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Original Endless Frontier header art

The Endless Frontier Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> The Endless Frontier

Dr. William Parry Murphy, the Nobel Prize awardee in Physiology or Medicine for 1934
Dr. William Parry Murphy, the Nobel Prize awardee in Physiology or Medicine for 1934

The McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research was one of three such labs showcased in The Search, Program No. 3 in The Endless Frontier series
The McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research was one of three such labs showcased in The Search, Program No. 3 in The Endless Frontier series

Originally founded in 1884 as the New York Cancer Hospital, with the philanthopy of John Jacob Astor and his wife, the facility eventually became Memorial Sloan-Kettering Institute with a donation of land by John D. Rockerfeller and the endowment and establishment of the facility by former General Motors executives Alfred P. Sloan and Charles F. Kettering. Memorial Hospital and the Sloan-Kettering Institute eventually combined to form the current Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1960.
Originally founded in 1884 as the New York Cancer Hospital, with the philanthropy of John Jacob Astor and his wife, the facility eventually became Memorial Sloan-Kettering Institute with a donation of land by John D. Rockerfeller and the endowment and establishment of the facility by former General Motors executives Alfred P. Sloan and Charles F. Kettering. Memorial Hospital and the Sloan-Kettering Institute eventually combined to form the current Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in 1960.

National Cancer Institute Act was passed in 1937, Public Health Service laws were rewritten to include more authority for research, grants, and training at NIH, as well as a clinical center. Among the first clinical cancer research centers supported by NCI was the United States Marine Hospital in Baltimore. Funded in 1939, the center was designated to provide expert cancer care for patients east of the Mississippi River
National Cancer Institute Act was passed in 1937. Public Health Service laws were rewritten to include more authority for research, grants, and training at NIH, as well as a clinical center. Among the first clinical cancer research centers supported by NCI was the United States Marine Hospital in Baltimore. Funded in 1939, the center was designated to provide expert cancer care for patients east of the Mississippi River

Background

From the January 21, 1952 edition of The Wisconsin State Journal:

     "THE ENDLESS FRONTIER."  With Raymond Massey as narrator, "The Endless Frontier," a new series of five documentary programs dramatizing achievement in medical research, will be broadcast on NBC-WIBA every Saturday from Jan. 26 through Feb. 23 as a joint presentation by the National Broadcasting Co. and the Health Information foundation.
     "Our Daily Bread," the initial program, will dramatize the story of nutrition--how food becomes part of the human machine--with many prominent scientists participating.
     Among them will be Dr. William P. Murphy, 1934 Nobel prize winner; Dr. William B. Castle, director of Boston City hospital's Thorndyke laboratory; Dr. Frederick J. Stare, head of Harvard university's department of nutrition; Dr. Robert Harris, of M. I. T.; Dr. M. E. Shils, Columbia university; and Dr. Martha Trulson, Dr. Mark Hegsted, Dr. Jean Mayer, Dr. Theodore Van Itallie, Dr. Charles S. Davidson and Dr. George Mann, all of Harvard.
     "The Endless Frontier" series will also dramatize in "The Search" on Feb. 2 the fight on cancer, followed Feb. 9 by "The Troubleshooters," on the development of cortisone; Feb. 16, "Only One to a Customer," on the increasing insight into the causes of heart trouble, and Feb. 23, PFC Bill Smith--Man Alive," on the dramatic medical advances coming out of the Korean battlefront and their meaning to American civilian life.

From the January 23, 1952 edition of The Capital Times:

Start Saturday
Cite Health Broadcasts On WIBA

     The city health department today urged Madison residents to listen to a series of five "outstanding" documentary health broadcasts, tracing the gains of modern science in the battle for health and examining future problems, which will start this Saturday over radio station WIBA at 5:30 p. m.
     Called "The Endless Frontier" the broadcasts will be presented on successive Saturdays, all at 5:30 p.m., and will be narrat
ed by Raymond Massey, noted Broadway and Hollywood actor.  They are being presented by the national Health Information
Foundation, and the National Broadcasting Co.
     Saturday's program will be "Our Daily Bread," a study of nutrition. The other programs, and their dates, are: Feb. 2, "The Search," an examination of the threat of cancer; Feb. 9, "The Trouble Shooters," the development of the miracle drug
cortisone; Feb. 16, "Only One to a Customer," heart disease, and Feb. 23, "Pfc. Bill Smith" a report on medical work in Korea.

