Click to go to Digital Deli Too Home Page blank head
Preserving the Golden Age of Radio for A Digital Age
Explore Our Golden Age Radio Research Pages Click here to learn about our approach to Golden Age Radio Preservation [Under Development] Click to go to Our Radio Articles Page This Feature Is Currently Not Available
 
This will take you to our Numeric Radio logs
This will take you to our A Series Radio logs This will take you to our B Series Radio logs This will take you to our C Series Radio logs This will take you to our D Series Radio logs This will take you to our E Series Radio logs This will take you to our F Series Radio logs This will take you to our G Series Radio logs This will take you to our H Series Radio logs This will take you to our I Series Radio logs This will take you to our J Series Radio logs This will take you to our K Series Radio logs This will take you to our L Series Radio logs This will take you to our M Series Radio logs
This will take you to our N Series Radio logs This will take you to our O Series Radio logs This will take you to our P Series Radio logs This will take you to our Q Series Radio logs This will take you to our R Series Radio logs This will take you to our S Series Radio logs This will take you to our T Series Radio logs This will take you to our U Series Radio logs This will take you to our V Series Radio logs This will take you to our W Series Radio logs This will take you to our X Series Radio logs This will take you to our Y Series Radio logs This will take you to our Z Series Radio logs This will take you back to our Text List of Radio logs

original Call for Music header art

The Call for Music Radio Program

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Call for Music

Harry James, Dinah Shore and Johnny Mercer mug backstage before Call for Music
Harry James, Dinah Shore and Johnny Mercer mug backstage before Call for Music

The Billboard teases the new Philip Morris program, Call for Music, co-starring Dinah Shore and Harry James (Jan 24th 1948)
The Billboard teases the new Philip Morris program, Call for Music, co-starring Dinah Shore and Harry James (Jan 24th 1948)

The Billboard  teases the possibility of Johnny Mercer joining Call for Music  (Jan 31st 1948)
The Billboard teases the possibility of Johnny Mercer joining Call for Music
(Jan 31st 1948)

Dinah Shore's new radio vehicle made the cover of The Billboard of Feb 28th 1948
Dinah Shore's new radio vehicle made the cover of The Billboard of Feb 28th 1948


Philip Morris sponsored Call for Music over both CBS and NBC
Philip Morris sponsored Call for Music over both CBS and NBC

Philip Morris featured its Revelation pipe tobacco during Call for Music
Philip Morris featured its Revelation pipe tobacco during Call for Music


The contemplated move to NBC signaled the departure of Lawrence and Lee from their writing and production credits (The Billboard of May 1st 1948)
The contemplated move to NBC signaled the departure of Lawrence and Lee from their writing and production credits (The Billboard of May 1st 1948)


While holding open the door for a possible Fall Season of Call for Music, Dinah Shore apparently felt that the proposed downsizing of the popular feature didn't merit her return. (The Billboard of June 19th 1948)
While holding open the door for a possible Fall Season of Call for Music, Dinah Shore apparently felt that the proposed downsizing of the popular feature didn't merit her return. (The Billboard of June 19th 1948)


During a rehearsal for Call of Music, Dinah dances with Van Johnson while hubby George Montgomery ignores them.
During a rehearsal for Call of Music, Dinah dances with Van Johnson while hubby George Montgomery ignores them.




Background

Philip Morris and Company was one of the most prolific sponsors of Radio throughout the Golden Age, bankrolling virtually every Radio genre heard during the era:

  • 1934 The Leo Reisman Orchestra
  • 1935 Johnny [Roventini] and The Foursome
  • 1938 The Perfect Crime
  • 1938 What's My Name?
  • 1939 Breezin' Along
  • 1939 Guess Where
  • 1939 Johnny [Roventini] Presents
  • 1939 Name Three
  • 1939 Where Are We?
  • 1940 Crime Doctor
  • 1941 Great Moments from Great Plays
  • 1941 Philip Morris Playhouse
  • 1942 Author's Playhouse
  • 1942 Purple Heart
  • 1942 The Philip Morris Program
  • 1944 It Pays to Be Ignorant
  • 1945 Talent Theater
  • 1946 Heart's Desire
  • 1946 The Johnny Desmond Follies
  • 1947 At Home with The Berles
  • 1947 Horace Heidt's Youth Opportunity Program
  • 1947 Kate Smith Sings
  • 1948 Call for Music
  • 1948 Everybody Wins
  • 1948 Philip Morris Playhouse
  • 1948 The Dinah Shore Show
  • 1948 The Mel Torme Show
  • 1948 This Is Your Life
  • 1949 Against The Storm
  • 1949 Casey, Crime Photographer
  • 1949 Hogan's Daughter
  • 1949 Ladies, Be Seated
  • 1949 One Man's Opinion
  • 1950 Candid Microphone
  • 1950 Truth Or Consequences
  • 1951 Philip Morris Playhouse on Broadway
  • 1951 The Bickersons
  • 1951 The Strange Romance of Evelyn Winters
  • 1952 My Little Margie
  • 1952 What's My Line?
  • The Eddie Cantor Show Business Show

