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Original Cecil and Sally header art

The Cecil and Sally Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Cecil and Sally

Cecil and Sally in character
Cecil and Sally in character



Johnny Patrick and Helen Troy
Johnny Patrick and Helen Troy





Vincent Kraft
Vincent Kraft




Johnny Patrick
Johnny Patrick




Helen Troy
Helen Troy

Benjamin Keith
Benjamin Keith

Edward Albee
Edward Albee

RKO Keith Orpheum (RKO)
RKO Keith Orpheum (RKO)

RKO Radio Picture intro screen
RKO Radio Picture intro screen

National Biscuit and Confection Company promo photo of Cecil and Sally
National Biscuit and Confection Company promo photo of Cecil and Sally

(Note: Funniest Things is listed to air the next day on KYA)
(Note: Funniest Things is listed to air the next day on KYA)

Adolph Linden
Adolph Linden

The Oregonian's Radio Station K-G-W and its Hoot Owls promo
The Oregonian's Radio Station K-G-W and its Hoot Owls promo
The company that made the transcription discs for Cecil and Sally was MacGregor and Ingram
The company that made the transcription discs for Cecil and Sally was MacGregor and Ingram.

MacGregor and Ingram became MacGregor and Sollie Inc.
MacGregor and Ingram became MacGregor and Sollie Inc.

C.P. MacGregor at the CPM Mike
C.P. MacGregor at the CPM Mike

Cecil and Sally promotional bill
Cecil and Sally promotional bill.

Fulton Theatre Cecil and Sally promotional bill
Fulton Theatre Cecil and Sally promotional bill

Cecil and Sally spot teaser
Cecil and Sally spot teaser

Johnny Patrick files for bankruptcy protection
Johnny Patrick files for bankruptcy protection
Oshkosh WI Strand Theatre promo for Cecil and Sally ca. 1934
Oshkosh WI Strand Theatre promo for Cecil and Sally ca. 1934


Helen Troy before the NBC mike on her Carefree Carnival program (1934)
Helen Troy before the NBC mike on her Carefree Carnival program (1934)


Helen Troy participates in renaming contest for the Eddie Cantor Show
Helen Troy participates in renaming contest for the Eddie Cantor Show


Johnny Patrick is dropped by 20th Century Fox
Johnny Patrick is dropped by 20th Century Fox


Hollywood Sights and Sounds article about Helen Troy
Hollywood Sights and Sounds article about Helen Troy


Helen Troy circa 1941
Helen Troy circa 1941


Helen Troy obit. circa Nov. 1942
Helen Troy obit. circa Nov. 1942

Johnny Patrick
Johnny Patrick

Teahouse of The August Moon

The Antoinette Perry Award commonly referred to as a 'Tony'
The Antoinette Perry Award commonly referred to as a 'Tony'

Growing Light

Inches

John Patrick at his Hasty Hill estate
John Patrick at his Hasty Hill estate

John Patrick circa 1992
John Patrick circa 1992

 John Patrick obituary
John Patrick obituary

'Cub Reporters' announcement for KFYO
'Cub Reporters' announcement for KFYO
Last known Cecil and Sally listing
Last known Cecil and Sally listing

Dairy Delivery Company's Cecil and Sally Spot from 1933
Dairy Delivery Company's Cecil and Sally Spot from 1933

Orpheum playbill for Cecil and Sally In Person
Orpheum playbill for Cecil and Sally In Person
We've enjoyed finding and collecting Cecil and Sally since its rediscovery a couple of years ago. But the preeminent current expert on Cecil and Sally is Doug Hopkinson, who has generously permitted us to include his excellent paper on this fascinating program on our site. Here follows his comprehensive report on one of earliest West Coast Radio's most entertaining--and popular--programs:

Cecil and Sally: A Study in Obscurity by Doug Hopkinson

Copyright April 2009, All Rights Reserved

About two years ago a friend of mine sent me an audio CD with two episodes of a radio show called Cecil and Sally circa 1930. My first thought was, what the heck is this? Probably some dusty old soap opera I'm not going to want to listen to.


When I played the CD what I heard was a couple of teen-age kids having silly conversations with each other. The two episodes I had were not sequential. The show was extremely simplistic in nature. It also sounded as if the recording was made too fast. The girl's voice and giggles are really what made it sound too fast to me. The boy sounded like Arthur Lake (Dagwood Bumstead). I was convinced it was him until I began to research the show. Once I started digging, I found that Cecil and Sally was not an obscure radio show at all but rather, a forgotten gem that wooed the nation and succeeded . It was one of the earliest radio shows to be distributed via electrical transcription, just on the heels of Amos N Andy. Tracing the history of the this radio show and it's two main actors revealed many other intertwined stories. I found myself going off on different tangents several times and collecting information on other subjects when they intersected with the Cecil and Sally story.


In January 2009 I was very lucky to make the acquaintance of a gentleman by the name of Wayne Eberhart, who sold me a number of transcription discs of Cecil and Sally. Wayne happens to be the grandson of Vincent Kraft.


Vincent Kraft (left) owned and founded radio station KJR in Seattle, WA back in 1922. He was also co-owner of the Pacific Broadcasting Corporation along with Frederick Clift. Pacific owned radio station KYA in San Francisco, which broadcast from the top of the Clift Hotel. KJR and KYA were both later sold and became part of Adolph Linden's failed ABC Network. My point here is the transcription discs were owned by Vincent Kraft and stayed in the possession of his family all these years. Wayne discovered the discs in his grandfather's house as a youth. He even broadcast them to the public from his high school's radio station. He also recorded 2 episodes onto 45 rpm records which he still sells to this day on his e-bay store. Incidentally, those 2 episodes are the same ones that I was given which started me off on my quest.


In real life, Cecil and Sally were Johnny Patrick and Helen Troy. John Patrick Goggan was born May 17, 1905 in Louisville, KY. As always, the more research you do, the more seemingly conflicting information you will uncover. Depending on the source Johnny was: A) abandoned by his parents and raised by his Aunt and Uncle, or B) abandoned by his parents and raised in various foster homes and boarding schools, or C) raised in a military family which frequently moved around from military base to military base, or D) Traveled a lot with his family until he was made an orphan (whatever that means) or E) Born and reared in the Island City of Galveston TX. The most complete biography I found listed his parents as John Francis and Myrtle (Osborn) Goggan. It also provided a list of schools he attended. They were, Holy Cross College, St. Edward's College, St. Mary's Seminary, Harvard University and Columbia University.

