Click to go to Digital Deli Too Home Page blank head
Preserving the Golden Age of Radio for A Digital Age
Explore Our Golden Age Radio Research Pages Click here to learn about our approach to Golden Age Radio Preservation [Under Development] Click to go to Our Radio Articles Page This Feature Is Currently Not Available
 
This will take you to our Numeric Radio logs
This will take you to our A Series Radio logs This will take you to our B Series Radio logs This will take you to our C Series Radio logs This will take you to our D Series Radio logs This will take you to our E Series Radio logs This will take you to our F Series Radio logs This will take you to our G Series Radio logs This will take you to our H Series Radio logs This will take you to our I Series Radio logs This will take you to our J Series Radio logs This will take you to our K Series Radio logs This will take you to our L Series Radio logs This will take you to our M Series Radio logs
This will take you to our N Series Radio logs This will take you to our O Series Radio logs This will take you to our P Series Radio logs This will take you to our Q Series Radio logs This will take you to our R Series Radio logs This will take you to our S Series Radio logs This will take you to our T Series Radio logs This will take you to our U Series Radio logs This will take you to our V Series Radio logs This will take you to our W Series Radio logs This will take you to our X Series Radio logs This will take you to our Y Series Radio logs This will take you to our Z Series Radio logs This will take you back to our Text List of Radio logs

Original Crime Does Not Pay head logo

The Crime Does Not Pay Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Crime Does Not Pay
WMGM logo circa 1949
WMGM logo circa 1949


Crime Does Not Pay spot Ad, Jan. 24, 1950
Crime Does Not Pay spot Ad, Jan. 24, 1950

M-G-M spot ad for Crime Does Not Pay
M-G-M spot ad for
Crime Does Not Pay

Billboard Magazine full page ad for M-G-M Radio Attractions from November 5 1949
Billboard Magazine full page ad for M-G-M Radio Attractions from November 5 1949


M-G-M contract player Donald Woods was featured in several Crime Does Not Pay episodes
M-G-M contract player Donald Woods
was featured in several Crime Does Not Pay episodes


March30th 1952 Spot Ad for the MBS run of Crime Does Not Pay
March30th 1952 Spot Ad for the MBS run of Crime Does Not Pay.

Background

The Marcus Loew Booking Agency had owned radio station call sign WHN since 1946. In September of 1948, WHN changed its call sign to WMGM, in part to capitalize on a series of M-G-M radio programming projects that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions was attempting to introduce to a national audience. Programs such as The Adventures of Maisie, Crime Does Not Pay, The Hardy Family, M-G-M Theatre of The Air, and The Story of Dr. Kildare, all drew on material that M-G-M, as a film studio, already had in the can.

Having established Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions for the express purpose of transcribing, then syndicating, this programming, all that remained was for M-G-M to obtain a well-established radio station from which to broadcast their programming packages. The working assumption was that once heard in a wide enough area they'd be picked up nation-wide in due time. The concept seemed to be working for several years, until a change in M-G-M focus made their M-G-M Radio Attractions division redundant. WMGM slowly began changing its format to remain viable to its expanding local audience, and the era of MGM-produced, network-ready, syndicated content dwindled to nothing.

The M-G-M cachet was so persuasive that within days of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions' July 1949 trade announcements, M-G-M Radio Attractions had sold the following initial eight-program 'portfolio' to over 200 outlets in 45 states and Canada:

The package actually came to the air before M-G-M's own WMGM began its initial broadcast run in October 1949. Chicago's Mutual key station, W-G-N, was the first to broadcast M-G-M Theatre of The Air on September 16, 1949, barely a month after the first programs had been recorded.

M-G-M's Maisie, Hardy Family and Dr. Kildare franchises, alone, spanned forty-two feature films over twenty years. Their broad appeal and the feel-good, optimistic values and themes they contained were like a tonic to post-Depression America. When M-G-M spun off its M-G-M Radio Attractions syndicated Radio programming division it seemed only natural to draw upon their proven track record of popular Film features and shorts. M-G-M's Crime Does Not Pay series of short features were another natural candidate for a Radio feature. M-G-M Theatre of The Air was an obvious answer to Lux Radio Theatre, the Screen Guild Theatre series', and NBC's long-running series' of Film adaptations.

Thus, in one master stroke, the newly formed M-G-M Radio Attractions brought a compelling package of four half-hour features, an hour-long film adaptation feature, and three fascinating fifteen-minute features, Hollywood U.S.A., Good News from Hollywood, and At Home With Lionel Barrymore to Radio to compete, head-to-head with the best, then-available Radio programming of the era.

It's easy to see why the package was gobbled up within days of its announcement. Small market Radio outlets, as well as large, highly successful regional Radio broadcasters could obtain a diverse, highly promising package of features from a major studio, starring some of the greatest talent of the era--and at a fraction of the cost to produce and broadcast these features in-house.

Of course by 1949 America had heard literally hundreds of uplifting, 'family values,' small town-oriented situation comedies and serials. But then in 1951, the Mutual Broadcasting System (MBS) sought to expand its own feature programming. It seemed natural to turn to M-G-M Radio Attractions for solid, already transcribed programming. Mutual stations had already comprised the majority of subscribers to M-G-M's intial portfolio of eight Radio Attractions features. So it was that, mid-1951, MBS and M-G-M began hammering out a deal for what eventually became a ten-feature package of transcribed, syndicated programming, as follows:

A stunning and compelling lineup to be sure, the package carried forward the half-hour features Crime Does Not Pay, The Hardy Family, The Story of Dr. Kildare, and The Adventures of Maisie, as well as the hour-long feature, M-G-M Theatre of The Air. The MBS package added the half-hour situation comedies, Woman of The Year and The Modern Adventures of Casanova; the half-hour mystery, The Black Museum; the half-hour variety feature, The Gracie Fields Show; and complimented M-G-M's Film adaptation feature, M-G-M Theatre of The Air with The M-G-M Musical Comedy Theatre of The Air.

After months of wrangling and delays, the deal was finally struck in November of 1951 and MBS began 'officially' airing the M-G-M Radio Attractions features the week of January 2-8, 1952. Designed to air in the prime-time spot of 8-10 p.m., Monday through Saturday, the package was also structured as a co-op package, similar to competing NBC's 'Tandem Package'. The Mutual package, referred to as 'MBS Plus', offered 'co-operative' advertising spots for multiple sponsors and advertisers. Thus a sponsor or advertiser could purchase any combination of quarter-hour advertising blocks between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m., from Monday to Saturday on a daily, weekly, or biweekly basis. The opportunity to leverage their sponsoring expenses held great appeal as Radio entered an era of stiff competition with Television for sponsors' dollars. It also afforded member MBS stations a combination of straight drama, adventure, situation comedy, Film and Musical adaptations, and Variety programming in a package that sold for the approximate cost of three to five weekly half-hour features.

M-G-M Radio Attractions brings 'Crime Does Not Pay' to radio

As must be immediately noticeable from the long list of movie actors heard in Crime Does Not Pay, this was not your everyday Golden Age Radio drama. Indeed, you might be forgiven if you fail to recognize more than a couple of Radio voice talents in the entire list. The Radio program was based on a very popular series of MGM Short Subjects they produced between 1935 and 1948 under the same name, Crime Does Not Pay.