Cigarette advertising played a major role in Radio of the 1930s to 1950s. One of the Advertising Industry's most lucrative sectors, the Ad agencies of the era ruthlessly competed with each other for Tobacco Industry accounts. Given the highly addictive nature of tobacco products of any kind, the Tobacco Industry was one of the United States Economy's most recession-proof, inflation-proof, and depression-proof industries. And indeed, the tobacco industry of the era routinely poured a significant amount of its profits into both Print and Radio advertising throughout the period. The industry also ensured that tobacco products were routinely employed in all manner of Film productions of the 20th Century.

After the Golden Age of Radio had come and gone, Philip Morris acquired the Miller Brewing Company in 1970, General Foods in 1985 and Kraft Foods in 1988. One might well argue that Philip Morris, U.S.A. inherited the legacy for a lion's share of the most important sponsorships throughout the Golden Age of Radio--Philip Morris, Kraft Foods, and General Foods having sponsored over 300 popular Radio programs of the era. In 2003, the Philip Morris companies changed their name to the Altria Group.

But thoughout both World War I and World War II, the tobacco industries routinely shipped millions of free cartons and pouches of tobacco products to the G.I.s overeas on every fighting front--the better to ensure that overseas G.I's wouldn't be forced by War to abandon their smoking addictions. And also to ensure that American tobacco products made even more significant inroads into the occupied countries on the fighting fronts. The Tobacco Industry was equally generous to the G.I.s during the Korean Conflict and the Vietnam Conflict. And in fact, it's been estimated that three times as many of the G.I.s of the era ultimately died of tobacco-related illnesses than the entire estimated 292,000 fatal American servicemen casualties of World War II.

Of course as history has revealed, Tobacco Advertising was also one of the era's most deceptive and misleading, routinely citing the health 'advantages' of a particular tobacco brand over its competitors. The more naked and bald-faced tobacco campaigns of the era routinely employed doctors and nurses to endorse the health efficacy of a particular brand's tobacco products. And quite naturally, another huge portion of the Tobacco Industry's profits were plowed back into influence peddling and lobbying against any form of regulation of tobacco products of the era--a practice that continued well into the 1990s.

Given the ruthlessly competitive and morally bereft nature of the Tobacco Industry of the era, it's no wonder that that same ruthless competition greatly influenced the Radio programming of the era. Indeed, to this day, most advertising historians and economists continue to cite the Tobacco Industry's influence peddling of the 20th Century to be the template from which most other deceptive corporate advertising practices achieved such illogical--and counter intuitive--success throughout the 20th Century.

Dinah Shore's rising star

While steadily increasing her popularity with one hit record after another, Dinah Shore got her first major boost from Eddie Cantor and his Time To Smile program between 1940 and 1942 and with frequent appearances on the long-running Chamber Music Society of Lower Basin Street with Paul LaValle during the same period. She'd also appeared over The Revuers during the same period while getting yet another boost from Xavier Cugat during 1940.

By 1941 Dinah Shore embarked on a long-running series of her own programs over three different networks and for six different major sponsors:

Throughout the entire period of headlining her own starring vehicles over both Radio and Television, Dinah Shore continued to make hundreds of guest appearances on other programs as well as performing in hundreds of AFRS and AFRTS programs of the 1940s and 1950s. And indeed her frequent appearances before military audiences both stateside and overseas endeared her to a generation of G.I.s and their families. Dinah Shore continued to be a favorite of G.I.s. for the remainder of Dinah Shore's life.

Philip Morris teams Dinah Shore and Harry James over CBS

"Call for Philip Morris" had been the signature Radio tag for Philip Morris for going on fourteen years by 1948. 'Sung' by famous little person Johnny Roventini and his several 'stand-ins' over the years, it was a natural extension to refer to their new Dinah Shore, Harry James and Johnny Mercer vehicle as "Call for Music." And indeed the pairing of jazz vocalist sensation Dinah Shore with Harry James and his Orchestra would seem to have been an equally natural hit premise. The Billboard thought so as well, almost weekly hyping the proposed series from its first teaser in mid-January 1948. By the time Call for Music actually premiered the two proposed leads were augmented by legendary Tin Pan Alley songwriter Johnny Mercer.