Quite an impressive list but no details are given as to when or how long he attended any of them. One source claims he had a delinquent youth. A 1932 article in the Galveston Daily News named Johnny as the grandson of Thomas Goggan who was a well known music store owner in that city. All sources agree that in 1924 or 1925 he decided to strike off on his own and get a job. Depending on the source, it is said Johnny was hired as an announcer at radio station KPO or as a switchboard operator at radio station KYA. Both were San Francisco radio stations, however, KYA was not established until December of 1926 while KPO was in operation since April of 1922. Both accounts could be true but one thing is for sure, our Cecil, Johnny Patrick, met his Sally, Helen Troy, at radio station KYA in 1928.


Helen Troy was born December 23, 1903 in San Francisco, CA. She was educated in Traverse City, MI at Sacred Heart Convent. After graduation she studied music, piano and organ in Chicago, IL. She went back to Traverse City for 2 years then to Detroit and finally to San Francisco, always employed as a theater organist. In 1928 she was hired as a staff organist at radio station KYA. This is where Sally met Cecil.


Helen made her stage debut beside her Uncle at the age of five on what was then known as the Keith Circuit. The Keith Circuit was a very dominant entertainment chain that was owned and operated by two (not very nice) men named Benjamin Keith (left) and Edward Albee (below Keith). They originally made a fortune by staging unauthorized productions of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas. They used their money to build a chain of theaters across the U.S. They borrowed the variety entertainment concept from the originator, Tony Pastor, and used it to produce continuous, multiple daily performances in their theaters. They called it "vaudeville". They did not invent the word but they were certainly responsible for making it a familiar term in the U.S. and Canada. Incidentally, some of you may be familiar with the motion picture company RKO. The "K" in RKO stands for Keith as in Benjamin Keith....But I digress...


Helen would pick up her mail at the switchboard that Johnny worked. They became friends and developed a regular routine where Johnny would do Milt Gross characterizations and Helen would respond in baby-talk. (Milt Gross was a popular cartoonist/author of the day, famous for his Yiddish dialect humor.) They eventually worked up a couple skits. One day a regularly scheduled show had to cancel at the last minute and somehow Johnny and Helen got to fill-in. One source says after filling in for three weeks, they were taken out of the schedule only to be put right back in after the station received many calls and letters wanting more Cecil and Sally. And that is how it all began.


The show itself was titled The Funniest Things and in the beginning that is how it was listed in the radio schedules. This quickly changed to being listed as Cecil and Sally. It was often referred to in newspapers as "The Comic Strip of the Air". It began as a three day a week show but soon became a six day a week show in most places that it was broadcast. Some stations even played it twice a day. It was popular with children, college students, housewives and just about everyone else. The appeal of the show was its simplicity. It all revolved around a very average pair of American teen-agers that always managed to find themselves in a predicament.


The dialogue between Cecil and Sally was often entertaining. Sally could blather on and on following her own convoluted logic while Cecil would listen and interject contrary or insulting comments which were very subtle at times. The plots were always fairly believable; things that could easily happen to a pair of young teens. The show was "chapterized" in the sense that a storyline could run anywhere from 4 to 20 shows to conclude. Over the years Cecil and Sally lost money, found money, got arrested several times, solved crimes, went to college and eventually got married to each other. The simplicity of the writing was the genius of Johnny Patrick and the formula to success for the radio show as well as his future. He wrote every script himself. Cecil and Sally was just the beginning of his long and successful writing career.


The Funniest Things was first broadcast in 1928 on KYA. (The earliest published date of broadcast I have found so far is April 10, 1929) (left).


In November of 1928, KYA was sold to the new ABC network. The ABC network began as a string of radio stations running up the West Coast from Los Angeles, CA to Spokane, WA with it's flagship station being KJR in Seattle WA. The president and owner of ABC was Adolph Linden (left). Linden quickly expanded his network into Salt Lake City, UT and Denver, CO. By July of 1929, Linden had pushed into the Midwest market with radio stations in Lincoln NE, Muscatine IA, St Louis MO, Chicago IL, and Minneapolis, MN. There were already plans and deals set for the East Coast but they came to a screeching halt on August 23 when Linden announced all operations at ABC were suspended. The company filed for bankruptcy the same day. At the time of its demise the ABC network consisted of 20 different radio stations. As the story unfolded a scandal was revealed, fingers were pointed and arrests were made. Adolph Linden was the central figure and on March 28, 1933, after four years of litigation, he finally went away to Walla Walla State Penitentiary on charges of grand larceny where he spent the next five years until his parole on March 19, 1938. This is a story in itself and I find myself digressing yet again....


The point is, the ABC network greatly expanded the exposure of Cecil and Sally to the radio audience. With the failing of the ABC network, Cecil and Sally were off the air from August 24, 1929 until December 16, 1929 when they began broadcasting on KPO in San Francisco. Johnny and Helen quickly made a decision to move to electrical transcriptions. Freeman Gosden and Charles Correll as Amos and Andy, had already proven the effectiveness of syndication via electrical transcriptions not much more than a year prior. If a network of radio stations could increase a fan base, a syndicated release via electrical transcription would increase a fan base exponentially and that is exactly what happened. By 1930 it was estimated that Cecil and Sally had over 15 million fans. Their show was broadcast on 53 radio stations in 27 states, 5 Canadian provinces, the Hawaiian Islands, Australia and New Zealand. This is not the description of an obscure show.


A 1930 article gives credit in part to Dick Haller for the success of Cecil and Sally. He was vice president and general manager of Patrick and Company, which handled the business interests of Cecil and Sally. Haller was previously involved with a very popular radio show in Portland, OR called the Hoot Owls. This show had had a rather talented young performer by the name of Mel Blanc who soon moved on to Hollywood to bigger and better things. Dick Haller had also been production manager for the failed ABC network. One could draw the conclusion that Haller helped guide the young Mr. Patrick to the pathway of success via the electrical transcription.


This company was incorporated in 1929 but wasn't listed in the San Francisco telephone directory until 1930. They specialized in producing small runs of personal recordings for musicians and non-professionals. In 1932 the company changed its name to MacGregor and Sollie, also located in San Francisco. This company lasted until 1937 when it became CP MacGregor Studios and eventually moved to Hollywood.


The MacGregor in these companies was C.P. "Chip" MacGregor.
Prior to starting these transcription companies he was manager of the San Francisco territory for Brunswick Records. Going into the transcription business was a natural transition for him. He made a name for himself in the transcription business. He not only produced them, he also distributed them. The list of radio shows he produced as syndicated electrical transcriptions is impressive.


The list includes The Shadow, Cecil and Sally, Sambo and Ed, Proudly We Hail, Al Jolson, Jubilee, Lux Radio Theater, Hollywood Theater, Eb and Zeb as well as musicians such as Leadbelly, Charlie Parker, Stan Kenton, Peggy Lee and many others. Many people felt that transcription discs were not equal to a live performance and took something away from a radio program. MacGregor countered this by maintaining that transcriptions allowed for a flawless performance and that losing the excitement of a live performance was a small price to pay. In 1941, he began producing (Skippy) Hollywood Theater. He was also the host of the show. It became one of the most successful syndicated radio shows ever. It had all the commercials built-in. It ran for 8 years and made Skippy peanut butter a household name.