From the January 31, 1952 edition of The Capital Times:

McArdle Lab Is Featured On NBC Program

     McArdle Memorial laboratory at the University of Wisconsin is one of three cancer research laboratories in the nation to be highighted in a nation-wide broadcast Saturday.
     The program is entitled "The Endless Frontier," and the cancer question is the second of a series dealing with various fields of science.  The first dealt with nutrition.
     Drs. Elizabeth and James Miller, McArdle husband-and-w i f e research team of azo dye fame, and Dr, H, P. Rusch, McArdle director, will take part in the program. Actor Raymond Massey is narrator.
     To be featured along with McArdle are the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, and the National Cancer institute, Washington, D. C.
     The program will be broadcast over WIBA, Madison, and the NBC network from 6:30 to 7 p. m. Saturday.

The Health Information Foundation also adapted The Endless Frontier series into a series of articles by Wade Arnold, NBC executive producer of the programs. The articles appeared in a booklet, also titled "The Endless Frontier" released for distribution to schools and libraries throughout the country. The articles deal with then recent research in cancer, cortisone, nutrition, heart disease, and battlefront medicine.

The Endless Frontier: Production History

First aired in January of 1952, the five-program arc was repeated throughout 1952. Great, Canadian-born character actor, Raymond Massey, served as the series' narrator for all five programs. The production showcased then cutting-edge medical technologies of the era:

  • Nutrition
  • Cancer Research
  • Cortisone
  • Treatment of Heart Disease
  • Battlefield Treatment

Raymond Massey's contribution as narrator for the series was a coup for NBC. By 1946, Massey had become one of America's most respected actors and most trusted personalities. His portrayals, both on stage and big screen, of Abraham Lincoln leant Massey an air of authority vital to the narration of these five important medical technology updates. Massey's narration, the importance of the subject matter, and the accompanying articles from each installment, combined to create a remarkably effective promotional vehicle. Even further, the very prestige of the medical institutions and medical professionals who contributed to the series created a nationwide demand for the series' rebroadcasts throughout 1952.

There's no question as to the importance of this brief, but highly influential series. The extraordinary advances in field hospital triage, medicines, and medical treatment throughout World War II, as well as the effectiveness of the mobile Army surgical hospitals or M.A.S.H. units of the Korean War underscored many of these medical advances.

This series remains one of the many overlooked gems from the magnificent canon of radio programs that survive from The Golden Age of Radio.

Series Derivatives:

The Forty Million
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Medical Documentary Dramas
Network(s): NBC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 52-01-26 01 Our Daily Bread
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 52-01-26 to 52-02-23; NBC; Five, 30-minute programs; Saturdays, 6:30 p.m.
Syndication:
Sponsors: Produced in cooperation with The Health Information Foundation
Director(s): Fred Weihe
Wade Arnold [NBC executive producer]
Principal Actors: Raymond Massey; Drs. Elizabeth and James Miller, Dr. H. P. Rusch, of McArdle Memorial laboratory;Dr. William P. Murphy, 1934 Nobel prize winner; Dr. William B. Castle, director of Boston City hospital's Thorndyke laboratory; Dr. Frederick J. Stare, head of Harvard University's Department of Nutrition; Dr. Robert Harris, of M. I. T.; Dr. M. E. Shils, Columbia University; Dr. Martha Trulson, Dr. Mark Hegsted, Dr. Jean Mayer, Dr. Theodore Van Itallie, Dr. Charles S. Davidson and Dr. George Mann, all of Harvard.
Recurring Character(s):
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s) Wade Arnold
Music Direction:
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): Ben Grauer
Raymond Massey [Narrator]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
5
Episodes in Circulation: 5
Total Episodes in Collection: 5
Provenances:
RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide, Martin Grams, Jr.'s Radio Drama.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances in logging The Endless Frontier were newspaper articles and radio listings, which, as you can see, provided ample coverage of the series.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

We came across an intriguing item while doing our research.  In the "Radio Drama" book by Martin Grams, Jr., the author describes the show:  "This short-run series starred Raymond Massey in a variety of Western and war dramas.  Broadcast over NBC Sunday afternoons from 1:30 to 2 pm, EST."