MGM Short Subjects had been a highly bankable asset for MGM. They also served as a 'farm club' for much of MGM's up and coming talent. Four of MGM's most popular Shorts were Our Gang, The Passing Parade, with John Nesbitt, the Oscar-winning Pete Smith Specialties, and Crime Does Not Pay. MGM made at least fifty Crime Does Not Pay short subjects. Beginning with 1935's Buried Loot, the first twenty-five MGM Crime Does Not Pay short subjects were:

  • 1935 No. 01: Buried Loot
  • 1935 No. 02: Alibi Racket
  • 1935 No. 03: Desert Death
  • 1935 No. 04: A Thrill for Thelma
  • 1935 No. 05: Hit and Run Driver
  • 1936 No. 06: The Perfect Set-up
  • 1936 No. 07: Foolproof
  • 1936 No. 08: The Public Pays
  • 1937 No. 09: Torture Money
  • 1937 No. 10: It May Happen to You
  • 1937 No. 11: Soak the Poor
  • 1937 No. 12: Give Till It Hurts
  • 1937 No. 13: Behind the Criminal
  • 1938 No. 14: What Price Safety!
  • 1938 No. 15: Miracle Money
  • 1938 No. 16: Come Across
  • 1938 No. 17: A Criminal Is Born
  • 1938 No. 18: They're Always Caught
  • 1938 No. 19: Think It Over
  • 1938 No. 20: The Wrong Way Out
  • 1939 No. 21: Money to Loan
  • 1939 No. 22: While America Sleeps
  • 1939 No. 23: Help Wanted
  • 1939 No. 24: Think First
  • 1939 No. 25: Drunk Driving

From that point forward the order and numbering of the remaining twenty-five shorts begin to deteriorate throughout the World War II years. MGM produced Crime Does Not Pay shorts through 1948, at which time WMGM began airing the Crime Does Not Pay radio program. While some of the Film version themes found their way into the Radio version, almost all seventy-eight Radio Crime Does Not Pay topics are original to the series. Many have theorized that some or all of the Crime Does Not Pay radio scripts had been works-in-progress for the Film version, or perhaps even envisioned for Television, where many of the Film shorts were already airing from time to time.

Whatever the medium, Crime Does Not Pay seems to have touched a nerve with the American public. With another world war looming, suspected 'fifth columnists' around every corner, and scams from the post-Depression years still running their course throughout the country, there was plenty of material from which to draw for MGM's Shorts Division.

All of this prologue is by way of explaining what appears to be an anomaly in Golden Age Radio--a series of radio programs recorded almost exclusively by movie actors. With the possible exception of Ed Begley, Everett Sloane, Lionel Stander and Joan Lorring, none of the other featured actors in the series ever played a major role in Radio. We don't mention this to in any way detract from these fine performers' work in this program. We simply point out the novelty of this program in the annals of Golden Age Radio history.

"In the Interest of Good Citizenship and Law Enforcement," MGM presented these seventy-eight programs as syndicated transcriptions. There had been a glut of such civic minded programs between the 1940s and 1950s, so it's difficult to imagine how MGM thought they might milk even more public interest out of yet another such program. But it turned out to be a very successful program for both MGM and WMGM. As with most programs of the genre, each script is presented as a morality play, arcing quickly to the moral dilemma, then racing to the end where the protagonist either pays for his or her crime, or resolves to go straight and sin no more.

The irony of the time was how crooked and corrupt local law enforcement had become throughout the post-Depression and post-World War II years. MGM wasn't above pandering to law enforcement by any means. And no less than J. Edgar Hoover himself--who loved being pandered to, personally--encouraged such crime-fighting programs. But that was the nature of the post-World War II recovery years. With everyone racing to either keep up with the Jones' or become the Jones', the vacuum created while no one was watching, was fertile soil for law enforcement corruption.

Crime Does Not Pay was well-received during its runs. The resurgence of the phrase "Crime Does Not Pay" was parodied in several contemporary radio programs and used in many monologues, newpaper articlesand editorials, and magazines of the era. The talent alone, employed during the run was noted often in the trade papers and magazines of the era. These were in many instances, some of the finest character talent in MGM's stable. For that reason alone, Crime Does Not Pay will remain an historical footnote to The Golden Age of Radio.

Series Derivatives:

AFRTS R- Series, Crime Does Not Pay
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Crime Dramas
Network(s): WMGM, New York; Mutual Broadcasting System, The AFRTS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): None
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): WMGM Run:
49-10-10 01 The Kid with A Gun

Mutual Run:
51-12-31 01 The Bag Man
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): WMGM Run:
49-10-10 to 51-04-11; WMGM, New York; Seventy-eight, 25-minute programs; Mondays, then Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.

Mutual Run:
51-12-31 to 52-12-22; Mutual; Fifty-two, 25-minute programs; Monday evenings.
Syndication: M-G-M Radio Attractions transcriptions; AFRTS R- Series, 'Crime Does Not Pay'
Sponsors: Various:
Baxter-Ferguson Nash; Ford's Finance and Insurance Company;
Director(s): Marx B. Loeb [Director]
Edgar Small [ Assistant Director]
Principal Actors: Donald Buka, Sidney Blackmer, Mildred Natwick, Cameron Mitchell, Bela Lugosi, Myron McCormick, Martin Gabel, Jean Muir, Alan Baxter, Richard Derr, Helen Craig, Everett Sloane, Barbara O'Neill, Jack La Rue, Lionel Stander, Nancy Coleman, John Gibson, Joseph Buloff, Alexander Kirkland, John Loder, Anna Lee, Herbert Rudley, Betty Furness, Neil Hamilton, Richard Webb, Blanche Yurka, Joseph Wiseman, Richard Hart, Margo, Frank Albertson, Horace McCann, Charles Corbin, Mary Wickes, Donald Curtis, Ralph Forbes, Sarah Haden, Dickie Moore, Joan Lorring, Morris Carnovsky, Donald Woods, Ralph Forbes, Harvey Stevens, Susan Douglas, Ian Keith, John Shelton, Una O'Connor, Edmund Ryan, Bram Fletcher, Robert Lowery, Ed Begley
Recurring Character(s): None
Protagonist(s): Varied from episode to episode
Author(s): None
Writer(s) Ira Marion, Burton B. Turkus [Technical consultant]
Music Direction: Jon Gart
Musical Theme(s): None
Announcer(s): Bob Williams
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
78
Episodes in Circulation: 64
Total Episodes in Collection: 60
Provenances:

240 more Golden Age Radio performers' photos can be found on our 'The Case of the Too-Long Forgotten Radio Stars' Pages
240 more Golden Age Radio performers' photos can be found on our 'The Case of the Too-Long Forgotten Radio Stars' Pages


'The Directory of The Armed Forces Radio Service Series' and The New York Times.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenance were newspaper listings and articles.

You're welcome to compare our fully provenanced research with Crime Does Not Pay log from the '1,500 expert researchers' at the OTRR. We've provided a screen shot of their current log for comparison, HERE, to protect our own due diligence:

  • The program titles we cite are those contained on the M-G-M Radio Attractions Transcription labels and/or as announced in the introduction of each program.
  • For some time there was no apparent record of the titles of Program #'s 51 and 52. In reviewing contemporaneous newspaper listings we determined that the title of Program #51 is Sucker's Bait and the title of Program #52 is Rigger's Racket, neither of which are in current circulation.
  • We've corrected all of the OTRR, Calfkiller OTR, Vintage Radio Place, old-time.com and Radio Drama inaccuracies in the log below.

Martin Gram's Radio Drama cites handsome character actor Donald Buka as the 'host' for the series. As best as we can determine, Donald Buka appeared in only two of the Crime Does Not Pay programs--and not as an announcer nor host. The announcer for the series was Bob Williams. Donald Buka never hosted Crime Does Not Pay. Where Martin Grams continues to acquire these tidbits is anyone's guess. Known more for explosive overacting, Buka remains something of a cult figure from the popular media of the era.

[Update: Donald Buka passed away on 23 July 2009 at the age of 88.]

