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Original Dangerously Yours header art

The Dangerously Yours Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Dangerously Yours

Dangerously Yours spot ad from July 1 1944
The first Dangerously Yours spot ad from July 1 1944


Vicks VapoRub logo

Dangerously Yours spot ad from July 22 1944
Dangerously Yours spot ad from July 22 1944


Dangerously Yours spot ad from Sep 30 1944
Dangerously Yours spot ad from Sep 30 1944


Matinee Theatre spot ad from October 28 1944
Matinee Theatre spot ad from October 28 1944


Matinee Theatre spot ad from November 11 1944 with Jory looking a little less in immediate danger in the caricature
Matinee Theatre spot ad from November 11 1944 with Jory looking a little less in immediate danger in the caricature

Background and Prologue

Dangerously Yours may--or may not-- have taken a long and tortured path to commercial broadcast. First allegedly auditioned in 1940 by what sounds very much to be Alfred Shirley in the role of host, the audition titled Masquerade announces an episode, Jungle Harvest to follow, but the audition never produced an on-air broadcast. Also note the format: Alfred Shirley introduces the adventure, then leaves it to that week's cast to perform the script. Fast forward to either 1942 or 1944, and now it's Victory Jory auditioning for Dangerously Yours, with Tony Marvin again acting as announcer--the only elements connecting the two auditions were the writer, Jean Holloway, the director, Richard Sanville, the composer, Arnold Johnson, and the announcer, Tony Marvin.

Victory Jory was coming off of a series of extraordinarily diverse roles in the wake of the wildy successful and turbulent Gone With The Wind film of 1939 which propelled several other character actors and B-list performers into the spotlight. But again, the audition didn't take. As with the first audition, the program announces a follow-on episode, It Happened in Gramercy Square.


We point this out because of widely varying acounts of when the two audition episodes actually aired. All the usual sources, citing no proof or rationale whatsoever, state that both episodes aired in June of 1944 within 24-hours of each other. There are several problems with this allegation--apart from the obvious absence of any provenance whatsoever to substantiate their 'complete and accurate,' claims.

Discussion

On the one hand, four key parties to the auditions are common to both auditions: Jean Holloway, Richard Sanville, Arnold Johnson and Tony Marvin. But the presence of Alfred Shirley apparently voicing the first audition suggests a date earlier than June 1944 for the Alfred Shirley audition. If these were ostensibly two auditions back to back, what possibile point was there in wasting two scripts on them if it was only to audition--and compare--two starring performers? Why the different announcement of the following production? Why Martin Gabel providing exposition for the one and Alfred Shirley providing his own exposition for his audition? And ultimately, Alfred Shirley was already successfully undertaking the program Romance for CBS for most of the summer of 1944. Another plausible explanation is that if indeed, the first audition had been in either June of 1940 or even June of 1942, it's entirely possible for Alfred Shirley to have appeared in it in during either year.

As to the Victory Jory audition, contemporaneous reports of Jory's willingness to suspend his Film appearances for a year to commit to a year of Jean Holloway's Dangerously Yours scripts seems consistent among the various sources reporting it. But could Jory still have recorded The Highwayman as an audition in 1942 just as easily as in 1944? Sure. But again, we have the same common announcer, composer, orchestra, writer and director for both known auditions--Tony Marvin, Arnold Johnson, Jean Holloway and Richard Sanville.

Conclusions

Here's our best informed guess regarding the order and chronology of the two auditions:

The Masquerade audition was recorded in 1944 either the week before or after the other audition, The Highwayman. One other possibility is that they were recorded during the same session. In any case it's clear that both were recorded for the Vick Chemical Company's evaluation. This begs a question of the plausibility of Vick Chemical Company juggling these two auditions over the previously reported period of as much as four years--plausible but only remotely likely.

While Victory Jory was reportedly ready to go all-in with the Dangerously Yours Radio production, we're reminded that such a decision, however well intentioned wasn't always arrived at unilaterally. It may not have been Jory's own decision to make. If I'd have been Vick Chemical Company then, as much as I'd have been interested in signing Victor Jory for a long-term commitment, I'd have wanted to cover my bases just in case something fell through. Hence, the Alfred Shirley hosted audition of Dangerously Yours. Such a format would almost surely have employed an actor of Alfred Shirley or Victor Jory's stature, as host, narrator and expositor for the series. This would have been much like what famous Stage, Film and Radio actor Gayne Whitman had done in many of his later years of Radio appearances.

We also doubt that Victory Jory would have made this same apparent 'commitment' back in 1942, only to wait around for two years to actually commit to it. The bottom line is that we trust our own ears. Arnold Johnson and his Orchestra are audibly credited with at least one of these auditions, but it's clear listening to both of them that it's Arnold Johnson and his orchestra providing the musical accompaniment to both auditions--indeed, sounding very much as if recorded during the very same session.