While one might be able to overlook the faux pas of the air time (it actually aired at 6:30 p.m. EST), and the day (it was actually a Saturday show), this researcher cannot overlook the absurdity of Grams' description of the show.  "Western and war dramas"?  This was a MEDICAL DOCUMENTARY, with Raymond Massey as narrator and a cast of doctors and scientists

The description of this show as a Western and War series does certainly make this author question the validity and accuracy of Mr. Grams' other "research".


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The Endless Frontier Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
52-01-26
1
Our Daily Bread
N
52-01-26 Capital Times
6:30 p.m. -- The Endless Frontier: new series on war against disease, with Raymond Massey as Narrator; first program, "
Our Daily Bread" -- WIBA.
52-02-02
2
The Search
N
52-02-02 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--The Endless Frontier (WIBA): "
The Search," story of cancer research with Drs Elizabeth and James Miller and Dr. H. P. Rusch, of McArdle Memorial laboratory, and representatives of Sloan-Kettering Institute, National Cancer Institute, Massachusetts General hospital, and University of Southern California. Raymond Massey, narrator.
52-02-09
3
The Troubleshooters
N
52-02-09 Capital Times
6:30 p.m.--The Endless Frontier: Raymond Massey in "
The Trouble Shooters," story of cortisone--WIBA.
52-02-16
4
Only One To A Customer
Y
52-02-16 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--The Endless Frontier (WIBA): Raymond massey in
story of war on heart disease.
52-02-23
5
PFC Bill Smith--Man Alive
N
52-02-23 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--The Endless Frontier (WIBA): Raymond Massey, narrator;
Pfc. Bill Smith, Man Alive," story of wounded man caught in flow of Korean battle.






The Endless Frontier Radio Program Biographies




Raymond Hart Massey
(Narrator)

(1896-1983)
Stage, Screen, Television and Radio Actor, Producer and Director

Birthplace: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Education: Havergal College; Toronto Model School; Upper Canada College; St. Andrews; Appleby College [with honours.]

Radiography:
1938 Ninety Years Of News
1939 The Pursuit Of Happiness
1940 Cavalcade Of America
1940 Fifth Row Center
1940 Lux Radio Theatre
1940 Everyman's Theater
1941 Kraft Music Hall
1941 Forecast
1942 Philip Morris Playhouse
1942 This Is War
1942 Dear Adolph
1942 Cleveland Symphony Orchestra
1943 Treasury Star Parade
1944 Two Men On A Raft
1944 The Battle Of the Warsaw Ghetto
1944 Columbia Presents Corwin
1944 The Eternal Light
1944 Answering You
1945 Treasury Salute
1945 Arch Oboler's Plays
1945 Inner Sanctum
1946 Harvest Of Stars
1947 Mission Not Completed
1947 Radio Reader's Digest
1947 The Bitter Herb
1948 Marine Story
1948 Lest We Forget
1948 V.D. Radio Digest
1949 Christmas Seal Sale
1949 MGM Theatre Of the Air
1950 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 Hallmark Playhouse
1952 The Endless Frontier
1955 Anthology
1956 The Unforseen
1957 Recollections At Thirty
Raymond Massey: Familiar Readings From the Bible
Chapel By the Side Of the Road
Raymond Massey's ancestral Canadian home from the late 1800s
Raymond Massey's ancestral Canadian home from the late 1800s

Raymond Massey takes Abraham Lincoln to Broadway from Life Magazine October 31, 1938
Raymond Massey takes Abraham Lincoln to Broadway from Life Magazine October 31, 1938

Raymond Massey as Abraham Lincoln in Film.
Raymond Massey as Abraham Lincoln in Film.