OTRisms:

  • In wide circulation are various sets of Crime Does Not Pay intentionally padded out and up-encoded to deceive collectors. The characteristics of most of them are as follows:
    • Recordings of exactly 31:00 or 32:00 minutes in duration. None of the genuine recordings from the Crime Does Not Pay canon run longer than 27:30. Indeed the vast majority clock in at 25:00 or thereabouts.
    • Recordings of precisely the following file sizes:
      • 7295kb
      • 9161kb
      • 13024kb
    • Recordings encoded at:
      • 56kbps and 6.3:1
      • 40kbps and 8.8:1
  • The vast majority of these intentionally altered recordings are actually 32kbps/22000hz/11:1 recordings up-encoded and padded with as much as five minutes of silence to give the impression of being either higher quality recordings or first generation encodes from M-G-M transcription discs.
  • Apart from the obvious fraud, naive collectors who continue to patronize or support such sources--and employ .mp3 players to enjoy their recordings--are not only wasting as much as 40-60Mbs of storage space, they're perpetuating the dissemination of this type of fraud throughout the Vintage Radio community.
  • Virtually all of the Crime Does Not Pay recordings on the archive.org Old Time Radio pages are from the above cited, altered canon of recordings. The source for the archive.org fraudulent recordings is the ironically commercial freeotrshows.com site. If you're a patron that site, proceed at your own risk.
  • Virtually all of the commercial Calfkiller OTR recordings--which the site touts as taken directly from the OTRR collection--are from the same altered circulating canon cited above.
  • The apparent common denominator in all of the sources disseminating this nonsense appears to be the OTRR collection at present, since the existing OTRR collection of Crime Does Not Pay contains virtually the same messed up encodes and misnamed files.

As to the point of even citing or logging the Mutual Broadcasting System rebroadcasts of Crime Does Not Pay, we simply don't understand the logic. The WMGM run was the only run of any historic import. The Mutual rebroadcasts were but a 52-episode subset of the original full run. But for continuity's sake and historical accuracy, we've included the MBS/M-G-M Run further below.


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here's the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled encodes. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article and log copyright 2009 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.







Crime Does Not Pay Program Log [WMGM Run] (All 78 episodes)

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
49-10-03
--
--
49-10-10
1
The Kid with a Gun
Y
[ Premiere Episode ]

49-10-10 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay,
49-10-17
2
All-American Fake
Y
49-10-17 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
All-American Fake, with Sidney Blackmer (Recording)
49-10-24
3
Death Is a Song
N
49-10-24 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Death Is a Song, with Margo, (recording)
49-10-31
4
Kid Twist
N
49-10-31 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Kid Twist, with William Prince, (recording)
49-11-07
5
Trigger Man's Moll
Y
49-11-07 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Trigger Man's Moll, With Nancy Kelly, (recording)
49-11-14
6
The Body of the Crime
Y
[Poor recording]

49-11-14 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Parker Fennelly, guest, (recording)
49-11-21
7
Summertime Take
Y
[Poor recording]

49-11-21 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Charles Korvin, guest, (recording)
49-11-28
8
Female of the Species
Y
49-11-21 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Mildred Natwick, guest, (recording)
49-12-05
9
A Piece of Rope
Y
49-12-05 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Cameron Mitchell, Guest, (recording)
49-12-12
10
Gasoline Cocktail
Y
49-12-12 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Bela Lugosi, Guest, (recording)
49-12-19
11
Dead Pigeon
Y
49-12-19 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Myron McCormick, Guest, (recording)
49-12-26
12
Glossy Finish
Y
49-12-26 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Martin Gabel, Guest, (recording)
50-01-02
13
Clothes Make the Woman
Y
50-01-02 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Martin Gabel, Guest
50-01-09
14
Law of the Jungle
Y
50-01-09 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Alan Baxter, Guest
50-01-16
15
Speech Is Silver
N
50-01-16 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Richard Hart, Guest
50-01-23
16
Devil in the Dark
N
50-01-23 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Helmut D'Antine, Guest
50-01-30
17
The Snatcher
N
50-01-30 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Helmut D'Antine, Guest
50-02-06
18
Kid Sister
N
50-02-06 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Marsha Hunt, Guest
50-02-13
19
For He's a Jolly Good Fellow
Y
50-02-13 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
John Beal, Guest
50-02-20
20
Death on the Doorstep
Y
50-02-20 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Donald Curtis, Guest
50-02-27
21
Kangaroo Court
Y
50-02-27 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Richard Derr, Guest
50-03-06
22
What's In A Name
Y
50-03-06 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Helen Craig, Guest
50-03-13
23
Death on Blake Street
N
50-03-13 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Russell Hardle, Guest
50-03-20
24
The Man Who Was Never Caught
N
50-03-20 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Alan Baxter, Guest
50-03-27
25
Thick as Thieves
Y
50-03-27 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Everett Sloane, Guest
50-04-03
26
Ingenious Woman
Y
50-04-03 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Barbara O'Neill, Guest
50-04-10
27
The Bag Man
N
50-04-10 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Ian Keith, Guest
50-04-17
28
The Rum Runner
N
50-04-17 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
J Edward Bromberg, Guest
50-04-24
29
The Visiting Fireman
N
50-04-24 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Arleen Whelan, Guest
50-05-01
30
Six, Two and Even
N
50-05-01 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Alfred Ryder, Guest
50-05-08
31
Don't Write, Telephone
Y
[Poor recording]

50-05-08 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Jack La Rue, Guest
50-05-15
32
Between the Dark and the Daylight
Y
50-05-15 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Lionel Stander, Guest
50-05-22
33
The Second Hand Pistol
Y
50-05-22 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Nancy Coleman, Guest
50-05-29
34
Imported Headache
Y
50-05-29 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Nancy Coleman, Guest
50-06-05
35
Fishmonger's Fortune
N
50-06-05 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
George Reeves, Guest
50-06-12
36
Short Circuit
N
50-06-12 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Hurd Hatfield, Guest
50-06-19
37
Clip Joint
Y
50-06-19 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
Alexander Kirkland, Guest
50-06-26
38
The Professor Pulls a Switch
Y
50-06-26 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay--
John Loder, Guest
50-07-03
39
The Lady Loves Kittens
Y
50-07-03 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay
: Play The Lady Loves Kittens. With Anna Lee
50-07-10
40
Once Too Often
Y
50-07-10 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay
: Play Once Too Often, With Herbert Rudley


52-02-25 Janesville Daily Gazette
Law Enforcement
A young hoodlum who enjoys killing becomes the object of an extensive man-hunt during the Crime Does Not Pay broadcast tonight at 9. The madman is apprehended but lax law enforcement officials set him free to ply his trade again. He kills again but this time police put him behind bars for good as the MBS crime feature unfolds the tale of "Once Too Often." Stage star Herbert Rudley plays the roll of Ollie Barker, the killer.

50-07-17
41
Burglar Alarm
Y
50-07-17 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay
: Play Burglar Alarm. With Betty Furness
50-07-24
42
Horseshoes Are for Luck
Y
[Intro Clipped]

50-07-24 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay
: Play Horseshoes Are For Luck. With Neil Hamilton
50-07-31
43
Beauty and the Beast

Y
50-07-31 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay
: Play Beauty and the Beast, With Everett Sloane
50-08-07
44
Giddyup Horsie
Y
50-08-07 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay
: Play Giddap Horsie. With Richard Webb
50-08-14
45
The Gangster Was a Lady
Y
50-08-14 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: The Gangster Was a Lady. With Blanche Yurka
50-08-21
46
Murder Makes Book
Y
50-08-21 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Murder Makes Book, With Joseph Wiseman
50-08-28
47
Father's Boy
Y
50-08-28 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Father's Boy. With Richard Hart
50-09-04
48
The Weak Spot
Y
50-09-04 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: The Weak Spot. With Margo
50-09-11
49
Horse Face
Y
[Intro Clipped]

50-09-11 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Horse Face. With Frank Albertson
50-09-18
50
They Gotta Have What to Eat
You Gotta Have What to Eat
Y
50-09-18 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: You Gotta Have What To Eat. With Horace McMahon
50-09-25
51
Sucker's Bait
N
[May have been preempted due to the Brooklyn Dodgers--New York Giants baseball double-header broadcast over WMGM from Ebbets Field between 1:25 p.m. and Midnight. The Dodgers split with The Giants, losing the day game and winning the night game]