So why the varying end-teasers and scripts? They were auditions. It didn't really matter what they announced as the following program as long as it might serve to whet the appetite of the intended audience--The Vick Chemical Company. So were Jungle Harvest and It Happened in Gramercy Square simply two favorites of the account executive at Vick Chemical Company's productions? In all likelihood, yes.

The Year of Living Dangerously . . . Yours

Dangerously Yours ultimately debuted commercially on Sunday, July 2, 1944 in a 1:00 p.m. afternoon timeslot. Though titled Dangerously Yours! the program was clearly not blood and guts adventure fare. Indeed it was widely announced as an anthology of romantic adventures. Romantic as in fanciful, given to wanderlust, or naively confident. Not precisely romantic as in "boy chases girl, girl allows boy to catch her, boy thinks he managed it all on his own" kind of romance. More of that would come in the follow-on to Dangerously Yours!--Vick's Matinee Theatre.

Vick was clearly doing everything within their power to both support their star, as well as please their growing national audience. For one, the works of some of modern history's most famous authors were adapted for the series, among them: Booth Tarkington, Edgar Allan Poe, Alfred Noyes, James Oliver Curwood and George Bernard Shaw. For another, the production seemed to bend over backwards in response to listener requests for future episodes of Dangerously Yours. This would take on a completely different guise in the follow-on Vicks Matinee Theatre productions.

Unfortunately, in the process several quite promising productions--and apparently their scripts--ended up in the round file, or were bounced around the schedule airing as much as four months after they were first announced. Many announced Dangerously Yours productions never made it to the air at all.

As confusing as this might seem for both archivists and the newspaper copywriters of the day, it was great for Vick's Radio audience. They felt like they were gaining a real voice in shaping future productions of a favorite program, and Vick, through the versatility and agility of its ensemble repertory company was quite prepared to juggle the schedule around at the last minute to suit popular demand.

By the end of the Dangererously Yours run, Victor Jory had both demonstrated an extraordinary versatility of his own in this fairly new medium to him, and had also cemented and nurtured a brand loyalty to Vick Chemical Company by remaining so responsive to audience demand for subsequent productions.

Indeed it was audience feedback that drove Dangerously Yours' segue to Vicks Matinee Theatre on October 22, 1944.

Dangerously Yours become less dangerous and more yours as Vicks Matinee Theatre

From the October 19 1944 Cedar Rapids Tribune:

ON THE AIR

Some Outstanding Features Scheduled By Station WMT

"Dangerously Yours" Changes Title,
Victor Jory Continuing As Star

Victor Jory's thrilling portrayal of swashbuckling heroes on the "Dangerously Yours" Sunday series on CBS has stirred such favorable nationwide response that the program policy will be broadened and the title changed to "The Matinee Theater," effective Oct. 22. The change will permit the presentation of a much greater variety of dramatizations of books, plays and motion pictures that have won universl acclaim. Jory will have a wider range for the versatile talents that have made him one of the top-ranking actors of stage and screen as well as radio's newest "matinee idol."
The decision to change the title and expand the scope of the highly successful "Dangerously Yours" series was taken because of the increasing number of listener requests for adaptation of books, stage dramas, and films which did not conform with the original idea of presenting only tales of dangerous living.
The first offering under the new program title, "The Matinee Theater," on Sunday, Oct. 22, will be Emily Bronte's immortal love classic, "Wuthering Heights." The program is heard over WMT Sundays at 1 p.m.

The lineage of Vicks Matinee Theatre to Dangerously Yours was quite understandable. Indeed, the only reason for even further differentiating Matinee Theatre from Dangerously Yours was a matter of degree. The new production retained the same cast, the same production support and the same sponsor--even the same timeslot. But Vick's public had spoken and Vick had listened.

As noted above, Vick was constantly soliciting suggestions or feedback from its programs' listeners--through both its spokepeople and its star, Victor Jory. The audience wanted more romantic romance mixed with its romantic adventure, and so Vick's Matinee Theatre reinvented itself to meet its audience's needs.

A word about the etymology of Matinee Theatre. For the first seven episodes of the new production, it was introduced as Vick's Matinee Theatre starring Victor Jory. Indeed, for the same first eight weeks of continuing to solicit suggestions and feedback from its listeners, Vick had Jory requests that listeners write the program care of Vick's Matinee Theatre at a New York City address.

From episode #8 forward, Vick's Matinee Theatre morphed into Vick Presents The Matinee Theatre, then simply Matinee Theatre by the end of the run. Even the 'care of' address was changed from "Vick's Matinee Theatre, New York 22, New York." to simply care of "Columbia Broadcasting, New York 22, New York.".

The schedule of future programs continued in flux for most of the latter two-thirds of the Matinee Theatre production run. Though somewhat confusing for listeners 50 years hence, there was something of a method to their apparent madness. Throughout the 1930s through 1950s the Radio networks for the most part remained intensely responsive to audience feedback. Moreso with a production such as Matinee Theatre wherein the sponsor even more actively sought the pulse of its audience in shaping its dramatic selections.