Due to the fact that the format of the show was similar to Lux and C.P.'s role was the same as that of Cecil B DeMille; he became known as "The DeMille of Discs". He had his own radio show in the mid-Fifties called The C.P. MacGregor Show. There are two circulating shows that are both AFRTS broadcasts (circa 1957). MacGregor was on the radio as late as 1965 hosting Heartbeat Theatre.


Cecil and Sally were at the height of their popularity between 1930 and 1932. On Jan 21, 1933 KPO announced that Cecil and Sally was coming to an end as far as live appearances behind the microphone went. The article in the newspaper claimed that Johnny and Helen had exclusively been broadcasting live on KPO while everywhere else they were heard via electrical transcription. This is contrary to every other article I have found.


Within a week the newspapers reported there was a rumor that Cecil and Sally might be touring as a stage show. On Feb 18, 1933 an official announcement came out that there was a 3 act play entitled Cecil and Sally starring Johnny Patrick and Helen Troy that would open in Oakland, CA on Feb 26th. By March 20, 1933 Cecil and Sally were back on the radio in San Francisco but not live. KYA picked up their transcriptions and announced the show would continue right where it left off in January on KPO.


The touring stage play began in Oakland, CA on February 26, 1933 as a three act comedy sketch. It was written by Johnny Patrick, using scripts he previously wrote for the radio show. Aside from Cecil and Sally the play featured six other characters from the radio show; Uncle Thomas, Aunt Bess, the Widow Mason, Gregory Gilliwater, Dr. Morgan and Mamie.


It is unclear if any of these supporting characters were portrayed by the original cast members from the radio show. By May of 1933 the tour was in Fresno, Ca and was billed as a 2 act sketch. The tour progressed Eastward. In January 1934 they were in Lincoln, NE. In February they were in Cedar Rapids, IA with the next stop scheduled for Albert Lea, MN.


In March 1934, they played at The Strand in Oshkosh, WI. I have been unable to find any stops beyond Oshkosh.


Every review was favorable and the tour was considered a success. The actor that portrayed Gregory Gilliwater was singled out by one reviewer as being particularly good. His name was Ralph Bell. IF this was indeed the same Ralph Bell we all know from Barry Craig and CBS Radio Mystery Theater and many, many other radio shows; my math indicates he would have been 17 or 18 years old at that time. Then again, it could just be coincidence.


Helen Troy returned to San Francisco and to the radio in June of 1934. She became a cast member of a show called Carefree Carnival which was broadcast on radio station KGO, an NBC station . Her first appearance was on June 9th. There are 2 shows known to be in circulation. Luckily one of them has Miss Troy in it. Interestingly, she portrayed a telephone operator in this show, a role that was to have a profound effect on her future.


Upon his return from the tour, Johnny Patrick was less visible to the public, until September 18, 1934 when it was reported in the newspapers that he had filed for bankruptcy. Listed as one of his creditors was Helen Troy in the amount of $120.00.


Research shows that Patrick must have devoted his time to writing. His first play titled Hell Freezes Over, opened in NY in December of 1935 and closed in January 1936 after only 25 performances. It featured George Tobias, a character actor most well known for his much later television role as Abner Kravitz on Bewitched, although, he appeared in many, many Broadway performances as well as films and television shows. In 1936 Patrick was hired on by 20th Century Fox as a screenwriter. He was credited in 17 films between 1936 and 1938.


Helen Troy, on the other hand, was making her debut in front of the camera. In April of 1936 she picked up a small role in Song and Dance Man (a George M. Cohan story) which starred Claire Trevor. Ironically, her character's name in the film is Sally. She played a telephone operator, a role that she was most likely specifically chosen for from her work on Carefree Carnival. She did so well that she became typecast for it for the remainder of her rather brief career.


At the end of April she had already landed a term contract for Claire Trevor's next movie Human Cargo.


In 1937 she joined the cast of Eddie Cantor's radio show, Texaco Town. Her character was (of course) a telephone operator. Eddie always referred to her as "operator" until a naming contest was announced. Listeners were asked to send in their choice of a name and the reason for the name. The judges of the contest were Rupert Hughes, Walt Disney, George Burns and Gracie Allen. On the night of the show of April 18, 1937, Eddie Cantor told the audience that there were more than 250,000 letters submitted. Of these, five had the same name that the judges chose. The winner of the contest was then chosen on the basis of the reason given for the name. Cantor neglected to reveal that reason but the winning name chosen was Saymore Saymore. The winner of the contest was Miss Susie McKee of Valdosta, GA and received a trip to Hollywood for two as a prize.


Meanwhile, Johnny Patrick is said to have contributed to the NBC show Streamlined Shakespeare in 1937.


He was also reportedly linked to writing for Helen Hayes and her radio show. If this is true, she could very well have helped open doors for his play writing career that was yet to blossom. He continued his work with 20th Century Fox in 1938 until December 11th when it was announced that he was let go. After 1938 there are no screen writing credits to his name for the next 10 years.


As Johnny Patrick's career was slowly gaining speed, Helen Troy's was quickly winding down. Helen's last known radio appearance was on Texaco Town on Sept 29, 1937, which was the opening night of the second season. She was in six films in 1937 and one film each in 1938 and 1939. She was in two films in 1940 before retiring due to an undisclosed illness.


Sadly, Helen Troy passed away on November 1, 1942 at the age of 38.
She was survived by her husband of many years, Dr. Alton Edward Horton and her 2 children, Kathryn Jane (15) and Troy Thomas (18).
Interesting is the fact that during the Cecil and Sally years there was never any mention of Helen being married and having a family. Newspaper and magazine articles portrayed her as a young single woman although in their defense they never stated it as a fact. Newspapers even played upon this by noting that Helen received at least one marriage proposal a week in her fan mail which she personally responded to every time, kindly turning down the offers.
The math involved would indicate that Helen was married and already had a four year old son and a one year old daughter by the time she was hired at KYA.


The same media portrayal was applied to Johnny Patrick as well. All the articles stated he was a Roadster driving, eligible young bachelor living in his Golden Gate, ocean-view high-rise apartment. His biography indicates he was married in 1925 to a woman named Mildred LeGaye. There is never another mention anywhere I have found, about divorce, re-marriage or children.


It is also interesting to note that a newspaper article in 1932 stated that Johnny Patrick aspired to be one of the country's leading playwrights and that those who knew his work and temperament were predicting he would attain his goal.