50-09-25 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Sucker's Bait. With Ed Begley
50-10-02
51
Sucker's Bait
N
50-10-02 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Sucker's Bait. With Ed Begley
50-10-09
52
Rigger's Racket
N
50-10-09 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Rigger's Racket. With Donald Buka
50-10-16
53
Voice of Death
Y
50-10-16 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Voice of Death, With John Loder
50-10-23
54
The Recruit
Y
50-10-23 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: The Recruit, With Charles Karvin
50-10-30
55
Escort for Hire
Y
50-10-30 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Escort for Hire, With Mary Wickes
50-11-08
56
The Big Book
N
[Slot taken by Dr. Kildare. Moves to Wednesdays]

50-11-08 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: Sketch: The Big Book, With Ed Begley
50-11-15
57
Mow the Man Down
Y
50-11-15 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Ward Wilson
50-11-22
58
The Celluloid Candle
Y
50-11-22 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Ralph Forbes
50-11-29
59
The Doll
Y
50-11-29 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Sarah Haden
50-12-06
60
'Kid Shiv'
Kid Shive
Y
50-12-06 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Dickie Moore
50-12-13
61
Two-Gun Annie
Y
50-12-13 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Joan Lorring
50-12-20
62
Strange Token
Y
50-12-20 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Morris Carnovsky
50-12-27
63
Building Blocks
Y
50-12-27 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Donald Woods
51-01-03
64
Death on the Upgrade
Y
51-01-03 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Donald Woods
51-01-10
65
Edge of the Desert
Y
51-01-10 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Harvey Stephens
51-01-17
66
Cards and Spades
Y
51-01-17 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Susan Douglas
51-01-24
67
The Old Mob Goes
N
51-01-24 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Ian Keith
51-01-31
68
Love Is Not All
Y
51-01-31 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Ralph Forbes
51-02-07
69
Heir Apparent
Y
51-02-07 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not
Pay: With Philip Reed
51-02-14
70
Carnival Frail
Y
51-02-14 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Carnival Frail, With Diana Barrymore
51-02-21
71
Rough Customer
Y
51-02-21 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Tough Customer, With John Shelton
51-02-28
72
For Sweet Charity
Y
51-02-28 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
For Sweet Charity. With Romney Brent
51-03-07
73
Operation--Payroll
Y
51-03-07 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Operation Payroll. With Harold Vermilyea
51-03-14
74
Diamonds Trumped
Y
51-03-14 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Diamonds Trumped, With Ralph Meeker
51-03-21
75
Through the Hoop
Y
51-03-21 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Through the Hoop, With Una O'Connor
51-03-28
76
Plug-Ugly
Y
51-03-28 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Plug-Ugly, With Edmond Ryan
51-04-04
77
Front Boy
Y
51-04-04 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Front, Boy, With Bramwell Fletcher
51-04-11
78
Violets, Sweet Violets
Y
[ Last Episode ]

51-04-11 New York Times
7:30 p.m. WMGM-Drama: Crime Does Not Pay:
Violets, Sweet Violets. With Robert Lowery
51-04-18
--
--





Crime Does Not Pay Program Log [Mutual Run] (52 Episodes, beginning with 'The Bag Man' )

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
51-12-24
--
--
51-12-24 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 8:00 Littlest Angel
51-12-31
1
The Bag Man
N
[ Premiere Episode ]

51-12-31 Janesville Daily Gazette
Ian Keith is starred as "
The Bagman" for the first broadcast in another of the WCLO-MGM-Mutual produced "crime does not pay" series to be aired tonight at 9. The veteran stage and screen star is cast as Marvin Stone, a collector for a gang that forced truckers and businessmen to pay tribute. A special district attorney's investigation prompts a murder in the gang's efforts to cover its tracks. This series is directed by Max Loeb, assisted by Edgar Small.
52-01-07
2
Visiting Fireman
N
52-01-07 Janesville Daily Gazette
WCLO's Crime Does Not Pay broadcast tonight at 9 stars Arleen Whelan in the story about the "
Visiting Fireman." Writer Ira Marion has adapted the age-old situation for the sucker game--respectable married men escaping for a night on the town--for the "Visiting Fireman story." Burton Turkus, the prosecutor of Murder Inc., is the technical consultant for this series which is directed by Marx B. Loeb. Music is composed and conducted by John Gart and an all-star radio cast is heard in support of Miss Whelan.
52-01-14
3
Six, Two, and Even
N
52-01-14 Wisconsin State Journal
8 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Alfred Ryder in "
Six, Two, and Even," tale of gambler who pushes luck too far.
52-01-21
4
Second Hand Pistols
N
52-01-21 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 9:00 Crime Does Not Pay

52-01-28 Lock Haven Express
7:30 -- Crime Does Not Pay, "
Second Hand Pistols."
52-01-28
5
Imported Headache
N
52-01-28 Janesville Daily Gazette
Joseph Buloff will be starred when the Crime Does Not Pay series is presented tonight at 9. Mr. Buloff is to be heard as Walter Dreiben, a Nazi who imports his criminal activities to this country and tries to set up shop here. The M-G-M produced Crime Does Not Pay series is directed by Marx Loeb. They are written by Ira Marion and John Gart is the musical director.

52-01-28 Lock Haven Express
7:30 -- Crime Does Not Pay, "
Imported Headache."
52-02-04
6
Fishmonger's Fortune
N
52-02-04 Wisconsin State Journal
7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): "
Fishmonger's Fortune."
52-02-11
7
The Gangster Was A Lady
N
52-02-11 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): "The Gangster Was a Lady", with Blanche Yurka.
52-02-18
8
The Professor Pulls the Switch
N
52-02-18 Wisconsin State Journal - 9 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): John Loder in "The professor Pulls the Switch," story of confidence man.
52-02-25
9
Once Too Often
N
52-02-25 Janesville Daily Gazette
A young hoodlum who enjoys killing becomes the object of an extensive man-hunt during the Crime Does Not Pay broadcast tonight at 9. The madman is apprehended but lax law enforcement officials set him free to ply his trade again. He kills again but this time police put him behind bars for good as the MBS crime feature unfolds the tale of "
Once Too Often." Stage star Herbert Rudley plays the roll of Ollie Barker, the killer.
52-03-03
10
Burglar Alarm
N
52-03-03 Janesville Daily Gazette
Betty Furness is to be starred in a radio characterization well demonstrating her outstanding abilities as an actress when the Crime Does Not Pay series presents the story about the "
Burglar Alarm" for its broadcast tonight at 9. She plays the part of Patty Rice, a girl born in the slums who uses criminal methods in her efforts to better herself.
52-03-10
11
Horseshooes Are for Luck
N
52-03-10 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Neil Hamilton as youth who makes killer pay for his record.

52-03-10 Lock Haven Express
7:30 -- Crime Does Not Pay, "
Horseshooes Are for Luck."
52-03-17
12
Beauty and the Beast
N
52-03-17 Janesville Daily Gazette
A concentrated mixture of high finance and romance add up to bigamy--and then murder. That's the recipe for the macabre tale of "
Beauty and the Beast" scheduled for Crime Does Not Pay program for tonight at 9. Stage and screen star Everett Sloane is featured in this underworld drama. Burton Turkus, who paved the way for the Murder Inc. break-up, is the technical consultant for these anti-crime features.
52-03-24
13
Giddap Horsie
N
52-03-24 Janesville Daily Gazette
Richard Webb is the star when the Crime Does Not Pay feature presents the racing story "
Giddap Horsie" on tonight's broadcast at 9. He's to be heard as the bettor who never takes a chance on a horse race--until the first time, when the honest jockey dies in a fixed race.
52-03-31
14
Father's Boy
N
52-03-31 Janesville Daily Gazette
Richard Hart is the star for The Crime Does Not Pay broadcast tonight at 9, when the story of "
Father's Boy" is presented. He is to be heard as the father who discovers his teen-aged son is criminally inclined.
52-04-07
15
The Weak Spot
N
52-04-07 Janesville Daily Gazette
Stage and screen star Margo plays the feature in the story of "
The Weak Spot," the drama for the Crime Does Not Pay broadcast tonight at 9. It's the tale of a pretty miss who built an empire on the weakness of others--trusting persons who did not look beyond their $2 bets to realize that the racket they were supporting bleeds millions of dollars each year from honest business channels.
52-04-14
16
Horse Face
N
52-04-14 Janesville Daily Gazette
While on the subject of mystery and crime programs, another fine drama will be presented on the series of Crime Does Not Pay presentations. Frank Albertson is to be the star for this broadcast tonight at 9. The drama is a tale of the gambling world and entitled "
Horse Face."
52-04-21
17
They Gotta Have What to Eat
N
52-04-21 Janesville Daily Gazette
Gangsters endorse the old military maxim that armies travel on their stomachs. That point will be dramatically outlined on Crime Does Not Pay during its broadcast tonight at 9. Horace MacMahon is to be featured in this crime drama. Burton Turkus, responsible for breaking up New York's Murder Inc. gang, is technical consultant for this MBS series.