But in the process, several otherwise worthwhile productions never aired as announced, for one reason or another. In other cases a program that was overwhelmingly voted for by the audience also somehow fell through the cracks. The program never explained these anomalies so we'll never know what was going on behind the scenes. But as best as we can determine, the following programs, though suggested--or even announced at least once--never made it to air:

Under Dangerously Yours:

  • Wallace of Scotland
  • The Prince of Darkness (may have been The Shadow of the Raven which did air)

Under Matinee Theatre:

  • The Petrified Forest
  • The Ballad of Beauty Stewart
  • Goodbye, Mr. Chips
  • Manslaughter
  • The Great McGinty
  • Only Yesterday

We raise this issue because there remain some question as to which program scripts actually aired and which ones were either postponed, delayed, or abandoned entirely--for whatever circumstances. Whether the practice of so baldly pandering to an audience is a wise practice or not, in the case of Dangerously Yours and Matinee Theatre, an often fickle, demanding audience apparently tired of being pandered to after only forty of the Dangerously Yours/Matinee Theatre productions.

We rush to point out that the series continued to receive excellent critical reviews, and from our own listening, the productions were for the most part well mounted, well paced, very well engineered. The two or three circulating exemplars from cracked masters are not a reflection of the originial engineering, but rather the hamfisted manner in which they were encoded to digital media. Victory Jory and Gertrude Warner for their parts, proved themselves highly versatile, multi-genre actors of the highest calibre--qualities that would serve both great character actors for another thirty years each.

The raw resilience of the entire ensemble cast was never more evident than in the constantly morphing weekly schedule their own audience set for them. But with only two exceptions, they seem to have met their audiences' demands on time. All in all a fine experiment but perhaps just not ready for prime time. Nor perhaps should any audience be given free rein to so structurally shape a favored program. Democracy works just fine in most areas except for The Arts. The Arts--Performing or Fine--are an area of society's culture that is usually so diverse, splintered and subjective that they defy democratization.

Such is the case with Radio and Television. One need look no further than to current pandering programming such as Survivor or American Idol or Dancing With the Stars. All of these programs are wildly popular with audiences that get precisely what they vote for, week in week out--predictable, homogenized, drama. No innovation, no experimentation, no Art, no soul, no out of the box thinking. Simply vulcanized, homogenized, sanforized, pasteurized pap. Nothing more, nothing less.

As with most things in society, there are limits to Democracy. The Arts have every logical, subjective and aesthetic reason to remain exceptions to Democracy. These two short-lived, while highly democratic programs, simply underscore our hypothesis.

Series Derivatives:

Vicks Matinee Theatre; The Matinee Theater; Matinee Theatre; Vicks Presents Matinee Theatre; AFRS H-5 Globe Theatre
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Romantic Adventure Dramas
Network(s): CBS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Dangerously Yours:
40-06-20 Aud Masquerade
42-06-21 Aud The Highwayman
Vicks Matinee Theatre:
None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): Dangerously Yours:
44-07-02 01 The Highwayman
Vicks Matinee Theatre:
44-10-22 01 Wuthering Heights
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): Dangerously Yours:
44-07-02 to 44-10-15; CBS; Sixteen, 30-minute programs; Sundays, 1:00 p.m.
Vicks Matinee Theatre:
44-10-22 to 45-04-08; CBS; Twenty-five, 30-minute programs; Sundays, 1:00 p.m.
Syndication: None
Sponsors: Dangerously Yours: Vick Chemical Company
Vicks Matinee Theatre:Vick Chemical Company
Director(s): Dangerously Yours:
Richard Sanville
Vicks Matinee Theatre:
Richard Sanville; Ed Wolf, Nick Dawson [Producers]
Principal Actors: Dangerously Yours: Victor Jory, Gertrude Warner, Inge Adams, Juano Hernandez, Ralph Bell, Claire Niesen, Jackson Beck, Joan Wetmore, Alfred Shirley, Joan Tetzel, Kermit Murdock, Janice Gilbert, Anna Karen
Vicks Matinee Theatre: Victor Jory, Gertrude Warner, Betty Winkler, Martha Sleeper, John Gibson, Jackson Beck, Judith Evelyn, John Brown, Janice Gilbert, Claire Niesen, Karl Swenson, Blanche Yurka, Alfred Shirley, Phillip Clark, Guy Spaull, Buford Hampden, Kermit Murdock, Arnold Moss, Inge Adams
Recurring Character(s): Dangerously Yours: None
Vicks Matinee Theatre: None
Protagonist(s): Dangerously Yours: None
Vicks Matinee Theatre:None
Author(s): Dangerously Yours: E.M. Hull, Hamilton Cochran, Booth Tarkington, Alfred Noyes, James Oliver Curwood
Vicks Matinee Theatre: Emily Bronte, Martha CheeverCharlotte Bronte, Maxwell Anderson, Charles Tazwell, James Hilton, Jane Powell, Daphne du Maurier, Alfred Noyes
Writer(s) Dangerously Yours: Jean Holloway [Writer/Adapter]
Vicks Matinee Theatre: Jean Holloway, David Victor, Herbert Little, Jr. [Writers/Adapters]
Music Direction: Mark Warnow; Arnold Johnson [Composer/Conductor]
Musical Theme(s): Mark Warnow and Orchestra; Arnold Johnson [Composer of 'Dangerously Yours' theme]
Announcer(s): Dangerously Yours: Harry Marble; Tony Marvin [Auditions only]; Martin Gabel [Host]
Vicks Matinee Theatre: Harry Marble; Martin Gabel [Host]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
Dangerously Yours: 18
Vicks Matinee Theatre: 25
Episodes in Circulation: Dangerously Yours: 13
Vicks Matinee Theatre: 22
Total Episodes in Collection: Dangerously Yours: 13
Vicks Matinee Theatre: 22
Provenances: RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the RadioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