The concept for the series was something of a novelty as well. Drawing upon the preeminence of each of the co-stars in their respective entertainment fields, Dinah Shore represented the popular songs of the era, Harry James represented Big Band music of the era, and Johnny Mercer represented the Tin Pan Alley and Broadway songwriting of the era. Call for Music was specifically targeted to the 18-25 demographic of the era and Lawrence and Lee's [Jerry Lawrence and Robert Lee] Call for Music's scripts were heavily weighted with the popular 'jive talk' of the era, an aspect that apparently disturbed noted Radio critic John Crosby to no end. Here's a sample from the March 22, 1948 edition of Oakland Tribune:

Dinah Shore
Teams With Songwriter

 By JOHN CROSBY
 
     Dinah Shore, the velvet-voiced lady from Tennessee, and Johnny Mercer, the songwriter, have teamed up on a new show titled "Call for Music" (8:30 p.m. California Daylight Time, Fridays) and, in all but a few details, it's a very happy arrangement.  Unfortunately the two singers have brought along Harry James, who is Betty Grable's husband, the butt of a great many tiresome jokes and also a trumpet player of considerable reknown.  James' trumpet, I understand, drives certain young ladies right out of their wits and has a somewhat similar effect on me.  It makes a loud, assertive, insistent noise that gets under my skin, though probably not in the way James plans.
     To pass on to more pleasant matters, Miss Shore occupies a rather special niche among feminine singers.  Her voice is as recognizable as Jack Benny's.  Her style is one of those patented and exclusive features the automobile manufacturers are always talking about and is so distinctively her own that she could cry for help in Times Square and be identified almost immediately.
HAUNTING VOICE
     This unique quality has a way of subtly altering the meaning of lyrics.  When Miss Dinah--as I'm sure the family servitors refer to her--tackles "McNamara's Band," the whole character of Ireland changes.  Magnolias start sprouting all over the ould sod.  She has at various times transformed Sioux City Sue into a southern girl and rather casually placed the penthouses of Manhattan somewhere around New Orleans.  In spite of these drastic geographical rearrangements, Miss Shore has a lovely haunting voice, her phrasing is among the most skillful to be found among popular singers, and I'm happy she's back on the air.
     As for Mercer, he is perhaps second only to Bing Crosby as a master of rhythm.  Someone once remarked about Crosby that he sounded the way all men think they sound in the shower.  The same remark might more aptly be made about Mercer, who sings as if he immensely enjoys the sound of his own voice and doesn't particularly give a hoot if anyone else does.  His voice, if you can call it that, is foggy, hollow, casual and extremely self-assured.  Mercer has been obscured by his songwriting, a more lucrative enterprise.  Hollywood, in fact, is bubbling over with song writers who also sing and can hardly be prevented from singing if anyone is careless enough to leave a piano exposed.
IMPLANTS TUNE
     Mercer's particular talent is an ability to implant a tune so thoroughly into your own mind that you find yourself whistling it the next day.  He clings tenaciously to the melody rather than revising it to his own taste, a gesture of respect from one songwriter to the rest of the profession which I greatly admire.  And, if that isn't enough recommendation, he is also a real, lowdown blues singer who can bring an air of conviction to some of the silliest lyrics ever written.  Parenthetically I'd like to insert the observation that the blues seem to be reasserting some of the popularity they enjoyed back in the '20's.  The other night Miss Shore embraced with magnificant courage "My Man," a song that I thought was buried with Helen Morgan.  She sang it very well, too.
     In spite of the excellence of its component parts, there are a number of things wrong with this show.  It's badly written, and loosely put together.  James, Mercer and Miss Shore are required to give tongue to some of the most ridiculous jive talk I ever heard.  Miss Shore is forced, conceivably at the point of a gun, to simper like a fourteen-year-old school girl and Mercer, an intelligent adult, is made to utter noises which most teen-agers of my acquaintance outgrew in the sixth grade.  This sort of thing, I imagine, is aimed at the jukebox set and--I'm just guessing here--is written by men with one foot into middle age.  All I can say is that they are insulting the intelligence of the teen agers.  Jive talk is not exactly deathless prose but the real thing is a lot better than this.  These writers ought to get out of the Brown Derby some night and do a little research near a jukebox.
Copyright, 1946, for The Tribune

As might be obvious from John Crosby's observations above, Crosby wasn't particularly hip to the 'jive talk' of the eighteen to twenty-five year-olds of the era. Given that Call for Music was specifically targeted to the 18-25 demographic of the era, Crosby's disdain for 'jive' was entirely understandable. Crosby wasn't particular enamored of Johnny Mercer either. But as history later proved, Johnny Mercer's songwriting talents became the stuff of Radio, Television, Film and Recording Industry legend. It's also true that Mercer had any number of other detractors of the era--but not among the target demographic.