52-04-21 Mt Verson Register
7:30 -- Crime Does Not Pay, "
What to Eat."
52-04-28
18
Sucker Bait
N
52-04-28 Janesville Daily Gazette
Ed Bagley, who starred in many Mutual network radio features several years ago, takes time out from his film chores to return to the air tonight. He will be heard on the MBS Crime Does Not Pay broadcast in the suspense drama, "
Sucker Bait." Burton Turkus, prosecutor of "Murder Inc.," is technical consultant for this anti-crime series. Air time is 9 p.m.
52-05-05
19
Rigger's Rocket
N
52-05-05 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Donald Buka in "Rigger's Rocket."
52-05-12
20
The Voice Of Death
N
52-05-12 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): John Loder in "The Voice of Death."
52-05-19
21
Escorts For Hire
N
52-05-19 Capital Times - 7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay: "Escorts for Hire", story of out-of-town gangsters who are imported to do local hoodlums dirty work--WISC.
52-05-26
22
The Big Book
N
52-05-26 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): how "The Big Book" aided a gang of criminals to spread a reign of terror in a peaceful community.
52-06-02
23
Mow That Man Down
N
52-06-02 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Ward Wilson is the star for the drama, "Mow That Man Down."
52-06-09
24
Celluloid Candle
N
52-06-09 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Ralph Forbes in "Celluloid Candle."
52-06-16
25
The Doll
N
52-06-16 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Sara Haden in "The Doll."
52-06-23
26
Kid Shiv
N
52-06-23 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Dickie Moore in "Kid Shiv."
52-06-30
27
Two-Gun Annie
N
52-06-30 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Joan Lorring in "Two-Gun Annie."
52-07-07
28
Strange Token
N
52-07-07 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 7:30 Republican Convention

52-07-07 Oshkosh Daily Northwestern
7:30--Crime Does Not Pay--mbs
52-07-14
29
Building Blocks
N
52-07-14 Wisconsin State Journal
:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC):
mobster falls in love with girl who wants him to go straight.

52-07-21
30
Death On the Upgrade
N
52-07-21 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 7:30 Democratic Convention

52-07-21 Oshkosh Daily Northwestern
7:30--Crime Does Not Pay--mbs

52-07-31 Bismarck Tribune
MBS -- 7:30 Crime Does Not Pay "
Death on the Upgrade"
52-07-28
31
The Rum Runner
N
52-07-28 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): "The Rum Runner."

52-08-04
32
Glory Place
N
52-08-04 Janesville Daily Gazette
Every city has its "great white way"--a modified version of the much-publicized Broadway of New York. Integral parts of these white ways are the places of merriment and a spot called the "clip joint." The story of Dan Sheridan's "
Glory Place" has been written by Ira Marion for the Crime Does Not Pay broadcast tonight at 9. Alexander Kirkland will be starred in the lead role.
52-08-11
33
The Lady Loves Kittens
N
52-08-11 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Anna Lee as arsonist who uses kittens as weapons.

52-08-11 Brownwood Bulletin
Arson, murder and kittens provide the strange triumverate for KBWD's "Crime Does Not Pay" drama tonight at 9. Anna Lee is to be starred as the arsonist who used kittens as fire weapons. Featured on the program in major supporing roles will be War Wilson and Roger De Koven. The story of why "
The Lady Loves Kittens" deals with the perfect arson set=up--perfect, that is, until a satchman is vurned to death and a homicide investigation is started.
52-08-18
34
Don't Write--Telephone
N
52-08-18 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Jack Larue in "Don't Write--Telephone."
52-08-25
35
Between the Dark and the Daylight
N
52-08-25 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Lionel Stander as underworld poetry lover.

52-08-25 Brownwood Bulletin
"Joey the Poet" was a tough underworld character despite his penchant for Longfellow's poetry. Poor finances, however, drove him to pursue a life of crime and subsequent imprisonment. This drama of an underprivileged youth is scheduled for KBWD-Mutual's "Crime Does Not Pay" tonight at 9. Film star Lionel Stander is the star for this production of "
Between The Dark and The Daylight." Burton b. Turkus, prosecutor responsible for the collapse of "Murder, Inc." is tecnhical consulatant for these crime dtramatizations.
52-09-01
36
Strange Token
N
52-09-01 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Morrie Carnovsky in "Strange Token."
52-09-08
37
Building Blocks
N
52-09-08 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Richard Derr in "Building Blocks."
52-09-15
38
Cards and Spades
N
52-09-15 Wisconsin State Journal - WISC 7:30 Crime Does Not Pay 52-09-15 Trenton Evening Times - MBS--8:30 Crime Does Not Pay, "Cards and Spades."
52-09-22
39
The Old Mob Goes
N
52-09-22 Janesville Daily Gazette
What happens when friction develops among members of an underworld gang? Mutual's Crime Does Not Pay program provides the answer in the story of "The Old Mob Goes" for it's broadcast tonight at 9. Ian Keith, starred on the premiere broadcast of this series, returns to play the feature role for tonight's show.
52-09-29
40
Love Is Not All
N
52-09-29 Janesville Daily Gazette
The sign on the door read "Union of Lonely Hearts." But instead of acting as a clearing house for matrimonial-minded persons, the operators used it as a front for a nationwide network of fences. The ring was broken up when a woman discovered that romance can't be bought at a price. The drama, called "Love Is Not All," is scheduled for presentation by the Crime Does Not Pay program tonight at 7:30.
52-10-06
41
Heir Apparent
N
52-10-06 Janesville Daily Gazette
How the laws of descent and distribution are applied in the underworld will be revealed when the Crime Does Not Pay program presents the story about the "Heir Apparent" tonight at 7:30. Phillip Reed stars in this production, Burton Turkus, prosecutor responsible for dissolving Murder, Inc., is the technical consultant for these crime dramas.
52-10-13
42
Carnival Frail
N
52-10-13 Janesville Daily Gazette
The hustle and bustle of carnival life backgrounds the crime drama scheduled by Mutual's Crime Does Not Pay program at 7:30 tonight over WCLO. The story revolves around a "Carnival Frail," a gal who knows all the answers. Stage star Diana Barrymore plays the lead role for this presentation. Burton Turkus, the prosecutor responsible for the Murder, Inc. cleanup, is the technical consultant for these underworld tales.
52-10-20
43
Rough Customer
N
52-10-20 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): John Shelton in "Rough Customer."
52-10-27
44
For Sweet Charity
N
52-10-27 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 7:30 Governor Stevenson

52-10-27 The Rhinelander
7:30--Crime Does Not Pay
52-11-03
45
Operation--Payroll
N
52-11-03 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 7:30 Proxmire Marathon