In 1942, John Patrick wrote his second play The Willow and I which opened in NY in December 1942 and closed in January 1943 after only 28 performances. The play featured Gregory Peck and Martha Scott. Before the play even opened, John Patrick had volunteered to join the American Field Service, which provided medical support to the British Army fighting WWII. He served with Montgomery's Eighth Army in Egypt and saw action in India and Burma. This experience was the foundation for his next play, which he finished writing on a ship-ride home after his tour of duty in 1944. The play was titled The Hasty Heart which opened in NY in January 1945 and closed in June 1945 after 204 performances. This play featured Richard Basehart. The play's successful run led to a film adaptation in 1949 starring Ronald Reagan and then a television movie in 1983.


It was in 1953 that John Patrick reached the pinnacle of his long career as a writer. He wrote a stage adaptation of the Vern J. Sneider novel, The Teahouse of the August Moon which opened on Broadway in October of 1953 and closed in March of 1956 after 1027 performances.


This play featured John Forsythe. Teahouse won Patrick the New York Drama Critics Circle Award for best American play of the year, a Pulitzer prize in drama, a Tony award, a Donaldson award from Billboard magazine for best new play and the League of NY Theaters and Producers Aegis Club award. In 1956 he wrote the screenplay for the movie it became, which starred Marlon Brando and Glenn Ford, also in the cast were Eddie Albert and Harry Morgan. John Patrick went on to write at least 48 more plays over the following 39 years including a musical adaptation of Teahouse (1970), under the title Lovely Ladies, Kind Gentlemen. None of his other plays had the same acclaim of Teahouse although many are still being performed in schools and small theaters to this day. As for screenwriting, John Patrick was responsible for several that resulted in prominent movies. Among them were Three Coins in a Fountain (1954), Love is a Many Splendored Thing (1955), High Society (1956), Les Girls (1957), The World of Suzie Wong (1960) and Gigot (1962). He also won two awards in 1957 for his screenwriting of Les Girls, the Screenwriters Guild award and the Foreign Correspondents award.


Unlike Helen Troy, John Patrick never got in front of a movie camera, although a few internet sites erroneously credit him with several film appearances. Patrick also liked to compose poetry and dabble in art. He did the artwork for two book covers in the 1990's. The books were The Growing Light by Martha Conley (1993) and Inches by William Marshall (1994).


John Patrick owned a 65 acre estate he called Hasty Hill, located in Suffern, NY. He purchased it following the success of his play The Hasty Heart. He also lived in retirement in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands for many years.


On November 7, 1995 John Patrick was found dead in his apartment at the Heritage Park Assisted Living facility in Delray Beach, FL. He was found by a housekeeper with a plastic bag over his head. He was said to have been in normal health for a 90 year old man and his death was ruled a suicide. The last thing John Patrick wrote was a poem he left behind. It was titled A Suicide Note. It read in part.., "... I won't dispute my right to die. I'll only give the reasons why. You reach a certain point in time. When life has lost reason and rhyme..."


Although in the end he wasn't remembered for having written Cecil and Sally, it isn't surprising. Many years had gone by and radio shows were and are ancient history to a modern society. This illustrates how short the memory of our culture has become and perhaps has always been. A few generations go by and memories pass on with the people that held them. In its day, Cecil and Sally was well known to millions of people. Today, very few people are even aware of this old radio show.


Cecil and Sally enjoyed a nice run on the airwaves. My suspicions are that no more transcriptions of the show were made after January 1933 as Johnny Patrick and Helen Troy were preparing to go on tour and after that they went off to establish themselves individually. They were finished as a team.


The radio show itself, however, was not quite finished. Electrical transcriptions made sure of that. Many cities enjoyed the show for years afterwards.


The exact number of shows in the Cecil and Sally series is not known but an article in the Avalanche Journal from Lubbock, TX on June 20, 1937 noted that the Cecil and Sally show was leaving the air on KYFO radio after 1392 broadcasts. The latest published date of broadcast in the U.S. that I found was February 22, 1938 in Uniontown, PA on radio station WWSW.


Cecil and Sally, a 15 minute West Coast radio show that through a series of fortunate events, timing, writing and foresight, captured the imagination and attention of millions of listeners nationwide for an entire decade. A 15 minute show that launched the short career of Helen Troy, the long career of Johnny Patrick and rubbed shoulders along the way with some very interesting and influential people associated with the radio industry. A 15 minute show that time has relegated to obscurity. A 15 minute show that deserves to be remembered in radio history.

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Please respect Doug's copyright of this article and attribute it appropriately.


We thank Doug for his insightful and thorough research on Cecil and Sally. There's very little we can add to Doug's observations. As a personal observation, this was a truly delightful program for any era, but given the competing serial fare of the day, truly remarkable by contrast. Patrick's scripts were both charming and bitingly humorous. They poked holes in many of 'polite society' conventions with earthy, common-denominator type humor. Never cruel, but deliciously ironic and timely, given the post-Depression years of its setting.

Helen Troy's tiny, lispy voice in the character of Sally was particularly charming. It's easy to understand how hard it was for Cecil to refuse her every whim--or scheme.

Series Derivatives:

The Funniest Things
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Mystery Dramas
Network(s): ABC Network [West Coast]; KPO, San Francisco (NBC Orange Network); As many as 53 independent radio stations in 27 states, 5 Canadian Provinces, the Hawaiian Islands, Australia and New Zealand.
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 28-??-??
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 28-??-?? to 37-06-20
Syndication: MacGregor and Ingram; MacGregor and Sollie; C. P. MacGregor
Sponsors: S and W Coffee; Dairy Delivery Company
Director(s):
Principal Actors: Johnny Patrick and Helen Troy
Recurring Character(s): Cecil Shotridge, Sally, Aunt Bess, Uncle Thomas, Dr. Morgan, John Foe, Mr. Lucre the banker, Otis, Widow Mason and Ichabod, the horse.
Protagonist(s): Cecil and Sally
Author(s): Johnny Patrick
Writer(s) Johnny Patrick
Music Direction:
Musical Theme(s): Unknown
Announcer(s): Unknown
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
1392
Episodes in Circulation: Approximately 150
Total Episodes in Collection: 58
Provenances: RadioGOLDINdex (David Goldin).

Notes on Provenances:

As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources.







