got the green light from David O. Selznick in 1948, at about the time that Orson Welles was enjoying one of several self-imposed exiles in Great Britain.

Released in September 1949, the film achieved both critical and popular acclaim, in spite of Orson Welles reputation as 'box-office poison' at that point in his career. Welles was already working on two other projects with British programming entrepreneur Harry Alan Towers, and the extraordinary success of The Third Man, The Third Man Theme and talk of a film sequel seemed to all point in the direction of a promising Radio version of The Third Man. But where to begin? The character Harry Lime was killed off in The Third Man.

Orson Welles' brilliant solution was to create an entire series of 'pre-quels' to The Third Man, all inevitably, inexorably leading up to Lime's ultimate fate in the sewers of Vienna. The film had already hinted at the apparent nine lives of the Harry Lime character, so it wasn't much of a stretch to extend that store of lives to fifty-one.

But how to make Harry Lime attractive enough to sustain 52 installments . . . Let's face it, Harry Lime was a slimeball. So in yet another inspired notion, Welles decided to go with Lime's disreputable character and play to it. Harry Lime becomes one of Radio's first successful anti-heroes. This was by no means a new direction for Welles himself. He loved writing for, directing and performing as an anti-hero. And had often done so already. But those were more subtle, more intellectual antiheroes. This would be a modern day antihero. A man with apparently no discernable socially or morally redeeming values whatsoever, no compunctions about lying, stealing, cheating or even murder, and yet a character capable of sustaining fifty-two compelling accounts of the adventures leading up to his ultimate demise.

Will the Real Harry Lime Please Stand Up . . . .

The background of The Lives of Harry Lime is completely interwoven with the period of Orson Welles' self-imposed exile in Great Britain, his desperate efforts to raise cash while in Europe, and the extraordinary evolution of The Third Man film itself. Indeed it's often quite difficult to separate Orson Welles from the Harry Lime character over the course of some three years that they were associated with each other.

Orson Welles had indeed become all but a scoundrel himself during the four years leading up to his extended stay in Great Britain and Europe. Even his most ardent, loyal fans and friends were left second-guessing as to what was happening to Stage, Radio and Film's boy genius. He'd had it all and lost it all, then repeated the cycle all over again. Each period of reckless abandon left even more personal and financial damage in its wake. Orson Welles, like the fabled cat with nine lives was becoming an awkward, real-life parody of the Harry Lime character he'd soon portray for three years in Film and Radio.

Welles' personal and financial dilemmas didn't escape the attention of Harry Alan Towers who likened himself as a self-styled "Orson Welles of Europe." While there's clearly no geniune point of comparison between the two, Orson Welles' untimely poor fortunes made him a ready target for Towers. Playing to both Welles' financial misfortunes as much as to Welles' need to innovate, Towers struck a devil's bargain with Welles to do three syndicated features for Towers of London: The Black Museum, The Lives of Harry Lime and a Sherlock Holmes production starring John Gielgud as Holmes and Ralph Richardson as Watson (Welles would direct, write, and perform in various roles, as well as in the recurring 'plum' role of Professor Moriarty.)

The Black Museum became a somewhat darker version of Towers' own Secrets of Scotland Yard which was still airing in many parts of the world even as The Black Museum was first broadcast. The Gielgud and Richardson send up of Sherlock Holmes was a natural point of interest for Welles and was clearly a project he could sink his teeth into.

But it was The Lives of Harry Lime that seems to have captured most of Welles' energy and time for well over three years in one form or another. Welles hadn't been David O. Selznick or Alexander Korda's first pick to portray Harry Lime. Selznick had wanted Cary Grant. It was the film's director, Carol Reed, that pressed for Orson Welles. Welles was ultimately offered a percentage of the profits from The Third Man, in lieu of a salary, but given Welles' dire financial straits at the time, he took the short money instead.

Virtually parodying his own deteriorating reputation at the time, Welles proved both elusive and obstinate on location, often disappearing for a week at a time while filming in Europe, and steadfastly refusing all location work involving sewers. He variously claimed to have written all of Harry Lime's dialogue, while at other times attributing the dialogue to Grahame Greene's brilliant screenplay. Quixotic and unpredictable, Welles' growing notoriety wasn't particularly well served by his continued shenanigans during The Third Man.

Ironically, by the time that The Lives of Harry Lime was being recorded in London's IBC Studios, Orson Welles seems to have felt far more comfortable with the character. The ironic titles, dialogue and twisty plots all bore the Welles genius and sparkle that his staunchest defenders continued to praise, despite Welles' roller-coaster career. Indeed, one very much senses in most of the Harry Lime installments that Welles revels in the very scoundrel-like nature of his protagonist.

The blurring of Orson Welles' real personality with his temporary alter-ego, Harry Lime, was not only a somewhat romantic notion but as much life imitating art in some respects. As a practical, historical fact, Orson Welles often simply ran away from obligations, commitments and 'the business of Hollywood' perhaps simply to reassert his own boyish wanderlust. Those assessments remain for others to make. But the similarities between the character, Harry Lime, and the artist, Orson Welles, remain as intriguing as they are informative.

The Lives of Harry Lime: The Man You Hate to Love

Granted, Harry Lime is a scoundrel of the most predictably ruthless stripe. And yet, he's one of those shameless curs that you simply can't stop learning more about. It's the perverse quality of the manner in which Welles frames his protagonist that makes any sympathy directed toward Lime and his fifty-two criminal adventures completely illogical.

The other obvious irony here is that it's the Harry Lime character that captured the focus of virtually everyone's attention in the Film version of The Third Man. And again, that's utterly counter-intuitive. By all human logic it's Joseph Cotten and his Holly Martins character that merits our sympathy. But instead of rooting for Martins and his quest to find his friend, it's Harry Lime that most viewers can't stop obsessing about. This point was clearly not lost on Orson Welles.

The anti-hero has been the elusive holy grail of sorts for many famous writers, dating as far back as the Greek Classics. Indeed the definition of what constitutes an anti-hero is equally elusive. At what point does an inveterate scoundrel become an anti-hero? Is it a question of continued exposure and character development? Or simply a subjective matter of individual taste.

Having repeatedly listened to all of the available examples of The Lives of Harry Lime we're still hard pressed to actually like or admire Harry Lime. And yet one can't help but marvel at his apparent utter absence of any moral compass. He's an self-admitted, unrepentant scoundrel, but as in the oft-repeated example of a train-wreck, despite the inevitable outcome one simply can't pry one's eyes off of it.

In retrospect, one is hard pressed to imagine anyone but Orson Welles that could have pulled this off. Perhaps it's simply the occasional parallels between Welles' own personal history and that of his Harry Lime character. The comparisons between Welles' own life-long wanderlust and that of his protagonist are inescapable. As are the resilience and indomitable personality of both Welles and the Harry Lime character.