52-11-03 The Rhinelander
7:30--Crime Does Not Pay
52-11-10
46
Diamonds Trumped
N
52-11-10 Janesville Daily Gazette
The action-packed drama of underworld characters on a murder spree will unfold during the Crime Does Not Pay program to be presented at 7:30 tonight over WCLO. The story is entitled "
Diamonds Trumped" and stars Ralph Meeker in the featured role.
52-11-17
47
Through the Hoop
N
52-11-17 Capital Times - 7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay: Una O'Connor in "Through the Hoop."
52-11-24
48
Plug Ugly
N
52-11-24 Janesville Daily Gazette
The many ramifications of underworld activities are to be unfolded in an action-packed drama scheduled for the Crime Does Not Pay program tonight at 7:30. The story deals with the criminal tendencies of "
Plug Ugly," a dreaded hoodlum. Edmond Ryan is starred in the lead. Burton Turkus, prosecutor for the eradication of Murder Inc., is the technical consultant for these crime stories.
52-12-01
49
Front, Boy
N
52-12-01 Wisconsin State Journal -7:30 p.m.--Crime Does Not Pay (WISC): Bramwell Fletcher in "Front, Boy."
52-12-08
50
Violets, Sweet Violets
N
52-12-08 Janesville Daily Gazette
Robert Lowery will prove that "
Violets, Sweet Violets" have earned their niche on the roster of crime prevention items tonight when Crime Does Not Pay presents a flower-studded adventure in the underworld. Broadcast time is slated for 7:30 this evening.
52-12-15
51
Ingenious Woman
N
52-12-15 Janesville Daily Gazette
Beautiful dolls are a glut on the underworld market. But what happens when brains are added to beauty will be told in the Crime Does Not Pay drama tonight at 7:30 over WCLO. It's the story of the "
Ingenious Woman" with Barbara O'Neill starred in the lead role of the mystery thriller.
52-12-22
52
Thick As Thieves
N
52-12-22 Janesville Daily Gazette
One of the top mystery stories to be heard over WCLO and Mutual is the Monday evening edition of Crime Does Not Pay at 7:30. These mystery shows are a mystery fans' must for listening.
Everett Sloan, one of radio's best known character actors, is starred for tonight's Crime Does Not Pay broadcast. The drama is titled "Thick as Thieves."
52-12-29
--
--
52-12-29 Wisconsin State Journal
WISC 7:30 Cage Closeups






Crime Does Not Pay Biographies




Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions
(Production Company)

(1924--)

Incorporation: New York City, NY, U.S.A.

Radiography:

1936 Leo is on the Air
1940 MGM Hollywood Theater
1943 People’s Reporter
1943 Lion’s Roar
1944 MGM Screen Test
1949 MGM Theater of the Air
1949 Crime Does Not Pay
1950 Dr. Kildare
1952 MGM Musical Comedy Theater of the Air

MGM trademark logo
MGM trademark logo
Marcus Loew, ca. 1902
Marcus Loew, ca. 1902

Samuel Goldwyn (Samuel Gelbfisz), ca. 1916 (Samuel Gelbfisz first entered into partnership with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn, hence the Gold-Wyn name. Gelbfisz later changed his name legally to Goldwyn, for understandable reasons)
Samuel Goldwyn (Samuel Gelbfisz), ca. 1916 (Samuel Gelbfisz first entered into partnership with Broadway producers Edgar and Archibald Selwyn, hence the Gold-Wyn name. Gelbfisz later changed his name legally to Goldwyn, for understandable reasons)

Louis B. Mayer, ca. 1935
Louis B. Mayer, ca. 1935

Metro logo ca. 1921
Metro logo ca. 1921


Goldwyn logo, ca. 1920, with 'Slats' The Lion

The revised Metro-Goldwyn logo, ca. 1922
The revised Metro-Goldwyn logo, ca. 1922


The amalgamated Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, with 'Tanner', the Lion, ca. 1925

'Grampa' Mayer with little Margaret O'Brien, July 4, 1944
'Grampa' Mayer with little Margaret O'Brien, July 4, 1944

MGM Radio Attractions transcription label for Program 9 of John Nesbitt's Passing Parade.
MGM Radio Attractions transcription label for Program 9 of John Nesbitt's Passing Parade.

WMGM logo circa 1949
WMGM logo circa 1949
With over 4,000 film credits to its name during its 85 years of operation, one might well imagine that MGM has always had as much business as it can handle. Radio would seem one of the last venues that MGM's roaring lion would care to tackle.

By 1924, movie theater magnate Marcus Loew had already acquired Metro Pictures Corporation (founded in 1916) and Goldwyn Pictures (founded in 1917) to provide a steady supply of films for his large theater chain, Loews, Incorporated. However, these purchases created a need for someone to oversee his new Hollywood operations, since long-time assistant Nicholas Schenck was needed in New York to oversee the theaters.

Louis B. Mayer's ten-year record of success on the West Coast made him a natural candidate to provide the oversight and managerial talent Loew was seeking. So Loew simply bought Mayer Pictures on April 16, 1924. Loew made Mayer vice-president of Loews and head of the studio operations in California. He appointed Harry Rapf and boy wonder, Irving Thalberg (only 25 at the time) as heads of production. For decades thereafter, MGM was listed on movie title cards as "Controlled by Loews, Inc."

Loew's original Metro-Goldwyn logo had already incorporated Goldwyn's mascot, Leo the Lion. Mayer's name was added to the masthead, and in a further nod to the Culver City Goldwyn studios, the "Art for Art's Sake" motto--Ars Gratia Artis--was incorporated into the initial MGM logo. The resulting logo has been updated several times during the ensuing eighty years, but those basic essential elements remain.

With the merging of the three major studios, MGM soon surpassed Universal Pictures as the largest studio in the world--a title it held for the following 25 years. When Marcus Loew died in 1927, control of Loews passed to long-time associate, Nicholas Schenck. Rival mogul William Fox of Fox Film Corporation saw Loew's passing as an opportunity to expand the Fox Empire. In 1929, with Schenck's agreement, Fox purchased the Loew family's holdings. Louis B.Mayer and Irving Thalberg were understandably outraged, but they weren't shareholders at the time.

Ever resourceful, Mayer used his political connections to persuade the United States Justice Department to sue Fox Film Corporation for violating federal antitrust law. But quite serendipitously, during the summer of 1929, William Fox was badly hurt in an automobile accident. Before he'd fully recovered, the stock market crash of 1929 wiped out all but a fraction of Fox's financial holdings. This effectively ended any chance of the Loews merger going proceeding--with or without the Justice Department's powerful blessing.

This was manna from heaven for Mayer. Nicholas Schenck and Mayer had never gotten along. Indeed, Mayer, who loved assigning pet names to friend and foe alike, reportedly referred to his boss as Mr. Skunk in private. The aborted merger only intensified the animosity between Schenck and Mayer. The persistant rivalry lasted over twenty more years, becoming an East Coast/West Coast, New York/Hollywood schism in the media giant. The rivalry finally ended when Schenck finally dismissed Mayer in 1951.

In 1934 MGM began to produce a number of three-color [Technicolor] short subjects including 1935's musical La Fiesta de Santa Barbara, waiting until 1938 to film a complete feature in the three-color process--Sweethearts with Jeanette MacDonald. But in addition to a growing short subjects program of its own, MGM also released the shorts and features produced by Hal Roach Studios, including the famous comedy shorts starring Laurel and Hardy, Our Gang, and Charley Chase. MGM's distribution deal with Roach lasted eleven years, from 1927 to 1938, with MGM reaping great benefit from the success of both the popular Laurel and Hardy films and the Our Gang comedy shorts.

MGM purchased the intellectual rights to Our Gang in 1938, moving the production in-house, and continuing production of the successful series of children's comedies until 1944. Between 1929 and 1931, MGM produced a series of comedy shorts called All Barkie Dogville Comedies [a shameless play on the 'All Darkie' farces from vaudeville and the silent film era], in which trained dogs were dressed up to parody contemporary films, while voiced by human actors.