We invite you to compare our fully provenanced research with the the '1,500 expert researchers' at the OTRR and their Dangerously Yours and Matinee Theatre logs, which the OTRR claims to be correct according to their 'OTTER log' they represent as the "most authoritative and accurate vintage Radio database in the world":

OTRRpedia

OTRRpedia

We've provided a screen shot of their current log for comparison, HERE and HERE to protect our own further due diligence, content and intellectual property.

Anyone of a Judeo-Christian background can't help but notice the ridiculous spelling of Bethlehem in the circulating title for Vick's Matinee Theater, Episode No. 10, a Christmas special titled, A Stable In
Bethlehem, U.S.A. from Christmas Eve, 1944. Their title, such as it is, is A Stable In Bethleham, U.S.A. A simple spelling error to be sure, but also the pointer to the site from which they most otr loggers plagiarize their entire logs: The Vintage Radio Place, notorious throughout the vintage Radio collecting hobby for it's almost laughable spelling errors. Laughable, until one naively attempts to research that title in libraries or newspaper archives, only to waste hours on end with such nonsense. But indeed, this one's so blatant that one might be justified in wondering why the OTRR, referring to their research as 'the most accurate otr database in the world' got something so patently obvious so wrong--yet again. The answer is painfully obvious. They don't do their own research, nor, apparently do they listen to anything they take credit for 'researching.'


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. Here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here's the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







The Dangerously Yours Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
40-06-20
0
Masquerade
Y
42-06-21
0
The Highwayman
Y

44-07-02
1
The Highwayman
Y
44-07-02 Charleston Gazette - "Dangerously Yours," a new weekly series dramatizing the adventure and romance and derringdo of chivalrous men from the pages of fiction and history, makes its debut over the CBS-WCHS today with Victor Jory and Gertrude Warner cast in the leading roles of the initial offering, an adaptation of poet Alfred Noyes' colorful "The Highwayman." Show is on at 2 p.m.
44-07-09
2
The Pirate Of Orleans
Y
44-07-06 Cedar Rapids Tribune - Victor Jory plays a return engagement in Columbia network's "Dangerously Yours" to present the story of "Poe and Virginia," on Sunday, July 9, over WMT--1:00-1:30 p.m. "Poe and Virginia" is the tender love story of Edgar Allen Poe and his gentle young wife. It was virginia's dauntless faith in her husband which probably inspired some of the greateset of Poe's works. The radio presentation is from an original script by Jean Holloway. Martin Gabel is heard as "The Voice of Adventure," while Harry Marble acts as announcer. Music is arranged and conducted by Mark Warnow. Richard Sanville directs the series.

"Poe and Virginia" appears to have been postponed until 44-09-17, when it aired as "The Shadow of The Raven"

Wallace of Scotland announced as next program.
44-07-16
3
The Man from the South
N
44-07-15 Mason City Globe-Gazette - EXCITING, plusating adventure laid in the Scottish highlands, will be the bill of fare on the new romantic adventure series, "Dangerously Yours," Sunday over KGLO-CBS at 1 p.m. The title role of Wallace, great legendary Scotch hero immortalized in the poetry of Robert Burns, will be Victor Jory, the star of the showl. He will be supported in the title role by Claire Niesen and a cast selected of radio's outstanding talent.

"
Wallace of Scotland" announced but not aired
44-07-23
4
A Man Named Jones
N
44-07-22 Mason City Globe-Gazette - IF ANY proof is needed that radio has come into its own as a medium ranking with pictures, Victor Jory can supply it. Scheduled to return to Hollywood when his Broadway show "The Two Mrs. Carrols" closed recently, the star was offered the leading role on the new KGLO-CBS Sunday afternoon romantic adventure series, DANGEROUSLY YOURS. He was so impressed with the role that he agreed to renounce flickers in favor of his air show for the next year to come! "A Man Named Jones" is the title of the story on the new romantic adventure series "Dangerously Yours," Sunday, over KGLO-CBS at 1:00 p.m. Program star Victor Jory will portray John Paul Jones, the father of our navy who made nautical history with his exploits during the Revolutionary war, and is famous for the classic statement, "Don't Give Up the Ship.