In the final analysis it's precisely Welles' disdain for what one might think of either Harry Lime or Welles himself that answers any of the rhetorical questions posed above. Harry Lime, whatever his personal shortcomings, is a compelling character. As was Welles. Indeed they both continue to be just as fascinating in death as in life. That's a direct reflection on both Welles' genius and Welles' force of personality. Both Welles and his fictional anti-hero(es) lived their lives for themselves and their own selfish personal interests. The extent to which their lives benefited others' was simply serendipity. And indeed Welles contributions to virtually all of his endeavors stand on their own merit. Welles' legendary personal philanthropy and largesse famously waxed and waned with his own personal fortunes. But in the final analysis he was as unrepentant as many of the brilliant arch-scoundrels he apparently loved to portray.

It's a given that every living soul, irrespective of their spirituality, knows that a day of reckoning is inevitable. To the degree to which they've lived an unrepentant life they'll either accept or reject their ultimate moment of reckoning. Given that admittedly narrow point of comparison, it's safe to say that Harry Lime would almost certainly have accepted his day of reckoning as willingly as one expects that Orson Welles must have.

The Lives of Harry Lime remains a compelling series of yarns that, like popcorn, draws you back for more and more, one kernel--or episode--at a time.

Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies

Series Derivatives:

The Third Man
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Adventure Dramas
Network(s): Radio Luxembourg; MBS; ABC; CBC; WRVR-FM
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): 51-06-xx 00 Ticket to Tangier [Possible audition]
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): Radio Luxembourg Run: ~51-08-03 01 Too Many Crooks
1952 MBS Run: 51-12-05 01 Unknown
1952 CBC Run: 52-09-03 01 Unknown
1976 WRVR-FM Rebroadcasts: 75-02-05 22 Cherchez La Gem
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): Radio Luxembourg Run: ~51-08-03 to ~52-07-25; Radio Luxembourg; Fifty-two, 30 minute episodes; Fridays
1952 MBS Run: 51-12-05 01 to 52-05-21; MBS; Twenty-five, 30 minute episodes; Wednesdays
1952 CBC Run: 52-09-03 to 54-11-05; CJOB; Two seasons of Fifty-two, 30 minute episodes; Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m. then 7:30 p.m.
1976 WRVR-FM Rebroadcasts: 75-02-05 to 75-09-09; WRVR-FM; Wednesdays
Syndication: Towers of London; Lang-Worth
Sponsors: Hemlock Farms; Key Soap of Kingston
Director(s): Orson Welles and Tig Roe; Harry Alan Towers [Producer]; Graham Greene [Creator]
Principal Actors: Cecile Chevreaux, Sebastian Cabot, Keith Pious, Robert Reardsy, Diana Foster, Frances Hyland, Suzanne Cloutier
Recurring Character(s): Varied by production.
Protagonist(s): Varied by production.
Author(s): Graham Greene [Creator]
Writer(s) Orson Welles; Graham Greene [Creator]
Music Direction: Sidney Torch [Composer/Conductor]; Anton Karas [Zither]
Musical Theme(s): "The Harry Lime Theme" also composed as "The 3rd Man Theme", Anton Karas with lyrics by Walter Lord
Announcer(s): Orson Welles [Host/Narrator]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
52
Episodes in Circulation: 51
Total Episodes in Collection: 52
Provenances: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

As usual, the RadioGOLDINdex was the most helpful published provenance, along with the newspaper radio listings broadcasts of The Lives of Harry Lime.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

As usual, we find that almost half of the circulating exemplars of The Lives of Harry Lime have been ridiculously adulterated by artificial 'stereoization.' Needless to say, The Lives of Harry Lime never--ever--aired in stereo. Anyone encoding The Lives of Harry Lime in bogus stereo is simply a charlatan. Buyer Beware.

The circulating 'audition' recording, "Ticket to Tangier": We cannot as yet confirm the integrity of the alleged 'audition.' It's conceivable that Harry Alan Towers provided such a device to promote the series after its Luxembourg run. We're unaware of any other series' for which Towers made an 'audition' recording available. When we know more we'll post it here.

It would appear that the RadioGOLDINdex has the only first person, publicly accessible collection of The Lives of Harry Lime E.T.s from which to draw provenances. Given the exceptional integrity of that resource, we have no reason to doubt its representations. We've filled in the two missing titles for their log simply to allow a cross-reference to our own newspaper-logged research results.

Note that the entire run was broadcast as least twice over The CBC. There's bound to be even further archival sources of either recorded from air recordings or perhaps even original E.T.s from those runs. The currently circulating exemplars are of satisfactory fidelity to enjoy all of the surviving episodes fully.


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[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







The Lives of Harry Lime Radio Program Log: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies

The Lives of Harry Lime Radio logged over the Mutual Broadcasting System

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
51-06-02
--
--
N
51-06-02 Blytheville Courier News - Orson Welles will star in a half-hour radio series titled, "The Lives of Harry Lime," based on the character n "The Third Man." Harry, apparently, had nine of 'em--he died in the final reel of the film.
51-09-19 Daily Oklahoman - Next month Orson Welles Will be heard on the airwaves here in his "Third Man" character. "The Lives of Harry Lime." The transcribed program is produced by Harry Alan Towers, the 29-year-old British Impresario who delights in being billed as "the Orson Welles of Europe."
51-09-19 Post Standard
Radio has lined up Orson Welles for a series based on "The Third Man," called "The Lives of Harry Lime." Welles is writing and directing ost of the shows, which are now being aired over BBC, broadcast in Australia, New Zealand, parts of Germany, and will soon be heard in French and Italian as well as in Dutch. It's due to debut early next month.

