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Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert head

The Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert

Ragtime was the earliest published form of Jazz
Ragtime was the earliest published form of Jazz

Eddie Condon jams with the greatest names of the Jazz world in a Life magazine photo spread from October 11 1943
Eddie Condon jams with the greatest names of the Jazz world in a Life magazine photo spread from October 11 1943

The young Blue Network took the bold step of bringing cutting edge Jazz to mainstream Radio
The young Blue Network took the bold step of bringing cutting edge Jazz to mainstream Radio

Condon's Jammin' at Condon's was one of Columbia's most prized Jazz albums
Condon's Jammin' at Condon's was one of Columbia's most prized Jazz albums


James P Johnson

Sidney Bechet

Earl 'Fatha' Hines

Art Hodes

Tommy Dorsey

Jack Teagarden

Gene Krupa

Woody Herman

Bobby Hackett

Joe Bushkin

Tony Motolla



Background

American Jazz wasn't widely heard until the 1920s. Up until that point in American music history, the type of music eventually labeled 'jazz' had been restricted to a form that had begun evolving in the American Southeast and South. The New Orleans brand of 'jazz' was coined Dixieland, and only later, Dixieland Jazz. The word 'jazz' itself wasn't coined until approximately 1915, as a West Coast term referring to the novel syncopated music evolving in and around Chicago with Bix Beiderbecke, Gene Krupa and others.

Once in wider circulation, the music genre, Jazz, or American Jazz came to represent several sub-genre of the form. Ragtime, Dixieland, Swing, Bebop, and regional varieties of Big Band Jazz began to be referred to collectively as simply 'Jazz,' and that's the term we'll generally refer to in this article.

The earliest recordings of 'jazz' were preserved on wax cylinders. Thankfully, hundreds of these fragile cylinder recordings have been transferred to digital and analog media over the years. The earliest Jazz interpretations over Radio didn't arrive until the late 1920s, and then only as novelty acts or performances. Jazz over Radio didn't really hit its stride until the late 1930s, and remained something of a novelty until the advent of World War II.

Once the World War II era arrived, the Office of War Information became persuaded that the more familiar music of the era might well serve as a significant morale booster for American troops overseas. In addition to popular country music, classical instrumentals and religious music, several important repositories of Jazz music began entering circulation through the auspices of the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS): Jubilee, One Night Stand, Downbeat, and G.I. Jive, among others. On the homefront, the big bands that remained intact after conscription were popularizing several forms of Swing, a Jazz variant of Blues, and Bebop, to popular acclaim and demand throughout the U.S.

Apart from the Big Band Remotes broadcast throughout Radio between the late 1930s and mid-1940s, Jazz had only been widely popularized on the The Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street, a program that began airing in 1940 and ran through 1952. In the context of the The Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street programs, the series both educated and entertained. The education aspect was an important one, since the form was still quite a novelty to most of mainstream America.

Eddie Condon takes Jazz awareness to a new level

Eddie Condon was an important interpreter and proponent of several forms of Jazz of the era, but his role in bringing Jazz to a far wider audience remains his greatest contribution to the genre. Eddie Condon, though predominantly a proponent of Dixieland Jazz, was also a significant promoter of all forms of Jazz variants of the era--and their interpreters. Even more importantly, white proponents of Jazz such as Condon, Harry James, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Glenn Miller, Woody Herman, the Dorsey Brothers and George Gershwin became voices for the tens of thousands of ethnic proponents of the form.

Indeed, in spite of the extraordinary popularity of 'crossover' society bands, black performers and composers such as Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, and Cab Calloway, among many others, the broader acceptance of Jazz hadn't yet acheived mainstream popularity. Indeed, several religious and social organizations throughout the U.S. viewed the Jazz form as a threat to the moral sensibilities of young people and adults alike.

