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Original The Halls of Ivy header art

The Halls of Ivy Radio Program

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Premiere spot ad for The Halls of Ivy from January 6 1950
Premiere spot ad for The Halls of Ivy from January 6 1950

Ronald Colman and Benita Hume publicity photo for Television's The Halls of Ivy (1954)
Ronald Colman and Benita Hume publicity photo for Television's The Halls of Ivy (1954)

The Halls of Ivy won the prestigious Eleventh Annual Peabody Award for Radio Drama
The Halls of Ivy won the prestigious Eleventh Annual Peabody Award for Radio Drama

Billboard Magazine review of the 11th Annual Peabody Awards, the first ever televised, during which The Halls of Ivy was awarded a Peabody for Best Radio Drama from May 12 1951
Billboard Magazine review of the 11th Annual Peabody Awards, the first ever televised, during which The Halls of Ivy was awarded a Peabody for Best Radio Drama from May 12 1951

The Joseph Schlitz Brewery initially sponsored The Halls of Ivy
The Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company initially sponsored The Halls of Ivy

LIFE Magazine published the following series of John Falter illustrated Schlitz ads during the final season of The Halls of Ivy:


'Here's a message from Milwaukee' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from January 7 1952
'Here's a message from Milwaukee' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from January 7 1952

'Here's one I can understand!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from January 21 1952
'Here's one I can understand!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from January 21 1952

'A Pleasant Interruption' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from March 3 1952
'A Pleasant Interruption' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from March 3 1952

'Time Out for Schlitz' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from March 17 1952
'Time Out for Schlitz' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from March 17 1952

'First the Schlitz . . . then the hat!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from March 31 1952
'First the Schlitz . . . then the hat!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from March 31 1952

 'I thought I was his favorite!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from February 18 1952, this one illustrated by Lyman Anderson
'I thought I was his favorite!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from February 18 1952, this one illustrated by Lyman Anderson

'Feels like home already!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from April 14 1952, this one illustrated by Austin Briggs
'Feels like home already!' LIFE Magazine Schlitz ad promoting The Halls of Ivy from April 14 1952, this one illustrated by Austin Briggs

Henry Russell and Vic Knight combined to create a best selling record from the catchy 'The Halls of Ivy' theme as well as the 'Drink, Drink, Drink' song introduced in The Halls of Ivy Program No. 20 'Doctor Abel Kandor of Ivy' --Billboard magazine of September 9 1950
Henry Russell and Vic Knight combined to create a best selling record from the catchy 'The Halls of Ivy' theme as well as the 'Drink, Drink, Drink' song introduced in The Halls of Ivy Program No. 20 'Doctor Abel Kandor of Ivy' --Billboard magazine of September 9 1950

Arthur Q. Bryan appeared as Professor Joe Warren
Arthur Q. Bryan appeared as
Professor Joe Warren

Background

From the March 10, 1950 edition of the Tipton Daily Tribune:

IN HOLLYWOOD

By FRANK NEILL
     International News Service
Staff Correspondent

    Hollywood, — (INS) — They all laughed when Ronald Colman, the distinguished dramatic actor, sat down to play the role of Professor William Todhunter Hall on the "Halls Of Ivy" radio show. 
     And they've been chuckling ever since, because the program suddenly has become one of the top humor shows on the air.
     Colman had been in semi-retirement for the past decade, appearing only in one movie each year and working mainly to keep from getting rusty, besides, he is a most particular gent about what type of dialogue he allows to emanate in pearshaped British tones.
     "It's partly Jack Benny's fault that we took on this show," admitted the Academy Award Winner.  The honor stemmed from his role in "A Double Life."
     Benny invited Colman and his wife, Benita Hume, to make like his neighbor on a radio broadcast.  The Colman's were colossal, to coin a trite Hollywood phrase.
     Radio sponsors begged the Colmans to go on radio.  Both refused, particularly the man of the family which enjoys a quiet life in rambunctious Hollywood.

          Writer Is Originator

     Thendon Quinn, one-time cartoonist from Grand Rapids, Mich., who had been writing the Fibber McGee and Molly shows for years, originated the mythical "Ivy College" and it's prexy, Dr.Hall, and his charming wife,
"Mrs. Victoria Hall," a former English Musical Comedy Actress.
     Producer Nat Woolf, a personal friend of Ronald's asked Colman to read the first couple of scripts.
     Result:  The Colmans, in a few short months, have wound up as radio's newest husband and wife team.  The show's radio survey rating has soared.
     Dore Shary, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer head, has been hollering to put "Halls Of Ivy" on the screen.  Colman says maybe.  Mrs. Colman,  however, says she will stick strictly to the microphone.  So her role in the projected film version probably will be taken by Greer Garson.

     All concerned, except the Colman's, are dickering for television versions of the show. 
     "But that must wait awhile," said Ronald, whose latest picture is "Champagne For Caesar."
     And Mrs. Colman, sitting beside him in their dressing room shortly before they went on the air, nodded.
     "This is fun now," she said.  "A live television show would be too much like an old Stock Company.  We wouldn't have time for anything else.

And then we have the following review by Radio critic and curmudgeon-at-large, John Crosby from the January 13, 1950 edition of the Portsmouth Times:

 
Radio In Review
 By JOHN CROSBY

 Ronnie And Benita
 IN "HALLS OF IVY", a brand new NBC radio program (8 p.m. Fridays), a couple of old pros make it look as easy as does Joe DiMaggio in center field.
     The two old pros are Don Quinn, who originated and writes the series, and Ronald Colman, who stars in it.  Mr. Quinn, I better add, is assisted in the writing by Walter Brown Newman, and Mr. Colman is abetted invaluably by Mrs. Colman.  And they're pretty wonderful too.
     In fact, I see no clear reason why Ronald and Benita, who already are well known to radio audiences through their work on the Jack Benny show, should not become one of America's favorite radio couples.
     These tired, myopic eyes first glimpsed Ronald Colman in 1923 playing opposite Lillian Gish in "The White Sisters".  Never one to rush in with rash and premature optimism, I held my counsel.
     Now, 27 years and an Academy Award later, I'm willing to go out on a limb and hazard the prediction that Colman is a man to watch.  That young actor (born 1891) will amount to something, you mark my words.
 
     IN "HALLS OF IVY", Mr. Colman plays the part of Dr. William Todhunter Hall, the president of Ivy College, whose ancience, the announcer informs us, "is attested by the fact that two years of Greek are still required for graduation".
     A sort of Mr. Chips, you're likely to say.  Well, yes and no.  The Colman personality, a mixture of urbanity, charm and culture with just a hint of Raffles still there, is too overwhelming to fit any such precise category.  Colman is always Colman in addition to his acquired characteristics.
     Dr. Hall's wife--Mrs. Colman, of course--is an ex-musical comedy actress who is considered the greatest boost to undergraduate morale in campus history.
     She teaches the students to tap dance, refers to her husband as "Toddy", and, in general, treats academic life with a levity the trustees find deplorable.  A perfect foil for her rather timid, serious husband.
 
     LIKE ALL GOOD radio comedies, Mr. Quinn has come up with a simple, solid format and then carefully refrained from cluttering it up with too many other ideas.
     In its opening episode, Dr. Hall and his wife, Vicky, simply fidgeted about the living room, waiting to be informed, whether Dr. Hall would or would not be reappointed.  She tells him to be brave.
     "Bravery in a college president," says Dr. Hall wearily, "is a superfluous virtue--the only virtue not absolutely required."
     This, by radio standards, is quite an adult observation.
 
     ALL THE DIALOG is literate and marked by an astonishing degree of common sense and humor.  The decision, when it comes, Dr. Hall tells his wife, will be delivered by two of the trustees--"Merriweather, whom I like and admire, and Wellman who is, in my opinion, a stinker."  That is a perfect example of the Colman style of both speech and delivery, a sort of English formality with a raffish gleam in its eye.
     Wellman, I have an idea, is going to be the villain of the piece.  He's an immensely wealthy soup magnate on whom the college depends for much of its money.
     Speaking of his soup fortune, Colman observes dryly:  "I suspect his grandmother was a witch who invented a broth which became a family secret."
 
     WHEN HIS WIFE advises him to give Wellman short shrift, he observed mildly:  "The test of manners is to meet bad ones with good ones."
     That last crack certainly sounds as if it had been made before by someone more eminent than Don Quinn, conceivably in the 17th century.  However, a diligent search of Bartlett's and Stevenson's, which lists far less witty epigrams, fails to reveal it.  Hey, Bartlett!  Hey, Stevenson!  How about admitting Mr. Quinn, one of radio's great sages?
     "Halls Of Ivy", I must admit, doesn't break any new ground in radio.  It is merely credible, funny, extraordinarily well cast and extremely well written.  What else do you want?
(Copyright, 1950, New York Tribune)

To those of you who've read many of Mr. Crosby's reviews that we've reprinted in these articles, it would appear, by comparison, that John Crosby is conferring no less than the Nobel Prize for Radio on The Halls of Ivy. And then we have this, from the February 28, 1951 edition of the Olean Times Journal, upon the second season of The Halls of Ivy:

HOLLYWOOD, Calif .—Ronald Colman, who's turning into a pretty good radio comedian these days, is sneaking something else in between the laughs.
     His listeners don't know it, but they get a lesson in democracy every time they tune in to "The Halls of Ivy." It's mostly Don Quinn's idea. Quinn, who also writes ''Fibber McGee and Molly," turns Colman into a college' president once a week, and moves him from crisis to crisis. And the way be does it has everybody, from radio critics to real-life college presidents, sending in fan letters. "Ivy" has even been nominated for the Peabody Award, one of the highest honors in radio.
     Stands a good chance of winning, too. Because this is one of the few times in radio a program sells high ideals and gets yaks doing it.
     Colman and Quinn wade right into the "untouchables." They took a swing at racial prejudice when a Chinese honor student tried to leave college because of intolerant classmates.
     On another show, Colman turned down a half-million dollar endowment when the lady donor refused to provide scholarships for certain races and creeds.
     "This school was founded on a concept of personal freedom and individual integrity," Colman said in a little speech. "And that is not for sale . . . Not even for $500,000.
     "The Constitution of the U. S. must not be used to wrap up such a shoddy bargain."
     Then there was the time the college paper blasted the UN for getting into so many brawls.
     "Politically, there is nothing healthier than violent argument and debate," Colman said. "It will be the absence of noisy discussion which should worry us. That's when the shoddy deals are being made in the back room.
     "I welcome any attempt whatsoever to bring reason and good will into international argument. At this time the UN is that attempt. Therefore, I am in favor of it."
     This is pretty deep stuff for a popular radio show. But Colman and Quinn have their listeners eating it up. Maybe because they break up the speeches with gags like this:
     "The dangerous age for men is from their first long pants to their last short breath."


Disclaimer and superlatives alert:

The authors of this article are unabashed admirers of this entire production, from its leading performers to its writers, supporting casts and technicians.

Let's get this out of the way right up front: The Halls of Ivy was, is, and will always be pure Radio magic. Indeed, if anything was 'too good for Radio'--even Golden Age Radio--it was The Halls of Ivy. The concept, the writing, the casting, the production and indeed, virtually every detail of this remarkable Radio series represented, arguably, the brightest moment of the waning days of The Golden Age of Radio:

  • The leading performers: Ronald Colman and Benita Hume [Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman] were unquestionably the perfect choice of leading performers for this series.
  • The writing staff: Don Quinn and his staff of some of the finest writers in Radio history, including Lawrence and Lee, Barbara and Milton Merlin, Walter B. Newman, and Hector Chevigny.
  • The ensemble cast: Gale Gordon, Herb Butterfield, Willard Waterman, James Gleason, Gloria Gordon, Elizabeth Patterson, Arthur Q. Bryan, Alan Reed, Lee Patrick and Barton Yarborough
  • The supporting casts: William Conrad, Barbara Jean Wong, Robert Easton, William Johnstone, Cliff Arquette, Joe Kearns, Ken Christy, Sam Edwards, Sheldon Leonard, Virginia Gregg, Bea Benaderet, Bill Irwin, Jeanne Bates, Elliot Lewis and Jane Morgan
  • Music direction and composition: Henry Russell and Vic Knight as composers, and Henry Russell conducting the orchestra and chorus
  • Production, direction and sound shaping: Nat Wolff and Don Quinn as both co-creators and Radio visionaries.
  • Announcing: NBC legend, Ken Carpenter, and his wonderfully familiar introductions and exposition.

Needless to say, The Halls of Ivy was a completely unexpected entry into the NBC lineup of the post-World War II years of Radio. What seems more unexpected, in retrospect, is why no one else evisioned such a production even sooner after the close of World War II. Our Miss Brooks, arguably the high school precursor to The Halls of Ivy, had already been airing for well over a year prior to The Halls of Ivy. Any comparisons--or contrasts--between the two education-themed productions are admittedly only slight, but they do bear a brief acknowledgment. More slapstick, by comparison, Our Miss Brooks did, indeed, re-introduce America to formal education in the post-War years. Their only two uniting performers--Gale Gordon and Jane Morgan--leant the same flavor to both productions in their respective performances, although Jane Morgan in a somewhat smaller capacity.

Gale Gordon was initially envisioned as the lead in The Halls of Ivy, with noted Stage actress Edna Best, the wife of series co-creator Nat Wolff (and former wife of Herbert Marshall) as Mrs. Hall. Willard Waterman and Herb Butterfield supported Gordon and Best in the two auditions/promotions for the proposed series. Indeed, it was Gale Gordon's involvement in Our Miss Brooks that undoubtedly sidelined his further initial involvement in The Halls of Ivy. The audition/promotion pieces for The Halls of Ivy were reportedly recorded in the Summer of 1949. Our Miss Brooks had already begun to create a stir by the Summer of 1949 and by the Fall season of 1949, Our Miss Brooks had become an entirely justified hit in Radio. Don Quinn, in his 1951 Hawaiian vacation interview with Owen Cunningham hints that it was Gordon's contractual involvements that sent Quinn and Nat Wolff casting about for other leading stars for their The Halls of Ivy project.