51-10-07 Cedar Rapids Gazette - Orson Welles has transcribed a series, "The Lives of Harry Lime" (the "Third Man", remember?).
It is being carried by the BBC, is set for airing in the United States soon.
51-12-05
1
Title Unknown
N
51-12-05 Daily News
WJZ 9:00 p.m. Lives of Harry Lime, Orson Welles
51-12-12
2
Title Unknown
N
51-12-12 Daily News
WJZ 9:00 p.m. Lives of Harry Lime, Orson Welles
51-12-19
3
Title Unknown
N
51-12-19 Daily News
WJZ 9:00 p.m. Lives of Harry Lime, Orson Welles
51-12-26
4
Title Unknown
N
51-12-26 Daily News
WJZ 9:00 p.m. Lives of Harry Lime, Orson Welles
52-01-02
5
Title Unknown
N
52-01-02 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-01-09
6
Title Unknown
N
52-01-09 Derrick
9:00 Lives of Harry Lime
52-01-16
7
Title Unknown
N
52-01-16 Derrick
9:00 Lives of Harry Lime
52-01-23
8
Title Unknown
N
52-01-23 Derrick
9:00 Lives of Harry Lime
52-01-30
9
Title Unknown
N
52-01-30 Derrick
9:00 Lives of Harry Lime
52-02-06
10
Title Unknown
N
52-02-06 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-02-13
11
Title Unknown
N
52-02-13 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-02-20
12
Title Unknown
N
52-02-20 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-02-27
13
Title Unknown
N
52-02-27 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-03-05
14
Title Unknown
N
52-02-05 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-03-12
15
Title Unknown
N
52-03-12 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-03-19
16
Title Unknown
N
52-03-19 Daily News
WJZ 9:00 p.m. Lives of Harry Lime, Orson Welles
52-03-26
17
Title Unknown
N
52-03-26 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-04-02
18
Title Unknown
N
52-04-02 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-04-09
19
Title Unknown
N
52-04-09 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-04-16
20
Title Unknown
N
52-04-16 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-04-23
21
Title Unknown
N
52-04-24 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-04-30
22
Title Unknown
N
52-04-30 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-05-07
23
Title Unknown
N
52-05-07 Daily News - WJZ 9:00 p.m. Lives of Harry Lime, Orson Welles
52-05-14
24
Title Unknown
N
52-05-14 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-05-21
25
Title Unknown
N
52-05-21 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. The Lives of Harry Lime
52-05-28
-- [Replaced for the Summer by Mr. President, but didn't return in the Fall]

52-05-28 Berkshire Evening Eagle
WJZ 9:00 p.m. Mr President





The Lives of Harry Lime Radio Program Logs

The Lives of Harry Lime Radio CBC Radio Station CKRC Run

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
52-09-03
1
Title Unknown
N
52-09-03 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime starring Orson Welles, one of radio's most sensational personalities, will be heard on CJOB at S.30 p.m. The supporting cast includes Diana Foster and Frances Hyland, star of the London production of A Streetcar Named Desire.
52-09-10
2
Title Unknown
N
52-09-10 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime starring Orson Welles, will be heard on CJOB at 9.30 p.m.
52-09-17
3
Three Farthings for Your Thoughts
N
52-09-17 Winnipeg Free Press
This week's story In the Lives of Harry Lime series starring Orson Welles,
takes place in Liverpool and concerns three farthings that are the clue to a fortune. Zither music for this program, to be heard at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB, is written and played by Anton Karas, creator ot the Third Man Theme.
52-09-24
4
Rogue's Holiday
N
52-09-24 Winnipeg Free Press
Rogue's Holiday is the title of this week's adventure in The Lives of Harry Lime on CJOB at 9.30 p.m. Orson Wells is starred in the role he made famous in the motion picture, The Third Man.
52-10-01
5
Work of Art
N
52-10-01 Winnipeg Free Press
On CJOB at 9.30 p.m. it's adventure time again as the Third Man — Harry Lime — tells the story of
Work of Art. As usual, Orson Welles is in the title role.
52-10-08
6
Operation Music Box
N
52-10-08 Winnipeg Free Press
This week's adventure in the Lives of Harry Lime, heard at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB, is called
Operation Music Box.
52-10-15
7
Title Unknown
N
52-10-15 Winnipeg Free Press
On CJOB at 9.30 p.m. Orson Welles will be heard in the Lives of Harry Lime.
52-10-22
8
Title Unknown
N
52-10-22 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime, starring Orson Wells is heard at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB.
52-10-29
9
Art is Long and Lime ls Fleeting
N
52-10-29 Winnipeg Free Press
This week's Lives of Harry Lime adventure is called
Art is Long and Lime ls Fleeting. Orson Welles appears as usual in the title role, on CJOB at 9:30 p.m.
52-11-05
10
In Pursuit of A Ghost
N
52-11-05 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 p.m. this week's Lives of Harry Lime on CJOB is called
In Pursuit of a Ghost, and stars Orson Welles.
52-11-12
11
Man of Mystery
N
[Many circulating exemplars are truncated--and artificially stereoized--to 20 minutes]

52-11-19
12
An Old Moorish Custom
N
52-11-19 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 p.m. this week's adventure in the Lives of Harry Lime on CJOB is entitled
An Old Moorish Custom. Orson Wells plays the Third Man.
52-11-26
13
Cherchez La Gem
N
52-11-26 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 a.m. Orson Welles stars In
Cherchez La Gem on The Lives of Harry Lime over CJOB.
52-12-03
14
Hands of Glory
N
52-12-03 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles stars at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB in another Lives of Harry Lime Adventure. This week's program is called
Hands of Glory.
52-12-10
15
Double Double Trouble
N
52-12-10 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles stars at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB in another Lives of Harry Lime adventure. This week's story is
The Double Double Trouble.
52-12-17
16
Horse Play
Y
52-12-17 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles appears asthe Third Man at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB when The Lives of Harry Lime presents A story entitled
Horse Play.
52-12-24
17
Title Unknown
N
52-12-31
18
Title Unknown
N
52-12-31 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles appears as the Third Man this evening at 7.30 aver
CJOB in The Adventures of Harry
Lime.
53-01-07
19
Title Unknown
Y
53-01-07 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles appears as the Third Man this evening at 7.30 over CJOB in The Adventures of Harry Lime.
53-01-14
20
Three Farthings For Your Thoughts
Y
53-01-14 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime starring Orson Welles as the third man in a story called
Three Farthings For Your Thoughts is heard at 9.30 on CKRC Alan
p.m. on CJOB.
53-01-21
21
Dark Enchantress
Y
53-01-21 Winnipeg Free Press
THIRD MAN
Dark Enchantress is the title of
this week's Lives of Harry Lime
adventure, starring Orson Welles
as the Third Man at 9.30 p.m. on
CJOB.
53-01-28
22
Earl On Troubled Waters
Y
53-01-28 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles stars in The Lives
of Harry Lime at 9.30 p.m. on
CJOB. The title of this week's story
is
Earl on Troubled Waters.
53-02-04
23
The Knockout
Y
53-02-04 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harr.y Lime, starring Orson Welles, at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB, will present a story entitled
The Knockout
53-02-11
24
Two Is Company
Y
53-02-11 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles appears in another Lives of Harry Lime adventure
at 9,30 p.m. over CJOB. This week's story is called
Two is Company.
53-02-18
25
The Dead Candidate
Y
53-02-18 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 p.m. on CJOB, Orson
Welles appears in another Lives of
Harry Lime adventure —
the Dead Candidate.
53-02-25
26
It's In The Bag
Y
53-02-25 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles stars at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB in another story in The Lives of .Harry Lime. This week's adventure is called
It's in the Bag
53-03-04
27
Hyacinth Patrol
Y
53-03-04 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles stars in
Hyacinth Patrol on The Lives of Harry
Lime at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB.
53-03-11
28
Title Unknown
Y
53-03-18
29
Title Unknown
N
53-03-18 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles appears as the Third Man at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB
53-03-25
30
Faith, Lime and Charity
N
53-03-25 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles stars as the Third
Man at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB when
The Lives of Harry Lime presents
a story called
Faith, Lime and Charity.
53-04-01
31
Pleasure Before Business
N
53-04-01 Winnipeg Free Press
THE THIRD MAN
The Lives of Harry Lime, heard at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB, will feature Orson Welles as the Third Man in a story called
Pleasure Before Business.
53-04-08
32
Fool's Gold
N
53-04-08 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 p.m. over CJOB, Orson Wells will star in another Lives or Harry Lime adventure. This week's story is called
Fool's'Gold.
53-04-15
33
Title Unknown
N
53-04-22
34
The Painted Smile
N
53-04-22 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30-p.m. over CJOB, Orson Welles will be featured In a story called
The Painted Smile on The Lives of Harry Lime.
53-04-29
35
The Circus
N
53-04-29 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 pm. over CJOB, Orson Welles will star as The Third Man when The Lives of Harry Lime presents a story called
The Circus.
53-05-06
36
Susie's Cue
N
53-05-06 Winnipeg Free Press
9-30 p.m. over CJOB, will present Orson Welles in an adventure entitled
Susie's Cue.
53-05-13
37
Vive le Chance
N
53-05-20
38
The Elusive Vermeer
N
53-05-27
39
Murder On The Riviera
N
53-05-27 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 p.m. over CJOB, Orson Welles is heard in a Lives of Harry Lime adventure entitled
Murder on the Riviera!
53-06-03
40
Title Unknown
N
53-06-10
41
A Night In A Harem 53-06-10 Winnipeg Free Press
At 9.30 p.m. over CJOB, Orson] Welles is heard in a Lives Harry Lime adventure entitled
A Night In A Harem
53-09-16
42
Clay Pigeon 53-09-16 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of ;Harry Lime, starring Orson Welles is back on the air at 9.30 p.m. on CJOB. The first show in the series is called
Clay Pigeon.
53-09-23
43
Ticket to Tangier 53-09-23 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime will follow at .30 p.m., starring Orson Welles as the suave hero in
A Ticket to Tangier.
53-09-30
44
Voodoo [Many circulating exemplars are truncated--and artificially stereoized--to 19 minutes; Contrary to the following announcement, the episode is set in Haiti, not Tahiti]