a.k.a. "Knight of the Seas"?
44-07-30
5
The Rogue of Paris
N
44-07-30 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p. m. — Dangerously Yours (WBBM): Victor Jory as Francois Villon 'in "The Rogue of Paris"
44-08-06
6
Cortez the Conquistador
Y
44-08-13
7
God's Country and the Woman
Y
44-08-13 Nebraska State Journal - Victor Jory stars in "God's Country and the Woman," a stirring dramatization of the James Oliver Curwood novel about the Canadian Northwest Mounted Police, on the "Dangerously Yours" broadcast heard over KFAB at 1 p.m. Jean Halloway wrote the script and Dick Sanville directs.
44-08-20
8
Monsieur Beaucaire
Y
44-08-19 Mason City Globe-Gazette
VICTOR JORY will be starred in Booth Tarkington's "
Monsieur Beaucaire," Sunday at 1 p. m. over KGLO-CBS instead Of "Beauty Stewart" as originally scheduled. "Beauty Stewart" will be presented at a later date. "Monsieur Beaueaire," adapted for radio by Joan Halloway, tells of a French prince who disguised himself as an English barber and then as a duke to win the love of a woman. Richard Sanville will direct. Background music is composed and conducted by Mark Warnow.

44-08-20 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Dangerously Yours (WBBM): Victor Jory in Tarkington's "Monsieur Beaucaire."

44-08-20 Lincoln Sunday Journal and Star
A confederate war hero will be portrayed by radio's matinee idol Victor Jory who will star in "Beauty Stewart" on Dangerously Yours," over KFAB at 1 p. m. The radio play, penned by Jean Halloway, tells of the exploits of one of the most romantic, legendary figures of the Civil war who never plunged into battle without a strumming banjo player beside him.

44-08-27
9
Bothwell of Scotland
Y
44-08-26 Mason City Globe-Gazette - "THE BALLAD OF BEAUTY STEWART," postponed from an earlier date, will be Victor Jory's starring vehicle on "Dangerously Yours," Sunday at 1 p.m. on KGLO-CBS. Jory will play the part of a romantic confederate hero of the Civil War, Jeb Stewart, who always rode into battle accompanied by a banjo player. Jean Halloway wrote the script, and Richard Sanville will direct. Musical bakgrounds are composed and directed by Mark Warnow.

44-08-27 Wisconsin State Journal
1 p. m. — Dangerously Tour*
(WBBM): "
The Ballad of Beauty
Stewart."
44-09-03
10
The Sheik
Y
44-09-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Dangeously Yours (WBBM): Victory Jory in "The Shiek."
44-09-10
11
The Firebrand
Y
44-09-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Dangeously Yours (WBBM): Victor Jory in "The Firebrand."
44-09-17
12
The Shadow of the Raven
N
44-09-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Dangeously Yours (WBBM): Victor Jory in "The Prince of Darkness," tale about Edgar Allen Poe.
44-09-24
13
Berkeley Square
N
44-09-24 Wisconsin State Journal
1 .p. m. — Dangerously Tours
(WBBM): Victor Jory in "
Berkeley
Square
."
44-10-01
14
Windward Passage
N
44-10-08
15
Assignment in Brittany
N
44-10-08 Wisconsin State Journal
1 .p. m. — Dangerously'Yours (WBBM): Victor Jory in "
Assignment in Brittany."
44-10-15
16
Front Page
N
44-10-19 Cedar Rapids Tribune

"Dangerously Yours" Changes Title, Victor Jory Continuing As Star

Victor Jory's thrilling portrayal of swashbuckling heroes on the "dangerously Yours" Sunday series on CBS has stirred such favorable nationwide response that the program policy will be broadened and the title changed to "The Matinee Theater," effective Oct. 22. THe change will permit the presentation of a much greater variety of dramatizations of books, plays and motion pictures that have won universl acclaim. Jory will have a wider range for the versatile talents that have made him one of the top-ranking actors of stage and screen as well as radio's newist "matinee idol."
The decision to change the title and expand the scope of the highly successful "Dangerously Yours" series was taken because of the increasing number of listener requests for adaptation of books, stage dramas, and films which did not conform with the original idea of presenting only tales of dangerous living.
The first offering under the new program title, "The Matinee Theater," on Sunday, Oct. 22, wil lbe Emily Bronte's immortal love classic, "
Wuthering Heights." The program is heard over WMT Sundays at 1 p.m.






Original Vick's Matinee Theater header art





The Vicks Matinee Theatre [Matinee Theater] Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
44-10-22
1
Wuthering Heights
Y
44-10-22 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): program "Dangerously Yours," changes title and format; Victor Jory stars in "Wuthering Heights."
44-10-29
2
Beloved Enemy
Y
44-10-29 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victory Jory in "Beloved Enemy."
44-11-05
3
My Favorite Wife
Y
44-11-05 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): "My Favorite Wife" starring Victor Jory.
44-11-12
4
Penny Serenade
Y
44-11-12 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "Penny Serenade."
44-11-19
5
The Scarlet Pimpernel
Y
44-11-19 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "The Scarlet Pimpernel."
44-11-26
6
Mr and Mrs Smith
Y
44-11-26 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "Mr. And Mrs. Smith."
44-12-03
7
Jane Eyre
Y
44-12-03 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): "Jane Eyre," starring Victor Jory.
44-12-10
8
Hold back the Dawn
Y
44-12-10 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "Hold Back the Dawn."
44-12-17
9
Elizabeth the Queen
Y
44-12-17 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "Elizabeth the Queen," Maxwell Anderson play.