Cecil and Sally Radio Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
28-??-??
1
N
Premiere Episode
63
After Sally's Date with Alexander
Y
64
Saying Goodnight
Y
65
Sally Can't Find Her Purse
Y
66
Sally Gives Cecil a Pink Sweater
Y
67
Cecil Tries to Lose the Sweater
Y
68
Cecil Convinces Sally That He Wants the Sweater
Y
69
Sally Ties Cecil's Tie
Y
70
Deciding to Go to a Movie
Y
71
Cecil Gets in a Fight Over a Parking Spot
Y
72
Waiting for Seats at the Theater
Y
73
Trip to the Soda Fountain
Y
74
Window Shopping
Y
75
Has Ben Hur Been Stolen
Y
76
Confession Magazine Rejects Cecil's Story
Y
77
Sugarpie Was Sick
Y
78
Uncle Thomas Thinks Cecil Has No Sense
Y
79
Cecil Teaches Sally to Drive
Y
80
Sally Crashes Ben Hur Into a Tree
Y
81
Sally is Afraid to Drive
Y
82
Sally Drives Downtown
Y
83
Sally Gets Pulled Over
Y
(disc damage1st 30 sec)
84
Discussing the Adventure
Y
(disc damage1st 30 sec)
85
Cecil Might Go to Jail
Y
86
Planning for Court
Y
87
Going Through Uncle Thomas' Basement
Y
88
Waiting in the Courthouse
Y
89
Telling Stories to the Judge
Y
90
The Judge Makes His Decision
Y
91
Sally Gets Fined by the Judge Instead
Y
92
Cecil's Not Ready for Marriage
Y
93
Sally Washes Cecil's Face
Y
94
Cecil Tries to Train Sugarpie
Y
95
Cecil Scares Sugarpie Up a Telephone Pole
Y
96
Sally Gets Cecil to Ring the Fire Alarm
Y
97
Firemen Arrive and Save Sugarpie
Y
98
Cecil is Jealous of the Fireman
Y
99
Sally Wants Fame and Fortune
Y
100
Sally Fancies Herself An Artist
Y
101
Sally Wants to Go to a Movie
Y
102
Pet Names and Baby Talk
Y
103
Cecil's Secret Nickname is Boz
Y
104
Doing a Crossword Puzzle
Y
105
Cecil's Castle
Y
106
The Ideal
Y
107
Cecil and Sally Really Do Like Each Other
Y
108
Cecil's On Top of the World
Y
109
Cecil Had to Change a Tire on Ben Hur
Y
110
Cecil's Going to Teach Sally to Fish
Y
111
Sally Drops Cecil's Camera Overboard
Y
112
Sally Loses An Oar and Falls in the Lake
Y
113
Cecil Rescues Sally
Y
114
Sally's Catch Gets Away
Y
115
Landing on the Island
Y
116
Cecil Tries to Take a Nap
Y
117
Sally Reads Poetry
Y
118
A Storm is Looming
Y
119
The Boat Floats Away
Y
120
Heading Back to Shore
Y
121
Visit From the Census Taker
Y
122
Sally Left Her Umbrella on the Streetcar
Y
123
Cecil Tells Sally She Has 'Slumbering Vitamins'
Y
124
Sally Has Cecil Believing He's Sick
Y
125
Sally Calls About Her Lost Umbrella
Y
126
The Faithful Dog Story
Y
127
Sally Is Moving to Europe With Uncle Thomas
Y
128
Cecil and Sally Reminisce
Y
129
Trying to Trick Mr Hatton
Y
130
Is the Store Losing Money
Y
131
The Rotten Egg Ploy
Y
132
Sally Plans to 'Vamp Mr Hatton
Y
133
Uncle Thomas Won't Sell the Store
Y
134
Taking a Walk By Mrs Morris' House
Y
135
Loves Me, Loves Me Not
Y
136
Adventure in a Half-Built House
Y
137
Hiding in the Half-Built House
Y
138
Cecil Tells Sally Ghost Stories
Y
139
Cecil Has a Loose Tooth
Y
140
Cecil Sneezes His Tooth Out
Y
141
Uncle Thomas Gave His Teeth Away
Y
142
Phoning Around to Find Uncle Thomas' False Teeth
Y
143
Cecil Finds the Teeth
Y
144
Argument Over What Movie to See
Y
145
Cecil Won't Let Sally Drive
Y
146
Picking A Fight With A Truck Driver
Y
147
Sally Insists Shw Was Short-Changed
Y
343
N
Uncle Thomas has discovered that Cecil found his wallet with $25 in it, but Cecil has already invested the money in oil stock
344
N
Cecil tries to sell his used Saxon automobile (named Ben Hur) to Levinsky so he can pay back the $25 to Uncle Thomas, but Levinsky drives a hard bargain.
367
N
Cecil and Sally are trying to avoid an escaped madman, but a keeper from the sanitorium thinks that Cecil and Sally are crazy
368
N
Cecil and Sally are locked up in the insane asylum and a fellow inmate has swiped the keys to the cell...but first, a riddle
381
N
A designing female has set her sights on Uncle Thomas
382
N
How to get Uncle Thomas away from Miss Mason . . . how about Cecil dressing like a policeman
383
N
Cecil dresses up as a policeman--including a water pistol, but suddenly, there's a robbery and a call for help
384
Cecil is a Policeman
N
Cecil is forced to act like a policeman
429
Sally and Sybil aren't speaking
N
Sally and Sybil aren't speaking. Sybil told Cecil that he has a strong chin and they have a fight
430
The doorbell rings
N
Cecil and Sally have had a fight, but Cecil visits and they make up...until the doorbell rings
431
The doorbell keeps ringing
N
The doorbell keeps ringing as Sally tries to keep Cecil from finding out that it's Alexander
432
Widow Mason was in two places at the same time
N
Widow Mason was in two places at the same time
517
Alexander and Cecil chat on the phone
N
Alexander and Cecil have a chat on the phone, while Sally is on a ladder [2nd half only]
518
Sally is reads a book . . . upside down
N
Sally is reading a book, with the book upside down [2nd half only]
539
Uncle Thomas was to talk with Miss Snodgrass
N
Uncle Thomas was to talk with Miss Snodgrass. There's a banker named "Mr. Lucre."
540
Mr. Smith's cook quit and Sally is hungry
N
Mr. Smith's cook quit and Sally is hungry
969
Widow Mason plans to sue Uncle Thomas
N
Widow Mason plans to sue Uncle Thomas
970
Little Otis
N
An introduction to little Otis
971
Gertrude Butterworth Mason writes her life story
N
Gertrude Butterworth Mason is writing the story of her life in the local newspaper, "The Glare", in which Uncle Thomas' breach-of-promise suit receives a lot of publicity
972
Breach-of-promise trial is broadcast
N
The breach-of-promise trial is broadcast on the radio...by a sportscaster
973
Widow Mason testifies at the trial
N
Widow Mason testifies at the trial
974
N
The breach-of-promise testimony continues
975
N
Sally testifies at the trial
976
N
Sally is cross-examined at the breach-of-promise trial
977
N
Uncle Thomas testifies at the breach-of-promise trial
978
N
Waiting for the verdict, a list of those Sally hates and the verdict is, "not guilty," so Widow Mason loses
979
N
Widow Mason still wants to be friends with Uncle Thomas, but Sally is rude to her on the phone
980
N
Cecil complains about little Otis
993
N
Cecil is waiting in a vacant lot for his big fight, but 13 guys show up for the fight
994
N
The watch that Otis took has disappeared
999
N
Otis has been run over and is in the hospital. He may never walk again (Cecil mentions that his full nae is 'Cecil Shotridge.')
1000
N
Cecil and Sally visit with Otis at the hospital and they tell him the story of, Anthony and Cleopatra."
1001
N
Aunt Bess and Doc have interrupted their honeymoon to fly home for Otis' operation
1002
N
Cecil and Sally are in the waiting room during Otis' operation and Otis may be able to walk again
1003
N
Cecil brings his dog Nero to visit with Otis while he's still in the hospital
1004
N
Cecil announces that he's going to college, so there's going to be a going-away party
1005
N
Cecil has gone shopping for college clothes...including a tux
1006
N
Sybil's cousin George is coming for a visit, and he's going to be living right next door, but Cecil is jealous
1007
N
Sally has gone to the library to borrow a book of poetry for George
1008
N
At Cecil's going-away party, Sally has danced with George, and Cecil's upset about it
1091
N
Ichabod, the horse, has a surprise in store
1092
N
Sally is rescued and becomes an actress without even trying
1009
N
Cecil has left for college, so Sally gets Uncle Thomas to send her to college too
1010
N
Cecil moves in and meets Bob, his roommate at college
1011
N
Sally surprises Cecil by showing up at college
1012
N
After two weeks at college, Cecil calls his roommate Bob, Sally calls her roommate Isabel
1013
N
Sally and their room-mates finally get to meet, but it's not exactly love at first sight
1014
N
Cecil is planning to join a fraternity
1015
N
Alexander, an upper classman at the fraternity, gives Cecil a hard time, and a paddling
1016
N
Cecil is the last to audition for the part of Romeo . . . after 52 others
1017
N
Sally brings Cecil to a vacant house. It has a balcony, so they can rehearse, Romeo and Juliet
1018
N
Cecil and Sally become the prisoners of the strange man on the floor, but he's no one and nothing
1019
N
The strange man brings an imaginary feast to the cellar, and a sharp knife to carve it with
1020
N
The strange man turns out to be an actor hired by Alexander to scare Cecil and Sally. Revenge is sweet
1021
N
Cecil has a cold. Cold water was thrown on him at the fraternity house. Alexander has left the college
1022
N
Alexander has returned and has put ants in Cecil's costume for Romeo and Juliet
1023
N
Cecil plans to use a beetle to scare Alexander, but that exotic beetle is from Egypt and costs 300 dollars
1024
Uncle Thomas and Aunt Bess Visit