53-09-30 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime, starring Orson Welles, will present
an adventure on the island of Tahiti entitled Voodoo, at 9.30 p.m., Wednesday
on CJOB.
53-10-07
45
The Bohemian Star 53-10-07 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime will present
a story concerning a royal diamond, entitled The Bohemian Star, at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB.
53-10-14
46
Paris Is Not The Same 53-10-14 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles will appear in another Lives Of Harry Lime adventure, entitled
Paris Is Not The Same, heard at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB.
53-10-21
47
Honeymoon 53-10-21 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime, starring Orson Welles, will tell
the story of a Sicilian bandit and a countess at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB.
53-10-28
48
The Blue Caribou 53-10-21 Winnipeg Free Press
A mountain top in Italy sets the scene for adventure in The Lives of Harry Lime, starring Orson Welles, to be heard at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB.
53-11-04
49
Greek Meets Greek 53-11-04 Winnipeg Free Press
The Lives of Harry Lime, heard at 9:30 p.m. over CJOB, will feature Orson Welles in an adventure in politics and the measles, entitled
Greek Meets Greek.
53-11-11
50
Title Unknown
53-11-18
51
Murder Is A Nasty Business 53-11-18 Winnipeg Free Press
Orson Welles as the Third Man in a Lives Of Harry Lime Adventure, inherits an odd legacy in
Murder Is A Nasty Business, at 9.30 p.m. over CJOB.
53-11-25
52
Title Unknown 53-11-25 Winnipeg Free Press
The shores of the Mediterranean will set the scene for adventure on The lives of Harry Lime, heard at 9:30 p.m. over CJOB.
54-09-17
1
Love Affair 53-11-25 Winnipeg Free Press
The first, .program in CKY's new mystery series. The Lives of Hnrry Lime, starring Orson Wells, will be broadcast at 9 p rn Tonight's story will be
Love Affair.
54-11-05
2
The Mexican Hat Trick 54-11-05 Winnipeg Free Press
The Mexican Hat Trick a story of a disappearance act, provides a vehicle for Orson Welles." as. the Third Man, b'n the Harry Lime series at 9 p.m. on CKY.





The Lives of Harry Lime Radio Program Logs

The Lives of Harry Lime Radio Luxembourg Run [from the RadioGOLDINdex]

All rights reserved by their respective parties. This list Copyright 2009 J. David Goldin
Date E.T. No. Title Avail. Notes
51-08-03
1
Too Many Crooks We include this list as a comparison point only. These dates are not our research product, nor can we attest to the E.T. Number recorded from each of these source recordings. We would also stipulate that we customarily find Mr. Goldin's recorded notes and annotations to be scrupulously faithful to their original source.
51-08-10
2
See Naples and Live
51-08-17
3
Clay Pigeon
51-08-24
4
Ticket To Tangier
A Ticket to Tangier
51-08-31
5
Voodoo [Many circulating exemplars are truncated--and artificially stereoized--to 19 minutes]

51-09-07
6
The Bohemian Star
51-09-14
7
Love Affair
51-09-21
8
Rogue's Holiday
51-09-28
9
Work Of Art
51-10-05
10
Operation Music Box
51-10-12
11
The Golden Fleece
51-10-19
12
Blue Bride
51-10-26
13
Every Frame Has A Silver Lining
51-11-02
14
The Mexican Hat Trick
51-11-09
15
Art Is Long and Lime Is Fleeting
51-11-16
16
In Pursuit Of A Ghost
51-11-23
17
Horse Play
51-11-30
18
Three Farthings For Your Thoughts
51-12-07
19
The Third Woman
51-12-14
20
An Old Moorish Custom
51-12-21
21
It's A Knockout
51-12-28
22
Two Is Company
52-01-04
23
Cherchez La Gem
52-01-11
24
The Hand Of Glory [Was listed as Fool's Gold]
52-01-18
25
Double Double-Cross [Was listed without a title]
52-01-25
26
Five-Thousand Pengos and A Kiss
52-02-01
27
The Dark Enchantress
52-02-08
28
The Earl On Troubled Waters
52-02-15
29
The Dead Candidate
52-02-22
30
It's In the Bag
52-02-29
31
Hyacinth Patrol
52-03-07
32
Turnabout Is Fair Play
52-03-14
33
Violets, Sweet Violets
52-03-21
34
Faith, Lime and Charity
52-03-28
35
Pleasure Before Business
52-04-04
36
Fool's Gold
52-04-11
37
Man of Mystery [Many circulating exemplars are truncated--and artificially stereoized--to 20 minutes]