On the Animation front, in 1930, MGM purchased the rights to distribute a series of cartoons that starred a character named Flip the Frog, produced by Ub Iwerks. The first cartoon in this series--Fiddlesticks--was the first sound cartoon to be produced in two-color Technicolor.

MGM's short subjects were not to be taken lightly. MGM's Loews Theaters connection provided a ready audience throughout the Loews stronghold in the Northeast United States. While producing as many as fifty feature films a year, it was the shorts--both animated and film--that was the glue connecting a full slate of enjoyable features for their cash-strapped Depression years audiences. And on the strength of a ready-made, captive distribution outlet--the Loews Theater chain--MGM was the only major studio during the period to issue stock dividends throughout the Great Depression years. But this monopoly would resurface fifteen years later in 1954's settlement of U.S. vs. Paramont Pictures, et. al, wherein Loew's, Inc., was ordered to divest itself of MGM.

Crime Does Not Pay, in addition to MGM's Passing Parade and Pete Smith Specialties were immensely popular in their day. The Pete Smith Specialties, in particular, were nominated for Academy Awards sixteen times in various short film categories. MGM's fifty Crime Does Not Pay shorts ran from 1935 to 1948, showcasing many early appearances by what would eventually become some of MGM's finest character actors and feature film stars.

It was the Crime Does Not Pay series of short features that led to MGM's inspiration to expand into Radio Programming. The Marcus Loew Booking Agency had owned New York radio station WHN since 1946. Responding to a suggestion by MGM publicity head, Pete Smith, MGM leased studio and manufacturing space in the Broadcasters Program Syndicate headquarters building in New York, to coincide with the launch of competing NBC's first 1949 broadcasts between its new NBC Studios in Los Angeles and its flagship studios in 30 Rockerfeller Plaza in New York. MGM was granted a call sign change from WHN to WMGM, to further call attention to its ownership of one of the nation's earliest radio stations.

M-G-M Radio Attractions recorded transcribed programs for syndication--and for broadcast over WMGM:

  • M-G-M Theatre of The Air
  • At Home with Lionel Barrymore
  • Hollywood, U.S.A.
  • The Story of Dr. Kildare
  • Good News From Hollywood
  • Crime Does Not Pay
  • The Hardy Family
  • The Adventures of Maisie
  • The Passing Parade
  • Woman of The Year
  • The Black Museum
  • M-G-M Musical Comedy Theater of The Air
  • The Modern Adventures of Casanova
  • The Gracie Fields Show

All fourteen programs were well received, but within seven years, MGM would be out of the radio programming and syndication business. MGM Records, however became a major label from the 1950s, on. WMGM's format changed to appeal to a broader audience--and format--and eventually reverted back to call sign WHN in 1962.




Lionel Jay Stander
(MGM Contract Player)

Radio, Television, Film and Stage Actor, Political Activist
(1908-1994)

Birthplace: The Bronx, New York City, NY, U.S.A.

Education:
University of North Carolina

Radiography:

1934 The Hour Of Smiles
1937 Lux Radio Theatre
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 The Rudy Vallee Sealtest Show
1941 Texaco Star Theatre
1941 Forecast
1943 Mayor Of the Town
1945 The Danny Kaye Show
1945 G.I. Journal
1947 Favorite Story
1947 Leo and the Blonde
1947 The Jack Parr Program
1948 Joan Davis Time
1948 The Eddie Cantor Pabst Blue Ribbon Show
1950 Crime Does Not Pay
To the Rear March
Damon Runyon Theatre (Audition)


Lionel Stander publicity photo, ca. 1938
Lionel Stander publicity photo, ca. 1938

Lionel Stander, reading, ca. 1935
Lionel Stander, reading, ca. 1935

Lionel Stander, reading, ca. 1936
Lionel Stander, reading, ca. 1936

Lionel Stander, publicity still, ca. 1936
Lionel Stander, publicity still, ca. 1936
Lionel Stander in St Benny, The Dip (1950)
Lionel Stander in St Benny, The Dip (1950)

Another Gordon Parks still from 1950's St Penny The Dip; Lionel Stander with Charles Ruggles
Another Gordon Parks still from 1950's St Benny The Dip; Lionel Stander with Charles Ruggles

Photo caption reads: Lionel Stander, now a private in the U.S. army air corps, is heard in WGN's ''Men of the Air from Mitchell Field'' a portion of the ''Full Speed Ahead'' series, heard every Wednesday at 3:30 p.m
Photo caption reads: Lionel Stander, now a private in the U.S. army air corps, is heard in WGN's ''Men of the Air from Mitchell Field'' a portion of the ''Full Speed Ahead'' series, heard every Wednesday at 3:30 p.m.

Stander in NY production of "Banjo Eyes" starring Eddie Cantor, ca. 1942
Stander in NY production of "Banjo Eyes" starring Eddie Cantor, ca. 1942
Stander was founding member of The Screen Actor's Guild
Stander was founding member of The Screen Actor's Guild
Stander before the infamous HUAC, ca.1943
Stander before the infamous HUAC, ca.1943

Stander in Once Upon A Time In The West, ca. 1969
Stander in Once Upon A Time In The West, ca. 1969

Lionel Stander in Hart To Hart, ca. 1981
Lionel Stander in Hart To Hart, ca. 1981
Photo study of Stander, ca. 1984
Photo study of Stander, ca. 1984
Stander at Awards ceremony, ca. 1990
Stander at Awards ceremony, ca. 1990
The loveable thug, gravel-voiced Lionel Stander, was born in The Bronx, New York, to Russian-Jewish immigrants; the first of three children. As a teenager Stander appeared in the 1926 silent film Men of Steel as an uncredited extra. During his one year at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, he appeared in a student production of The Muse and the Movies: A Comedy of Greenwich Village.

Stander's professional acting career began in 1928, as Cop and First Fairy in Him by e.e. cummings at the Provincetown Playhouse. He claimed that he got the roles because one of them required shooting craps, and a friend in the company volunteered him. He appeared in a series of short-lived plays through the early 1930s, including The House Beautiful, which Dorothy Parker famously derided as "the play lousy."

In 1932, Stander landed his first credited film roles in the Warner-Vitaphone short features In the Dough, with Fatty Arbuckle and Shemp Howard, and Salt Water Daffy (1933) with Jack Haley and Shemp Howard. He made several other shorts, the last being The Old Grey Mayor (1935) with Bob Hope. That year, he was cast in a feature, Ben Hecht's The Scoundrel with Noel Coward. He moved to Hollywood and signed a contract with Columbia Pictures. Stander was in a string of films over the next three years, most notably in Frank Capra's Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) with Gary Cooper, Meet Nero Wolfe (1936), A Star Is Born (1937) with Janet Gaynor and Fredric March, and Nothing Sacred (1937).

Stander's distinctive, gravelly voice, tough-guy appearance, comedic timing, and talent with dialects made him a very popular, respected, and successful radio actor. In the 1930s and 1940s he was on the Eddie Cantor Show, Bing Crosby's Kraft Music Hall Show, the Lux Radio Theater production of A Star Is Born, The Fred Allen Show, The Mayor of the Town with Lionel Barrymore and Agnes Moorehead, Kraft Music Hall for NBC, Stage Door Canteen for CBS, the Lincoln Highway Radio Show, and The Jack Paar Show.

Indeed, in 1941 he originated the title role of The Life of Riley for CBS, later made famous by William Bendix. He was a regular on Danny Kaye's zany comedy-variety radio show on CBS (1946–1947), playing himself as "just the elevator operator" amidst the antics of Kaye, future Our Miss Brooks star Eve Arden, and bandleader Harry James.

Strongly liberal and staunchly pro-labor, Stander espoused a variety of social and political causes, and was a founding member of the Screen Actors Guild. At a SAG meeting held during a 1937 studio technicians' strike, he told the assemblage of 2000 members, "With the eyes of the whole world on this meeting, will it not give the Guild a black eye if its members continue to cross picket lines?" Stander also supported the Conference of Studio Unions (CSU) in its fight against the Mob-influenced International Alliance of Stage Employees (IATSE).