N
A visit from Uncle Thomas and Aunt Bess. They're going to see Romeo and Juliet
1026
N
Cecil ruined the performance of Romeo and Juliet by forgetting his lines, falling off the balcony, tearing his tights, and hitting the balcony
1027
N
The dean has appointed Cecil in charge of collecting money for the new stadium
1028
N
Cecil and Sally try to collect money for the stadium, not realizing they're at a gambling den. When the cops raid the place, they're arrested too
1029
N
Cecil and Sally are brought before the night judge. Sally is fined $50, Cecil uses the money raised for the stadium to get her out of jail
1030
N
Back in his room, Cecil's room-mate returns; soon afterward, Cecil discovers that the money collected for the stadium has been stolen
1031
N
Cecil has "lost" the money that belonged to the college. The body of the show only. The date is approximate
1032
N
Cecil has been frantically trying to raise the money to replace the stolen $550, with no luck. Room-mate Bob confesses that he stole the money
1033
N
Cecil and Sally report to the dean's office to face the music. They're both expelled
1034
N
After being expelled, Cecil and Sally are packing to leave. Bob says goodbye, admitting that he's a "yellow coward." Cecil has a few words to say to Alexander.
1035
N
Cecil and Alexander come to blows. Alexander takes out a knife
1036
N
Cecil and Sally return home, but there's nobody around
1037
N
Uncle Thomas has returned home. Cecil plans to stay with his friend Willie at the cemetery until his Aunt Bess and Doc return
1038
N
Willie's father has disappeared in the cemetery. Cecil and Sally search the cemetery, but find only a skunk
1041
N
Cecil and Sally bury the clothes that were ruined after the encounter with the skunk. While digging a hole, Cecil finds a tin box filled with new $5 bills
1042
N
Cecil and Sally tell Uncle Thomas about the money in the box. They plan to put an ad in the newspaper to find the owner of the money. Internal evidence in this program points to a 1932 recording date
1043
N
After the ad appears about the money, a phone call is received claiming the money, but the caller can't identify the lost money. Six more phone calls follow, all claiming the money. The seventh call is a threat
1044
N
Aunt Bess has returned home. Someone is following Cecil
1045
N
Cecil runs out of gas, avoiding the trap set for him. Willie has gotten a letter, nailed to the front door. It's a suicide note supposedly from his father
1046
N
Cecil has taken $550 of the $600 found in the cemetery, bought a money order and sent it to the college to replace the money stolen by Bob
1047
N
A T-Man tells Cecil that the money was countefeit. Cecil tells the government man how he got the money
1048
N
Cecil and Sally return to the cemetery to find Willie's father. They hear someone crying for help
1049
N
Entering the tomb, Cecil and Sally find Willie's father underground. The body of the show only
1050
N
The counterfeiters return and question Willie's father, while Cecil and Sally hide. When the counterfeiters leave, everyone is left trapped in the underground tomb
1051
N
Cecil and Sally are rescued from the underground tomb by the government agents
1052
N
Cecil and Sally have gone to headquarters to try and identify the counterfeiters. Sally indentifies the chief of police as a suspicious character
1053
N
Cecil receives a letter from "a friend." The letter says, "I must see you, I'm in trouble!"
1054
N
At the fountain in the park, a meeting with an old friend from college, Bob
1055
N
Bob is staying with Cecil's aunt. Bob has a new job, and he repays to Aunt Bess some of the money he stole previously
1056
N
Aunt Bess has been arrested for counterfeiting! The money was given to her by Bob
1057
N
Bob has been working for the counterfeiters, and they're coming to pay Bob a visit
1058
N
Bob calls the police before the counterfeiters arrive, and the bad guys are arrested
1059
N
Sally makes plans about how to spend her part of the reward. The reward is $600, sort of
1060
N
Cecil and Sally are opening a hamburger stand by the edge of the cemetery
1061
N
After three hours open for business, no hamburgers have been sold
1062
N
A bum gets the first hamburger, at no charge. Nero (the dog) has eaten the rest of hamburger meat
1063
N
A rainy Sunday dashes hope for a profit. Cecil mentions that he had hoped to "start a chain of hamburger stands." News is received about Doctor Shepherd's expedition to the south pole. An explosion has occured aboard the ship
1064
N
Aunt Bess hasn't been told yet about her husband, Doctor Shepherd. Uncle Thomas is asked what to do
1065
N
Widow Mason comes to visit, and she's all sympathy
1066
N
Bob pays a visit and meets Cecil's friend Willie
1067
N
Aunt Bess is out of money because Doctor Shepherd left no will, except the will leaving everything to his first wife. Bob has lost his job at the park
1068
N
Cecil is working for Uncle Thomas again. He writes to his rich Aunt Violet for help
1069
N
Cecil is going to try to get Widow Mason to move away
1070
N
Cecil and Sally visit Widow Mason to try to get her to move, so Aunt Bess can move in. Widow Mason wants to talk it over with Uncle Thomas, over dinner
1071
N
Uncle Thomas says he'll think about having dinner with Widow Mason and then decides against it. Sally telephones Widow Mason again
1072
N
Sally is cutting out coupons from magazines, planning to write Widow Mason's name on the coupons and mail them in. She's filled out 208 coupons so far, planning to annoy Widow Mason
1073
N
Cecil and Sally have further plans to make Widow Mason move out. Cecil complains to the police about a dead horse on the front lawn. How about Widow Mason's goat?
1074
N
Cecil tries to get the goat to Widow Mason's house, which is not an easy task. Aunt Violet has arrived in town and is waiting at the train station. There's a goat in the rumble seat
1075
N
Down at the train station, Sally meets a colored red cap named Wintergreen, at the same time that she wants a stick of chewing gum. Aunt Violet wants to stay at a hotel, not knowing Cecil wrote the letter of apology and signed Aunt Bess' name. Aunt Violet says, "I never heard of such idiocy," which is an apt description of this program. Then an Irish cop shows up
1076
N
Sally calls Aunt Bess, saying that she's Aunt Violet
1077
N
Aunt Violet meets Aunt Bess and the sparks fly
1078
N
Sally says, "we've got the goat, we might as well use it." The cops have been called; the goat is brought into the yard. The goat has a few ideas of his own
1079
N
Widow Mason joins Cecil and Sally up a tree. The policeman arrives; he too winds up in the tree
1080
N
Aunt Violet visits Aunt Bess' house because Bess is away. When Bess seems to have returned unexpectedly, Aunt Violet hides in the closet. However, it's the man who owns the goat at the door. He wants his goat and is sure it's in the closet
1081
N
Aunt Bess is sick in bed, even though she and Cecil have to move. Without meaning to, Cecil gets Aunt Violet angry at him
1082
N
Cecil and Sally visit Aunt Violet in her hotel room. He tries to borrow $500 for Aunt Bess
1083
N
Cecil has put his car up for sale, trying to raise $500 for Aunt Bess. He winds up with $300 and an old truck
1084
N
Widow Mason announces that she's going to sublease the house. Guess who's rented it? Aunt Violet
1085
N