Raymond Massey as Jonathan Brewster in the 'Capra-corn' masterpiece, Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)
Raymond Massey as Jonathan Brewster in the 'Capra-corn' masterpiece, Arsenic and Old Lace (1944)

Raymond Massey as Dr. Leonard Gillespie with Richard Chamberlain as Dr. Kildare in the Television series of the same name (1961-1966)
Raymond Massey as Dr. Leonard Gillespie with Richard Chamberlain as Dr. Kildare in the Television series of the same name (1961-1966)
From the July 30, 1983 edition of The Winnipeg Free Press:

Raymond Massey
87, dies in California
 

     TORONTO (CP)--Actor RaymondMassey, brother of Canada's first Canadian-born governor general, died last night in Los Angeles at the age of 87.
     Massey had been ill with pneumonia for several weeks, said his nephew, Hart Massey of Port Hope, Ont.
     The debonair actor, known for his role as Dr. Gillespie in the television series Dr. Kildare and for his portrayal of Abraham Lincoln on stage and screen, was born in Toronto to a wealthy family of industrialists and became an American citizen in 1944.
     Massey grew up in a world of private schools and clubs and was enrolled in the Canadian Officers Training Corps at the University of Toronto when the First World War began.
     Commissioned a lieutenant in the Canadian Field Artillery, he fought in France until being wounded at Ypres in 1916.  After six months of convales-cence, he served with the British Mili-tary Mission to the United States as an instructor in trench warfare.
     Massey's brother, the late Vincent Massey, was Canada's first Canadian-born governor general.     Vincent Massey, who retired in 1959, died in 1967.

From the July 31, 1983 edition of The Chronicle Telegram:

Raymond Massey

     BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP)— Raymond Massey, a gauntfaced, courtly actor who brought Abraham Lincoln to life on screen and later won over TV audiences as no-nonsense Dr. Gillespie on "Dr. Kildare," has died at the age of 86.
     The Canadian-born actor, who appeared in more than 70 movies and 80 stage productions, died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center at 8:30 p.m. Friday.  He had been hospitalized for 3 1/2 weeks suffering complications of pneumonia, his son Geoffrey said yesterday.
     Massey, once described as "the man who took Abraham Lincoln off the penny" and made him a living image for millions, retired from acting more than a decade ago and lived in Beverly Hills.  He had just completed filming an autobiographical television program to be shown in Canada.
     Among his most noted films were "The Prisoner of Zenda," with David Niven, who also died Friday, "Arsenic and Old Lace," "East of Eden," "Dangerously They Live," "Seven Angry Men" and "The Naked and the Dead."
     Massey, who directed 35 of his stage productions, made his final stage appearance in 1970 in London, saying he lacked stamina and was disenchanted with modern theater.
     "To me theater should be enchantment, make-believe, pretend," he once told an interviewer.  "Today it's sex, obscenity and squalor."
     Massey once described himself as "so Republican it makes my skin crack."
     He played Lincoln in Robert Sherwood's Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway play, "Abe Lincoln In Illinois" for two years, then took the show on national tour.  The 6-foot-2 actor later portrayed the lanky president in three movies, describing the role as "overwhelming."
     "Actually, I'd kill with my bare hands anyone who tried to get the part away from me," he said in a 1955 interview.
     TO A LATER generation, Massey was Dr. Gillespie, the crusty old physician of NBC's "Dr. Kildare" series (1961-65) that starred Richard Chamberlain.
     In 1972 he appeared in a television movie "All My Darling Daughters."
     Born Raymond Hart Massey on Aug. 30, 1896, in Toronto, Massey was the grandson of the founder of the Massey farm machinery empire.  His brother, the late Vincent Massey, was Canada's first Canadian-born governor general.
     Massey's acting career began during World War I when he served with a small Canadian expeditionary force in Siberia after being wounded at Ypres in 1916.  Out of boredom in the bleak, frozen waste, he organized a minstrel troupe.
     Encouraged by a chance meeting with famed American actor John Drew, Massey took up acting professionally, debuting with a bit part in the 1922 London production of Eugene O
'Neill's "In the Zone."

The above Canadian and American renditions of Raymond Massey's obituary inadvertently overlooked Massey's exceptional contributions to American Radio. Raymond Massey's estimated 400 appearances throughout the Golden Age of Radio represented some of the most prestigious dramas of the era. Massey's appearances throughout the era were invariably met with great fanfare, and justifiably so.