44-12-24
10
A Stable In Bethlehem, U.S.A.
Y
44-12-24 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in Christmas play, "A Stable in Bethlehem, U.S.A."
44-12-31
11
No Time For Love
N
44-12-31 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "No Time for Love."
45-01-07
12
Random Harvest
Y
45-01-07 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in James Hilton's "Random Harvest."
45-01-14
13
Smilin' Through
Y
45-01-14 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "Reap the Wild Wind."
45-01-21
14
Rebecca
Y
45-01-21 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Gertrude Warner in "Rebecca."

Martin Gabel subs for Victory Jory on vacation for one week
45-01-28
15
Beautiful Dreamer
Y
45-01-28 Wisconsin State Journal - 1 p.m. -- Matinee Theater (WBBM): Victor Jory in "Beautiful Dream," drama on Stephen Foster's life.
45-02-04
16
Dark Victory
N
45-02-11
17
Reap The Wild Wind
Y
Jory offers Intermezzo, Goodbye Mister Chips, or The Petrified Forest for the following program.
45-02-18
18
Intermezzo
Y
Jory offers Night Bus, Manslaughter, or The Canary Murder Case for the following program.
45-02-25
19
The Highwayman
Y
Jory announces Night Bus for following Sunday, offers The Great McGinty, Only Yesterday, or Mayerling for the following week.
45-03-04
20
Night Bus
N
45-03-04 The Sunday Messenger
1:00 p.m. -- Victor Jory in "
Night Bus" by Samuel Hopkins Adams, CBS-WBNS

45-03-11
21
Rendezvous At Mayerling
Y
45-03-11 Nebraska State Journal - Victor Jory is starred in "Rendezvous at Mayerling," one of history's great romances on Columbia's "Matinee Theater" at 1 p.m. on KFAB.
45-03-18
22
The Pirate Of New Orleans
Y
Air: next week Till We Meet Again or The Love Story Of Elizabeth Barret and Robert Browning.
45-03-25
23
Till We Meet Again
Y
Victor Jory announces in two weeks, April 8, will be the last show. Next week: The Love Story Of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning.
45-04-01
24
The Love Story Of Elizabeth Barrett and Robert Browning
Y
45-04-08
25
A Man Named Jones
Y






The AFRS H-5 Series 'Globe Theatre' Radio Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
44-12-17
Elizabeth The Queen
Y
45-01-14
202
Smilin' Through
Y






The Dangerously Yours Radio Program Biographies




Victor Edwin Jory
(
Host/Performer)
Stage, Screen, Radio and Television Actor; Writer; Director
(1902-1982)

Birthplace: Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada

Radiography:
1942 Dangerously Yours
1942 Matinee Theater [Audition]
1944 Green Valley U.S.A.
1944 Matinee Theater
1944 American Pilgrimage
1944 Theatre Of Romance
1945 War Town
1945 The Adventures Of Ellery Queen
1948 Family Theatre
1948 The Hunters [Audition]
1949 Crisis In War Town
1950 Hallmark Playhouse
1952 Best Plays
1957 Suspense
1957 CBS Radio Workshop
1975 CBS Radio Mystery Theatre
The Diary
Victor Jory circa 1954
Victor Jory circa 1954

Victor Jory as Captain Palfi in The King Steps Out (1935)
Victor Jory as Captain Palfi in The King Steps Out (1935)

Canadians Victor Jory and Middleweight champ Frankie Battaglia spar circa 1935
Canadians Victor Jory and Middleweight champ Frankie Battaglia spar circa 1935

Makeup still of Victor Jory as Jonas Wilkerson the brutal overseer in Gone With the Wind (1939)
Makeup still of Victor Jory as Jonas Wilkerson the brutal overseer in Gone With the Wind (1939)

Victor Jory as The Shadow (1940)
Victor Jory as The Shadow (1940)

Victor Jory as Tall Tree in Cheyenne Autumn (1964)
Victor Jory as Tall Tree in Cheyenne Autumn (1964)

Victor Jory as the aboriginal chief in Papillion (1973)
Victor Jory as the aboriginal chief in Papillion (1973)

Born a Canadian, Victor Edwin Jory was born in Dawson City, in the Yukon Territory of Canada in 1902. By the 1920s, his family had emigrated to Pasadena, California. Jory was reportedly raised in Pasadena and Canada through his High School years, but his boxing experience had been while he was still living in or visiting Canada. He'd reportedly compiled four professional fights there before ending his boxing career.