Nor was everything sweetness and light behind the mike of Call for Music. While the legendary writing/producing team of Jerome 'Jerry' Lawrence and Robert Lee had gotten Call for Music off to an entertaining start, the team soon became disenchanted with the heavy-handed tactics of Philip Morris and its ad agency--Biow--in controlling the pace and content of the program. At about the same time as the Lawrence and Lee kerfuffle came to a head, Philip Morris decided to move Call for Music from CBS to NBC.

The format of Call for Music changed somewhat with the series' shift from CBS to NBC. The move to NBC also brought a new writing and producing team--Bill Brennan at the helm and Robert Smith doing the writing. During the CBS broadcasts of the series, Dinah Shore and company had introduced several 'medleys' as a featured element of the program. Messrs. Brennan and Smith made the medley element a key feature of the entire NBC run. Call for Music continued to feature segments dedicated to Dinah Shore, Harry James and Johnny Mercer, but in a more structured, uniform format for the remainder of the run.

The CBS run of Call for Music comprised an audition for Philip Morris and ten weekly broadcasts between February 13th 1948 and April 16th 1948. NBC continued the broadcasts beginning on April 20th 1948 and running for eleven more episodes until June 29th 1948. The trade papers and newspapers of the era cited the break beginning July 6th 1948 as a 'summer hiatus,' for the popular program, signaling the possibility that the series would return in the Fall of 1948.

Another distinction between the CBS and NBC renditions of Call for Music were Philip Morris' promotion of its Philip Morris Cigarettes during the CBS run and promotion of its Revelation Pipe Tobacco during the NBC run.

Philip Morris had determined to downsize the scope, talent, format and budget for Call for Music. Costing a reported $11,000 per half hour over both CBS and NBC, Philip Morris proposed dropping both Harry James and Johnny Mercer from any future Call for Music broadcasts and reducing the budget to $8,000 per half hour--at most. By the Fall of 1948 it had become apparent to all parties that the proposed new format simply wasn't attractive enough to continue the series.

As things actually transpired, Call for Music didn't return from its hiatus for a Fall 1948 Season. While continuing to appear with great regularity as a guest performer in both Radio and Television, Dinah Shore's Television offers began to consume most of her attention, as well as new exposure in Film. Call for Music was by no means Dinah Shore's last regular program over Radio, however. Dinah Shore's long association with Chevrolet brought her back to the radiowaves in 1954 with her last regular Radio program.

Series Derivatives:

Dinah Shore-Harry James Show; On Call for Music; AFRS
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Variety
Network(s): CBS; NBC; The AFRS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): 48-02-09 Audition Program [CBS]
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): CBS: 48-02-13 01 Opens with 'Manana'

NBC: 48-04-20 01
A Medley from Five Hollywood Films
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): CBS: 48-02-13 to 48-04-16; Ten 30-minute programs; Fridays at 10pm

NBC: 48-04-20 to 48-06-29; Eleven 30-minute programs; Tuesday evenings
Syndication: Columbia Broadcasting System; NBC; The AFRS
Sponsors: Phillip Morris, Revelation Pipe Tobacco
Director(s): Jerry Lawrence. Robert Lee, Bill Brennan
Principal Performers: Dinah Shore, Harry James, Johnny Mercer
Recurring Character(s): None
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s) Jerry Lawrence, Robert Lee, Robert Smith
Music Direction: Harry James and his Orchestra
Ticker Freeman [Dinah Shore's arranger]
Musical Theme(s): "On the Trail" from Ferde Grofe's Grand Canyon Suite
Announcer(s): Jack Rourke [CBS commercial spokesman]
John Holbrook [NBC commercial spokesman]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
23
Episodes in Circulation: 11
Total Episodes in Collection: 17
Provenances:


RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide.

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the RadioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc



What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here are the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article, log, and independent research results copyright 2011 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.