Ronald Colman, for his part, was coming off of the wonderful Lawrence and Lee written, Ziv production, Favorite Story, which had already catapulted Colman into the family rooms of Radio listeners across America. Colman's recent long-running exposure over Radio unquestionably came to the attention of NBC, whose KFI studios in Hollywood had originated Favorite Story. But Colman would naturally need a compatible Mrs. Hall as a co-star. Enter the Jack Benny connection. . .

The Colmans who, in real life, lived right down the street from Jack Benny and Mary Livingston, had guest-starred in a running arc of at least four Jack Benny Program episodes as themselves--and to quite popular--and critical--acclaim in the Jack Benny vehicle. Benita Hume, who'd formally retired from show business some six years earlier, had been coaxed into the recurring appearances on the Jack Benny Program, and seemed the logical choice as 'Mrs. Hall' if she could be persuaded to appear with hubby Ronald in a recurring series. The rest became Radio History.

The Gordon family remained well represented from the premiere of The Halls of Ivy forward however, with Gale Gordon's mother, Gloria Gordon premiering in the role of Dr. and Mrs. Hall's housekeeper and cook, Penny, along with the initial ensemble cast of The Colmans, Willard Waterman, and Herb Butterfield. When Willard Waterman got the call to further Film, Radio, and Television work, Gale Gordon came back to essentially 'replace' Willard Waterman's role as John Meriweather, one of the more sympathetic members of the Ivy College Board of Governors, as John Meriweather's brother, Charles Meriweather. The aritifce employed for continuity's sake was a reference to John and Charles Meriweather being identical twin brothers, thus allowing Gale Gordon's character to 'slip right into the shoes' of his twin brother from that point forward. Gale Gordon remained in the ensemble cast as Charles Meriweather until the end of the series. Heard in recurring roles over the three seasons were the following members of the ensemble cast:

  • Ronald Colman as Dr. William Todhunter "Toddy" Hall, Ph.D., L.L.D., M.A., and President of Ivy College
  • Benita Hume [Colman] as Mrs. Victoria "Vickie" [Cromwell] Hall, former London Stage actress
  • Herb Butterfield as Mr. Clarence Wellman, Chairman of the Board of Governors of Ivy College--and Soup Magnate
  • Willard Waterman as Mr. John Meriweather member of the Board of Governors of Ivy College
  • Gale Gordon as Mr. Charles Meriweather member of the Board of Governors of Ivy College
  • Gloria Gordon as Penny, the Hall's first housekeeper and cook
  • Arthur Q. Bryan as Professor Joseph 'Joe' Warren
  • Alan Reed as Professor Heaslip of Ivy's English Department
  • Bea Benaderet as Alice, the Maid (an ex-WAC)
  • Barton Yarborough as Calhoun Gaddy
  • Elizabeth Patterson as Miss Louisa Tate, the 'non sequitur dropping' housekeeper and cook
  • James Gleason as Officer Grogan of the Ivy College constabulary
  • Lee Patrick as Miss Goodsen, Dr. Hall's unbelievably efficient Personal Secretary

It was an absolutely marvelous ensemble over all three seasons. We'd be remiss however, to not note the passing of Radio legend Barton Yarborough during the third season of The Halls of Ivy. Yarborough performed in his fourth appearance as 38-yr old Ivy sophomore, Calhoun Gaddy, on December 5, 1951, less than two weeks before a critical heart attack would prematurely end his incredible career. The Calhoun Gaddy character was one of several key recurring characterizations that would eventually extend through all three seasons of The Halls of Ivy.

In addition to the marvelously evolving ensemble cast, the series enjoyed numerous unforgettable, sparkling performances by some of the finest character actors of the era:

  • Barbara Jean Wong as a Chinese-American coed running for student office
  • Legendary Hollywood dialectician Robert Easton, among others, in the roles of "Moose" the lovesick Ivy College fullback and later as "Central" Park the phone repairman
  • Jane Morgan of Our Miss Brooks Radio and Television fame, as the memorable Mrs. Yates, the 70-year-old coed
  • Fritz Feld as the charming Professor of Psychiatry imposter, 'Doctor' Spaatzen
  • Bill Johnstone as Ivy College's oldest surviving alumnus, Dr. Lucien Royce
  • Ken Christy as Mr. Packard, fight promoter and manager, and also as 'Coach' Delavan
  • Sheldon Leonard as "Beans" Philips an ex-boxer
  • Mary McGovern as little Sheila Quincannon, crippled by polio
  • John Brown as Professor Harmon, the professor shamed by little Sheila Quincannon's own personal bravery

Ronald Colman, for his part was virtually playing himself, or so his genius as an actor tended persuade his adoring audiences, in any case. Our personal belief is that he actually was, very much, simply playing himself. The romantic interplay between Dr. Hall and his wife over Radio was remarkably genuine and even intimate at times during each episode. In this respect, in particular, Benita Hume was every bit the scene stealer in virtually every epsiode of The Halls of Ivy. We say 'scene-stealer' not only inspite of, but indeed because of so many of the other captivating, riveting and wonderfully endearing performances of the ensemble cast and guest performers. The enduring, underlying romance between Ronald and Benita Colman was absolutely palpable throughout the series.

Perhaps it was simply Benita Hume's six-year absence from the public limelight that made her performances so remarkable. That's certainly the easiest explanation, but simply doesn't do Benita Hume justice. Indeed almost every episode, for at least the first two seasons in any case, would have Ronald Colman reflecting on his earliest meetings in England with his eventual bride. These loving and romantic flashbacks had Colman in his approximate early 30's in age as the 'suitor' Dr. Hall, and then London Stage actress Victoria Cromwell in her mid-20s, one was given to assume. And yet both great actors literally embodied those far younger characterizations quite believably in every instance.

At this point it's probably instructive to point out that neither of the two great leading actors for this series--nor their brilliant head writer, Don Quinn--had the benefit of completing formal higher education (Ronald Colman had attended Cambridge University in England but never graduated). Indeed, none of the three of them had anything other than a single honorary degree between them at the time that The Halls of Ivy first aired. This is all the more remarkable given the highly literate portrayal of Dr. Hall in particular. As fan mail almost immediately began pouring in shortly after the series' premiere, students and faculties from across the nation were sending glowing praises and wishes that their own College and University presidents and faculty members could be as literate, wise, sophisticated and philosophical as was Ronald Colman's portrayal of Dr. William Todhunter Hall.

This presented a P.R. problem not so much for the series itself, as much as for the thousands of colleges and universities throughout the U.S. and Canada. Recognizing the almost unrealistically idealized image that Ronald Colman was portraying each week, the production company began highlighting the significant accomplishments of several of the more notable real-world college presidents across the country. Over the course of the series, The Halls of Ivy formally recognized eight such educators, thus lending a bit more balance to Ronald Colman's wildly successful interpretation of everyman's idealized college president.

The other unspoken--or at least more subtly recognized--demographic were the hundreds of thousands of ex-G.I.s who'd elected to take advantage of the nation's first G.I. Bill during the post-World War II years. Though they never really beat the audience over the head with it, the writers did often mention the more heroic and remarkable histories of some of their imaginary students. Mentions of a Medal of Honor recipient among the student body of Ivy College, as well as frequent reminders of the relatively advanced ages of some of the Ivy students provided more than a passing nod to G.I. Bill students and their accomplishments, tribulations, and real-world problems in post-War America.

The series also went far out of its way to highlight national problems of prejudice and stereotyping that had almost never been mentioned, let alone dramatized, over a Radio production of the visibility and popularity of The Halls of Ivy. Indeed, even common automobile courtesy, public safety--and even campus hooliganism and hazing--came under the scrutiny of at least five of the epsiodes during the series. This was, after all, a period of vastly increased automobile ownership and usage. Roadway and pedestrian fatalities during the post-War years had reached epidemic proportions throughout America. The Halls of Ivy very skillfully and sensitively utilized their 'bully pulpit' to raise many of these very important national priorities with sensitivity, frankness and humor--but always quite effectively.

The importance of this production and its far-reaching popularity was not lost on the series' primary sponsor. The Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company almost immediately realized that it could tap a far different demographic than it had traditionally targeted during the World War II years. Throughout their sponsorship of the series, through both their on-air pitches, and in the print media of the era, Schlitz began portraying their target audience as urbane, sophisticated, 'shirt-and-tie' drinkers, such as college graduates and professionals, both insistent on quality and mindful of the need for sophisticated moderation. This was almost unheard of during previous beer-promotion campaigns over Radio, and more reminiscent of the campaigns of wine sponsors such as Schenley's Cresta Blanca or the Gallo Family and Roma Wine campaigns of the 1940s.

Even more serendipitous was the amazing popularity of 'The Halls of Ivy Theme' penned by Henry Russell and Vic Knight. The theme was so catchy and effective that within four months the demand for the song propelled it to national popularity. Russell and Knight eventually cut a two-sided LP of 'The Halls of Ivy' with what became an even more enduringly popular song, 'Drink, Drink, Drink' on the flip side. 'Drink, Drink, Drink' was first performed on-air during the 'Doctor Abel Kandor of Ivy' episode on May 17, 1950. To this day, 'Drink, Drink, Drink' remains one of the more popular nostalgic favorites of a bygone era with colleges--and fraternities in particular, throughout the world. And in all fairness to 'The Halls of Ivy Theme', it also continues to be a sentimental favorite of many colleges and universities throughout the U.S. and Canada almost seventy years later.

It's impossible to overstate the historic importance of The Halls of Ivy. The pointedly adult themes presented throughout the series, represented ground-breaking material for the era. Indeed, during a period of explosion in popular Television, The Halls of Ivy almost immediately recaptured an audience that Radio networks had all but written off by 1951. The sophistication of the production--from beginning to end--was emulated for years after The Halls of Ivy left the air--on both Radio and Television. And indeed, as must have seemed inevitable, after the first six months of airing over Radio, the production company began discussions with Television networks about the feasibility of mounting a similar production for television viewers. Of course the key to the success of any Television rendition of The Halls of Ivy would have to be The Colmans' participation. The Colmans did, indeed eventually agree to another two years, and the Television version of The Halls of Ivy premiered as an ITC production over CBS Television on October 19, 1954. The series, sponsored by Nabisco and International Harvester, ran for over a year, utilizing the almost verbatim scripts from the Radio series. It might well have run far longer but for the rapidly evolving political climate of the Korean War and Cold War years.

Adlai Stevenson, a self-styled intellectual of the highest order, was twice defeated by General Dwight Eisenhower for the Presidency of the United States. Somewhat more ironic is the fact that when The Halls of Ivy first aired over Radio, General Eisenhower was the President of Columbia University of New York, and by the time The Halls of Ivy debuted over Television, soon to be elected President Eisenhower had returned to the position of President of Columbia University after two years of service as the Supreme Commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (N.A.T.O.). Indeed, if anyone had a stake in the continuing success of The Halls of Ivy--over any medium--it should have been 'Ike' himself. But as history would later disclose, Ike's running mate and Vice President, Richard M. Nixon, was virulently opposed to the very 'Northeast intellectual establishment' idealized throughout The Halls of Ivy.

In any case, The Halls of Ivy was overtaken by even graver events. Ronald Colman himself passed away in April of 1958, less than three years after the final airing of The Halls of Ivy over Television. Benita Hume survived her adoring husband by another nine years, passing away in England in November of 1967. They were survived by their daughter, Juliet Benita Colman.

Series Derivatives:

The Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman Show; AFRTS END-163 'Halls of Ivy'; Voice of America rebroadcasts
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Situation Comedy
Network(s): NBC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): 49-06-22 01 Dr. Hall's Reappointment
49-06-23 01 Dr. Hall's Reappointment
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 50-01-06 01 Dr. Hall's Reappointment
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 50-01-06 to 52-06-25; NBC [Radio City, Hollywood]; One Hundred and Nine, 30-minute programs; Friday, then Wednesday evenings
Syndication: NBC Orthacoustic for Ivy Productions; The AFRS; Voice of America
Sponsors: Joseph Schlitz Brewing Company; The Voice of America
Director(s): Thendon 'Don' Quinn [Creator/Director], Nat Wolff [Creator/Director]; Milton Merlin [Director]
Principal Actors: Gale Gordon, Edna Best, Herbert Rawlinson, Gloria Gordon, Herb Butterfield, Willard Waterman, Lee Millar, Norman Field, Leo Cleary, Peter Leeds, Ronald Colman, Benita Hume, Gloria Gordon, Herb Butterfield, Herbert Rawlinson, Lee Miller, Willard Waterman, Roland Morris, William Conrad, Gil Stratton, Ted Osborne, Henry Blair, William Johnstone, Barbara Jean Wong, Ben Wright, Earle Ross, Barney Phlilips, Joseph Kearns, Edwin Max, Eleanor Audley, Hans Conried, Richard LeGrand, Florence Wolcott, Anne Whitfield, Alan Reed, Cliff Arquette, Herb Vigran, Jack Kruschen, Jane Morgan, Janet Scott, Jerry Hausner, Eric Snowden, Bea Benadaret, Lois Corbett, Lucille Norman, Gale Gordon, Paula Winslowe, Raymond Lawrence, Henry Martin, Sam Hearn, Sam Edwards, Ken Christy, Stacy Harris, Sheldon Leonard, Charles Seel, Jean Vander Pyl, Jeffrey Silver, John McGovern, Bill Thompson, Conrad Binyon, Bob Sweeney, Virginia Gregg, Robert Esson, Gloria McMillan, Sandra Gould, Ken Peters, Helen Crutchfield, Mary ALden, Hanley Stafford, Charles Smith, Jim Backus, Jack Benny, Elliott Lewis, Norman Field, Peter Leeds, Lionel Da Silva, Fay Wray Riskin, Rye Billsbury, Barton Yarborough, Arthur Q. Bryan, Lou Merrill, Jess Kirkpatrick, Alice Backes, Kurt Martell, Joseph Carbo, Sammie Hill, James Gleason, Janet Warren, Jean Tatum, Sarah Selby, Elizabeth Patterson, William Erwin, Lee Patrick, Robert Easton
Recurring Character(s): Dr. William Todhunter "Toddy" Hall, PhD, LLD, MA, President of Ivy College, Ivy, U.S.A. [Gale Gordon (audition) and Ronald Colman]
Mrs. Victoria [Cromwell] Hall, former London stage actress [Benita Hume]
Mr. Clarence Wellman, Chairman of the Board of Governors of Ivy College and Soup Magnate [Herb Butterfield]
Mr. John Meriweather member of the Board of Governors of Ivy College [Willard Waterman]
Mr. Charles Meriweather member of the Board of Governors of Ivy College [Gale Gordon]
Penny, the housekeeper [Gloria Gordon]
Alice, the Maid and ex-WAC [Bea Benaderet]
Professor Heaslip [Alan Reed]
Professor Joseph 'Joe' Warren [Arthur Q. Bryan]
Calhoun Gaddy [Barton Yarborough]
Miss Louisa Tate, housekeeper [Elizabeth Patterson]
Officer Grogan [James Gleason]
Miss Goodsen, Dr. Hall's Personal Secretary [Lee Patrick]
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s) Thendon 'Don' Quinn, Walter B. Newman, Hector Chevigny, Cameron Blake, Leonard St. Clair, Gene Stone, Jerome Lawrence, Robert E. Lee, Robert Sinclair, John Di Grazio, Barbara Merlin, Milton Merlin, Philip Nelson, Ronald Colman
Music Direction: Henry Russell [Composer/Conductor]
Musical Theme(s): "The Halls of Ivy" by Henry Russell and Vic Knight
Announcer(s): Don Stanley [Auditions]; Ken Carpenter, Frank Martin, Hy Averback
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
113
Episodes in Circulation: 90 (includes two auditions)
Total Episodes in Collection: 89 (includes two auditions)
Provenances:


The Halls of Ivy NBC Orthacoustic transcription label

Billboard magazine review of The Halls of Ivy from January 28 1950
Billboard magazine review of The Halls of Ivy from January 28 1950

Billboard magazine updated a previous review of the CBS-Television version of The Halls of Ivy on April 23 1955
Billboard magazine updated a previous review of the CBS-Television version of The Halls of Ivy on April 23 1955
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide. Special thanks to Walt Pattinson for his helpful suggestions on improving the accuracy and readability of our logs below.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the radioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

We invite you to compare our fully provenanced research with the The Halls of Ivy log from the OTRR. We've also provided a screen shot of their current log for comparison, HERE, to protect our own further due diligence.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

Contrary to the OTRR's assertions on their archive.org 'certified accurate' The Halls of Ivy page, the episode they refer to as "The Leslie Hoff Painting" was not scripted by Ronald Colman. It was scripted by Cameron Blake and Don Quinn. Ronald Colman did, however, write the script for Episode No. 48, "The Goya Bequest" which aired on January 24, 1951. Any one of the OTRR's 'quality listeners' would have heard both credits announcements had any of them actually listened to the two episodes. As with most of what the OTRR 'certifies' as 'accurate', it would appear that few of their membership actually listen to anything they certify as 'accurate.' More's the pity.

Nor, as the OTRR represents, were there ever 110 actual broadcasts of The Halls of Ivy. There were only 109. They apparently arrived at their inaccurate math by trusting the notoriously inaccurate The Halls of Ivy commercial cassette catalog of The Vintage Radio Place for their log details. Both The Vintage Radio Place and OTRR logs cite a Season Three premiere date of September 26, 1951, but Pete Kelly's Blues occupied that spot in the web lineup of the era and aired its last epsiode on that date. The Halls of Ivy's third season premiere actually aired on October 3, 1951 to great fanfare across the U.S. and Canada.

Nor, as the OTRR alleges, did Nabisco ever sponsor The Halls of Ivy over Radio. It wasn't until two years after the Radio version of The Halls of Ivy was cancelled that Nabsico--and later International Harvester--sponsored the CBS-Television version of The Halls of Ivy for one season. We have no idea whatsoever where the OTRR obtains its 'facts', but they seem more inclined to continually revise history than report history in most instances.

This fine, inspirational and thoroughly delightful production has long been one of the most offensively titled programs to surface from the Golden Age of Radio. Many of the anecdotal titles that have evolved over the years represent some of the most ham-fisted, and in some cases most offensively and inappropriately titled programs to be preserved from the era. Topping the list--hands-down--is the unbelievably and insensitively titled Episode No. 94, for 37 years apocryphally titled, "The Lame Girl and the Hypochondriac." We've seen any number of rude, insensitive and inappropriately titled episodes over the past fifteen months that we've devoted to our attempts to correctly document and catalog our first 300 Golden Age Radio program catalogs of the era. But this particular title is emblematic of the utterly offensive and insensitive treatment accorded this national treasure we refer to as Golden Age Radio and which the rest of the vintage Radio collecting community insists on referring to as simply 'otr', or old-time radio.

Insulting this timeless national treasure by ignominiously referring to it as 'old-time' anything is offensive enough, but apocryphal titles such as "The Lame Girl and the Hypochondriac" are simply beyond the pale. Not only is such a title offensive to the vintage Radio collecting community at large, but it's an absolute insult to the brilliant cast and supporting technicians that assembled and broadcast this exceptionally fine series. The actual title, as promoted to the newspapers of the era was, "A Little Child Shall Lead Them," an altogether more appropriate and sensitive title for an episode so sensitively and lovingly mounted by both NBC and the entire The Halls of Ivy production company. But to have such a ridiculous and offensive anecdotal title continue in such wide circulation associated with a production as fine as The Halls of Ivy demeans not only the entire The Halls of Ivy production staff, but the vintage Radio preservation community in general.


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here are the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







The Halls of Ivy Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
49-06-22
--
Dr. Hall's Reappointment
Y
[Audition before live audience with Gale Gordon and Edna Best]
49-06-23
--
Dr. Hall's Reappointment
Y
[Audition, shorter, no live audience, commercial pitch to potential sponsors; Peter Leeds as 'Pushy' Morgan]
[Truncated]
50-01-06
1
Dr. Hall's Reappointment
Y
[Premiere]

50-01-01 Zanesville Signal
Don't forget the new show starring Mr. And Mrs. Ronald Colman which bows in next Friday night at 8 o'clock over WHIZ NBC! The new program, written by Don Quinn of "Fibber McGee and Molly" scripting fame, is called "Halls of Ivy." It's a humorous but penetrating insight into the campus life of "Dr. William Todhunter Hall," a serious-minded college President (Ronald Colman), and his vivacious wife, "Victoria" (Mrs. Colman), a one-time English variety star.

50-01-05 Titonka Topic
After 30 years of acting--on the stage, in silent and talking pictures and in guest shots on the air--Ronald Colman has embarked on his own radio series (NBC Friday evenings). The applause he and Benita Hume Colman received after their four appearances on Jack Benny's show pursuaded them. "The Halls of Ivy" presents them as a college president and his wife.

50-01-06 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): new comedy series starring Ronald Colman and Benita Hume (Mrs. Colman) as college president and his unpredictable wife, a former musical comedy star.

50-01-06 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30—KFI—Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Coleman premiere tonight on their first radio series, "The Halls of Ivy" . . .
for all who have: 'enjoyed this couple when they have appeared together on the airways before, this should be a weekly treat.
50-01-13
2
Mr. Wellman's 'Student' Editorial
Y
[Note that the newspaper description bears no resemblence to the title or content of this episode, but as indicated in the Billboard review, the 'second episode' they reviewed was indeed about the threatened explusion of a student]

50-01-13 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): college president's wife give unacademic lesson in applied psychology to timid professor. 50-01-13 San Antonio Express - WHEN AN IVY COLLEGE PROFESSOR SUFFERS STAGE fright at the prospect of making a speech,
the president's wife gives him an unacademic but effective lesson in applied psychology during the second episode of NBC's "The Halls of Ivy" comedy series Friday. Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman are co-starred as Dr. Hall and his wife, Vicky. WOAI--7 P.M.

50-01-13 Capital Times
7 p. m. — The Halls of Ivy: Mrs. Colman, as college president's wife,
gives an unorthodox lesson to a stage-frightened professor--WIBA

50-01-13 San Antonio Express
WHEN AN IVY COLLEGE PROFESSOR SUFFERS STAGE fright at the prospect of making a speech, the president's wife gives him an unacademic but effective lesson in applied psychology during the second episode of NBC's "The Halls of Ivy" comedy series Friday. Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman are costarred as Dr. Hall and his wife, Vicky. WOAI—7 P.M.

50-01-13 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30—KFI—
When an Ivy College professor suffers stage fright the president's wife gives him an unacademic lesson in applied psychology, during the second session of the "Halls of Ivy," .the comedy series that stars the "Colmans."
50-01-20
3
Gangster Money
The Gangster's Son
Y
50-01-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): college president rejects "gangster money," angers board of governors.
50-01-27
4
Ivy's Charter Day Ceremony
Y
50-01-27 San Antonio Light
The Ronald Colmans are getting into complications on the Halls of Ivy weekly comedy program. (WOAI, 7 p.m.)
50-02-03
5
Dr Bromley's Question
Y
50-02-03 Capital Times
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy: Mrs. Colman unsnarls another campus problem.

50-02-03 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30—KFI—There is competition even in the academic world, as Dr. Todhunter Hall (Ronald Colman) finds
out when
he endeavors to employ a renowned Shakespearean professor. The situation looks desperate for the "Halls of Ivy" until Victoria, his wife, comes up with a unique solution
50-02-10
6
The Snowman
N
50-02-10 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall suffers a blow to his pride.

50-02-10 Lowell Sun
50-02-10 HALLS OF IVY: Ronald Colman and Mrs. in college drama, "
First Snowfall Proves Windfall for the Prexy"; WBZ, 8.00
50-02-17
7
A Chinese Girl Runs for Office
The Chinese Student
Y
50-02-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Ronald Colman, as college president, helps fight intolerance toward Chinese student.

50-02-17 Lowell Sun
RONALD COLMAN and Mrs. Colman In "Halls of Ivy" series: "
A Chinese Girl Runs for Office""; WBZ, 8.00
50-02-24
8
The Student Thief
Y
[Note that the newspaper descriptions below bear no resemblence to the title or content of this episode]

50-02-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Vicky debates home vs. stage.

50-02-24 Lowell Sun
"HALLS OF IVY", drama series, starring Ronald Colman and Mrs. Colman, "
Vicky Gets Offer to Return to Stage"; WBZ, 8.00

Earle Ross as 'Doc' Fish
50-03-03
9
The Halls Give Advice to the Lovelorn
Merton Savada's Crush
Y
50-03-03 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall and Vicky encounter a student's love problem.

50-03-03 Lowell Sun
Ronald Colman and Mrs. "
Give Advice to the Lovelorn" in Halls of Ivy drama series; WBZ, 8.00
50-03-10
10
The Home Fires or The Footlights
Victoria's New Review
Y
50-03-10 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Home fires are brighter than footlights.

50-03-10 Lowell Sun
Ronald Colman and Mrs. in "Halls of Ivy" drama series. "
The Home Fires or The Footlights"; WBZ, 8.00
50-03-17
11
The Prexy Runs Political Offenders Out of Town
Dirty Politics
Y
50-03-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall foils a town council political move.

50-03-17 Lowell Sun
Halls of Ivy, campus drama series, starring Ronald Colman and Mrs., "
The Prexy Runs Political Offenders Out of Town"; WBZ, 8.00
50-03-24
12
Untangling A Triangle
Professor Gerhardt's Secret
Y
50-03-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): the Colmans advise professor's wife who thinks her husband philanders.

50-03-24 Lowell Sun
Ronald Colman and his Mrs., in Halls of Ivy, campus drama series: "
Untangling A Triangle"; WBZ, 8.00
50-03-31
13
The Prexy Dabbles In Music
The Ivy Chamber Music and Knockwurst Society
Y
50-03-31 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Ronald Colman plays his fipple-flute.

50-03-31 Lowell Sun
"HALL OF IVY," college campus drama with Ronald Colman and his Mrs. "
The Prexy Dabbles In Music"; WBZ, 8.00.
50-04-07
14
The Prexy and Wife Play Hooky
Toddy Plays Hooky
Y
50-04-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall and Vicky play hooky.

50-04-07 Lowell Sun
HALL OF IVY, college campus drama, starring Ronald Colman and the Mrs., "
The Prexy and Wife Play Hookey";WBZ, 8.00.
50-04-14
15
A Lost Dog Worth A Million Dollars
Mrs Foster's Lost Dog
Y
[Note that the newspaper descriptions below bear no resemblence to the title or content of this episode]

50-04-14 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): a problem in book-publishing.

50-04-14 Lowell Sun
RONALD COLEMAN.and wife "Halls of Ivy," campus drama. "
The Prexy Has Deadline Troubles"; WBZ, 8.00

50-04-14 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30—KFI—Dr. Hall, Ronald Coleman, and his wife, are in a' quandry on tonight's "Halls of Ivy" program. After spending four years writing a biography of an obscure philosopher he learns that one of his colleagues is engaged in the same work. Which one shall be published?
50-04-21
16
A Speeding Ticket and A Loverly Bunch of Coconuts
Traffic and Cocoanuts
Y
[Poor recording]

50-04-21 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall gets a traffic ticket.

50-04-21 La Crosse Tribune
HALLS OF IVY, starring Ronald Colman, is easily the biggest new comedy hit of the 1949-50 radio season. During tonight's broadcast on WKBH-NBC at 7:00 P.M., the Colmans deal with a domestic crisis when a ticket for speeding threatens to interfere with an amateur musical show.
50-04-28
17
The Prexy's Literary Prize
The Scofield Prize
Y
50-04-28 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Ronald Colman hears he has won a $20,000 prize.

50-04-28 Lowell Sun
RONALD COLEMAN and wife in Halls of Ivy, drama. "
The Prexy's Literary Prize"; WBZ, 8.00

50-04-28 Long Beach Press-Telegram
8:30—KFI—Dr. William Todhunter Hall is told that he has won a $20,000 literary prize and immediately sets out to build a home for retired college presidents and get a fur coat for his wife. But it turns out that the real winner Is a student of "Ivy College" who has given all the credit to Dr. Hall.
50-05-05
18
Vicky Charms A Student's Mother
Student Actress
Y
[The Ivy Glee Club sings the entire "Halls of Ivy" ballad]

50-05-01 Wisconsin State Journal
TIP O' THE MORNING: "The Halls of Ivy" will move to-a new. time-period next week.
Beginning May 10, it will be on WIBA and WTBA-FM at 7:p.m. Wednesdays.