From the July 26 1944 edition of The Elyria, Ohio Chronicle-Telegram:

Today's Sports Parade

By JACK CUDDY
United Press Staff Correspondent 

NEW YORK--(UP)--Victor Jory, one of the busiest character actors in the entertainment world, said "I would pay $50,000 for a top-flight fighter, if I wasn't sure that said fighter would worry me to an early grave."
     Jory of the villainous countenance is perhaps America's most rabid fight fan.  He is a former pug; also a former manager.  He engulfs and enmeshes current boxing writers with his flood of up-to-the-minute fight statistics.     Jory, who must be in his 40's, is lean and athletic-looking; although he says he was on the verge of a nervous breakdown years ago when managing a certain young welterweight while he was playing with a stock company at Minneapolis.  No--it wasn't King Tut nor Frankie Battaglia, in whom villainous Vic had financial interests.
    JORY owned this particular welterweight outright, and he tried to be manager and trainer.  "I would put this kid to bed every night," he said last night, "and then I would spend a couple hours running back and forth between the fire escape at the rear of the hotel and the front entrance and every night that kid would break and I'd pick him up later--full of gin--at a certain night spot.  He almost killed me.  I was ready for a straight jacket when I gave him up."
     Jory shrugged off inquiries about his success in the current radio hit "Dangerously Yours in which he is a swash-buckling hero every Sunday afternoon.  He clammed up to questions about the new Broadway play, "The Perfect Marriage," which goes into rehearsal soon.  He wanted to enjoy himself.  He wanted to talk boxing.
     The guy who had starred in such pictures as "Gone With the Wind," "Mid-Summer Night's Dream," "Dodge City" and 107 other films, continued, "That kid in Minneapolis made me so disgusted with boxing--for awhile--that I turned to race horses.  I had a small string for several years . . . They almost ruined me financially, probably because I made the mistake of betting on my own horses.  I'm convinced that the biggest sucker in the world is the guy who bets on his own nags.  Those horses take a fiendish delight in double-crossing you."
     VICTOR Edwin Jory, although reared in Pasadena, Calif., as a schoolmate of the late Charley Paddock, "the world's fastest human," began boxing at Vancouver, B. C., where he had four professional fights in the old Horseshoe Arena.  He also fought twice at Nanimo B.C., a coal camp; once in Delingham, Wash.; and once in Everett, Wash.
     "I was a fair light heavyweight." he explains, "but just a preliminary fighter.  They wouldn't pay me as much money for fighting as I could earn as a ham actor in stock companies.  So I turned more and more to the stage.  Later I turned simon pure as a member of the National Guard in California and won the Western States light heavy-weight championship at the Presidio in San Francisco--just for fun.  But by that time I was an actor, and I have been ever since.  But I've still lived in the ring--vicariously--and wish I had a fighter today--if I wouldn't have to live for both of us."

By way of further explanantion, Victor Jory had been the boxing and wrestling champion of the Coast Guard during his military hitch.

He'd toured extensively with theater troupes--and had even appeared on Broadway--before making his Hollywood debut in 1930. Initially cast in romantic leads, his forte was portraying villains. He made over 200 films and 50+ Television episodes. He also wrote at least two plays.

Jory is most remembered for his roles as Jonas Wilkerson, the brutal and opportunistic overseer, in Gone with the Wind , as Lamont Cranston, The Shadow in the 1942 serial film The Shadow, as Oberon in Max Reinhardt's film A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935), and as the aboriginal chieftain in Papillion (1973).

Jory's Television career found him making numerous guest appearances--often in recurring roles--such as that of Mannix's father, Stefan Mannix in Mannix (1969-1971) and an aging FBI agent in The Rockford Files (1974).





Gertrude 'Trudy' Warner
(Ensemble Player)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress
(1917-1986)

Birthplace: Hartford, CT, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1939 Guy Hedlund and Company
1940 Against The Storm
1940 Listener's Playhouse
1940 Behind the Mike
1940 Beyond These Valleys
1940 The O'Neills
1941 City Desk
1941 Ellen Randolph
1941 The Mystery Man
1942 Perry Mason
1942 Columbia Workshop
1944 Dangerously Yours
1944 Matinee Theater
1944 Mrs. Miniver
1944 Romance
1944 Theatre Of Romance
1945 Mysterious Traveler
1945 Brownstone Theatre
1945 The Adventures Of Ellery Queen
1946 Treasury Salute
1947 Studio One
1947 Joyce Jordan, M.D.
1949 The Shadow
1949 Secret Missions
1949 Murder By Experts
1949 Cavalcade Of America
1949 MGM Theatre Of the Air
1951 The Fat Man
1951 American Portraits
1951 Dimension X
1952 Nick Carter, Master Detective
1958 Whispering Street
1961 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1961 Suspense
1964 Theatre Five
Young Doctor Malone
Your Movietown Radio Theatre


Gertrude Warner poses to support Chinese Women's Relief efforts from 41-05-23
Gertrude Warner poses to support Chinese Women's Relief efforts from 41-05-23


Gertrude Warner as Joyce Jordan M.D. circa 1948
Gertrude Warner as Joyce Jordan M.D. circa 1948

Gertrude Warner circa 1941 as Ellen Randolph in the soap opera of the same name
Gertrude Warner circa 1941 as Ellen Randolph in the soap opera of the same name.

