Click to go to Digital Deli Too Home Page blank head
Preserving the Golden Age of Radio for A Digital Age
Explore Our Golden Age Radio Research Pages Click here to learn about our approach to Golden Age Radio Preservation [Under Development] Click to go to Our Radio Articles Page This Feature Is Currently Not Available
 
This will take you to our Numeric Radio logs
This will take you to our A Series Radio logs This will take you to our B Series Radio logs This will take you to our C Series Radio logs This will take you to our D Series Radio logs This will take you to our E Series Radio logs This will take you to our F Series Radio logs This will take you to our G Series Radio logs This will take you to our H Series Radio logs This will take you to our I Series Radio logs This will take you to our J Series Radio logs This will take you to our K Series Radio logs This will take you to our L Series Radio logs This will take you to our M Series Radio logs
This will take you to our N Series Radio logs This will take you to our O Series Radio logs This will take you to our P Series Radio logs This will take you to our Q Series Radio logs This will take you to our R Series Radio logs This will take you to our S Series Radio logs This will take you to our T Series Radio logs This will take you to our U Series Radio logs This will take you to our V Series Radio logs This will take you to our W Series Radio logs This will take you to our X Series Radio logs This will take you to our Y Series Radio logs This will take you to our Z Series Radio logs This will take you back to our Text List of Radio logs

original Burns and Allen Programs Part 6 header art

The Burns and Allen Radio Programs | Part Six

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Burns and Allen Part 6
Burns and Allen mug before the NBC microphone
Burns and Allen mug before the NBC microphone


Hormel promoted its Spam processed meat product over The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
Hormel promoted its Spam processed meat product over The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show

Female production line employees put the finishing touches on cases of SPAM (1939)
Female production line employees put the finishing touches on cases of SPAM (1939)

This 1939 advertising supplement by Hormel touted both the loyalty of Hormel employees to their plants and Hormel's loyalty to and importance to their various plant communities. In 1939 fully a quarter of the population of Austin, Minnesota, the company's headquarters was employed by Hormel. Even more noteworthy, given current events, is the highlighted employee's ownership of a two-story home for his family on the wages of a ham-boner.
This 1939 advertising supplement by Hormel touted both the loyalty of Hormel employees to their plants and Hormel's loyalty to and importance to their various plants' communities. In 1939 fully a quarter of the population of Austin, Minnesota, the company's headquarters, was employed by Hormel. Even more noteworthy given current events, is the highlighted employee's ownership of a two-story home for his family on the wages of a ham-boner--a factory ham-boner, not a commercial butcher.

Hormel Spam ad featuring George Burns and Gracie Allen from November 1st 1940
Hormel Spam ad featuring George Burns and Gracie Allen from November 1st 1940

Hormel also promoted its Hormel Chili Con Carne over The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
Hormel also promoted its Hormel Chili Con Carne over The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show

During World War II Hormel instituted two-color packaging for domestic SPAM tins as an economy measure
During World War II Hormel instituted two-color packaging for domestic SPAM tins as an economy measure.


During the mid-1940s forward, a group of 44-60 female ex-GIs toured the U.S. as The Hormel Girls. They also appeared over Radio in several series' of their own.


Premiere spot ad for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show for Hormel and Spam from July 1st 1940
Premiere spot ad for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show for Hormel and Spam from July 1st 1940

Artie Shaw and his orchestra replaced Ray Noble for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
Artie Shaw and his orchestra replaced Ray Noble for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show

The three Smoothies--Rosalind 'Babs' Stuart and brothers Charlie and Little Ryan--served as the vocalists for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
The three Smoothies--Rosalind 'Babs' Stuart and brothers Charlie and Little Ryan--served as the vocalists for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show

Popular West Coast announcer 'Bud' Hiestand was the spokesperson and announcer for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
Popular West Coast announcer 'Bud' Hiestand was the spokesperson and announcer for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show

Announcer Jimmy Wallington replaced Bud Hiestand for the last eight weeks of The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show when it moved the production to New York
Announcer Jimmy Wallington replaced Bud Hiestand for the last eight weeks of The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show when it moved the production to New York


Background

George Burns and Gracie Allen's five seasons over CBS launched a Burns & Allen franchise over Radio, in Film and on Television spanning twenty-six years. Burns & Allen's Radio programs spanned eighteen of those years:

Needless to say, as George Burns and Gracie Allen's fame and popularity continued to rise there were no end of sponsors willing to promote their goods with Burns & Allen as their headliners.