50-05-05 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Vicky lends the light touch to a college problem.

Ronald Colman announces the new day and time for the series
50-05-10
19
'Brutal Truth'
Mrs Whitney's Statue
Y
[Moves to Wednesdays]

50-05-10 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mr. And Mrs. Ronald Colman's program moves to Wednesday nights; Dr. Hall faces problem of art for money's sake.

50-05-10 Long Beach Press-Telegram
6:00— KFI— "The Halls of Ivy," co-starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman,
moves to this new time spot tonight. This time they struggle with a problem when a wealthy patroness offers them a piece of sculpture which is a monstrosity. Can they keep "Ivy College" artistically pure and not forego the fat endowment attached to the gilt?

Gale Gordon as Charles Meriweather
50-05-17
20
Doctor Abel Kandor of Ivy
Dr. Abel
Y
50-05-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): student decides to put his father through college.

The Vic Knight and Henry Russell composition, 'Drink, Drink, Drink' is first performed on-air.
50-05-24
21
The Medical Student and 'The Champ'
Y
50-05-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): opposites attract.

Ken Christy as Mr. Packard, Sheldon Leonard as 'Beans Philips' and Stacy Harris as Terry Ryan
50-05-31
22
The George Sexton Endowment
The Sexton Award
Y
50-05-31 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): board of governors needles Dr. Hall for more endowments.

50-05-31 Long Beach Press-Telegram
6:00—KFI—Dr. William Todhunter Hall and his good wife, Vicky, are preparing to take it easy as the final exams are on at the "Halls of Ivy." But with the students so busily engaged the board of governors takes this time to needle him for more endowments.
50-06-07
23
Another D-Day
D-Day
Y
50-06-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): farming vs the law.

50-06-07 La Crosse Tribune
HALLS OF IVY
will put white-collar man in overalls to save a student from becoming a lawyer during the Ronald Colman comedy show at 7:00 tonight on WKBH-NBC. The college president, played by Colman, helps a student convince his father that he should be a farmer
50-06-14
24
The Stolen First Edition
Y
[Streamload-damaged recording]

50-06-11 Lowell Sun
Ronald Colman is Hollywood's absent-minded professor just before his air show, "Halls of Ivy," hits the mike. Mrs. C. tested him out the other day five minutes before airtime. "Ronnie,"'
said Bonita, "I feel faint and I don't think I'll go on this time." Colman beamed back: "Fine, Bonita, but let's talk about it after we do the show."

50-06-14 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Vicky buys rare book for 50 cents, runs into trouble.

50-06-14 La Crosse Tribune
HALLS OF IVY has a mystery of its own at 7:00 tonight when the college president's wife, as played by Mrs. Ronald Colman, comes home with a rare book she bought for 50 cents. The bargain calls for some tall explaining when it's discovered that the book was mistakenly removed from the college library by a young assistant.
50-06-21
25
The Bentheimers and the Census
Y
50-06-21 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): seven children and a trailer camp on the campus.

50-06-21 La Crosse Tribune
HALLS OF IVY has e housing problem during the comedy broadcast at 7:00 tonight on WKBH-NBC.
The problem consists of a family with seven children and a trailer home, who create a whole range of problems. It isn't until the census taker provides an unexpected solution that peace returns to the campus
50-06-28
26
The Annual 'Faculty Car' Raffle
Y
50-06-28 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): faculty members obey graduates at Senior Prom time, and Dr. Hall uncovers a tragic problem.

50-06-28 La Crosse Tribune
TRADITION turns the tables at Ivy College when faculty members are ordered to do students' bidding during the broadcast at 7:00 p. m. tonight on WKBH-NBC. But when one of the professors refuses to act as a chauffeur for a student, the comedy takes a serious turn. The college president, played by Ronald Colman, is faced with a need to divert prom funds to save the professor's eyesight. The problem, however, Is. solved in an unexpectedly light-hearted manner
50-07-05
27
Dr. Hall's Annual Poetry Reading
Poetry Reading
Y
50-07-05 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): love blossoms over a Bunsen burner.

Famous dialectician
Robert Easton appears as 'The Moose". Alan Reed as Professor Heaslip
50-07-12
28
The Education of Annie Bell's Father
The Education Of Annie Belle
Y
50-07-12 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): college president meets opposition of girl student's father.

50-07-12 Long Beach Press-Telegram
6:30--KFI--Dr. and Mrs. Hall take a girl into their home as a housekeeper so that she may work her way through college. Her father is opposed to the plan until the Ivy President proves to him that his own education has been neglected. This
winds up the season for "Halls of Ivy".

[End of Season One]





50-09-13
29
Ivy vs. The United Nations
N
50-09-13 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mr. And Mrs. Ronald Colman return to the air with chapter about
dispute between two fraternities.

50-09-13 Long Beach Press-Telegram
6:30--KFI--After a summer vacation Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman will be back for their second season as the stars of "Halls of Ivy." Tonight
Dr. Hall and "Vickey" are called upon to arbitrate a dispute between the Dekes and the Delts.
50-09-20
30
A Hazing at Ivy
N
50-09-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mrs. Ronald Colman arbitrates a dispute over hazing.

50-09-20 Long Beach Press-Telegram
6:30--KFI--
Hazing at Ivy College is taboo, and it becomes the duty of "Prexy" Hall to stop it on "The Halls of Ivy." Tradition also call for prexy's wife "Vicky," Mrs. Colman, to arbitrate all hazing matters.
50-09-27
31
Pride and Prejudice
The Leslie Hough Painting
Y
50-09-27 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): prexy turns down half-million-dollar endowment.
50-10-04
32
The Bentley-Brooke Triangle
The New English Teacher

Henry Russell and Vic Knight combined to create a best selling record from the catchy 'The Halls of Ivy' theme as well as the 'Drink, Drink, Drink' song introduced in The Halls of Ivy Program No. 20 'Doctor Abel Kandor of Ivy' --Billboard magazine of September 9 1950

Y
50-10-04 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA):
handsome new professor seeks advice after prexy's wife enrolls in his course.

50-10-04 Capital Times
7 p. m.—Halls of Ivy:
Prexy Colman suspects a triangle involves Vicky—WIBA.

50-10-04 Ruthven Free Press
Ronald and Benita Colman had no idea when they embarked on "The'Halls of Ivy", series last January, that they were launching a show that would become so popular so soon. "Really adu]t entertainment'' is the description given by its many devoted listeners. Not only the show, but its theme song immediately became popular; in fact, so many people wanted a recording of the song that a record has been made fay the group that sings it on the NBC Wednesday night broadcasts. College presidents and faculty members have praised the series; students lament the impossibility of finding a college president like Colman.
50-10-11
33
Dry Rot and Termites at Ivy
Phone Problems
Y
50-10-11 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman.

Robert Easton as 'Central' Park
50-10-18
34
Five On 'Prince D' in The Third
Scandal
Y
[Poor recording]

50-10-18 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman.

50-10-18 Oakland Tribune
Dr. William Todhunter Hall, the alias Ronald Colman uses on "Halls of Ivy," one of the most literate comedies on the air, was explaining campus conduct for young teachers to a young teacher named Brooke the other day. It seemed to make a good deal of sense so I'll pass it along. "We don't live by any hard and fast rules here, Brooke. The regulation things: drive on the right side of the street, honor thy father and thy mother, and don't shoot any members of the board
of governors between September and June.''
50-10-25
35
Long-Distance Chess with Purdue
N
50-10-25 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Pres. F.L. Hovde of Purdue university presents testimonial to Ronald Colman as president of Ivy college.

Long Beach Press-Telegram
6:30— KFI— Ronald Colman. as "Dr.. William Todhunter Hall," president of mythical Ivy College, calls Frederick L. Hovde, president of Purdue University, for one of his long-distance chess moves.

50-10-25 Capital Times
A REAL-LIFE university president will salute a make-believe prexy on "The Halls of Ivy" broadcast over WIBA and WIBA-FM at 7 tonight. Dr. Frederick L. Hovde, president of Purdue university, fly to Hollywood to present a testimonial to Ronald Colman, who plays Dr. William Todhunter Hall, president of Ivy college, on the comedy series.
"For too many years," says Dr. Hovde, "too many radio programs have given a false impression of campus life, a bombastic depiction of a musical comedy existence with moronic youths, lovesick coeds, silly sentimentalism, and overemphasis on sports.
'The Halls of Ivy," on the contrary, describes college life as it actually is. This show has an adult treatment which is a refreshing change from the juvenile version of college days that creates a wrong concept of universities in the minds of those who have not had a college education."
Dr. Hovde, former all-American football player and Rhodes scholar, is making the trip under auspices of Phi Delta Theta fraternity, of which he is a member. He is representing Phi Delta Theta fraternity chapters at 113 colleges and over 60,000 alumni who have officially approved the citation Colman will receive.
50-11-01
36
The Model Co-ed
N
50-11-01 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): model co-ed tries to get herself expelled.

50-11-01 Capital Times
7 p.m,—Halls of Ivy:
Ronald and Benita Colman solve problem of model co-ed who tries to get expelled—WIBA.
50-11-08
37
The National Music Festival
N
50-11-08 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): talented music student faces expulsion over nonpayment of tuition.

50-11-08 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY campus drama, with Ronald Column and wife, Benita. "
The National Music Festival"; WBZ, 8.00
50-11-15
38
The Glee Club Serenades The Halls
N
50-11-15 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): glee club serenades Dr. and Mrs. Hall.
50-11-22
39
Jack Benny Visits Ivy
N
[AFRS only]

50-11-22 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Jack Benny visits the campus.
50-11-29
40
The Honor Student's Dilemma
Y
50-11-29 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): co-ed's conscience causes confession.
50-12-06
41
Brain vs. Brawn
N
50-12-06 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): brain vs. brawn in fight for endowment.
50-12-13
42
The Snow Queen
N
50-12-13 Wisconsin State Journal - 7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): prexy uses election of snow queen to resolve dating dilemma.

50-12-13 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY: Ronald Colmans pay homage to a Snow Queen, campus drama WBZ, 8.00.
50-12-20
43
The Christmas Eve Kidnapping
N
50-12-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): hoodlums try to kidnap student on Christmas eve.
50-12-27
44
Marriage Relations Trouble
N
50-12-27 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): a proposed marriage relations course runs into trouble when a campus romance leads to a secret marriage.
51-01-03
45
Professor Barrett's Play
Y
51-01-03 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Pres. Hall copes with ambitious professor's dull play.

51-01-03 Capital Times
7 p.m. — The Halls of Ivy:
"Prexy" Ronald Colman and the problems of a playwriting professor—
WIBA.

With
Elliott Lewis as Harry Nolan and Norman Fields as Professor Barrett
51-01-10
46
A Shared Discovery
N
51-01-10 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall and Vickey solve problems of teacher and pupil who make same chemical discovery.

51-01-10 Capital Times
7 p.m.—The Halls of Ivy: the Colmans solve moral problem of a simultaneous chemical discovery—WIBA.
51-01-17
47
PhD's and Their Foibles
N
51-01-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Toddy and Vicky uncover foibles of doctors of philosophy.

51-01-17 La Crosse Tribune
HALLS OF IVY, the 7:00 p. m. WKBH-NBC comedy program starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, discover what makes doctors of philosophy the way they are during tonight's broadcast. The president of Ivy college and his ex-actress wife prove that even in a world of mental giants, people actually know only what they have experienced.
51-01-24
48
The Goya Bequest
Y
[Episode written by Ronald Colman]

51-01-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Vicky invades Prexy's tax study.

51-01-24 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY, starring Ronald Colman and wife, Benita. "The Prexy and His Tax Form"; WBZ, 8.00.
51-01-31
49
The Case of the Missing Birth Certificate
Professor Warren's Retirement
Y
51-01-31 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): retiring history professor can't prove he was born.

51-01-31 Lowell Sun
HALLS- OF IVY, slarring Ronald Colman and wife, Benita. "Case of the Missing Birth Certificate" ; WBZ 8 00
51-02-07
50
An Astronomical Solution
N
51-02-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): astronomy professor faces loss of job.
51-02-14
51
Dr Hall Threatens to Resign
N
51-02-14 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): visit to rival campus starts rumors and trouble.
51-02-21
52
Calhoun Gaddy
Y
[Poor recording; end truncated]

51-02-21 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): 38-year-old freshman spouts Shakespeare with southern accent.

Barton Yarborough as Calhoun Gaddy.
51-02-28
53
The Legrand Award and Hell Week
The French Scholarship
N
[AFRS only]

51-02-28 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): snowball fight traps French visitor

51-02-28 Corpus Christi Times
Visiting French dignitaries get quite a shock when they're caught in the midst of a snow fight on Ivy campus. And it takes some tall explaining by Dr. and Mrs. Hall to set things right Don't miss The Halls of Ivy at 7:00 p.m.
51-03-07
54
The Case for Romance
Eddie Grey's Wedding

Y
51-03-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): the Colmans recommend marrying for love.

51-03-07 Capital Times
WHEN A COUPLE of Ivy college students who think love is old-fashioned plan to marry to pool their' expenses, Ronald olman (Dr. Hall) and Mrs. Colman ( V i c k y ) make a case for romance on "The Halls of Ivy"
broadcast at 7 tonight over WIBA and WIBA-FM.
The prexy and his ex - actress wife recreate a scene from their own honeymoon days and this example teaches the younger couple the error of their ways.
A new love song, composed by Music Director Henry Russell especially for this week's story helps to put the point over.
Ken Carpenter announces "The Halls of Ivy," which was created by Don Quinn. This week's script was written by Quinn and Director Nat Wolf.
51-03-14
55
A Problem of The Heart
His Father's Image
Y
51-03-14 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): president consoles ex-athlete whose son doesn't follow his footsteps.