52-04-18
38
The Painted Smile
52-04-25
39
Harry Lime Joins the Circus
52-05-02
40
Suzie's Cue
52-05-09
41
Vive le Chance
52-05-16
42
The Elusive Vermeer
52-05-23
43
Murder On the Riviera
52-05-30
44
The Pearls of Bohemia
52-06-06
45
A Night In A Harem
52-06-13
46
Blackmail Is A Nasty Word
52-06-20
47
The Professor Regrets
52-06-27
48
The Hard Way
52-07-04
49
Paris Is Not the Same
52-07-11
50
Honeymoon
52-07-18
51
The Blue Caribou
52-07-25
52
Greek Meets Greek





The Lives of Harry Lime Radio Program Logs

The Lives of Harry Lime WRVR-FM 1975 Rebroadcasts [from RadioGOLDINdex]

All rights reserved by their respective parties. This list Copyright 2009 J. David Goldin
Date E.T. No. Title Avail. Notes
75-02-05
23
Cherchez La Gem
N
We include this list as a comparison point only. These dates are not our research product, nor can we attest to the E.T. Number recorded from each of these source recordings. We would also stipulate that we customarily find Mr. Goldin's recorded notes and annotations to be scrupulously faithful to their original source.
75-02-12
24
Fool's Gold
N
[Should be Hand of Glory]
75-02-18
25
Unknown
N
[Should be Double Double-Cross]
75-03-18
27
The Dark Enchantress
N
75-04-08
32
Turnabout Is Fair Play
N
75-04-15
31
Hyacinth Patrol
N
75-04-22
28
The Earl On Troubled Waters
N
75-04-29
33
Violets, Sweet Violets
N
75-05-06
34
Faith, Lime and Charity
N
75-05-13
35
Pleasure Before Business
N
75-05-20
36
Fool's Gold
N
75-06-08
43
Murder On the Riviera
N
75-07-15
44
The Pearls of Bohemia
N
75-07-22
45
A Night In A Harem
N
75-07-29
46
Blackmail Is A Nasty Word
N
75-08-05
47
The Professor Regrets
N
75-08-12
48
The Hard Way
N
75-08-19
49
Paris Is Not the Same
N
75-08-26
50
Honeymoon
N
75-09-09
52
Greek Meets Greek
N






The Lives of Harry Lime Radio Program Biographies: Description Details Provenances Logs Biographies




George Orson Welles
(Director, Scenarist, Actor, Producer, Narrator)
Stage, Screen, Radio and Television Actor, Author, Poet, Artist, Magician, Pianist, Producer, Director
(1915-1985)

Birthplace: Kenosha, Wisconsin, U.S.A.

Education: The Todd School, Chicago, IL, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1936 Musical Reveries
1936 The March Of Time
1936 Columbia Workshop
1937 Les Miserables
1937 Shakespeare Festival
1937 The Shadow
1938 The Mercury Theatre of The Air
1938 The Silver Theatre
1938 Campbell Playhouse
1939 Columbia Masterworks' The Merchant Of Venice
1940 This Is Radio (for New York World's Fair)
1940 A Discussion Between H. G. Wells and Orson Welles
1940 The Rudy Vallee Sealtest Show
1941 Front Page Drama
1941 Forecast
1941 The Orson Welles Theatre
1941 We Hold These Truths
1941 The Cavalcade Of America
1942 Treasury Star Parade
1942 Ceiling Unlimited
1942 Suspense
1942 Information Please
1942 The Texaco Star Theatre
1942 Hello Americans
1942 The Radio Reader's Digest
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1943 Reading Out Loud
1943 The Pepsodent Show
1943 The New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra
1944 Radio Almanac
1944 The Dinah Shore Program
1944 The Lux Radio Theatre
1944 Fifth War Loan Drive
1944 The Radio Hall Of Fame
1944 The Charlie McCarthy Show
1944 Now Is The Time
1944 This Is My Best
1944 Stop Or Go
1944 G. I. Journal
1945 Command Performance
1945 Fourteen August, A Message For The Day Of Victory
1945 Armed Forces V-J Program
1945 The Victory Chest Program
1946 The Danny Kaye Show
1946 The Fred Allen Show
1946 The Mercury Summer Theatre
1946 The Bill Stern Colgate Sports Newsreel
1946 The Orson Welles Program [ABC]
1947 The Esquire Jazz Concert
1950 This Is The U. N.
1951 The Lives Of Harry Lime
1952 The Black Museum
1954 Anthology
1954 The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes
1955 The Ed Sullivan Show
1956 Tomorrow
1956 Biography In Sound
1972 The Hallmark Hall Of Fame
1974 The Dick Cavett Show
1975 The Tom Snyder Show
1976 NBC: The First Fifty Years
1983 Something Wicked This Way Comes
The Story Of The Juggler Of Our Lady
Adventures Of A Quarter

Orson Welles, ca. 1938
Orson Welles, ca. 1937

Welles publicity photo, ca. 1939
Welles publicity photo, ca. 1939

Welles rehearses with Mercury Theatre Players, ca. 1938
Welles rehearses with Mercury Theatre Players, ca. 1938

Welles and wife Virginia Nicholson, ca. 1938
Welles and wife Virginia Nicholson, ca. 1938

Welles' second book with collaborator Roger Hill, ca 1941
Welles' second book with collaborator Roger Hill, ca 1941

Welles' The Mercury Shakespeare book inside plate from 1941
Welles' The Mercury Shakespeare book inside plate from 1941

A Welles sketch for The Mercury Shakespeare book
A Welles sketch for The Mercury Shakespeare book.

Welles rehearses Mercury Theatre for its next play the day after The War of The Worlds broadcast, Oct. 31, 1938
Welles rehearses Mercury Theatre for its next play the day after The War of The Worlds broadcast, Oct. 31, 1938

Welles is quizzed by reporters after The War of the Worlds broadcast
Welles is quizzed by reporters after The War of the Worlds broadcast.