Aunt Bess has left town, Cecil and Bob and Nero (the dog) have moved in with Aunt Violet. Sally's friend Flossie telephones. Plans are made for a picnic next Sunday
1086
N
Aunt Violet imposes her very strick rules for the picnic, and it's cancelled when everyone fakes having a cold. How about having it in the front yard
1087
N
Cecil has an idea to use the truck to move a horse. Sally has had a tooth pulled
1088
N
How to get a horse onto a truck. The destination turns out to be the library
1089
N
Sally had written the delivery address incorrectly. Now, what to do with the horse
1090
N
No-one wants the horse, who has an appetite like a horse! The horse has been staying in Aunt Violet's garage. Calls to a French laundry...or two
1093
N
Sally is going to appear as Joan of Arc at the tent show
1094
N
The story of Joan of Arc goes up in flames. Nothing goes right, except the owner of the horse shows up to claim his property
1095
N
Pierre, the owner of the horse, with a very European accent (certainly not French), wants to be paid for the use of his horse
1096
N
Aunt Bess is going to stay away two more months. Pierre is very interested in Aunt Violet
1097
N
Pierre visits at Sally's house, and reads his poetry to her
1098
N
Aunt Violet has taken a liking to Pierre, and his poetry
1099
N
Cecil is mad...very mad! This, of course, leads to a discussion about cows
1100
N
Aunt Violet has given Pierre money to buy new clothes. Cecil is none-too-pleased
1101
N
Cecil has called a psychiatrist to visit and see if Aunt Violet is crazy. The doctor thinks Sally is slightly crazy, and who can blame him
1102
N
The doctor finally gets to examine Aunt Violet, who gets angry at the thought of being examined by a psychiatrist and threatens to make up a new will
1103
N
Aunt Violet's pearl necklace and pigskin traveling case have been stolen
1104
N
The evidence points to Pierre as the thief when he walks in wearing Bob's suit. Pierre returns the pearls because he couldn't get $50 for them. He's insulted and Aunt Violet forgives him
1105
N
Cecil says that he'll never go back to Aunt Violet's house. He's been away three nights now, then Aunt Violet has disappeared
1106
N
Where is Aunt Violet? A policeman suspects Cecil has had something to do with the disappearance
1107
N
A call is received from the morgue, and Cecil is accused of murder by Pierre
1108
N
The policeman comes to the house and puts Cecil in handcuffs. Pierre accuses Cecil of murder (in an accent that sounds a little more French than in previous episodes). Aunt Violet returns and overhears Pierre's unkind words about her. Cecil has passed the test
1109
N
Aunt Violet is going to buy back Cecil's car for him. It's on its way back. Uncle Thomas telephones with the news that Aunt Bess has just returned
1110
N
Aunt Bess returns, and she has a baby girl with her! Cecil has a new cousin. No mention is made of how Aunt Bess became pregnant, since her husband, Doctor Shepherd, has been killed near the south pole
1111
N
Cecil and Sally try to think up a name for the new baby
1112
N
Aunt Violet has changed her mind. She wants to make up with Aunt Bess
1113
N
Aunt Violet and Aunt Bess kiss and make up. A weepy reconciliation
1114
N
Everyone is living in the same house. Sally tries to come up with a name for the baby and asks her friends for help
1115
N
Shopping for the baby
1116
N
Cecil and Sally are baby sitting. A symphony of broken dishes
1117
N
Cecil and Sally are going to work at the Pine Lake resort for the summer
1118
N
The baby is going to be named Diane Violet Shepherd. Cecil and Sally are to be the godparents
1119
N
Sally wants to make a telephone call to Flossie. It will only take a minute
1120
N
Everyone is on the train, on the way to the Pine Lake resort. Sally decides to write a poem
1121
N
Sally tries the hotel telephone. It works! This hotel offers "service with a smile
1122
N
Cecil and Sally swim out to a raft on the lake. Several boys have "looked" at Sally
1123
N
While sitting on the hotel's veranda, Cecil and Sally meet. Tommy Dixon and his cousin Peggy join the conversation
1124
N
Sally is reading a book while floating on an inner tube. She's jealous of Peggy, but is afraid she's going to drown...in water that's only knee-deep
1125
N
Who is the mystery man who never speaks? He's a sausage-maker who's lost his false teeth
1126
N
Cecil and Sally meet Gus, the local half-wit. He tells them about an "outlaw cave" nearby
1141
N
While they're on the train going home, Cecil and Sally play, "Truth Or Consequences." Sally is jealous of April Clark
1142
N
Bob has gotten a job and left town. Cecil is planning to go into the automobile business with Mr. Clark, April's father
1143
N
Widow Mason has married Mr. Wentworth J. Wentworth. The happy couple visit the Smiths, but Mr. Wentworth hardly gets a word in
1144
N
Aunt Violet has left town for a few months. Cecil tries to sell a car to Mr. Wentworth, who never gets a word in
1145
N
Cecil visits the Wentworths; Mr. Wentwork still hasn't gotten in a complete sentence. Could the role of Mrs. Wentworth (formerly Widow Mason) be played by Verna Felton?
1146
N
April comes to visit Cecil, but only Sally is at home. A discussion of Cecil Shotridge follows
1147
N
April and Sally have become good friends in just a few minutes. They're such good friends that Cecil gets knocked down with a bookend
1148
N
Cecil and Sally have a fight
1149
N
A week later, Flossie tells Sally that April Clark has been seen out dancing with Cecil. Sally asks Uncle Thomas to buy a car from Cecil so that they can make up. However, Cecil has taken April to the country
1150
N
Cecil is about to sell a car to Mrs. Rockster, when Sally interrupts and spoils his presentation
1151
N
Today is Sally's birthday, and relations are strained with Cecil. Big news: Flossie is going get married to Stu Brown. Cecil pays a visit for the first time in two weeks
1152
N
Cecil has bought Sally a Spanish shawl for her birthday. Sally turns down the lights. Flossie's fiance is referred to as "Stu Brown" and also "Bob."
1153
N
Cecil has been reading, "The Art Of Making Love."
1154
N
Cecil takes Sally to lunch and tries to propose
1155
N
As Cecil prepares to propse, Sally announces that she's going to have her tonsils taken out
1156
N
Cecil and Uncle Thomas visit Sally in the hospital. Cecil proposes, but Sally is fast asleep while he pops the question
1157
N
Cecil talks to Aunt Bess about getting married and learns that Aunt Violet is going to Europe. April Clark visits Cecil and he finds himself engaged to the wrong girl
1158
N
Cecil visits Sally in the hospital (who is only heard whispering). April visits at the same time and tells Sally that she's going to marry Cecil
1159
N
After Sally returns home, Cecil visits her at home and tells her the engagement to April is all a mistake
1160
N
Cecil tries to get out of his engagement to April, but she tells him that she's going blind! The body of the show only
1161
N
Cecil explain to Sally why he couldn't break his engagement to April
1162
N
Just before the wedding, Cecil learns that April is not really going blind
1163
N
Ten minutes before the wedding, Cecil takes Sally for a ride in the country, leaving April waiting for him at the church. Cecil's voice sounds like he's getting hoarse.
1164
N
Cecil and Sally visit April after the wedding has been called off. They confront April with the knowledge that she's not really going blind
37-06-20
1392
Y
[ Last Episode ]