It was the exhuberance and optimism of the World War II years that launched all forms of Jazz into wider popular consciousness. The famous series of Carnegie Hall concerts that first 'legitimized' the Jazz form, combined with the increasing demand for the form over Radio, persuaded the young American Broadcasting Company, then still referred to as The Blue Network, to begin airing a series of Eddie Condon's 'Town Hall Recitals', airing from, appropriately enough, New York's Town Hall venue.

The Blue Network picked up the recitals about eight performances into the series with its Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert program. During the same period, Eddie Condon performed twice at Carnegie Hall, with many of the guest artists and performers from the Radio program.

1944 and 1945 were breakthrough years for Eddie Condon and Jazz in general. The Town Hall series of Jazz recitals had been both a boon to the popularization of Jazz itself, as well as introducing hundreds of thousands of fans to Condon's 'NicksieLand' Jazz, after the New York club, Nick's, where Condon had first made a name for himself. Condon's NicksieLand Jazz was also popularized over the equally ground-breaking Pete Kelly's Blues crime drama -- variety format created by Jack Webb. While ostensibly presented as St. Louis Blues and Jazz, the Pete Kelly's Blues interpretation, as performed by Webb's 'Big 7,' was highly reminiscent of Condon's NicksieLand variant of Jazz.

Condon's free-wheeling format paves the way for popular Jazz

Though predominantly airing Condon's own variant of Jazz, Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert played host to some of the greatest names of the Jazz World in the course of its forty-six episodes. Pianist Gene Schroeder, bassist Bob Haggart, clarinetist Pee Wee Russell, cornetist Max Kaminsky, baritone trumpeter Ernie Caceres, trombonist Benny Morton, and drummer George Wettling formed the core of Condon's Jazz ensemble. All, of course, accompanied by Eddie Condon on his tenor guitar, banjo or ukulele.

Condon's concerts were very much the free form they'd been throughout his Jazz Band Ball and Town Hall recitals--loose, free-wheeling, and barely under control; just the way Jazz lovers of the day liked it. Indeed, the structure of Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert initially aired in a highly unstructured format. The program would begin by immediately launching into a Jazz cut of between two and a half to three and a half minutes, followed by Eddie Condon describing the piece just played, while citing the band members and their instruments. After the first thirteen installments, announcer/narrator Fred Robbins assumed most of the announcing and hosting duties with Eddie Condon, at the same time adding a more structured introduction and close for each program.

The Blue Network wisely chose to seize on the lack of structure to the concerts, citing them as "the only unrehearsed, free-wheeling, completely barefoot music on the air." A wise move on several levels. The Town Hall series of recitals had amounted to little more than jam sessions prior to the Blue Network's airing of the programs. It was that spontaneity and jam session quality that only enhanced the authentic Jazz feel of the programs. But indeed, as every Jazz aficionado knows all too well, there's little that's genuinely unstructured in any Jazz piece--scored or unscored. But then, that's the genius of the form: the appearance of a free-wheeling, free-flowing music form, in what is otherwise a highly structured and brilliantly scored or extemporized piece of multi-instrument music.

Condon's ensemble was enhanced over the course of the series by most of the Jazz World's most successful proponents. Among them were Joe Bushkin, Joe and Lou McGarity, Buster Bailey, Art Hodes, Art Holder, 'Hot Lips' Page, Bobby Hackett, James P. Johnson, Sonny Greer, Gene Krupa, Tony Mottola, Joe Marsala, Jack and Norma Teagarden, Sidney Bechet, Earl 'Fatha' Hines, Tommy Dorsey, and Woody Herman. Needless to say, Jazz aficiandoes of the era were thrilled beyond measure to hear their favorite artists appearing regularly over a major weekly broadcast.

The format was, of necessity, altered from its customary 30-minute program to an occasional 15-minute program. WJZ, the fledgling Blue Network's flagship station, had negotiated the rights to air major college football games of the era. Whenever a major game fell on a Sunday during Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert, the network shortened those broadcasts to 15-minutes to accomodate the football broadcasts.