Barton Yarborough as Calhoun Gaddy.
51-03-21
56
The Chinese White Elephant
N
51-03-21 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): eccentric recluse gives college an ornate Chinese chair.
51-03-28
57
The Co-ed Night Club Singer
N
51-03-28 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Lucille Norman, guest; the Colmans find co-ed working as entertainer in night club.
51-04-04
58
Campus Unrest and the Draft
N
51-04-04 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): students' uncertain status leads them to vandalism.
51-04-11
59
The Banned Book
N
51-04-11 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): big city bans professor's book.
51-04-18
60
Romiette and Julio
Y
51-04-18 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): the Ronald Colmans resolve problem about school play.
51-04-25
61
'Note the Quote' Visits Ivy
Y
[Poor recording; end truncated]

51-04-25 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall competes with hot-dog salesman in radio quiz.
51-05-02
62
Campus Unrest and the Draft
Champ Waterford
Champ Waterfield
Y
[Opens with Peabody Award announcement; Repeat, live performance of 51-04-04 in Washington D.C., at the request of the 39th Annual Dinner of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce]

51-05-02 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): repeat broadcast of episode about campus vandals, from annual dinner of U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

51-05-02 San Antonio Express
The U. S. Chamber of Commerce will play host to Mr. and Mrs, Ronald Colman at its annual dinner Wednesday in Washington, when the Colmans will present their Peabody award-winning, show. "The Halls of Ivy" (WOAI, 7 p.m.). It will be a repetition of the program aired April 4, which was widely praised. The story deals with vandalism at "Ivy College."

51-05-02 Reno Evening Gazette
HALLS OF IVY which is heard at 6:30 tonight as tne winner of the llth annual GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY AWARD in the drama category, for mixing wit and charm with liberal and enlightened social philosophy." Mr and Mrs Ronald Colman Btar as THE HALLS OF IVY.

51-05-02 Capital Times
Another of tonight's highlights on the WIBA and WIBA-FM schedule will be "The Halls of Ivy," at 7, to be presented from the annual dinner of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D. C. . Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman will repeat, by request, their script of April 4, in which they dealt with the problem of vandalism involving students about to be drafted.
51-05-09
63
Glory Golightly
Gloria Golightly
Y
[End clipped]

51-05-09 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): folk singer substitutes for coloratura soprano in college concert.

51-05-09 Corpus Christi Times
KRIS--When a famous coloratura soprano breaks her engagement at Ivy College, Dr. and Mrs. Hall substitute a guitar playing folk singer, to the consternation of the Board of Governors. Don't miss "The Halls of Ivy" at 7:00

Barton Yarborough as Calhoun Gaddy.
51-05-16
64
The Eleventh Commandment
N
51-05-16 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY, campus drama, with Ronald Colman and Mrs. Colman. Tribute to Alpha Delta Phi, oldest sorority. Mrs. Colman receives "First Lady of Campus" citation; WBZ, 8.
51-05-23
65
Cook's Night Out
Y
[Poor recording; end truncated]

51-05-23 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Prexy tries to cook a meal.
51-05-30
66
Budding Scientist or Blooming Idiot
The Noblingdale Mathematics Award
Finals Day Award
Y
51-05-30 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): problem of science student who won't study for cultural courses.

51-05-30 Corpus Christi Times
A science student who hasn't the time for cultural arts is the current problem of The Halls of Ivy 7:00. Dr. and Mrs. Hall (Ronald and Benita Colman) tax their ingenuity to help this young intellectual see the light.

With
Jeanne Bates and Eddie Firestone
51-06-06
67
The Egyptology Expert
Vickie and the New Professor's Wife
N
51-06-06 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Toddy and Vicky unmask an imposter.

51-06-06 Capital Times
7 p. m. — The Halls of Ivy: Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman unmask
Egyptology Expert" as former actress — WIBA.
51-06-13
68
Finals Season Doldrums
Finals Season
Y
51-06-13 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): final exams leave the Halls with no problems to solve.

51-06-13 Capital Times
7 p. m. — The Halls of Ivy: final exams put campus in quiet mood—WIBA.

51-06-13 Long Beach Press-Telegram
ON RADIO . . . More than 100 United States Marines from Camp Pendleton will visit the "Halls of Ivy" program tonight when it is aired from KFI at 6:30
51-06-20
69
The Halls Foil A Raid on Public Funds
Pork Barrel Politics
Y
51-06-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): mayor tries to tax Ivy students, but the Halls block him.

51-06-20 Portsmouth Times
You can't teach good government at college with a sample of bad government sitting on the college doorstep. Dr. Hall proves the point in "The Halls of Ivy" episode on NBC tonight at 8.
When the mayor of the town digs up an old law in order to tax Ivy College students for money to build an unnecessary addition to the City Hall, Dr. and Mrs. Hall find an old law on their own that tops the mayor's.

51-06-20 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY: "The Ronald Colmans
Foil a Raid on Public Funds" ; WBZ. 9.
51-06-27
70
Student Tries Learning Lesson the Easy Way
Commencement
N
51-06-27 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): student sells exam questions, learns a lesson from Dr. Hall.

51-06-27 Portsmouth Times
7 p.m.—NBC: A student who gets hold of a copy of the questions to be asked in a forthcoming examination and sells copies to fellow-students gets his come-uppance in the season's final, "The Halls of Ivy".

51-06-27 Long Beach Press-Telegram
RADIO This is the last airing of "The Halls of Ivy" as the Colemans depart for Europe for the summer. The show is heard over KFI at 6:30

51-06-27 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY, final drama of the season, "
Student Tries Learning Lessons the Easy Way;" Ronald Colman and wife Benita, stars; WBZ, 8.

[End of Season Two]





Announcement of return of The Halls of Ivy on October 3 1951
51-09-26 La Crosse Tribune
NEXT WEEK: Two comedy shows, each of which has opened up a completely new type of radio programming, return to WKBH-NBC.
They're the popular "Halls of Ivy" show, starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, and Groucho Marx's "You Bet
GROUCHO Your Life."
They'll both be heard on WKBH-NBC beginning next Wednesday.

51-09-26 San Mateo Times
The final session of "
Pete Kelly's Blues" will be beard over KNBC at 5:30 Wednesday night. The "Halls of Ivy" return the following Wednesday, October 3.

51-10-03
71
God Never Shuts One Door, But He Opens Another
Adoption
Y
[Premiere of Third (Final) Season; replaces Pete Kelly's Blues]

51-10-03 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman open third season.

51-10-10 Capital Times
The Colmans will be heard at 7 in the their award - winning series about a college president and his wife, a former English actress.
The first program of the season will concern a lesson in tolerance.
51-10-10
72
The Ivy Bull Editorial
Y
51-10-10 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman show college can triumph over criticism.

51-10-10 Capital Times
7 p. m.—The Halls of Ivy: college president and wife quell turmoil over campus critic— WIBA.
51-10-17
73
Contested Student Council Election
Y
[Poor recording]

51-10-17 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): 70-year-old grandmother enrolls as freshman, embarrasses her son.

51-10-17 San Mateo Times
"Dr. and Mrs, Hall" are faced with the
unusual problem of how to cope
with a 70-year-old grandmother in
the Halls of Ivy at KNBC at 8
o'clock.
51-10-24
74
Mrs 'Why,' the 70-Year-Old Coed
Y
51-10-24 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): story, postponed last week, of 70-year-old grandmother on campus.

51-10-17 Capital Times
If Don Quinn has his way — and he probably will — "The Hall of Ivy" is going to be a Broadway play.
Quinn is the creator of "Ivy,' heard as 7 p. m. Wednesdays on WIBA and WIBA-FM, and of "Fibber McGee and Molly," heard on the same stations at 8:30 p. m. Tuesdays.
In an interview in New York. Quinn said: "We've turned down four movie offers and a lot af book offers.
We want to do a Broadway play first, because the play sets up everything else."
The "we," Quinn explained means Nat Wolff, director of the radio show; Edna Best, the actress who in private life is Mrs. Wolff and Quinn himself. They'll offer it first to Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, who co-star in the radio series.
A dream of long standing, the "Ivy" radio show was born at the right psychological moment, Quinn
feels. "Radio was too big, and it would have been too fancy a show a while back," he said. "It came along in what some people call radio's declining years — I don't — and it caught on phenomenally fast.
"It's funny about this show," Quinn went on. "People come up to me and say: "I like it, but is it for everybody?' I mean busboys, bootblacks, college presidents. It's delightful to meet them face to face. They all ask if it's for everybody."
Ideas for most of the shows come out of the headlines.
"We did one on hoodlumism on college campuses," he said, "about boys who aren't sure of their draft status and feel they might as well raise Cain. We got more reaction to that script than to any other. We had to offer it to the public; sent out 700 within a week.'
Tonight's program will be the story of
a 70-year-old grandmother who creates a problem when she enrolls as a freshman in Ivy college.

Jane Morgan
as Mrs. Yates, the 70-Year-Old Coed
51-10-31
75
Football Crisis
Football Coach
Y
51-10-31 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): over-emphasis of football raises a problem.

51-10-31 The Progress
NBC — 8 Halls of Ivy "
Football Crisis"

51-10-31 Portsmouth Times
8 p.m. — NBC: Overemphasis on college football is the theme for the "Halls of Ivy" tonight. Diplomatic intervention is required of President and Mrs. Hall when a conflict arises between Ivy College's football coach and the school's board of governors. Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman are heard as the chief executive and his wife.

51-10-31 The Times
NBC — 8 Halls of Ivy "
Football Crisis;"

51-10-31 Brainerd Daily Dispatch
NEW YORK (JF)—On the air
tonight (Wednesday): NBC—7
Halls of Ivy, "
Football Crisis;"

Ken Christy as 'Coach' Delavan
51-11-07
76
Halloween Audit
Halloween
Y
51-11-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Ronald Colman and wife, Benita, in campus trouble with college pranks.

51-11-07 The Times
On the air tonight (Wednesday): NBC—8 Halls of Ivy "
Halloween Audit";

51-11-07 Brainerd Daily Dispatch
NEW YORK (JF)—On the air
tonight (Wednesday): NBC—7 Halls of Ivy, "
Hallowe'en Audit;"
51-11-14
77
The Mystery Student
The Late Student
Y
[Poor recording]

51-11-14 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): mysterious student saves the day when Halls' car breaks down.

51-11-14 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY: the Ronald Colman learn that 'philosophy and gasollne' do mix; WBZ. 8.

51-11-14 San Mateo Times
A day's vacation and all its complications will be the subject on the "Halls of Ivy"'on KNBC at 6:30.
51-11-21
78
A Minister's Son Prefers Music to The Ministry
The Minister's Son
Y
51-11-21 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): clergyman's son prefers musical career to forefathers' profession.

51-11-21 San Antonio Light
Audrey Call, violinist and composer, has written the script for this week's Halls of Ivy program starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman. Miss Call plays first violin in the orchestra for the weekly Halls of Ivy show (WOAf, 7 p. m.)

51-11-21 Lowell Sun
RONALD COLMAN and wife Benita, in Halls of Ivy sketch, "
Minister's Son Prefers Musical Career to Ministry"; WBZ, 8.
51-11-28
79
Ashes for Fire
A Loaf of Bread, A Jug of Wine, A Plug of Chewin' Tobacco
Professor Warren's Romantic Folly
Y
51-11-28 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): student gardener causes campus turmoil.

51-11-28 Oakland Tribune
Tonight at 6:30 p.m., over KNBC we may hear Ronald Colman once atain as the President of Ivy College, when he is expected to take on a student with imagination who proposes to work his way through college by growing vegetables (of all places) on the Ivy College Campus.

51-11-28 La Crosse Tribune
HALLS OF IVY adds a rural touch to itscomedy drama at 7:00 P.M., on WKBH-NBC. When a 38 year old Ivy student discovers he can't put himself through college by selling eggs,
he decides to raise vegetables too. The situation gets complicated when it's discovered that he has planted his truck garden on college property.

Sarah Selby as Fern Winthrop
51-12-05
80
The Wellman-Gaddy Farm Combine
N
[Adulterated recording; Voice of America rebroadcast]

51-12-05 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): story of student gardener,
originally scheduled last week.

51-12-05 San Mateo Times
"The Halls of Ivy" will present the story originally scheduled for last week on tonight's radio show on KNBC at 6:30...

Barton Yarborough as Calhoun Gaddy.
51-12-12
81
Professor Royce's Nostalgic Return
Y
51-12-12 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): former Ivy professor returns with memories and help.

51-12-12 Capital Times
When a former professor, 80 years old, returns for a last look at Ivy college, the president and his wife give him something to live for in tonight's story of "The Halls of Ivy," to be broadcast by WIBA and WIBA-FM at 7.
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman co-star as Dr. William Todhunter Hall, college
president, and his wife, Vicky. The former head of the English department believes his usefulness is over but his knowledge of Ivy's early days turns out to be an invaluable aid to Hall and Ivy, while his memories of "Toddy" as a freshman bring delight to Vicky.

51-12-12 Portsmouth Times
8:00 p.m.—NBC: Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Coleman star in "Halls of Ivy." Tonight's play concerns an old, former professor who believes his usefulness is over until he proves a boon for President and Mrs. Hall

William Johnstone as Dr. Lucien Royce

51-12-19
82
The Snowman

Y
51-12-19 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman
repeat Christmas story, "The Snowman," about college tradition.

51-12-19 Capital Times
An "all-time" favorite of "The Halls of Ivy" will be repeated when Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman re-enact "The Snowman" over WIBA and WIBA-FM at 7 tonight.
This was one of the "Ivy" scripts responsible for the program's winning the Peabody Award.
"The Snowman" is the story of an Ivy college tradition. Students build snow men on professor's lawns in sizes to match their academic popularity. When Colman, as Pres. William Todhunter Hall, finds no snowman on his lawn, he fears the worst and his wife, Vicky (played by Mrs. Colman), blames herself and her stage background for his fall from grace. Before the half-hour is over, matters are set straight,
51-12-26
83
'Sweet Sorrow'
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

51-12-26 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): "prexy" becomes an actor.

51-12-26 San Mateo Times
"Vicky" coaches the Ivy Dramatic club for it's annual play and "Dr. Hall" tastes stardom for t brief moment on Halls of Ivy on KN'BC at 8 o'clock.
52-01-02
84
Hell Week vs. Help Week
Y
52-01-02 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): fraternity hazing undergoes a change when Ronald Coleman, as president of Ivy college, takes drastic action.