Welles makes the cover of Time Magazine May 9 1938, two months after the birth of daughter Rebecca
Welles makes the cover of Time Magazine May 9 1938, two months after the birth of daughter Rebecca

Welles boating in the family pool with wife Rita Hayworth and daughter Rebecca
Welles boating in the family pool with wife Rita Hayworth and daughter Rebecca, ca. 1946

Welles as Lamont Cranston, The Shadow, ca. 1937
Welles as Lamont Cranston, The Shadow, ca. 1937

Orson Welles, John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson record a BBC broadcast of Sherlock Holmes, ca. 1948
Orson Welles, John Gielgud and Ralph Richardson record a BBC broadcast of Sherlock Holmes, ca. 1948

Welles assesses a set for a Stage production, ca. 1972
Welles assesses a set for a Stage production, ca. 1972

Welles as The Third Man, walks into the mist, ca. 1949
Welles as The Third Man, walks into the mist, ca. 1949

"I started at the top and worked down."
--Orson Welles (1981)

Frank, prophetic, revealing words from a man most experts consider one of the great artistic geniuses of the 20th Century. There's no disputing his genius--at every endeavor he ever set his hand or mind to. George Orson Welles was born to a very successful inventor and a gifted, beautiful concert pianist. It's no wonder he was equipped as well as he was to excel at every Performing Arts challenge he ever attempted.

Already a child prodigy in multiple talents--art, the piano, and magic--he lost his mother at the age of nine. Welles' father took him on a world tour for the next six years. Then his father died when Welles was fifteen. He became the ward of a family friend, Dr. Maurice Bernstein, in Chicago.

Upon graduating from The Todd School in 1931, Welles decided to foregoe College for the present and instead take a sketching tour of Ireland, his ancestral home. Once in the U.K., Welles attempted to enter the London Stage, then returned to the U.S. to attempt to enter the Broadway Stage. Unsuccessful in both Drama centers, Welles' wanderlust took him to Morroco and Spain. It's reported that he even attempted bull-fighting while in Spain.

Coaxed back from Europe, friends Thornton Wilder and Alexander Woolcott got him a tryout with Katherine Cornell's road company. It was while with Katherine Cornell that Welles made his Broadway Stage debut as Tybalt in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet (1934). Also in 1934, Welles directed his first short film, The Hearts of Age, and married his first wife, Virginia Nicholson, who later acted with him in Mercury Theatre.

While on tour with Katherine Cornell and then William Kane he collaborated with fellow Todd School alumnus and Headmaster, Roger Hill to write Everybody's Shakespeare, a book containing acting treatments of The Merchant of Venice, Julius Caesar and Twelfth Night. Welles and Hill collaborated on another book in 1941. But it was Katherine Cornell's influence on Welles that eventually led to the dramatically novel approaches he took to the Classics. Cornell's updated treatments of both Romeo and Juliet and The Barretts of Wimpole Street were considered quite avant garde for their day. Indeed it was his impatience with Cornell in helping further his career that led him to work with William Kane back in Chicago.

In Chicago, Welles teamed with other Todd School alumni to mount a drama festival of his own with local actors, Dublin's Gate Theatre actors Micheál MacLiammóir and Hilton Edwards, and several Broadway stage artists he'd met during his first abortive attempt to break into the New York Stage. The festival was an unexpected success and caught the attention of John Houseman who was then working with the Federal Theatre Project under the auspices of the Works Progress Administration.

Houseman's current project was working with the Negro Theatre Unit of the Federal Theatre Project in mounting an all-Negro production of Macbeth, set in Haiti. The players of the Negro Theatre Unit were primarily comprised of actors and technicians from Harlem's American Negro Theatre. The production was heralded by the public and critics alike and toured the U.S. under the auspices of the Federal Theatre Project. Still only 20, Welles was finally being hailed as a Theatre prodigy.

Though having already performed in Radio during 1935, Welles' first lead in Radio came with 1936's Musical Reveries, a fifteen-minute variety-drama format wherein Welles' segment comprised drama and poetry readings. Welles and John Houseman formed the Mercury Theatre in 1937, mounting one of Broadway's most controversial treatments of Julius Caesar. Drawing on his experience with Katherine Cornell, Welles made the Shakespeare classic into a contemporary exploration of Mussolini's fascist Italy, with the sparsest of sets, fascist military costuming, and only dramatic lighting and sound to add to the atmosphere. Both heralded and despised by traditional Stage critics, the notoriety got Welles and Houseman an opportunity to air a serial presentation of Les Miserables (1937) over The Mutual Broadcasting System. Running for seven weeks of installments during the Summer of 1937, the program was a resounding success and introduced the Mercury Theatre repertory ensemble to the nation.

The success of both Les Miserables and Welles' performances in The Shadow (1937) got Welles and Houseman a shot at a prime time CBS commitment to nine, hour-long Mercury Theatre productions of Welles' chosing, conceptually titled, "First Person, Singular." The concept envisioned Welles narrating a series of productions in his own words and from his own perspective (e.g. in the first person, singular, or 'I'). The first nine broadcasts met with broad acceptance and critical acclaim, resulting in CBS extending the commitment for thirteen more installments.

It was with that second set of programs that Welles broadcast the Mercury Theatre's most famous and remarkable production, The War of The Worlds, a novel by H.G. Wells that had been brilliantly adapted for Halloween Eve by Howard Koch, one of the Mercury Theatre writers. The production and aftermath of the production are chronicled in detail above, but The War of the Worlds catapulted Orson Welles into the realm of Performing Arts legend within forty-eight hours of that historic broadcast.

While Welles did go on to even further accomplishments in the Performing Arts, it goes without saying that Orson Welles will always be equally viewed as both a Radio and Film Legend. Anyone with an even passing awarness of The Golden Age of Radio will undoubtedly mention Orson Welles in any discussion of Radio from the 1930s to the 1950s. Welles' imprint on the history of that era is part of the very fiber of Radio History--and not simply for his Shadow (1938) appearances, his various Mercury Theatre productions over the years, or his The Lives of Harry Lime (1951) performances.

Radio is an aural medium. Welles' genius was in shaping every phrase he uttered over Radio with an ear to what ultimately came out of the radio set or speaker at the other end. Welles knew radio technology and knew how to best employ it for maximum effect. He accomplished the same in Film. Studying both the available technology--and techniques--then maximizing their results at the receiving end, whether that was simply ears and imagination or eyes, ears and imagination. It was one's imagination that Welles sought to connect with. From the elaborate dramatic tempo and framing of a suspenseful spoken phrase, to the most elaborate crane shot in Film, Welles played and tinkered with the medium at hand until he acheived his desired effect.

There's no disputing Welles' genius, nor that he possessed the archetypal temperament of a genius. He demanded perfection--from himself and from those he worked with. And his demands were often both quixotic and onerous. But irrespective of the egos he bent and the frustration he engendered in his collaborators, Welles produced Art. Brilliant Art. In every medium he undertook.

There's no room on this page for an exhaustive biography of Orson Welles. And even if we chose to undertake such a biography the warts and missteps of Welles' career would invariably distract attention from a fair assessment of Welles' enduring impact. We're neither intellectually equipped nor at a level from which to judge Orson Welles' life. We determined that, frank and realistic to the end, Welles alone, was best equipped to make those kinds of judgements.