Though not yet as mainstream as it's 'big three' competitors, the Blue Network acquitted itself well with Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert series. It was a bold step for 'the new kid on the block' and gave Jazz a boost it sorely needed to further establish Jazz as a viable, popular, music form. The Town Hall recitals were so popular for their era that they've been re-compiled and re-pressed in their entirety over the years. The Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert represents the majority of those recitals as well as the Jazz Band Ball variant of Condon's concerts of the era. All in all Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert represents a remarkable repository of American Jazz as it was approaching its zenith. Indeed many of the recordings from the canon represent the last appearances of some of the Jazz World's most gifted proponents. And so it is, that Jazz's time capsule lives on, through the Golden Age of Radio.

Series Derivatives:

AFRS R-Series 'Eddie Condon'
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Jazz Concerts
Network(s): ABC Blue Network, The AFRS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 44-05-20 01 Sweet Georgia Brown
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 44-05-20 to 45-04-07; Blue Network [ABC]; Forty-six, 30-minute and 15-minute programs; Saturdays, varying afternoon times.
Syndication: AFRS
Sponsors:
Director(s): Jack Bland, Addison Amore [Directors]
Ernest Anderson [Producer]
Principal Performers: Eddie Condon, Joe Bushkin, Sid Catlett, Bob Casey, Pee Wee Russell, Joe McGarity, Sterling Bose, Buster Bailey, Billy Butterfield, Max Kaminsky, Miff Mole, Art Hodes, Don Frye, Lou McGarity, Art Holder, Edmond Hall, George Wettling, Hot Lips Page, Pops Foster, Bobby Hackett, Gene Schroeder, James P. Johnson, Joe Grauso, Liza Morrow, John O'Hara, Rex Stewart, Sonny Greer, Ernie Caceres, John Kirby, George Frazier, Bill Harris, Clyde Hart, Bob Haggart, Willie 'The Lion' Smith, Jonah Jones, Benny Morton, Sid Weiss, Gene Krupa, George Wettling, Tony Mottola, Joe Marsala, Harry 'the Hipster' Gibson, Carl Kress, Jess Stacy, Lee Wiley, Mugsy Spanier, Bill Harris, Cliff Jackson, Red McKenzie, Jack Lesberg, Cozy Cole, Dick Cary, Jimmy Dorsey, Wingy Manone, Jack Teagarden, Cliff Jackson, Norma Teagarden, Sidney Bechet, Johnny Blowers, Jack Eberle, Harry Bluestone, Earl Fatha Hines, Al Jarvis, Sidney Bechet, Yank Lawson, Hank D'Amico, Tommy Dorsey, Vernon Brown, Dave Bowman, Woody Herman
Recurring Character(s): None
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s)
Music Direction: Dick Charles, Dick Mack [Engineers]
Musical Theme(s): None
Announcer(s): Fred Robbins
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
46
Episodes in Circulation: 49
Total Episodes in Collection: 49 [Includes one AFRS recording and two demos]
Provenances:

RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the radioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

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The Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
44-05-20
1
Sweet Georgia Brown
Y
[Premiere]

44-05-19 Wisconsin State Journal
Saturday 2:30 p.m--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concerts (WCFL): "Sweet Gerogia Brown," "Peg O' My Heart," "Carolina Shout."
44-05-27
2
At The Jazz Band Ball
Y
44-05-26 Wisconsin State Journal
Saturday 2:30 Jazz Concert--WCFL
44-06-03
3
Ballin' the Jack
Y
[Beginning clipped]