52-01-02 Capital Times
Fraternity hazing comes under fire on "The Halls of Ivy," starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, heard tonight at 7 on station WIBA.
D r. Hall , played by Coleman, as president of Ivy college, has been disturbed by the problem for many years. When an ivy student is rushed to a hospital as the result of hazing ritual, Dr. Hall takes drastic action. He proposes diverting h a z i n g into helpfulness and the idea meets with instant success

52-01-02 Albuquerque Journal
Dr. and Mrs. Hall acquire a housekeeper when "MISS TATE" Elizabeth Patterson Joins the HALLS OF IVY Listen Tonight at 6:30 P. M.
52-01-09
85
Jerry Carter's Economics Lesson
Nelson Carter's Son
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-01-09 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): story of student who wants to change teachers, written by C.W. Parke, professor emeritus of English, University of Cincinnati.

52-01-09 Capital Times
7 p. m.—Halls of Ivy: Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman in story of student who wants to leave tough teacher, written by retired Cincinnati professor and Don Quinn—WIBA.

52-01-09 Syracuse Herald Journal
A real-life professor, Clyde W. Parke, English prof, at the University of Cincinnati, is co-author of tonight's Halls of Ivy script on WSYR at 8.
52-01-16
86
Art Poses Controversy on Campus
Art Exhibit
Y
52-01-16 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): controversy over college art show.

HALLS OF IVY, starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, "
Art Poses Controversy on Campus" ; WBZ. 8.
52-01-23
87
Let Slip The Hot Dogs of War
Medal of Honor
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-01-23 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): college president copes with problem of co-ed who's ashamed of her father.
52-01-30
88
A Track Star Regains His Balance
Track Star
Y
52-01-30 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): athletics vs. academic standing.

52-01-30 Capital Times
7 p. m. — The Halls of Ivy: track star leaves school because he thinks scholarship, is more important to him than athletics—WIBA.
52-02-06
89
A Mysterious Glee Club Donation
Glee Club Donation
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-02-06 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): mysterious donor backs tour of college glee club.

52-02-06 Long Beach Press- Telegram
Time Changed
Effective tonight the Halls of Ivy radio show, usually heard at 6:30 will be changed to 7 p. m. It is received in this area over KFI.

52-02-06 Oakland Tribune
Tonight all 71 chapters of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity are uniting to pay tribute to this program that "most typifies college life." Scrolls will be presented (but after the program) to Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman (neither of whom went to college) by what the fraternity calls its "Moonlight Girl," Miss Virginia Witmer of Santa Ana. The "Moonlight Girl" is selected each year by ballot from the 17 sororities represented "at U.C.L.A The scroll presentation will take place at Hollywood's NBC studios, with one representative from each of the 71 chapters of Phi Sigma Kappa."
52-02-13
90
A Question of Loyalty
Dean Huxley
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-02-13 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): English professor and dean of women tangle over Pres. Hall.

52-02-13 Oakland Tribune
7-00 p.m. KNBC—HALLS OF IVY, Dr Lynn Townsend White, president of Mills College, Oakland, is honored on tonight's program.

52-02-13 The Post-Standard
Ronald Colman, who plays the role of William Todhunter Hall, president of Ivy Colleec,' in "TheHalls of Ivy" at8 p. m. Wednesdays over WSYR, tonight will start his salute to college presidents.
The first personage to be so honored will be Dr. Lynn White Jr.. of Mills College, Oakland, Calif., long an ardent fan of the radio program. The salute to the hard-working college executives, who seldom receive accolades, was conceived by Don Quinn, creator of "The Hails of Ivy."
Workers and listeners alike get into the. act on the writing job for the mythical Ivy campus. The powerful "college try" feeling has projected itself to real campuses.
University professors and presidents become so engrossed in the problems of Colman, who co-stars with liis wife, Benita, in the comedy-drama program, that they write in "suggestions. Many are suitable for scripts.
For example. Prof. Clyde W. Parke of the University of Cincinnati, sent Mr. Colman a story idea in lieu of a fan letter, stating that he found working on it a welcome change from editing textbooks and encyclopedia articles. Prof. Parke would up with co-author credits with Quinn on a story which demonstrated that a teacher could be a good instructor without winning a popularity contest.

52-02-13 San Mateo Times
Dr. Hall comes in for criticism from the dean of women on the Halls of Ivy. heard over KNBC at 7 o'clock. (Note the new times.)

52-02-13 Reno Evening Gazette
The popular series of THE HALLS OF IVY starring Mr. and Mrs Ronald Caiman is heard one-half hour later Wednesdays so tonight tune in at 7:00 o'clock to hear Dr. and Mrs. Hall defend themselves to the college's 'dean of women.
52-02-20
91
'The Voice' of The XIVY Vine
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-02-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): mysterious voice broadcasts gossip on campus station.

52-02-20 Capital Times
7 p.m.—The Halls of Ivy: radio gossiper on campus station stirs up Mr. Wellman. chairman of school's board—WIBA

52-02-20 San Mateo Times
A mysterious female voice heard over the Ivy college radio station causes Dr. Hall a bit of trouble in the Halls of Ivy on KNBC at 7 o'clock.
52-02-27
92
Mr. Wellman's Overdue Book
Budget Problems
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-02-27 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA):
Mr. Wellman loses controversy over library fund.

52-02-27 San Mateo Times
Ivy college gets a donation on The Halls of Ivv heard on KNBC at 7 o'clock

52-02-27 Oakland Tribune
At 7 tonight on KNBC's "Halls of Ivy" Dr. Wm. Todhunter Hall (Ronald Colman) runs into opposition for a library fund from
a board chairman whose record shows that he owes the library $1995.45 over due fines for a book he borrowed 31 years previously.

James Gleason as Officer Grogan
52-03-05
93
'Easy' Maxwell, Astronomy Professor
The Astronomy Exam
Y
52-03-05 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): student walks out on "too easy" examination.

52-03-05 Capital Times
7 p.m.—The Halls of Ivy: college student leaves "too easy" exam in astronomy—WIBA.

52-03-05 San Antonio Express
7:00 PM.:WOAI
Dr. and Mrs. William Todhunter Hall (Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman) straighten out a serious -problem on HALLS OF mr tonight.
This program is
dedicated to President M. T. Harrington, of Texas A.&M., the fourth to be honored
by HALLS OF IVY

52-03-05 Oakland Tribune
7:00 p.m. KNBC—HALLS OF IVY. When a student walks out on an Astronomy examination because it is too easy. Dr. Hall finds he has several problems to solve.

The Halls of Ivy is awarded top honors for 1951 from National Association for Better Radio and Television
52-03-12
94
A Little Child Shall Lead Them
The Lame Girl and the Hypochondriac
Y
[Ronald Colman dedicates the show to Dr. Horace Mann Bond, president of Lincoln University, Chester County, Pennsylvania]

52-03-12 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): handicapped child gives lesson to overworked teacher.

52-03-12 San Antonio Express
7:00 P.M. WOAI
A hopelessly crippled little girl brings inspiration to everyone tonight on the HALLS OF IVY, starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman

52-03-12 Portsmouth Times
8 p.m.—NBC:
A crippled little girl is the source oJ inspiration to a self-pitying college professor on the "Halls of Ivy" program.
By observing the happiness of the handicapped child the professor comes to realize that he has been overemphasizing his own ailments.

'52-03-12 San Mateo Times
"
A Little Child Shall Lead Them" will be the topic on the "Halls of Ivy" heard on KNBC at 7 o'clock

52-03-12 Capital Times
7 p. m.—The Halls of Ivy: a professor's handicapped daughter gives a lesson to an overworked faculty member.—WIBA

Mary McGovern as Sheila Quincannon and John Brown as Professor Harmon
52-03-19
95
Founder's Day
The Oldest Living Graduate
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-03-19 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Pres. Hall calls square dances at alumni party.

52-03-19 Oakland Tribune
7:00 p.m., KNBC--HALL OF IVY, Ivy College's president, Dr. Hall welcomes visiting alumni on "
Founder's Day" and provides them with a few surprises.
52-03-26
96
Spring Fever at Ivy
Stolen Money
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-03-26 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): co-ed suspected of campus theft.

52-03-26 San Antonio Express
7:00 P.M. WOAI
A possible thief among the co-eds at Ivy College poses a problem for Ronald and Benita Colman, co-starring as President and Mrs. William Todhunter Hall on the HALLS OF IVY

52-03-26 San Mateo Times
The possibility of the existence of a thief among the coeds troubles Dr. and Mrs. Hall on the Halls of Ivy, heard over KNBC at 7 o'clock
52-04-02
97
The Academic Worth of A Professor
Professor Grimes
Y
52-04-02 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): professor faces unjust dismissal.

52-04-02 Long Beach Press-Telegram
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman will be heard as the heads of Ivy College saving a professor from dismissal on the HALLS OF IVY broadcast on KFI at 7.

52-04-02 Capital Times
7 p.m. — The Halls of Ivy: Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman greet members of National, Assn. of Deans of Women, present problem of professor facing unjust dismissal—WIBA.

52-04-02 San Antonio Express
7:00 P.M. WOAI
The HALLS OF' IVY, starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, will play hosts to 300 women educators who are in Los Angeles attending the convention
of the National Association of Deans of Women.

52-04-02 Tucson Daily Citizen
6:30— Halls of Ivy. Ronald Colman |
conies to v the de'ferise'.of a -young
professor- who. has been unjustly
dismissed (KVOA).

52-04-02 Lowell Sun
HALLS OF IVY campus drama, Ronald and Mrs. Colman. "
Academic Worth of a Professor" : WBX, 8.
52-04-09
98
The Secret Faculty Marriage
Y
52-04-09 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): professors' secret marriage poses problem for prexy.

52-04-09 Long Beach Press-Telegram
Two professors who marry contrary to college rules throw a problem into the laps of President and Mrs. William Todhunter on the HALLS OF IVY show at 7 on KFI. Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman are the perennial stars of this program.
52-04-16
99
Mademoiselle from Sorbonne
The French Exchange Student
Y
[Ronald Colman dedicates the episode to E. Wilson Lyon, president of Pomona College, Claremont, CA]

52-04-16 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): student from France stirs up freedom-of-speech controversy.

52-04-16 San Antonio Express
7 P.M. WOAI
An exchange student whom Ivy College s t u d e n t s have d u b b e d "
Mademoiselle from Sorbonne," starts a miniature conflagration on the campus and Dr. and Mrs. HaJl straighten the situation out to everyone's satisfaction on the HALLS OF IVY.

Gladys Holland as Eloise Jenet
52-04-23
100
Sonnet or Canzone
Professor Walden's Son
Y
52-04-23 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): student fears he'll flunk his father's course.

52-04-23 Tucson Daily Citizen
6:30— Halls of Ivy- --An Ivy student who -has, fears of flunking a course is assisted by the college prexy. KVOA

52-04-23 San Mateo Times
The fears of a student, son of an Ivy college professor, that he will flunk, take up the time of Dr. Hall on the Halls of Ivy on KNBC at 8 o'clock.

Lee Patrick as Dr. Hall's Secretary, Miss Goodsen [Ken Carpenter is heard crediting Virginia Gregg with the performance. This ending may have been spliced into the close]
52-04-30
101
Faculty Follies Act I
Y
[Ronald Colman dedicates the 100th performance to Tufts University, Medford, MA and its President, Leonard Carmichael on their own 100th Anniversary]

52-04-30 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): 100th performance; Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman in "Faculty Follies."

52-04-30 Post-Standard
The award-winning radio show,
Halls of Ivy, celebrates its 100th performance tonight, 8 p.m., WSYR. Despite this relative brief life, Halls of Ivy has raked in more awards than dozens of shows put together. Holders of the coveted Peabody Award, it has been recognized not only in radio and entertainment circles but by educators thruout the country. The universal award for the Halls goes for its ability to produce good entertainment on an adult level, combining humor and sophistication, philopophy and common sense. A masterwork in its field.

52-04-30 Long Beach Press-Telegram
"The Halls of Ivy" with Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Coleman will celebrate the 100th performance on the network on KFI at 7.

52-04-30 San Antonio Express
7:00 P.M. WOAI
To celebrate its 100th performance, the HALLS OF IVY, starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, will present one of its rare musical themes, "
Faculty Follies." 7:00 P.M. KMAC .
52-05-07
102
Faculty Follies Act II (Conclusion)
Y
52-05-07 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mr. Wellman threatens to cancel "Faculty Follies."

52-05-07 Portsmouth Times
8 p.m.—NBC: Dr. and Mrs. Hall (Mr and Mrs. Eonald Colman) are faced with a problem when the chairman of the board of Ivy College threatens to cancel the "
Faculty Follies" during the "Halls of Ivy" broadcast.
52-05-14
103
A Contralto Finds Her True Voice
Student Singer
Y
52-05-14 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Ronald Colman salutes Pres. E.B. Fred of University of Wisconsin; promising music student threatens to give up singing.

52-05-14 San Antonio Express
7:00 PM. WOAI
One of Ivy College's most beautiful and talented music students suddenly decides to give up singing tonight on HALLS OF IVY, President Hall finds the perfect solution.

52-05-14 Capital Times
Ronald Colman, president of "Ivy College," will salute Edwin B, Fred, president of the University of Wisconsin on "Halls of Ivy" over WIBA and WIBA-FM at 7 tonight.
Each week , the award-winning
program is dedicated to the head of an outstanding college or university.
In tonight's comedy - drama, a beautiful and talented music student suddenly decides to give up singing. Mr. and Mrs. Colman, as Pres. and Mrs. William Todhunter Hall, discover the secret reason for the decision and find a solution for the girl's problem.
52-05-21
104
Doctor Spaatzen's 'Green Thumb'
Doctor Spatzen
Y
52-05-21 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Dr. Hall unmasks a bogus but charming psychiatrist who comes to the campus of Ivy college.

52-05-21 Capital Times
Dr. William Todhunter Hall, president of Ivy College, unmasks a bogus Psychiatrist on the Halls of Ivy tonight at 7 p.m. on WIBA. Chairman of the Board of Governors of Ivy, Clarence Wellman, meets a "celebrated Viennese psychiatrist" while on a business trip to Chicago and proudly brings him back to Ivy. Comedy runs riot in the unfolding of the story which reveals Mr. Wellman's guest as a charming fraud.