Also in 1937, Ivan F. Cox, a deposed officer of the San Francisco longshoremen's union, sued Stander and a host of others, including union leader Harry Bridges, actors Fredric March, Franchot Tone, Mary Astor, James Cagney, Jean Muir, and director William Dieterle. The charge, according to Time magazine, was "conspiring to propagate Communism on the Pacific Coast, causing Mr. Cox to lose his job." This was a common accusation throughout the 1930s and 1940s as the powerful studios were actively enlisting the support of everyone they could, to combat the growing voice of technical and performers' unions--including the support of the Mob and reactionary, 'free-trade' right-wing politicians.

In 1938, Columbia Pictures head Harry Cohn allegedly called Stander "a Red son of a bitch" and threatened a $100,000 fine against any studio that renewed his contract. Despite continuing critical acclaim for his performances, Stander's film work dropped off drastically. After appearing in 15 films in 1935 and 1936, he appeared in only six films in 1937 and 1938. Then he was in just six movies from 1939 through 1943--none by major studios, and the most notable being Guadalcanal Diary (1943).

Stander was understandably unapologetic for his beliefs and causes. The Hollywood Studio System manipulated and controlled its talent like chattel, responding to any objections or union organizing by ostracizing or blacklisting any technician or performer who dared stand up to them. Stander once observed:

"We fought on every front because we realized that the forces of reaction and Faciscm fight democracy on every front. We, too, have been forced, therefore, to organize in order to combat them on every front: politically through such organizations as the Motion Picture Democratic Committee; economically through our guilds and unions; socially, and culturally through such organizations as the Hollywood Anti-Nazi League."

Lionel Stander had been subpoenaed by the very first House Un-American Activities Committee inquisition in Hollywood during 1940, when it was headed by Texas Congressman Martin Dies. The right-wing extremist Dies Committee had succeeded in abolishing the Works Progress Administration's Federal Theatre Project as a 'left-wing menace' in 1939. The attack on the Federal Theatre Project was understandably opposed by most progressives in Hollywood. Stung by the criticism from Hollywood, the Dies Committee decided to turn its attention to Hollywood itself.

Dies' infamous HUAC compiled a long-list of "real and suspected" communists to a Los Angeles County grand jury, which also subpoenaed Lionel Stander. The testimony was leaked, and the newspapers reported that Stander, along with such prominent Hollywood progressives such as James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, Frederic March and Franchot Tone, had been identified as communists. Reactionary committee chairman Dies offered all of the people named as communists the "opportunity" to "clear themselves" if they would "cooperate" with him in executive session. Stander was the only one to appear who was not "cleared" by Dies' committee. He was subsequently fired by his studio Republic Pictures.

Stander continued to work after being fired by Republic. He appeared in Hangmen Also Die! (1943), a film about the Nazi Reinhard Heydrich, who was assassinated by anti-fascists. After being blacklisted, Stander worked as a broker on Wall Street and appeared on the stage as a journeyman actor. He returned to the movies in Tony Richardson's The Loved One (1965), and he began his career anew as a character actor, appearing in many films, including Roman Polanski's Cul-de-sac (1966) and Martin Scorsese's New York, New York (1977). Other movies he appeared in included Promise Her Anything (1965), The Black Bird (1975), The Cassandra Crossing (1976), 1941 (1979), Cookie (1989) and The Last Good Time (1994), his final film.

Stander is remembered by contemporary audiences for playing Max on TV's Hart to Hart (1979-1984) with Robert Wagner and Stefanie Powers, a role he reprised in a series of Hart to Hart TV movies. Stander also appeared on Wagner's earlier TV series It Takes a Thief (1968) and on the HBO series Dream On (1990).

Why take so much space describing Lionel Stander's heroic stand against the fascist Hollywood Studio system--and their right-wing supporters in Congress? Because it informs much of what we lost when we lost The Golden Age of Radio. We lost more than the wonderful entertainment. The systematic dismantiling of the tens of thousands of small radio stations that built The Golden Age of Radio, destroyed the 'voice' of political and social diversity over public airwaves--forever. The airwaves are no longer public. They're privately controlled, privately influenced, and create enormous private profits. Under the Law we still technically own the airwaves, but we've ceded our ownership of the airwaves to private corporations--by our apathy and ignorance alone.

Lionel Stander saw it coming decades before his peers. He believed in the freedom of the public airwaves and his career was systematically destroyed simply because he espoused a belief in the Freedom of Speech, the freedom to organize, and the freedom of the airwaves.

Lionel Stander died of lung cancer on November 30, 1994 in Los Angeles, California. He was 86 years old. Let us hope that as we listen and watch Lionel Stander's body of work in Film, Radio and Television, we'll remember that he was more than an actor. He was a brave, outspoken patriot at a time in Hollywood when the majority of his peers were running for cover.




Joan Lorring [Mary Magdalena 'Dellie' Ellis]
Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress
(1926- )

Birthplace: Hong Kong, China

Radiography:

1943 Lux Radio Theatre
1945 This Is My Best
1945 On A Note Of Triumph
1945 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1945 Suspense
1945 Columbia Presents Corwin
1946 Theatre Of Romance
1946 You Were There
1946 Favorite Story
1946 Academy Award
1948 Family Theatre
1948 Cavalcade Of America
1948 Famous Jury Trials
1948 Ford Theatre
1948 The Eternal Light
1950 Presenting Charles Boyer
1950 Crime Does Not Pay
1952 Inner Sanctum
1952 Best Plays
1953 21st Precinct
1956 This Is My Story
1961 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1964 Theatre Five
1974 CBS Radio Mystery Theatre
1975 Faces Of Love
1983 Six By Corwin

Joan Lorring publicity photo ca. 1949
Joan Lorring publicity photo ca. 1949

1945's The Corn Is Green Poster
1945's The Corn Is Green

Lorring with Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre in 1946's The Verdict
Lorring with Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre in 1946's The Verdict



Mary Magdalena Ellis [Joan Lorring] was born in Hong Kong on April 17, 1926. Forced to leave her native country after the outbreak of WWII, she arrived with her family in America, while a teenager, in 1939. Upon finding Radio work in Los Angeles, the young Anglo-Russian actress worked her way into films making a minor debut at age 18 in the romantic war drama Song of Russia (1944.) She subsequently played the small part of Pepita in the ensemble suspenser The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1944.)

The following year Joan won the coveted role of the scheming, trampish Bessie opposite Bette Davis in The Corn Is Green (1945), earning an Academy Award nomination for "Best Supporting Actress", losing to Anne Revere for National Velvet (1944.) But what she won was the attention of Warner Brothers Studio, who were quite impressed with the up-and-comer and eagerly signed her up.

Joan proved quite able in a number of atmospheric film noir roles, including Three Strangers (1946) and The Verdict (1946), both opposite the malevolent pairing of Sydney Greenstreet and Peter Lorre. Inexplicably, her film career went into a rapid decline by the end of the 1940s. As a result she sought work elsewhere and maintained with stage, radio and small screen endeavors into the next decade. On Broadway she made her debut in the prime role of budding college student Marie who sets off the explosive dramatic action in Come Back, Little Sheba (1950) starring Shirley Booth and Sidney Blackmer.

She continued with strong roles in The Autumn Garden (1951), Dead Pigeon (1953) and "A Clearing in the Woods" (1957). Among her many 1950s dramatic showcases on TV was her portrayal of convicted ax-murderess Lizzie Borden's sister Emma on an Alfred Hitchcock episode. In the 1970s, Joan made a mini-comeback in the Burt Lancaster movie The Midnight Man (1974) as Cameron Mitchell's wife. She also performed on radio soap operas and appeared for a season on the TV soap Ryan's Hope (1975) before phasing out her career once again. Long married to New York endocrinologist Dr. Martin Sonenberg, she is the mother of two daughters.




Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Crime Does Not Pay