Cecil and Sally Radio Program Biographies




C.P. MacGregor
(Series Syndicator)
Producer, Transcriber, Studio Owner
(1897-1968)
Founded: Los Angeles, CA

Radiography:
1929
Cecil and Sally
1938
Jonathan Thomas and His Christmas On The Moon
1947-1954
Proudly We Hail
1948
The La Rosa Hollywood Theatre Of Stars
1950-1952
Salute To Reservists
1953
Better Living Radio Theatre
1953
Keep Your Guard Up
1956-1965
Heartbeat Theatre [for The Salvation Army]

The Henry King Show
The California National Guard Show
The Cavalcade Of Drama
Skippy Hollywood Theatre
The New National Guard Show

and literally thousands more.

C.P. MacGregor c. 1945
C.P. MacGregor c. 1945


1939 promo for C.P. MacGregor's 'Proof of Profit Plan'

Information on C.P. MacGregor and his family remains somewhat sketchy, but he's one of the more fascinating icons of the era of The Golden Age of Radio. In 1924, MacGregor was Brunswick Records manager for the San Francisco territory. He later founded his own studios--C.P. MacGregor Studios--at 729 S. Western Avenue, Hollywood, CA. He was referred to as "the DeMille of the discs."

This first of his companies--MacGregor and Ingram Company--was incorporated around 1929. Some of their electrical transcriptions of the era bear the call letters of KFRC, 610 AM, San Francisco--one of the 31 stations comprising the West Coast Don Lee-Mutual Network. Given the close association between Don Lee and C.P. MacGregor there's every likelihood that MacGregor often used Don Lee's KFRC Studios in San Francisco before establishing himself in the Melrose District of Los Angeles.

By 1932 the company had changed its name to MacGregor & Sollie, located on Mission Street, in San Francisco and survived until approximately 1937. MacGregor & Sollie promoted their San Francisco transcriptions as Hollywood-style dramas. Stations from coast to coast routinely contracted with MacGregor & Sollie for their syndicated transcriptions at $17.50 for each episode.

By 1945 the C.P. Macgregor Studios had migrated to 729 South Western Avenue, Hollywood, CA. Throughout that era C.P.MacGregor had begun to adopt 16" transcription discs exclusively.

MacGregor was a prolific, diverse producer and distributor of syndicated transcription discs, producing The Shadow, Cecil and Sally, AFRS programs, Al Jolson, Jubilee, Lux Radio Theatre, Hollywood Theatre, and Eb and Zeb. He also produced hundreds of commercial recording sessions with the lofty likes of Leadbelly, Charlie Parker, Stan Kenton, Peggy Lee and hundreds of other prominent Jazz and contemporary recording artists. Liberty Records--the predecessor to Capitol Records--recorded in their studios in the mid-1940s.

It goes without saying that MacGregor operated in a highly competitive field, with the likes of Westinghouse's World Broadcasting System and the Radio Networks themselves. That he was able meet his much larger competitors head-on--and dominate them--speaks volumes for C.P. MacGregor's quality and business acumen.

Today the Library of Congress has possession of the entire surviving MacGregor collection, including the surviving output of the 1931 through 1970 masters and recording ledgers from all three companies: MacGregor and Ingram, MacGregor and Sollie, and C. P. MacGregor.



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