Raymond Massey appeared in:

  • Thirteen installments of Cavalcade of America
  • Three Norman Corwin-directed productions
  • Three Lux Radio Theatre productions
  • All five episodes of The Endless Frontier (1952)
  • The entire run of The Unforeseen (1956)
  • Several episodes of Marine Story

Massey's radiography also discloses a great many religious and inspirational programs of the era. A profoundly religious man his entire life, Raymond Massey rarely hestitated when asked to lend his considerable reputation and authority to the public service anthologies of the era.




Benjamin Franklin 'Ben' Grauer
(Announcer)
Radio, Television, Film and Stage Actor; NBC Announcer/Narrator
(1908-1977)

Birthplace: Staten Island, New York City, U.S.A.

Education: B.A., City College of New York

Radiography:
1930 The Coca-Cola Top-Notchers
1932 Olympic Games
1933 Thrills Of Tomorrow For Boys
1934 The Baker's Broadcast
1934 Fleischmann's Yeast Hour
1935 Radio City Matinee
1935 The Nellie Revell Show
1935 Ripley's Believe It Or Not
1935 Circus Night In Silvertown
1935 Lux Radio Theatre
1935 The Magic Key
1936 Paul Whiteman's Musical Varieties
1937 The Shell Show
1937 Shell Chateau
1937 The Fact Finder
1938 The Royal Desserts Program
1938 Walter Winchell
1938 Pulitzer Prize Plays
1939 Richard Himber and His Orchestra
1939 The Vitalis P rogram
1940 H.V. Kaltenborn
1940 News Roundup
1952 America Looks Abroad
1940 Behind the Mike
1941 The News From Europe
1941 Sunday Evening News Roundup
1941 NBC Sunday News Roundup
1941 Jergens Journal
1941 The Hemisphere Review
1941 Two Years Of War
1941 Radio City Music Hall Symphony Orchestra
1941 Kay Kyser's Kollege Of Musical Knowledge
1941 The March Of Time
1942 Radio City Music Hall On the Air
1943 Music Of the New World
1943 Mr and Mrs North
1943 Information Please
1943 The NBC Symphony Orchestra
1943 The Fitch Bandwagon
1943 Your Home Front Reporter
1943 General Motors Symphony Of the Air
1944 Treasury Salute
1944 Opening Of the Fourth War Loan
1944 NBC D-Day Coverage
1944 Republican National Convention
1944 Democratic National Convention
1944 We Came This Way
1944 Liberaton
1945 The Harold Lloyd Comedy Theatre
1945 V-E Day Coverage
1945 Atlantic Spotlight
1945 The Charlie McCarthy Show
1946 Alec Templeton Time
1946 A Story For V-J Day
1947 Echoes Of A Century
1947 Home Is What You Make It
1947 Here's To Veterans
1947 You Have To Go Out
1947 Housing 1947
1948 The Chesterfield Supper Club
1948 Guest Star
1948 Living 1948
1948 Author Meets the Critics
1949 March Of Dimes
1949 The Henry Morgan Show
1949 Could Be
1950 The People Act
1950 We Can Do It
1950 The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show
1951 Memo For Americans
1951 The Big Show
1951 Theatre Guild On the Air
1951 Living 1951
1951 American Portraits
1952 The Endless Frontier
1952 The Forty Million
1953 Medicine U.S.A.
1955 Biography In Sound
1955 Best Of All
1955 Guest Star
1956 X Minus One
1956 Recollections At Thirty
1956 Sleep No More
1957 The Boston Pops
1959 Johnny Presents
1959 Meet the Press
1961 Monitor
1962 Democracy In America
1968 New Year's Eve All-Star Parade Of Bands
1973 New Year's Eve With Guy Lombardo
1976 The First Fabulous 50Ben Grauer

Ben Grauer circa 1947Ben Grauer circa 1947


Caption: Ben Grauer not only takes 'em but develops 'em (1938)

Ben Grauer applauds the Boss, Raymond Firestone on accepting an award for The Firestone Hour
Ben Grauer applauds the Boss, Raymond Firestone on accepting an award for The Firestone Hour.