[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







The Call for Music Program Log

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
48-02-06
--
--
48-02-09
Aud
Opens with 'Manana'
Y
[Audition]

48-02-13
1
Opens with 'Manana'
Y
[Premiere for Philip Morris; Valentine's Day theme; Replaces the Milton Berle Show]

48-02-13 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Call for Music (WBBM):
new series with Dinah Shore, Harry James, Johnny Mercer.
48-02-20
2
Title Unknown
N
48-02-20 Wisconsin State Journal
9:00 Call for Music WBBM
48-02-27
3
Title Unknown
N
48-02-27 Wisconsin State Journal
9:00 Call for Music WBBM WCCO
48-03-05
4
Excerpts from Look Ma, I'm Dancin'
N
48-03-05 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Call for Music (WBBM): Dinah Shore, Harry James, Johnny Mercer in
highlights of "Look, Ma, I'm Dancin'."
48-03-12
5
A Medley from 'Casbah'
N
48-03-12 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Call for Music (WBBM):
Dinah Shore, Harry James, and Johnny Mercer feature score of "Casbah," salute French entertainers.

48-03-12 Long Beach Press-Telegram
7:00—KNX—Dinah Shore, Johnny Mercer and Harry James join in
a medley of the hit tunes from the current film, "Casbah," during CBS "Call for Music'
48-03-19
6
Opens with The Big Brass Band from Brazil
Y
48-03-19 Wisconsin State Journal
9:00 Call for Music WBBM

48-03-19 Morning Herald
Although this column has been more or less referring to the program that way, CBS says the listing for Dinah Shore's show at 10 o'clock "shall be the "Dinah Shore-Harry James show" rather than the rather vague identification of "Call for Music."
48-03-26
7
Salute To 'Annie Get Your Gun'
Y
[Easter program; cracked master]

48-03-25 La Crosse Tribune
. . .indications now are that Mr. Ace and Jane, recently introduced, ... will be moved from Saturdays to Fridays on CBS after the Dinah Shore show is, transferred by sponsor to NBC to become the i replacement for Milton'Berle. If not the Aces, the spot definitely will become comedy.

48-03-26 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Dinah Shore, Harry James (WBBM):
salute N.Y. Palace theater's 30th birthday with vaudeville tunes.
48-04-02
8
Salute To Eddie Cantor
Y
48-04-02 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Shore and James (WBBM):
"Ida," "Whoopee," and "Margie" in salute to Eddie Cantor.

48-04-02 Bluefield Telegraph
The Dinah Shore-Harry James show now being heard Fridays at 10 p. m. over CBS, will be shifted to NBC to replace the Milton Berle show ,on Tuesday nights at 8 o'clock, beginning April 20, Patrick H. Gorman, advertising manager for Phillip Morris, the sponsor, has announced. The Philip Morris "Call for Music" program, which, in addition to Shore and James also stars Johnny Mercer, is designed to appeal to the 18-25 age group.
48-04-09
9
Opens with Wait Till the Sun Shines Nellie
Y
48-04-09 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Dinah Shore, Harry James (WBBM):
"Saturday Night in Central Park," "I Still Get Jealous," "Shauny O'Shay," "Thousand Islands Song."
48-04-16
10
Music from 'Carousel'
N
48-04-16 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Dinah Shore, Harry James
(WBBM): music from "Carousel."





48-04-20
1
A Medley from Five Hollywood Films
Y
[Call for Music moves to NBC]

48-04-20 Wisconsin State Journal
7 p.m.--Call for Music (WIBA):
Premiere of the Dinah Shore, Harry James, Johnny Mercer popular music show; "You're Too Dangerous, Cherie," "But Beautiful," "Dickey Bird Song," "Hoorah for Love," "I Cried for You," "Pianissimo," "Sabre Dance" and "Sugar Blues."
48-04-27
2
A Medley from 'Casbah'
Y
48-04-27 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 7:00 Call for Music
48-05-04
3
A Medley of Lullabies
Y
48-05-04 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 7:00 Call for Music
48-05-11
4
A Western Medley
Y
48-05-11 Wisconsin State Journal
6 p.m.--Call for Music (WMAQ): Dinah Shore, Harry James, Johnny Mercer;
"Heartbreaker," "My Guitar," Western Medley, "Nature Boy," "I'll Always Be In Love With You," "Honeysuckle Rose" (on WIBA at 7).
48-05-18
5
A Medley from 'Inside U.S.A.'
Y
48-05-18 Wisconsin State Journal
6 p.m.--Call for Music (WMAQ): Dinah Shore, Harry James, Johnny Mercer;
"Rhode Island Is Famous for You," "Haunted Heart," "My Gal Is Mine Once More," "First Prize at the Fair," "Toolie Oolie Doolie," "Tell Me a Story," "My Guitar," "Dixie" (on WIBA at 7).
48-05-25
6
A Summer Vacation Medley
Y
48-05-25 Wisconsin State Journal
6 p.m.--Call for Music (WMAQ): Dinah Shore, Harry James, Johnny Mercer;
"June Is Bustin Out All Over," "My Guitar," "Brazil" (on WIBA at 7).
48-06-01
7
A Medley from 'Easter Parade'
Y
48-06-01 Wisconsin State Journal
6 p.m.--Call for Music (WMAQ):
Medley from "Easter Parade" (on WIBA at 7).
48-06-08
8
A Medley from 'Romance on the High Seas'
Y
48-06-08 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 7:00 Call for Music
48-06-15
9
A Medley from the Movies
Y
48-06-15 Wisconsin State Journal
6 p.m.--Call for Music (WMAQ): Dinah Shore sings
"Over the Rainbow," Harry James offers "Dream Girl," Johnny Mercer sings "You Don't Have to Know the Language" (on WIBA at 7).
48-06-22
10
A Medley of Dreams
Y
48-06-22 Wisconsin State Journal
6 p.m.--Call for Music (WMAQ): "When I Grow Too Old to Dream," Dinah Shore;
"Dream a Little Dream of Me," Harry James; "Did You Ever See a Dream Walking," Johnny Mercer (on WIBA at 7).
48-06-29
11
A Medley of Music from The South
Y
[Last program]