52-05-21 San Antonio Express
7:00 P.M. WOAI
A celebrated Viennese "psychiatrist" is unmasked during the HALLS OF IVY broadcast tonight, Clarence Wellrnan, chairman of the board, is responsible for the presence of the charming fraud.

Fritz Feld as Doctor Spaatzen
52-05-28
105
Our Mummy Is Missing
Mummynapper
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast; time and pitch adjusted]

52-05-28 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): a replica from the tomb of Tut-Ankh-Amen confronts Dr. William Todhunter Hall.

52-05-28 San Antonio Express
7:00 P.M. WOAI
A replica of the King Tut mummy is found at the Halls' front door and some Sherlock Holmes tactics are employed by Dr. and Mrs. William Todhunter Hall to unravel the mystery on HALLS OF IVY
52-06-04
106
Dr. Hall Is 'in loco parentis'
Pregnant Student
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-06-04 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): impending motherhood threatens to keep co-ed from final examinations.

52-06-04 San Mateo Times
Ronald Colman goes to bat for a GI bride when impending motherhood threatens to keep her from passing her final examination. Halls of Ivy on KNBC at 7 o'clock.
52-06-11
107
The Wellmans Who Came to Dinner
The Wellmans Come to Dinner
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-06-11 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Mr. Wellman comes to dinner on wrong night.

52-06-11 Long Beach Press-Telegram
What to do when company makes a mistake and comes to dinner on the wrong night will be told on "The Halls of Ivy" featuring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman over KFI at 7.
52-06-18
108
The Glamour of Mathematics
Math Professor
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-06-18 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): Woman mathematics professor, hired sight unseen, surprises campus.

52-06-18 San Mateo Times
Glamour comes to the aid of the Halls of Ivy when it is heard on KNBC at 7 o'clock.
52-06-25
109
The Farewell Party
Summer Vacation
N
[Voice of America rebroadcast]

52-06-25 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Halls of Ivy (WIBA): season ends with faculty farewell party for Dr. Hall and Vicky.

52-06-25 Syracuse Herald Journal
A farewell party will be part of the plot of Halls of Ivy, the college show that has its final program of the season tonight at 8 on WSYR.

52-06-25 Syracuse Post-Standard
Also signing off after tonight's show wiil be WSYR radio's highly praised Halls of Ivy. Ronald Colman and his wife, Benita, will be closing up another season of topflight entertainment.
With scripts by Don Quinn—and others by Colman, himself— Halls of Ivy has given the radio audience a truly adult comedy show. Added to the comedy is a mixture of sophisticated humor, human philosophy and warmth, and a touch of pathos. Put together with an expert touch, the show has risen to one of the highest spots on radio.
Audience reaction has reached even the halls of other colleges and educational institutions—many of which have acknowledged the skill of all involved in the program.

52-06-25 Long Beach Press-Telegram
The president of Ivy College is a little hurt when none of his students seem to think enough of him to come to his bon voyage party but it proves a successful party after all on KFI at 7.

52-06-25 Capital Times
"The Halls of Ivy,", starring Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Colman, will end its 1951-52 season with the broadcast at 7 tonight over WIBA and WIBA-FM. The .story tells how Colman, as the president of Ivy college, feels slighted when no students appear at 'the farewell party being given for him by the faculty as the school year ends.
But the students have a surprise in store for their popular president, Dr. William Todhunter Hall, and his wife, Vicky. As the program ends, an augmented chorus sings the "Ivy" theme song, composed by Henry Russell, director of the show's orchestra.





Voice of America 'The Halls of Ivy' Radio Program Rebroadcasts Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
51-11-28
79
Ashes for Fire
Y
51-12-05
80
The Wellman-Gaddy Farm Combine
Y
51-12-26
83
Sweet Sorrow
Y
52-01-09
85
Jerry Carter's Economics Lesson
Y
52-01-16
86
Art Poses Controversy on Campus
Y
52-01-23
87
Let Slip The Hot Dogs of War
Y
52-02-06
89
A Mysterious Glee Club Donation
Y
52-02-13
90
A Question of Loyalty
Y
52-02-20
91
The Voice' of The XIVY Vine
Y
52-02-27
92
Mr. Wellman's Overdue Book
Y
52-03-19
95
Founder's Day
Y
52-03-26
96
Spring Fever At Ivy
Y
52-04-02
97
The Academic Worth of A Professor
Y
52-04-09
98
The Secret Faculty Marriage
Y
52-04-23
100
Sonnet or Canzone
Y
52-05-07
102
Faculty Follies Act II (Conclusion)
Y
52-05-14
103
The Contralto Finds Her True Voice
Y
52-05-21
104
Doctor Spaatzen's Green Thumb
Y
52-05-28
105
Our Mummy Is Missing
Y
52-06-04
106
Dr. Hall Is 'in loco parentis'
Y
52-06-11
107
The Wellmans Who Came to Dinner
Y
52-06-18
108
The Glamour of Mathematics
Y
52-06-25
109
The Farewell Party
Y





AFRS END 163 'Halls of Ivy' Radio Program Log

Date AFRS # Title Avail. Notes
50-03-17
Hall Substitutes in Chapel
N
50-04-07
Ivy Chamber Music Society
N
50-05-05
Vicky's Acting Career
N
50-06-07
31
Philip Weatherby's Dad
N
50-11-22
Jack Benny Visits Ivy

Y
51-02-28 The Legrand Award and Hell Week
Y
51-11-21 A Minister's Son Prefers Music to The Ministry
Y






The Halls of Ivy Radio Program Biographies




Ronald Charles Colman
(Dr. William T. Hall)

Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1891-1958)

Birthplace: Richmond, Surrey, England, U.K.

Education: London University

Military Service: Served with London Scottish during World War I; decorated Mons Medal

Radiography:
1939 The Circle
1939 Lux Radio Theatre
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 Good News
1940 Arch Oboler's Plays
1940 Canadian Red Cross Emergency Appeal
1941 America Calling
1942 Towards the Century Of the Common Man
1942 Over Here
1942 Radio Reader's Digest
1942 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1943 The Charlie McCarthy Show
1943 Command Performance
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1944 Everything For the Boys
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1945 D-Day
1945 A Tribute To...
1945 Suspense
1945 The Doctor Fights
1945 Columbia Presents Corwin
1945 Request Performance
1945 Theatre Of Romance
1945 The Lucky Strike Program
1946 Academy Award
1946 Encore Theatre
1946 Favorite Story
1946 Theatre Guild On the Air
1948 Hallmark Playhouse
1948 Sealtest Variety Theater
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1950 The Halls Of Ivy
1950 Document A/777
1950 The Miracle Of America
1950 Screen Guild Theatre
1950 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 A Salute To...
1954 Anthology
1972 Same Time, Same Station
A Program Of Canada
Ronald Colman circa 1917
Ronald Colman circa 1917

Ronald Colman and Vilma Banky circa 1928
Ronald Colman and Vilma Banky circa 1928

Ronald Colman fan card circa 1932
Ronald Colman fan card circa 1932

Ronald Colman in The Masquerader (1933)
Ronald Colman in The Masquerader (1933)

Ronald Colman in Clive of India circa 1935
Ronald Colman in Clive of India circa 1935

Ronald Colman and Jane Wyatt in Frank Capra's Lost Horizon (1937. Poster illustration by James Montgomery Flagg of 'Uncle Sam' illustration fame
Ronald Colman and Jane Wyatt in Frank Capra's Lost Horizon (1937. Poster illustration by James Montgomery Flagg of 'Uncle Sam' illustration fame.

Ronald Colman in If I Were King (1938)
Ronald Colman in If I Were King (1938)

Colman's split-personalities in A Double Life (1947)
Colman's split-personalities in A Double Life (1947)

Ronald Colman in Champagne for Caesar with Celeste Holm and Vincent Price (1950)
Ronald Colman in Champagne for Caesar with Celeste Holm and Vincent Price (1950)

Ronald Colman and Benita Hume publicity photo for Television's The Halls of Ivy (1954)
Ronald Colman and Benita Hume publicity photo for Television's The Halls of Ivy (1954)

Ronald Colman's last film appearance headlining The Story of Mankind (1957) as The Spirit of Man
Ronald Colman's last film appearance headlining The Story of Mankind (1957) as The Spirit of Man

Vincent Price and Ronald Colman reunite in 1957's The Story of Mankind
Vincent Price and Ronald Colman reunite in 1957's The Story of Mankind

The Colmans -- Ronald and Benita Hume -- roughing it with Jimmy Weldon circa 1957
The Colmans -- Ronald and Benita Hume -- roughing it with Jimmy Weldon circa 1957

Ronald Colman in Life Magazine circa 1957
Ronald Colman in Life Magazine circa 1957

Ronald Colman in Life Magazine spread circa 1957
Ronald Colman in Life Magazine spread circa 1957
Ambitious young Ronald Charles Colman was serving as an office boy in 1908 with the British Steamship Company while performing with the Bancroft Amateur Dramatic Society. In 1916 he debuted on the London Stage. In 1919 he enjoyed his Film debut in The Toilers.

And in 1920 he emigrated to America, soon after appearing in various stage roles, including a small part with George Arliss in The Green Goddess. He was chosen by Lillian Gish as leading man in the films The White Sister (1923) and Romola (1924).

In 1924 he was invited to Hollywood by Samuel Goldwyn. By the early 1930s, Colman's star status is virtually assured when Samuel Goldwyn permits Colman the luxury of appearing in only one film per year. Jealously protective of his own image and reputation, Colman felt compelled to sue the Goldwyn Studios in 1933 over false rumors of Colman drinking on set during the making of The Masquerader.

The 1940s marked the beginning of Colman's work on Radio, including numerous repeating guest spots with wife Benita Hume on Jack Benny's program, several drama anthologies, numerous patriotic appeals both in America and abroad, several retrospectives of his own Film triumphs and innumerable appearances as himself, or as a couple with his wife, Benita Hume.

Colman also had several of his own Radio programs, among them, Everything For The Boys (1944) for Autolite and The Halls of Ivy (1950-52) with his wife Benita Hume. The Radio version of The Halls of Ivy was a Peabody Award winner. The Halls of Ivy was also chosen the Best New Radio Show for 1950. The Colmans spun the Radio version into a Television series that ran for two years from 1954 to 1955 and also garnered honors as Best New Television Show for 1954 .

According to director George Cukor, "Colman knew more about acting for the camera than any actor" he'd ever worked with. For Colman fans, this does not come as a revelation. From Ronald Colman's earliest film triumphs you can see that it's not the camera that loves him. It's Colman's native, effortless ability to place himself in the optimal position before the camera that delivers his characterizations most effectively.

For three generations of Film fans, Colman's suave, debonair sophistication served as a pattern of behaviour, carriage and dress they could quite comfortably and confidently emulate to great effect--and the women of America couldn't have been more grateful.

Throughout Colman's entire life, his quiet, soft-spoken delivery set an entire new standard for the roles in which he was cast. As counter-intuitive as it seems, that very soft - spokenness made Colman's patented delivery all the more effective. Why? Look at the lessons of early Radio. Both before and after the circuitry innovations that dramatically cleared the airwaves of the pops and spits and rasps that had made radio listening such a challenge, the art of listening to Radio became an acquired skill.

And yet once that skill was acquired, the art of listening to anything -- Radio included -- became a valuable skill indeed. Colman's secret was understanding the natural tendency to listen even more intently to quieter or more subtle aural passages to grasp their full nuance or meaning. That's precisely the technique that Ronald Colman employed to make his own softer-spoken deliveries even more subtle and effective to the observer or listener alike. Some might say there's a lesson there to be learned as it might apply in the business world as well.

It wasn't simply Colman's beautifully modulated voice, either. As Cukor pointed out, Colman could accomplish a great deal more by forcing the viewer to follow Colman's most subtle movements, just as he forced them to follow and listen to his voice. Colman wasn't limited to specific roles by any means. He played swashbucklers and rogues and lovers and heroes and thinkers and 'everymen' with equal effectiveness. Even when cast in a role which requires the viewer to suspend disbelief even more than usual, it was never that much of a stretch. Everyone was pulling for Ronald Colman. Everyone was willing for Ronald Colman to be anyone he chose to be in Film.

That's far more than sympathy or empathy. Colman's singular gift was his almost effortless ability to convince his severest critics that he could be and would ultimately become anything or anyone he was set to portray.

Ronald Colman had no problem transitioning to talkies. Indeed, Colman's first sound film, Bulldog Drummond (1929), garnered him an Academy Award nomination. Watching Colman as Drummond begs the question of why he didn't go on to an entire series of Bulldog Drummond adventures. He was a natural in the role. But then he was also a natural in Raffles (1930).

Bulldog Drummond was instructive on several levels. The Bulldog Drummond characterization is predictably madcap and frenetic, yet Colman adapted well to it. Colman's athleticism in the role seems quite natural and more reminiscent of Douglas Fairbanks, the senior. The snappy dialogue is delivered just as crisply and effectively as any actor of the genre, including George Sanders, Warren William, William Powell, or Basil Rathbone. In short, one wonders if a Colman-acted Bulldog Drummond franchise might not have been the early equal of Sean Connery's triumph as James Bond.

Be that as it may, Colman chose what were the best roles for his career quite wisely indeed. Had he reeled off a series of Bulldog Drummonds we might have been robbed of his marvelous performances in Raffles (1930), Arrowsmith (1931), Clive of India (1935), A Tale of Two Cities (1935), a reprise of Bulldog Drummond in Bulldog Drummond Strikes Back (1934), Lost Horizon (1937), or The Prisoner of Zenda (1937).

Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Colman's sympathetic--and romantic--appeal continued to arc. Random Harvest (1942) in particular, was one of the World War II era's most popular films. Colman's appearance with Greer Garson was pure magic.

A Double Life (1947), the film for which Colman received an Academy Award, is an intriguing commentary on Colman, the movie actor par excellence, who in this film plays a legitimate stage actor who becomes so immersed in the role of Othello that he is driven to murder. Colman, as the dashing romantic lead, is measured against one of the great tragic roles in the Shakespeare tradition. Colman taking a run at Shakespeare is tested twice in the film: on opening night, when his style is conventional (e.g., theatrical), and near the end, when Colman replays the scene in rhythms and tones that are far more cinematic--Colman's forte.