Ben Grauer interviews Tobey Balding a five year old British evacuee during a World War II Broadcast
Ben Grauer interviews Tobey Balding a five year old British evacuee during a World War II Broadcast
Ben Grauer chats with Kukla of Kukla, Fran and Ollie from the TV Show of the same name
Ben Grauer chats with Kukla of Kukla, Fran and Ollie from the TV Show of the same name

Ben Grauer circa 1964
Ben Grauer circa 1964

Helen Hayes sits next to Mrs. Ben Grauer -- Melanie Kahane -- at an unidentified event during the 1960s
Helen Hayes sits next to Mrs. Ben Grauer -- Melanie Kahane -- at an unidentified event during the 1960s

Ben Grauer sits at the Monitor Desk with Miss Monitor on the phone
Ben Grauer sits at the Monitor Desk with Miss Monitor on the phone.


Benjamin Franklin Grauer was born in Staten Island, New York. Already a child actor in films and on Broadway during the 1920s, he began his career as a child actor in David Warfield's production of The Return of Peter Grimm. Among his early credits were roles in films directed by D.W. Griffith.

After graduating from Townsend Harris High School, he received his B.A. from City College of New York in 1930. Grauer started in radio as an actor but soon joined the broadcasting staff of the National Broadcasting Company. Grauer was one of the four narrators, along with Burgess Meredith, of NBC's public affairs series The Big Story, which focused on courageous journalists.

Starting in 1932, Grauer covered the Olympic Games, presidential inaugurations and international events. During the course of his extraordinary radio career, Ben Grauer covered nearly every major historic event, including the Morro Castle fire, the Paris Peace Conference and the US Occupation of Japan.

Upon graduating in 1930, a 22-year-old Ben Grauer joined the staff at NBC. He quickly rose through the ranks to become a senior commentator and reporter. He was the designated announcer for the popular 1940s Walter Winchell's Jergens Journal and was selected by Arturo Toscanini to become the voice of the NBC Symphony Orchestra. Grauer took over in 1940 and remained until it was disbanded in June 1954. Toscanini said he was his favorite announcer.

Grauer provided the commentary for NBC's first television special--the opening in of the 1939 New York World's Fair. In 1948 Grauer, together with John Cameron Swayze provided the first live TV coverage of the national political conventions. In 1956 NBC began broadcasting some of their shows in living color and in 1957 the animated Peacock logo made its debut. It was Grauer who first spoke the now famous words, "The following program is brought to you in living color on NBC," behind the Peacock graphic. During his forty year broadcast career, Ben Grauer hosted numerous TV programs on NBC, including game shows, quiz shows, concerts and news programs.

In 1954, he married interior designer Melanie Kahane.

Millions still remember his NBC coverage of the annual New Year's celebrations on both radio and TV. Between 1951 and 1969, Grauer covered New Years Eve at Times' Square eleven times. Grauer continued covering New Year's Eve for Guy Lombardo's New Year's Eve specials on CBS throughout the 1970s, with his last appearance on December 31, 1976, the year before both he and Guy Lombardo died.

Several years after the death of Toscanini, Grauer and composer Don Gillis (who produced the NBC programs from 1947 to 1954), created the Peabody Award-winning radio series Toscanini, the Man Behind the Legend. Beginning in 1963, it continued through the centennial of Toscanini's birth in 1967. The Toscanini series ran for nearly two decades on NBC Radio and then other radio stations until the early 1980s.

In the last decade before his death, Grauer collected material for a projected history of Prices and Pricing, with special attention to Book Prices. He was active in several professional journalistic organizations as well as the Grolier Club. Grauer had a strong interest in the graphic arts, annually printing his own Christmas cards.

All of the networks produced at least one or two truly memorable network voices, whether as recurring announcers, heavily tapped narrators, or on occasion simply the voice of a familiar newsreader. NBC Radio was particularly blessed in this regard, as were its listeners. CBS had Dan Seymour, and NBC had Ben Grauer. The two were justifiable legends in their own lights at their respective networks.

But Ben Grauer quite literally did it all at NBC. No matter the task--from newswriting or reading to comedy to Toscanini to quiz shows to all day stints at Monitor--and on both Radio and Television. Ben Grauer literally has no equal in the history of Radio and Television as an announcer, and few equals in overall versatility.

The literally thousands of circulating Radio recordings and Television kinescopes or films that bear Ben Grauer's unmistakable signature--crystal clear ennunciation, steady rock-solid delivery, and natural enthusiasm. We miss him now 32 years after his passing and indeed he will always be missed as long as any of his recordings remain available.




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