48-06-29 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 7:00 Call for Music
48-07-06
--
--
48-07-06 Wisconsin State Journal
WIBA 7:00 Mel Torme






The Call for Music Radio Program Biographies




Frances Rose 'Dinah' Shore
Jazz Vocalist; Radio, Television and Film Personality; Animal rights activist
(1916-1994)

Birthplace: Winchester, Tennessee, U.S.A.

Education: Vanderbilt University

Radiography:
1940 Lucky Strike Presents
1940 The Chamber Music Society Of Lower Basin Street
1940 The Revuers
1940 It's Time To Smile
1940 Behind the Mike
1941 Tenth Anniversary Salute To Movie Radio Guide
1941 Greek War Relief Fund
1941 The Men Behind the Guns
1941 We the People
1941 Songs By Dinah Shore
1942 President Roosevelt's Diamond Jubilee
1942 Command Performance
1942 The Pause That Refreshes...On the Air
1942 Homage To George Gershwin
1942 Special Mileage Rationing Program
1942 In Person: Dinah Shore
1942 Lights Out
1943 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theater
1943 Paul Whiteman Presents
1943 Bond Drive For the Cruiser Los Angeles
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1943 The Dinah Shore Program
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1943 Duffy's Tavern
1944 AFRS Thankgiving Show
1944 Showtime
1944 March Of Dimes Campaign
1944 America Salutes the President's Birthday
1944 Mail Call
1944 Truth Or Consequences
1944 Everything For the Boys
1944 The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
1944 Make Mine Music
1944 The American Band Of the A.E.F.
1944 Recording Session For British and American Army Charities
1944 Birds Eye Open House
1944 Thanksgiving Special Program
1944 Christmas Stocking (AFRS)
1945 V-E Day Special
1945 Seventh War Loan Memorial Day Program
1945 Last Program Of ABSIE
1945 Music For Millions
1945 Music America Loves Best
1945 Armed Forces V-J Program
1945 The Victory Chest Program
1945 NBC Parade Of Stars
1945 Jerome Kern Memorial Special
1946 Music Fights Infantile Paralysis
1946 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1946 Bill Stern Colgate Sports Newsreel
1946 Stars In the Afternoon
1946 American Veterans Committee Salutes Al Jolson
1946 The Ford Show
Dinah Shore circa 1947
Dinah Shore circa 1947

 Dinah Shore circa 1946
Dinah Shore circa 1946
From the February 24th 1994 edition of the Syracuse Herald Journal:

Dinah Shore dies

TV, radio film star
favored golf, animals.

The Associated Press

     BEVERLY HILLS. Calif. - Entertainer Dinah Shore, whose career spanned radio, television and concert performances, died today.  She was 76.
     Miss Shore, who was recently diagnosed with cancer, died at her home here after a short illness, said publicist Stephanie Masters.