We opened with Welles' own assessment of his performing life. It's both brutal and honest. Welles' life after Mercury Theatre and both Citizen Kane (1941) and The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) wasn't idle in the least, but beset with personal and financial distractions, Welles never quite recaptured the consistent brilliance and genius of his first twenty years on the public stage.

Welles never seemed to find the time for all the projects he wanted to pursue, but he made the time to leave the world in awe of his extraordinary talent. More importantly, he left a legacy of excellence and innovation in every endeavor he did undertake, inspiring hundreds of thousands of younger performing artists to reach for the unattainable and--occasionally--actually grasp it, as George Orson Welles had.




Anton Karas
(Musician)

Stage, Radio, Television, and Film Musician and Composer
(1906-1985)

Birthplace: Brigittenau, Vienna, Austria

Radiography:
1950 Oklahoma City Symphony Orchestra
1951 Theatre Guild On the Air
1951 The Lives Of Harry Lime

Anton Karas (at zither) and Carol Reed confer on The Third Man sound track, circa 1949
Anton Karas (at zither) and Carol Reed confer on The Third Man sound track, circa 1949

Anton Karas with zither, circa 1950
Anton Karas with zither, circa 1950

The Harry Lime Theme Sheet Music, Copyright 1948
The Harry Lime Theme Sheet Music, Copyright 1948

Karas and Welles confer over The Lives of Harry Lime scoring
Karas and Welles confer over The Lives of Harry Lime scoring

The Third Man Theme LP by London Records. In today's terms it had gone 'Gold' within three months of the first showing of the Film
The Third Man Theme LP by London Records. In today's terms it had gone 'Gold' within three months of the first showing of the Film.
Anton Karas embarks on his 1950 World Tour following the critical success of The Third Man and its theme
Anton Karas embarks on his 1950 World Tour following the critical success of The Third Man and its theme.
Anton Karas was one of five children born to a Viennese factory worker. A music fan almost from birth, Anton Karas' earliest aspirations were to one day become a band leader. Temporarily constrained by his family's limited financial resources, he was nonetheless encouraged to learn an instrument, as were his two brothers and two sisters. His instrument of choice, the zither, first came into his possession when he encountered it in his grandmother's attic at the age of 12.

As a practical matter, his father enrolled Anton Karas in an apprenticeship with a tool and die maker when young Anton was 14. Young Karas was also taking private music instruction at night. Karas completed his apprenticeship as a machinist in 1924, working in an automobile factory for a year.

1924 also found Karas enrolled at Vienna's University of Music and Performing Arts. To supplement his school stipend, Karas performed as an entertainer in a local Viennese wine bar, or 'heuriger'. Karas continued to support himself at the University with his work as an entertainer, ultimately graduating in 1928.

By 1930 he was married, followed soon after by the birth of his daughter. Between 1939 and 1945 Anton Karas was employed with The German Wehrmacht in anti-aircraft warfare. Often traveling as far away as Russia, Karas reputedly took a zither along with him wherever he was sent.

Following the War, and the economic collapse of much of the former German/Austrian empires, British Director Carol Reed visited Vienna in 1948, while scouting locations for his impending The Third Man project. Reed reportedly heard Karas performing at a local heuriger and decided that Karas' zither music would be the perfect atmospheric backdrop to The Third Man.

Karas reportedly accompanied Reed back to London to stay with Reed while they composed the score to The Third Man. The Harry Lime Theme was for all intents, Karas' first professional composition. Karas has always preferred performing to composing and upon completing and recording the score in London, immediately returned to his home and family in Vienna.

The film, The Third Man, became an almost instant international success--everywhere outside Austria in any case. Many prominent Viennese were reportedly offended by the great city's depiction in Carol Reed's film. But they quite understandably loved Karas' theme music and score. Karas himself became an overnight international sensation, with The Harry Lime Theme reputedly having sold over half a million copies in L.P. format by the end of 1949. Indeed, sales of the zither itself, long since viewed as a somewhat antique instrument, experienced something of a resurgence, given The Harry Lime Theme's popularity.

Karas embarked upon a World Tour of his zither playing for most of the first half of 1950, and was, upon his return welcomed by both the Chancellor of Austria as well as luminaries from both within and without Vienna. A quiet, somewhat introverted performer at heart, the notoriety and public exposure and glamour never truly pleased him. All he ever seemingly wanted to do was return to Vienna and continue to perform his music.

Despite his own misgivings, he toured yet again in 1951, then again later in 1962 and the early 1970s. In the interim, he'd opened his own Wine Garden in Vienna in 1954, which quite undertandably became an instant Viennese hotspot and tourist destination.

Karas ultimately retired from the performing stage beginning in 1966, eventually withdrawing completely from all but private performances and teaching.




Henry Graham Greene, OM, CH
(Author/Creator)

Author, Playwright, Critic
(1904-1991)

Birthplace: Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England, U.K.

Radiography:
1943 Lux Radio Theatre
1948 Studio One
1949 NBC University Theatre
1949 Escape
1951 Theatre Guild On the Air
1951 Lives Of Harry Lime, The
1953 Suspense

Graham Greene circa 1938
Graham Greene circa 1938

Expatriate American mentor Ezra Pound
Expatriate American mentor Ezra Pound

Expatriate American mentor Gertrude Stein with Alice B. Tokals in background
Expatriate American mentor Gertrude Stein with Alice B. Toklas in background

Greene's screenplay for The Third Man (1949) , vewed as one of the top 100 films of all time both in The U.S. and Great Britain
Greene's screenplay for The Third Man (1949) , vewed as one of the top100 films of all time both in The U.S. and Great Britain

Graham Greene reflecting on the amazing reaction to The Third Man
Graham Greene reflecting on the amazing reaction to The Third Man

Greene's Our Man in Havana resulted in another Box office and critically acclaimed hit for 1959
Greene's Our Man in Havana resulted in another Box office and critically acclaimed hit for 1959

Greene effectively retired shortly after 1984 to spend more time with his mistress and family
Greene effectively retired shortly after 1984 to spend more time with his mistress and family

Graham Greene was one of six children born to Charles Henry Greene, the headmaster of Berkhamsted School, and Marion R. Greene, a first cousin of the famed writer Robert Louis Stevenson. Given Greene's life-long affliction with what we now refer to as bi-polar disorder, his reported dislike of school, family and socialization seem understandable. He reportedly attempted to run away from home and school at least once.

In an attempt to resolve his apparent mental and emotional problems he was sent to London for psychotherapy under the auspices of a student of the famous Sigmund Freud. While staying in London he began to develop his keen love for literature and began to write poetry.

Noted American expatriate writers Ezra Pound and Gertrude Stein became lifelong mentors to Greene even before he returned home to complete high school. Upon graduating from secondary school in 1922, Greene entered Oxford University's Balliol College. While at Oxford, Greene spent much of his time traveling and dabbled with membership in the Communist Party. He subsequently repudiated his Communist beliefs, but clearly retained some philosophical sympathies with the international movement.