Trudy Warner practices fencing to improve her skills for Radio circa 1941
Trudy Warner practices fencing to improve her skills for Radio circa 1941

Gertrude Warner still providing Home Economics tips in this article from 41-01-10
Gertrude Warner still providing Home Economics tips in this article from 41-01-10


Another Home Ec tip from Gertrude Warner from 41-10-24
Another Home Ec tip from Gertrude Warner from 41-10-24

Gertrude Warner announcment of her appearance in The Glass Slipper episode of The Mystery Man 11 November 1941
Gertrude Warner announcment of her appearance in The Glass Slipper episode of The Mystery Man 11 November 1941

Gertrude 'Trudy' Warner was born and raised in Hartford, Connecticut. After graduating from high school and college she found herself hosting a series of Home Economics daytime programs of the era, making something of a name for herself in the process. In addition to her local Home Economics spots on WTIC Hartford she was also appearing in some dramatic productions for the station as early as the mid-1930s. Station WTIC, appropriately enough, is the wonderful station that produced the Golden Age of Radio series during the 1960s and 1970s, following that with their A One Night Stand with The Big Bands Series from the same era.

1939 took her to the NBC Red network for 1939, after which she moved to CBS in 1940. Trudy Warner debuted in her first lead role in Radio as Rebecca Lane in Beyond These Valleys (1940) for CBS. Trudy Warner brought a great deal of diversity to CBS--before her Radio career she'd been a blues singer. Her Radio colleagues tagged her with the nickname "Butch" for her year or so over WTIC, broadcasting butcher tips, home economics advice and table etiquette.

Warner's jump into Radio proved to be the wisest career move she'd ever make. Within two years she was appearing regularly in as many as six to eight daytime soaps, adventure, or romance dramas. By 1944 she'd been noticed and selected for both lead and co-starring support roles in a wide array of straight dramas and mystery or detective dramas. She was also on her way to becoming one of Radio's most prosperous young stars.

After the extraordinarily well received Lux Radio Theatre production of Mrs. Miniver, CBS elected to spin-off Mrs. Miniver as a Radio series of its own. Gertrude Warner was selected to portray Greer Garson's role from the Film version. Trudy Warner portrayed Mrs. Miniver for almost two years with Karl Swenson in the role of 'Clem'.

From the Rhinelander Daily News 44-12-20:

A Tough Business

But some of the biggest moneymakers in radio are hardly known by name. They're the soap opera stars and hard-working announcers. Clayton Collier and Karl Swenson, who play in at least a half-dozen shows a week, keep the wolf from their door to the tune of nearly $100,000 a year. Pert Julie Stevens and blues-singer-turned actress Gertrude Warner vie with their radio sisters for top place at similar salaries.

Following the success of her co-starring appearances with Victor Jory in Dangerously Yours (1944) and Matinee Theatre (1945), she was picked up as the co-star in The Adventures of Ellery Queeen. She was also still appearing in Theatre of Romance, Brownstone Theatre and several daytime soap operas of the era.

Trudy Warner was first married in June 1946, prompting a voluntary suspension of her Radio career and her departure from the successful Ellery Queen Mystery program. Apparently the retirement/suspension was short-lived, since by 1947 she was again appearing in yet another array of daytime dramas, regular adventure series' and specials.

By 1949 she'd begun to appear as Margot Lane [the third] in The Shadow, with Brett Morrison. She was also appearing in several Calvalcade of Americas, as well as the now routine number of concurrent daytime soap operas. During the 1950s and 1960s she began to occasionally appear in Television soap operas, but it was her Radio work that kept her most busy throughout The Golden Age of Radio.

By any account, Trudy Warner's career in Radio and Television has to stand as one of the ten most ambitious, successful such careers in the history of Radio. And yet, it's virtually impossible to find anything about her other than a few snippets of repetitive information regarding this remakable actress and her equally remarkable career.

Account after account from the era has her appearing in several Radio dramas at the same time, volunteering for one worthy cause or another, continuing to contribute Home Economics tips to the Nation's homemakers, or improving her skills either formally or informally. All of this over a Radio career of some 28 years and well over 4,000 performances.

Miss Warner also appeared in television commercials and taught acting for television at Weist Barron studios and at Oberlin College.

One of Radio's most versatile, ambitious, and hardest working young performers, Trudy Warner's entire career in the Performing Arts underscored the ethics of hard-work, continued education in one's craft--whether formal or on-the-job--and seizing opportunities the very instant they present themselves.

While unaccountably under-recognized for the past fifty years, we hope we can be the catalyst to create renewed interest in this fine actress and her amazingly successful career--by anyone's measure.




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