Miss Shore's grown children and ex-husband George Montgomery were with her when she died, said spokeswoman Connie Stone.
     Her television career spanned the 1950s to the early 1990s, when she had a half-hour talk show, "A Conversation with Dinah," on The Nashville Network.
     Miss Shore, who won 10 Emmy Awards, started in 1951 with "The Dinah Shore Show," a live, 15-minute musical show.  The more elaborate "'The Dinah Shore Chevy Show" premiered in 1956 and ran until 1963.
     From 1974-79 she was in "Dinah," from 1970-74 in "Dinah's Place," and from 1979 to 1984, "Dinah and Friends."
     Referring to the TV camera, she said in a 1989 Associated Press interview:  "I don't know how to be afraid of that old red eye.  It's one person to me.  I don't visualize large numbers of people out there.
I'm comfortable with it."  Prior to going into television, she was a singing star on radio known for such hits as "I'll Walk Alone" and "The Anniversary Song."
     She occasionally appeared in films in the 1940s including "Follow the Boys" and "Fun and Fancy Free."
     She was born Frances Rose Shore on March 1, 1917 in Winchester, Tenn.
     A graduate of Vanderbilt University, she began her broadcast singing career in 1938 on New York's WNEW, joining the NBC network later that year and signing a contract with RCA Victor in 1940.  A year later she joined Eddie Cantor's radio program; by 1943 she was starring in her own radio program, sponsored by General Foods.
     She married Montgomery in 1943 and had two children, Melissa Ann Hime, born in 1948, and John David Montgomery, born in 1954.  She divorced Montgomery in 1962.  A second marriage to Maurice F. Smith in 1963 lasted only a year.
     For more than two decades she had played host to the Dinah Shore Classic golf tournament in the Palm Springs area.  She was also a champion of animal rights.



Harry [Haag] James
Bandleader; Trumpeter; Radio, Television and Film Personality
(1916-1983)

Birthplace: Albany, Georgia, U.S.A.

Education: Vanderbilt University

Radiography:
1937 Benny Goodman and His Orchestra
1938 Camel Caravan
1938 All-Star Jam Session (BBC)
1941 The Chamber Music Society Of Lower Basin Street
1942 The Bill Stern Colgate Sports Newsreel
1943 Lux Radio Theatre
1944 Yank Swing Session
1945 Command Performance
1948 Call For Music
1949 Philcon Radio Time
1953 The Betty Grable-Harry James Show
1953 The Buddy Rich Quartet
To the Rear March
Big Band Themes On the Air
Meet Corliss Archer
Irving Miller Orchestra
Swingin' 'N Sweet
Bud's Bandwagon
Downbeat
Harry James circa 1947
Harry James circa 1947

From the July 5th, 1983 edition of the Syracuse Herald-Journal

Bandleader Harry James
dies of cancer in Las Vegas

     LAS VEGAS, Nev. (UPI) — Bandleader Harry James, who had one of the hottest trumpets in show business for more than 40 years, died Monday night.  He was 67.
     James, who suffered from lymphatic cancer, had been ill since April but had performed as recently as June.
     He was born March 15, 1916, in Albany, Ga., where the Mighty Haag Circus was pitched at the time.  His mother performed on a trapeze until one month before his birth.  His father conducted the circus band.
     They proudly christened their son Harry Haag James.
     By the time he was 6, James had begun his musical lessons under his father's direction.  At 10, he was playing solo trumpet and at the age of 12 was given the job of conducting the No. 2 circus band.
     When he was 15, he got tired of playing marches for the circus and began sitting in with dance bands around the Southwest.  Within a few years he was offered a job with Ben Pollack's orchestra and he wrote a song, "Peckin" which started a dance craze among a newly spawned group of jazz music lovers who were known as jitterbugs.
     But it was a trumpet solo on a Pollack record called "Deep Elm" that brought James his first real break, a recording of "Sweet King."
     Benny Goodman heard the record and sent for James, who joined him in 1937.  It was Goodman who encouraged James to form his own band and in 1939 he took the advice.
     When James took off on his own he found the going tough.  His band was good but there were no listeners.
     Then James took advantage of his own horn and recorded the classic "You Made Me Love You" and the country sat up and listened.  He had hit the big time.  He followed his original hit recording with "I Cried For You," "I Had the Craziest Dream," "Ciribiribin" and other hits with gaudy trumpet solos.
     James' first marriage was to singer Lois Tobin and his third was to former showgirl Joan Boyd in 1967.  They were divorced in 1970.
     During his marriage to Miss Grable, James appeared in several 20th Century Fox movies, including "Do You Love Me," "Springtime in the Rockies," "Best Foot Forward," "Two Girls and a Sailor" and "Bathing Beauties" and he was technical adviser and played all the trumpet parts in "Young Man with a Horn."
     His television activities included network appearance on the "Shower of Stars," "The Jerry Lewis Show" and the "Danny Thomas Show."
     James had appeared in Syracuse several times, his latest being at the Jefferson Street armory in May of 1982. In May of 1962 his band played for the Police Benefit Association in the War Memorial.  He also played at the Three Rivers Inn and in 1949 at the Syracuse University senior ball.