In spite of these varied distractions and interests, Greene still completed his studies at Oxford three years later with a second in History, having renounced the Anglican Church for Catholicism, and having published a poorly received collection of his poetry, entitled Babbling April.

Greene undertook his professional writing career first as an unpaid apprentice for the Nottingham Journal, then later for the London Times. Greene reportedly enjoyed the experience and indeed held a position as an assistant editor with the London Times right up until he published his first fiction novel, The Man Within (1929). The Man Within very much underscored themes that Graham Greene would continue to develop for the remainder of his career: betrayal, pursuit and death. Indeed, Greene would come to be known as one of the most effective modern proponents of these themes of the 20th Century.

Greene published two more novels in 1931: Name of Action and Rumour at Nightfall. Neither gained further traction with literary critics. It was his fourth novel, Stamboul Train (1932, and published as Orient Express in the U.S.) that caught the attention of an international audience and commensurate critical acclaim.

Greene's next critical success was with his 1938 novel, Brighton Rock, an elaborate, suspenseful morality play chock full of the violence and sexual energy that many of his subsequent suspense novels would build upon. Greene followed Brighton Rock with The Confidential Agent and The Lawless Roads (1939). Greene's The Power and The Glory, which he deemed one of his most satisfying literary works, also followed his 1938 trip to Mexico and South America that had inspired The Lawless Roads.

After the outbreak of World War II, Greene was recruited into the Intelligence Service and was deployed to West Africa to gather intelligence on Axis activities in that strategic, mineral-rich area of the world. Upon cessastion of hostilities, Greene capitalized on his rich experiences as an intelligence officer with his 1948 novel, The Heart of The Matter, one of his first wildly popular hits with American readers. But even more popular was his subsequent triumph, The Third Man, in 1949.

Commissioned as a screenplay for director Carol Reed, Greene also wrote a novella with which to frame the screenplay. The novella was published in 1950 so as not to undercut the Film for which he wrote the screenplay. Released in September of 1949, The Third Man became an almost overnight film noir classic. The film catapulted everyone connected with it to overnight stardom, revived Orson Welles' previously stalled career, made Anton Karas an overnight sensation with his The Harry Lime Theme, and virtually assured Graham Greene further A-list treatment as a screenwriter and playwright from that point forward.

Graham Greene followed The Third Man with The Heart of The Matter (1953), The Quiet American (1958), Our Man in Havana (1959) and Travels with My Aunt (1972). These, of course in addition to some forty other screenplays, Television scripts and adaptations and five plays. If you've gotten an impression that an underlying location theme seems to have percolated up throughout his screenplays, you're in good company. The often off-beat, exotic, far-flung and controversial locations for most of his plots were collectively referred to as Greeneland.

Greene's legacy of compelling suspense and intrigue fiction has resulted in no less than seven further treatments of his novels and short stories since his death in 1991 from complications of a blood disease.

Graham Greene remains as popular in the U.S. as Ian Fleming. Indeed, simply judging by the sheer quantity of his screenplays and adaptations that have aired at one time or another over American Television, one might reasonably argue that he's even more popular than Ian Fleming given that measure.

Greene worked with and was both loved and respected by some of the greatest proponents of modern suspense fiction of the 20th Century, including Orson Welles, Noel Coward, John Gielgud, Joseph Cotten, Alfred Hitchcock, Maggie Smith and Nicol Williamson. As of this writing no less than three of his novels are either in production or awaiting release.



Harry Alan Towers
(Producer/Syndicator)

Radio, Television, and Film Producer
(1920--)

Birthplace: London, England, U.K.

Radiography:
1942 The Royal Air Force Takes the Air
1946 The March Of the Movies
1951 The Lives Of Harry Lime
1952 The Black Museum
1952 The Adventures Of the Scarlet Pimperne
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Harry Alan Towers shortly after his return to civilian life circa 1948
Harry Alan Towers shortly after his return to civilian life circa 1948

Harry Alan Towers circa 1984
Harry Alan Towers circa 1984
Harry Alan Towers was born, raised and educated (Italia Conti school for child actors) in London, England. He joined the R.A.F. at the outbreak of World War II, becoming the programme director for British Forces Radio, the British equivalent of America's Armed Forces Radio Service. In that capacity, Towers was responsible for securing, editing, producing and distributing Radio broadcasts via electrical transcription throughout the far-flung reaches of The British Empire's war effort.

Upon completing his service in the R.A.F, he returned to London to establish Towers of London, a company to syndicate original Radio programming via electrical transcription. Backed by his mother's financing, Margaret Miller Towers and her son inaugurated what would become one of post-War England's most successful media production companies.

Among Towers' most successful Radio syndications were Secrets of Scotland Yard (1948) with Clive Brook, The Lives of Harry Lime (1951) with Orson Welles, The Black Museum (1952) with Orson Welles, and The Adventures of The Scarlet Pimpernell (1952) with Marius Goring. Towers had become well equipped to engineer these usually worldwide syndications. As Programme Director for British Forces Radio, his day to day activities had been consumed with deal-making around the globe in acquiring and distributing entertaining programming to British Forces overseas.

That experience served him even better--and far more profitably--as an independent programming producer and syndicator cutting syndication deals with America, Australia, Luxembourg, Mozambique, South Africa and Canada.

The Independent Television network (ITV) was established in 1955 as a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters. Its charter was established by the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV opened yet another avenue for Towers of London. That same year, Towers of London began to package and produce an ambitious array of programming, including The Golden Fleece (1955), The Boy About the Place (1955), Teddy Gang (1956), The Lady Asks for Help (1956), The Scarlet Pimpernel (1956), The Suicide Club (1956), The Little Black Book (1956), The New Adventures of Martin Kane (1957), A Christmas Carol (1958), 24 Hours a Day (1959), Down to the Sea (1959), Gun Rule (1959) and Missing Person (1959).

Ever the entrepreneurial innovator, the 1960s and 1970s found Towers producing an ambitious and prolific number of 90-minute, made-for-Television movies for syndication around the world. Often joining forces with other independent production companies, Towers' deal-making and relentless ambition have continued to help create a minor entertainment empire that dots the globe to this day.

Towers' life has not been without its own speedbumps, excesses and awkward situations, but Towers' apparent limitless well of resolve and resilience seem to have made him only more and more successful over the years.

Last heard of in South Africa, Harry Alan Towers was reportedly undertaking as many as twenty-five concurrent projects as of 2003. He's reached the age of 89 in one of modern civilizations most ruthless industries. He must have been doing something right.

[
Update: Harry Alan Towers passed away July 31st 2009 in Canada after a short illness]




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