44-06-03 Lima News
A jazz veteran of the old days in New Orleans, Edmund Hall, clarinetist, who began his career with Louis Armstrong on the River Boats, will be a guest tooter on "Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert" over WJZ Saturday at 3:30 p.m., EWT. Benny Morton, celebrated Negro trombonist, will also appear at this week's jam session on which Joe McCarthy, Editor of "Yank" will be the commentator.
44-06-10
4
Muskrat Ramble
Y
44-06-09 Wisconsin State Journal
Saturday 2:30 Jazz Concert--WCFL
44-06-17
5
Fats Waller Tribute
Y
44-06-16 Wisconsin State Journal
Saturday 2:30 Jazz Concert (WCFL): honors the late Fats Waller with "Honeysuckle Rose," "Ain't Misbehavin'."
44-06-24
6
I Found A New Baby
Y
[Beginning clipped]

44-06-24 The Lima News
3:30--Eddie Condon & Jazz Concert--blu
44-07-01
7
Lady In Love
Y
44-07-01 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-07-08
8
Struttin' with Some Barbeque
Y
44-07-08 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-07-15
9
That's A'Plenty
Y
44-07-15 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-07-22
10
Fidgety Feet
Y
[15 Minute Program]

44-07-22 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue

44-07-22 Chicago Tribune
2:30--WCFL--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert

44-07-22 Chicago Tribune
2:45--WCFL--News; J. Robert Johnson.

44-07-29
11
Swing That Rhythm
Y
44-07-29 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-08-05
12
George Gershwin Tribute
Y
44-08-05 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-08-12
13
Everybody Loves My Baby
Y
44-08-12 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-08-19
14
Clarinet Marmalade
Y
44-08-19 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-08-26
15
California, Here I Come
Y
44-08-26 Joplin Globe
2:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blue
44-09-02
16
Walkin' The Dog
Y
44-09-02 The Lima News
3:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blu
44-09-09
17
Love Nest
Y
[Eddie Condon's Jazz Band Ball; End clipped]

44-09-09 The Lima News
3:30--Eddie Condon and Jazz Concert--blu
44-09-16
18
Rosetta
Y
[15 Minute Program]

44-09-15 Wisconsin State Journal
Saturday--12:30 p.m.--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert (WCFL): program
at new time.

44-09-16 The Lima News
1:45--Michigan vs Iowa Football--nbc cbs blu
44-09-23
19
That's A'Plenty
Y
44-09-23 Hutchinson News-Herald
12:30 Eddie Condon
44-09-30
20
At The Jazz Band Ball
Y
[Last Town Hall Concert]

44-09-30 Hutchinson News Herald
12:30 Eddie Condon
44-10-07
21
At Sundown
Y
44-10-07 Port Arthur News
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu
44-10-14
22
Muskrat Ramble
Y
44-10-14 Port Arthur News
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu
44-10-21
23
Royal Garden
Y
44-10-21 Bradford Era
1:30 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert
44-10-28
24
Sweet Georgia Brown
Y
44-10-28 Lima News
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu
44-11-04
25
My Blue Heaven
Y
44-11-04 Hutchinson News Herald
12:30 Eddie Condon
44-11-11
26
Easter Parade
Y
[15 minute program]

44-11-11 Port Arthur News
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu

44-11-11 Chicago Tribune
1:05--WCFL--Football--N. D. vs. Army.

44-11-11 New York Times
1:30--WJZ--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert.

44-11-11 New York Times
1:45--WJZ--Football--Army vs. Notre Dame at Yankee Stadium.
44-11-18
27
Way Down Yonder In New Orleans
Y
[15 minute program]

44-11-18 Frederick News-Post
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu

44-11-18 Chicago Tribune
12:45--WCFL--Football--Purdue. vs. Navy.

44-11-18 New York Times
1:30--WJZ--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert.