John Herndon Mercer
Jazz Vocalist; Songwriter; Radio, Television and Film Personality
(1909-1976)

Birthplace: Savannah, Georgia, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1933 The Kraft Program
1934 Kraft Music Hall
1938 Saturday Night Swing Club
1938 Hollywood Rendezvous
1939 The Camel Caravan
1939 The Dixieland Music Shop
1940 Cavalcade Of Music
1941 ASCAP On Parade
1943 Command Performance
1943 Open House Party
1943 The Pepsodent Show
1943 Fibber McGee and Molly
1943 Paul Whiteman Presents
1943 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1944 Mail Call
1944 Jubilee
1944 The Chesterfield Music Shop
1944 G.I. Journal
1945 Radio Hall Of Fame
1945 V-E Day Special
1945 Request Performance
1946 Your Hit Parade
1946 The Benny Goodman Music Festival
1947 The Ford Show
1948 Christmas Seal Party
1948 Call For Music
1948 Leo Forbstein Memorial Program
1949 Philco Radio Time
1949 King For A Night
1953 Bud's Bandwagon
1953 The Les Brown Show
1953 The 1953 Hert Fund
1953 The Johnny Mercer Show
1953 It's Time For Johnny Mercer
1953 Guest Star
1956 Stars For Defense
1962 Christmas Sing With Bing
Yank Swing Session
To the Rear March
Personal Album
Music On Deck
The Naval Air Reserve Show
Here's To Veterans
Hot Off the Record Press
Johnny Mercer, With Orchestra Conducted By Paul Weston
Johnny Mercer circa 1941
Johnny Mercer circa 1941
From the June 26th, 1976 edition of the Syracuse Herald-Journal

Song writer Johnny Mercer dies

     LOS ANGELES (AP) - Johnny Mercer, whose haunting jazz and blues lyrics thrilled millions for half a century, won four Oscars and made him the highest-paid song writer in the world, has died at age 66.
     The mellow-voiced Mercer, who wrote lyrics for such hit songs as '"Laura," "That Old Black Magic," "Jeepers, Creepers" and "Moon River," died yesterday at his Bel Air home.
     A family spokesman said his death was caused by complications from brain surgery performed last Oct. 25 to remove a benign tumor.
     Mercer began his career as a performer, but gained world fame for his haunting lyrics for the 1944 movie mystery "Laura."
     "I tried to be a singer and failed," Mercer once said.  "Then I tried to be an actor and failed.  So I just naturally fell into lyric writing."
     He gave up his acting ambitions and began singing in New York cabarets, where he was noticed by Paul Whiteman.
     Whiteman, impressed with Mercer's easy, untutored style, offered him a spot in the Whiteman Band and Mercer's duets with trombonist Jack Teagarden became a favorite of jazz buffs.
     Mercer became a top radio personality after moving to Hollywood in 1935.  He also made records and such duets with Bing Crosby as "Darling Clementine" and "Bob White" were big sellers.
     "Lazy Bones," written in collaboration with Hoagy Carmichael was one of Mercer's earliest song hits.  As the years passed, Mercer began limiting his appearances and devoting full time to lyric writing.
     Born Nov. 18,1909, in Savannah, Ga., Mercer wrote his first song — "When Sister Suzy Struts Her Stuff" - for his sister.  His first of some 75 hits was "Out of Breath, Scared to Death of You" written in 1929 for the Garrick Gaieties, a musical show.
     Mercer, who never lost the soft southern drawl of his native Georgia, did not win a role with the Gaieties, but married one of its performers, Elizabeth "Ginger" Median.  The couple had two children, Amanda and John.
     The composer won Oscars for "The Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe" in 1946, "In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening" in 1952, "Moon River" in 1962 and "Days of Wine and Roses" in 1963.  He also wrote the lyrics for "Blues in the Night."
     Mercer sometimes wrote both words and music with such songs as "Something's Gotta Give," "G.I. Jive," "Dream" and "I'm an old Cowhand."
     His film scores included "Here Come the Waves," "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers," "Daddy Long Legs," "Star-Spangled Rhythm" and "The Harvey Girls."
     Among his Broadway shows were "St. Louis Woman," "Top Banana," "Li'l Abner" and "Foxy."  His most recent show was "Good Companions" which he wrote with Andre Previn; it ran for a year in London.
     He never wrote rock and roll, saying "I'm too old for that."
     Mercer is survived by his wife, two children and three grandchildren.
     Funeral arrangements were pending in Savannah.




Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Call for Music