The film's underlying conceit is the suggestion that Colman and other actors like him depend on their charm, wit, grace, but that they labor, sometimes even to their own detriment to be good actors. The film not only underscores Colman's star image, but provides a chance for us to see an actor at the very height of his craft; Colman's meticulous preparation and execution is apparent in even his smallest scenes. Early in the script, as Anthony John recalls how he had already come a long way with his ambition, Colman perfectly caricatures the juvenile in tennis shorts 'he' used to be, then performs a remembered scene with 'his father,' then comes back to himself as he remembers having to teach himself how to talk, how to move, and how to think. Pure Colman. Pure Genius.

In the 1950s, Colman turned in a marvelously sympathetic portrayal of a television quiz show sensation in Champagne for Caesar. Ronald Colman's swan song in Film was--so very appropriately--as 'The Spirit of Man' in 1957's The Story of Mankind.

From the Santa Barbara Daily Review, April 19, 1958:

Actor Ronald Colman
Dies of Pneumonia

SANTA BARBARA (INS)--Academy Award winner Ronald Colman, 67, debonair leading man of scores of the screen's most famous films, died today of pneumonia.
Colman, who was one of movies' top stars for three decades, succumbed at 5 a.m. at St. Francis Hospital in Santa Barbara, 100 miles north of Hollywood on the California coast.
His actress-wife, the former Benita Hume, was at his bedside when death came to end a career highlighted by such well-loved pictures as "Lost Horizon," "A Double Life" and "Under Two Flags."

A friend of the family, Robert Sinclair, said the British-born actor suffered from fibrosis of the lungs, which turned into pneumonia.
Sinclair said Colman had experienced trouble wtih a "low grade infection" for many years. It actually began while he was serving with the British Expeditionary forces in France in World War I.
A Hollywood associate said that after the Colmans' "Halls of Ivy" television program went off the air, the actor, his wife and their daughter, Juliet, went to Europe, where his lung condition became worse.

The Colmans had been planning a trip to the south of France next August.

Comedian Jack Benny, with whom Colman frequently appeared on radio and television, said when informed of the actor's death:
"I am deeply saddened at the news. He was a great actor, a great gentleman and a great friend."
His most recent film was "The Story of Mankind." Before that, he and his wife starred for several years in the "Halls of Ivy" radio and television serials.

Sinclair said Colman became ill Saturday night and was taken to St. Francis Hospital yesterday. He apparently made a full recovery, but he died this morning.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday at the All Saints By the Sea Episcopal Church in Santa barbara, followed by cremation.
Colman was born at Richmond, Surrey, England, on Feb. 9, 1891, and began his acting career on the London stage in 1916. He came to America four years later to tour with stage comopanies and appear in New York in "La Tendresse" and "The Nightcap."

His "Halls of Ivy" radio show won the George Foster Peabody award and other accolades, and he was voted the film personality who had proven most effective in radio in Motion Picture Daily's 1951 poll.

Ronald Colman lived with episodic lung pain most of his adult life. It never affected his performances. Stiff-upper-lip Brit that he was at heart, he simply soldiered on for an entire career after being afflicted with lung damage while in the service of his country during World War I. The infamous mustard gas attacks of World War I killed or maimed hundreds of thousands of soldiers on both sides of World War I.

A few--the strongest in both will and character--managed to outlive their disease's inevitable--and terminal--prognosis. We're blessed that Ronald Colman was one of them.




Herb Butterfield
(Clarence Wellman)

Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1895-1959)

Birthplace: Rhode Island, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1934 The Story of Mary Marlin
1938 Wayside Theatre
1939 Kitty Keene, Inc.
1942 Author's Playhouse
1944 Suspense
1944 Screen Director's Playhouse
1946 The Human Adventure
1946 Grand Marquee
1946 Lights Out
1946 Cavalcade Of America
1946 The Cat (Audition)
1946 Lux Radio Theatre
1946 Dark Venture
1947 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1947 The City
1947 The Whistler
1947 Johnny Madero, Pier 23
1947 Mystery In the Air
1947 All-Str Western Theatre
1947 Ellery Queen
1948 Favorite Story
1948 The First Nighter Program
1948 Let George Do It
1948 The Adventures Of Ellery Queen
1948 Jeff Regan, Investigator
1949 Pat Novak, For Hire
1949 Family Theatre
1949 Escape
1949 This Is Your FBI
1949 Night Beat
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe
1949 The Halls Of Ivy
1949 Young Love
1949 Four Star Playhouse
1949 The Adventures Of Frank Race
1949 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1949 The Railroad Hour
1949 Broadway Is My Beat
1949 Dragnet
1950 Dangerous Assignment
1950 The Story Of Dr Kildare
1950 Hallmark Playhosue
1950 The Line-Up
1950 Presenting Charles Boyer
1950 Tales Of the Texas Rangaers
1950 Mr President
1950 The New Adventures Of Nero Wolfe
1950 The Adventures Of Nero Wolfe
1951 The Amazing Nero Wolfe
1951 The Great Gildersleeve
1951 Romance
1951 The Man From Homicide
1951 Wild Bill Hickok
1951 The Roy ROgers Show
1951 The Silent Men
1952 Guest Star
1952 The Pendleton Story
1952 I Was A Communist For the FBI
1952 This Is O'Shea (Audition)
1952 On Stage
1952 Crime Classics
1953 Hallmark Hall Of Fame
1953 General Electric Theatre
1953 The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show
1953 Father Knows Best
1954 That's Rich
1954 Stars Over Hollywood
1954 The Freedom Story
1954 You Were There
1954 Life With Luigi
1954 My Little Margie
1956 CBS Radio Workshop
1957 Heartbeat Theatre
The Private Practice Of Dr Dana
This Fabulous World
Skippy Hollywood Theatre
Raleigh's Radio Rally
Herb Butterfield directed The Story of Mary Marlin over Chicago's WMAQ (1936)
Herb Butterfield directed The Story of Mary Marlin over Chicago's WMAQ (1936)


Herb Butterfield, ca. 1957
Herb Butterfield ca. 1957


Herb Butterfield in character as Preacher Jim (upper left) is showcased in a newspaper teaser for 1939's Kitty Keene, Inc. serial melodrama
Herb Butterfield in character as Preacher Jim (upper left) is showcased in a newspaper teaser for 1939's Kitty Keene, Inc. serial melodrama.
Born in 1895 in Rhode Island, Herbert Butterfield first entered Radio in 1926, appearing in several east coast serial melodramas and revues. His first credited roles came in the late 1930s with frequent appearances as a character actor in most of the more popular dramas of the era. Herb Butterfield also directed the Chicago NBC Key Station's productions of The Story of Mary Marlin (1934). Butterfield's early recurring role as Preacher Jim in the serial drama Kitty Keene, Inc. (1939) first established him as an attractive and reliable co-star.

Upon relocating to California, Butterfield soon proved himself one of the West Coast's finest, most reliable and durable performers, Herb Butterfield became a fixture in most of the early detective and suspense dramas of the Golden Age of Radio. A Mutual-Don Lee player for many years, Herb Butterfield was a regular performer in many of the network's earliest syndicated West Coast productions.

Indeed, Herb Butterfield's very recognizable voice was most associated with virtually every radio noir detective and crime drama aired over Radio. A favorite of Jack Webb, Herb Butterfield appeared in virtually every Jack Webb Radio and Television vehicle he ever produced, invariably playing either a crusty detective or a world-wisened, sympathetic tough. In Ellery Queen's eighth season, Herb Butterfield appeared as Inspector Queen.

A regular on Radio's popular Halls of Ivy, Butterfield portrayed Ivy College Chairman of the Board Clarence Wellman for twenty episodes with the series' stars Ronald Colman and Benita Hume. By then a frequent CBS player, Herb Butterfield appeared in seven of the CBS Radio Workshop (1956-1957) experimental radio broadcasts in a wide variety of roles.

During his career in Radio, Herb Butterfield appeared in over 4,000 episodes. He compiled another forty appearances on Television during a career cut short by his death in 1959 at the age of 64. His last appearance in Television was in the Colgate Theatre comedy production starring Claudette Colbert, September 28, 1958.

One of Radio's more ubiquitous performers, Herb Butterfield's distinctive voice lives on through the thousands of Radio episodes that have survived from the Golden Age or Radio. Consistently endearing, no matter what roles he appeared in, the characteristic fatherly tone of most of his performances hearken back to a time when American society was far more basic, forthright and genuine. Herb Butterfield fit that description to a tee.



Kennneth L. 'Ken' Carpenter
(Announcer)

Radio, Television and Film Announcer, Narrator and Personality
(1900-1984)

Birthplace: Avon, Illinois, U.S.A.

Education: B.A., Lombard College

Radiography:
1935 Rose Bowl Game
1935 Henry Busse and His Montmartre Orchestra
1936 The Magic Key
1936 The Packard Hour
1937 Paramount's Silver Jubilee
1937 Streamlined Shakespeare
1937 The Packard Summer Program
1938 The Ray Noble Show
1938 Kraft Music Hall
1939 Amos 'n' Andy
1940 The Rudy Vallee Sealtest Show
1940 Little Old Hollywood
1940 Bing Crosby Presents
1941 Quiz Kids
1941 The Jello Program
1941 Sweet and Rhythmic
1941 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1941 Songs By Bob Carroll
1941 The Great Gildersleeve
1941 One Man's Famiy
1942 Freedom's People
1942 Command Performance
1942 Eyes Aloft
1943 The Pepsodent Show
1943 Jubilee
1943 Treasury Star Parade
1943 Mail Call
1944 Mystery House
1944 World News Parade
1944 Academy Awards
1944 The Charlie McCarthy Show
1944 The Shaeffer World Parade
1944 The Elgin CHristmas Day Greeting To America
1945 The March Of Time
1945 The Chase and Sanborn Program
1945 The Life Of Riley
1945 Music For Millions
1946 Truth Or Consequences
1946 Philco Radio Time
1947 Criminal At Large (Auditon)
1947 Elgin Thanksgiving Day Greeting To America
1948 Here's To Veterans
1948 Red Cross Fund Campaign
1948 The Bing Crosby Show
1948 Guest Star
1948 This Is Bing Crosby
1949 Opportunity U.S.A.
1949 A Tribute To...
1950 The Halls Of Ivy
1950 Welcome Back Baseball
1950 Screen Director's Playhouse
1950 The Man Called X
1951 Mr Keen, Tracer Of Lost Persons
1952 The Nelson Eddy Show (Audition)
1952 Truth Or Consequences
1952 Lux Radio Theatre
1952 The Judy Garland Show
1953 Christmas Seale Sale
1953 General Electric Theatre
1953 Easter Seal Parade For Crippled Children
1953 All-Star Revue
1956 Biography In Sound
1959 Stars For Defense
1959 Have Gun, Will Travel
1960 The Bing Crosby-Rosemary Clooney Show
1961 Christmas Sing With Bing
1964 It's That Tie Again
1974 The Tomorrow Show
1976 The Good Old Days Of Radio
Yank Swing Session
Stand By For Music
Treasury Star Parade


Ken Carpenter circa 1943


Carpenter was a member of Phi Delta Theta while attending Lombard College

Ken Carpenter (far right) emcees the Kraft Music Hall with Bing Crosby, Marilyn Maxwell and John Scott Trotter
Ken Carpenter (far right) emcees the Kraft Music Hall with Bing Crosby, Marilyn Maxwell and John Scott Trotter


Born in Avon, Illinois, Kenneth Carpenter was the son of Barlow Carpenter, a Universalist minister, and Clara Carpenter. Ken Carpenter graduated from Lombard College in Galesburg, Illinois in 1921, where he was a member of the national Phi Delta Theta chapter, a fraternity of college students espousing "the cultivation of friendship among its members, the acquirement individually of a high degree of mental culture, and the attainment personally of a high standard of morality". Lombard College also is where Carpenter met his future lifelong wife, Betty.

Ken and Betty Carpenter moved to Hollywood in 1929 and soon after, Ken became a staff announcer at Hollywood's KFI radio. After announcing the 1935 Rose Bowl game on NBC, he found himself in demand for national programs. He became Bing Crosby's announcer in 1936 shortly after Bing took over the hosting duties on the Kraft Music Hall. Carpenter remained with Bing Crosby through the next 27 years. He also announced for Al Jolson and Edgar Bergen's long-running show. He performed in the same capacity on the Radio and Television versions of Lux Radio Theatre and One Man's Family.

Throughout the Golden Age of Radio Broadcasting--and beyond--Ken Carpenter remained one of Radio's busiest announcers, appearing in over 6,000 broadcasts during a forty-two year career in Radio. The staggering array of Radio programs Ken appeared in forever set him apart in the annals of Radio Broadcasting History.

Ken Carpenter also enjoyed careers in both Film and Television. He was the announcer/narrator for a fascinating series of forty-one Paramount-produced, Jerry Fairbanks-directed shorts entitled Unusual Occupations (1939-1949), which won several Academy Awards in the Short Subject category. He was also the uncredited announcer in Frank Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), and the announcer, emcee, commentator, or narrator in:
  • Rhythm on the River (1940)
  • Road to Zanzibar (1941)
  • New York Town (1941)
  • The Secret Code (1942)
  • The Spirit of Stanford (1942)
  • Strictly G.I. (1943)
  • Mystery Broadcast (1943)
  • True to Life (1943)
  • What a Woman! (1943)
  • Who's Who in Animal Land (1944)
  • The Crime Doctor's Courage (1945)
  • The Lonesome Stranger (1946)
  • Cross My Heart (1946)
  • Ladies' Man (1947)
  • Grounds for Marriage (1951)
  • Susan Slept Here (1954)

All told, Ken Carpenter enjoyed a Film career spanning twenty years. Ken Carpenter was also in demand on Television, enjoying yet another ten year career as the announcer for Lux Video Theatre (1950-1955) and The Bing Crosby Show (1954) among others.

Over a forty-seven year career in the Performing Arts, Ken Carpenter stands as a legend in Radio and a true American Treasure of 20th Century Broadcasting. Ranked among the top five most important announcers in his craft, Ken Carpenter's career in Radio will probably never again be equalled.

But equally important, as a beloved gentleman and icon to all of the Broadcast announcers that followed him, he remains one of the most influential proponents of his craft to this day.




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