44-11-18 New York Times
1:45--WJZ--Football--Football: Purdue vs. Navy, at Baltimore.
44-11-25
28
September In The Rain
Y
44-11-26 Frederick News-Post
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu
44-12-02
29
I Found A New Baby
Y
44-12-02 Port Arthur News
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu
44-12-09
--
Preempted
--
[Preempted for Sixth War Loan Show]

44-12-09 Port Arthur News
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu

44-12-09 Frederick News-Post
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu

44-12-09 New York Times
1:00--WJZ--Sixth War Loan Show: The Bowl and the Picture. With Mattie Christians. Oscar Homolka
44-12-16
30
Ballin' The Jack
Y
44-12-16 Frederick News-Post
1:30--Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert--blu

44-12-16 New York Times
1:00--WJZ--Eddie Condon Jazz Concert
44-12-23
31
Eddie Condon's Christmas Jazz Concert

Y
[Christmas Jazz Concert]

44-12-22 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
44-12-30
32
Walkin' The Dog
Y
44-12-30 New York Times
1:00--WJZ--Eddie Condon Jazz Concert
45-01-06
33
Sunday
Y
45-01-06 New York Times
1:00--WJZ--Eddie Condon Jazz Concert
45-01-13
34
September In The Rain
Y
45-01-12 Sheboygan Press
Saturday 3:15 Eddie Condon Music
45-01-20
35
Jazz Me Blues
Y
45-01-19 Sheboygan Press
Saturday 3:15 Eddie Condon Music
45-01-27
36
The St. Louis Blues
Y
45-01-26 Sheboygan Press
Saturday 3:15 Eddie Condon Music
45-02-03
37
It's Been So Long
Y
45-02-02 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
45-02-10
38
Should I?
Y
45-02-09 Racine Journal Times
Saturday 3:15 P.M. WENR--Eddie Condon's Con
45-02-17
39
Strut, Miss Lizzie
Y
45-02-16 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
45-02-24
40
Honeysuckle Rose
Y
45-02-23 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
45-03-03
41
I Found A New Baby
Y
45-03-02 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
45-03-10
42
Sweet Georgia Brown
Y
45-03-09 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
45-03-17
43
As Long A I Live
Y
45-03-17 New York Times
1:00--WJZ--Eddie Condon Jazz Concert
45-03-24
44
Struttin' With Some Barbeque
Y
45-03-23 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
45-03-31
45
Easter Parade
Y
45-03-30 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC
45-04-07
46
Ballin' The Jack
Y
45-04-06 Beatrice Daily Sun
Saturday 12:00 Eddie Condon

45-04-07 New York Times
3:00--WJZ--Eddie Condon Jazz Concert
45-04-14
--
--
--
[All programming Preempted for FDR Tributes]

45-04-13 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 2:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC

45-04-21 New York Times
WJZ--
All scheduled news and programming cancelled for tributes and FDR Memorials
45-04-21
--
--
--
45-04-20 Brownsville Herald
Saturday 2:00 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert BNC

45-04-21 New York Times
3:00--WJZ--
Saturday Senior Swing
--
--
45-04-28 New York Times
3:00--WJZ--
Saturday Senior Swing





AFRS R-Series 'Eddie Condon' Program Log

Date AFRS No. Title Avail. Notes
44-05-27
1
At the Jazz Band Ball
N
44-06-10
2
Muskrat Ramble
N
44-06-17
3
The Joint Is Jumpin'
N
44-06-24
4
I Found A New Baby
N
44-07-08
6
Struttin' With Some Barbeque
N
44-07-15
7
That's A'Plenty
N
44-07-22
8
Fidgety Feet
N
44-08-12
11
Everybody Loves My Baby
N
44-08-19
12
Clarinet Marmalade
N
44-08-26
13
California, Here I Come
N
44-09-02
14
Walkin' the Dog
N
44-09-09
15
Love Nest
N
44-09-16
16
Rosetta
N
44-09-23
17
Sweet Georgia Brown
N
44-10-07
19
At Sundown
N
44-10-14
20
Muskrat Ramble
N
44-10-21
21
Royal Garden Blues
N
44-12-16
28
Ballin' the Jack
N
44-12-23
29
The Sunny Side Of the Street
N
45-01-27
34
St Louis Blues
N
45-02-03
35
It's Been So Long
N
45-02-10
36
Should I?
N
45-03-03
40
I Found A New Baby
N
45-03-10
41
Sweet Georgia Brown
N
45-03-31
44
I Ain't Gonna Give Nobody None Of This Jelly Roll
N
45-04-07
45
Ballin' the Jack
N
45-04-14
46
September In the Rain
N
45-04-21
47
Strut, Miss Lizzie
N
45-xx-xx
--
September In The Rain
Y






The Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert Radio Program Biographies




Eddie Condon [Albert Edwin Condon]
Jazz Performer, Composer, Band Leader; Jazz Visionary
(1905-1973)

Birthplace: Goodland, Indiana, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1938 All-Star Jam Session
1939 America Dances
1941 The Chamber Music Society Of Lower Basin Street
1942 Jam
1944 Eddie Condon's Jazz Concert
1952 Doctor Jazz
Eddie Condon circa 1943
Eddie Condon circa 1943

Eddie Condon's first book was We Called It Musc (1947)
Eddie Condon's first book was We Called It Musc (1947)
From the August 5, 1973 edition of the San Antonio Light:
 
Jazz Great Condon Dead
 
     NEW YORK (UPI) --Jazz great Eddie Condon whose driving, Chicago style of guitar playing sparked bands for 40 years from the 1920s to the 1960s, died Saturday of a bone disease at Mt. Sinai Hospital after a lengthy illness.  He was 68.
     Condon, whose guitar was a rarity in basic jazz, helped make New York City a mecca for fans who flocked to his famous club, Eddie Condon's, in Greenwich Village in the post World War II years, and later when he moved it uptown in the days when 52nd street rang with great jazz bands.
     He was born Albert Edwin Condon in Goodland, Ind., Nov. 16, 1904.  His family moved to Illinois when he was two because, joked Condon, who was as fast with a quip as he was with his guitar, the Hoosier State "went dry and I couldn't take that."
     Condon quit school at 15 and headed for Chicago's Roaring Twenties night spots where a new school of jazz--Chicago style--was being nursed into life by such youngsters as Bix Biederbeck, Gene Krupa, Bud Freeman, and Joe Sullivan.
     He joined a chicago band, Homer Peavey's Jazz Bandits.  In 1925 he and Red McKenzie formed the Chicago Rhythm Kings, whose records are now collectors items.
     He and McKenzie moved to New York in 1928 and started another band, the Mound City Blue Blowers, consisting of four instruments--the banjo, guitar, comb and leather suitcase, and became the hit of New York cafe society until big band swing came into vogue in the 1930s.
     During those years Condon played in Artie Shaw's band and helped spearhead a rival of Dixieland style jazz in the 1940s, organizing jazz concerts in Carnegie Hall and then setting up his own nightclub.
     Condon's sidemen were legion, but many of his best records featured such stars as trumpeters Wild Bill Davison and Billy Butterfield and trombonist George Brunies.
     In the 1950s Condon wrote a column on jazz, filled with his pithy witticisms, for the New York Journal-American.
     Condon was the author of three books on his life in jazz  -- "We Called it Music," "Treasury of Jazz," and the latest, to be published soon, "Eddie Condon's Scrapbook of Jazz."
     In his last public appearance, July 6, 1972, he played at Carnegie Hall during the Newport Jazz Festival in New York City.
     Condon never considered jazz an art form.  "Canning vegetables is an art form.  So's getting a suntan."  he said.  "Jazz is just unscored music."
     At the first Newport Jazz Festival in 1954, a harried local club president after studying the damage a night of hot music did to the tennis courts, told him, "If you ask me, another night like that and it will be the end of those courts."
     Parried Condon:  "If you ask me, it's the end of tennis."
     His survivors include his wife, Phyllis, and two daughters, Liza, 28, and Maggie, 29, of New York City.



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