The George Armour Hormel Company sponsors Burns and Allen's ninth Radio program

Though not a newcomer to network Radio, the George A Hormel Company managed to coax George Burns and Gracie Allen away from both Lehn & Fink and CBS for Burns and Allen's ninth outing over Radio. Thus Burns and Allen returned yet again to the National Broadcasting Company's NBC-Red network for The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show for Hormal and Spam.


The promotional film, 'This Is Hormel' documents a plant tour of the Hormel company of the mid-1960s. iPad, iPhone and iPod users can view it here.

Panoramic view of one of the larger Hormel plants of 1939
Panoramic view of one of the larger Hormel plants of 1939

George Armour Hormel's dynasty as a meatpacker of predominately canned meat products began in 1891 as the George A. Hormel and Company. Initially a conventional meatpacking company based in Austin, Minnesota, by 1927 under the leadership of his son Jay, the company expanded into canned ham and beef stew. In 1937 Hormel introduced its iconic 'SPAM' brand, a combination of canned ham and pork shoulder meat. In addition to its various promotional campaigns in Print and Radio, SPAM grew even greater acceptance--or revulsion, as personal tastes reflected--as a staple component of G.I. rations throughout World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam era. Indeed during at least 1943, when the U.S. Mint issued its famous pressing of steel pennies--'steelies'--Hormel produced its SPAM tins in a monocolor theme a wartime economy measure.

In researching George A. Hormel's history we encountered several ambiguities regarding Hormel's birth date, actual age, and actual middle name. All of the biographies we encountered gave Hormel's middle name as 'Albert.' But when we began retrieving specific contemporary news articles from the era we enountered this article from the December 5th 1908 edition of the Austin [Minnesota] Daily Herald:
 

 BIRTHDAY CLUB
 Celebrates Birthday of
George A. Hormel with Large Gathering


      One of the most enjoyable meetings the Birthday club has ever held was that given at the home of A.L. Eberhard Friday evening when Mr. and Mrs. G.F. Baird and Mr. and Mrs. A.L. Eberhard entertained the club.  All members excepting two were present, and Mrs. E.S. Selby, Mrs. Walter Waldron and Bert Sherwood were guests of the club.
     At seven o'clock dinner was served the entire company sitting down to one long table which was extended through living room, hall and den.  Two little roast pigs, brown as berries, and looking as comfortable as in their pens, with ears of corn in their mouths, whetted the appetites of the guests, and abundant justice was done to the elegant dinner served.  A birthday cake bearing forty-eight lighted candles was placed before Mr. Hormel to remind him of his birthday.
     A delightful evening of music and fun followed.
     After dinner when cigars were passed, the following biography of Mr. Hormel was read:
                GEORGE A. HORMEL
      George Armour Hormel was born in Buffalo, N.Y., Dec. 4, 1860, and his mother was greatly pleased when it was announced that she had a son of the 'dairy brand."  Georgie was a most precocious boy and there is reason to believe that his prenatal request was "Put me off at Buffalo."  This made him a Buffalo at a very early age, later he joined the Elks.  Those who saw him in his babyhood say he was a beautiful child.  He was large for his age and soon outgrew his crib, and his little pink toes extended beyond the bottom railing and were much admired by the girls of the neighborhood who came daily to play with Georgie's little toes, and to repeat the old rhyme, "This little pig went to market, this little pig stayed at home."  Whenever this was said little Georgie would yell with delight.  And here we have one of those striking illustrations of the truism, "As the twig is bent, the trees inclined."  The constant repetition of the little pig story found lodgment in the infantile mind and the idea was then conceived of sending little pigs to market, and marking them with Hormel brand before they went.  We find in the life of the child a remarkable series of incidents that all pointed to the life work of the man.  He built packing houses with his child's blocks and vociferiously called for more when he had his toy house as big as he could make it with the blocks at hand.  When given a Noah's Ark he threw them all over the fence except the pigs.  These he cherished with especial care and cornered all the toy pigs of his companions.  If he had had them he would have traded a dozen teddy bears for one little pig.
     Nor was the trait peculiar to his infancy.  When he went to school the first piece he ever spoke was Lamb's Dessertation on a Roast Pig.  When he studied literature he preferred Bacon to Shakespeare and Hogg to Hawthorne.  In Sunday school it is recounted that he shed tears when he was told of the herd of swine that were driven into the sea.  He considered that a wicked waste of good pork.  But that had happened before there were government inspectors to say how much devil was detrimental in food stuff.  He astounded the church elders by his argument against the Mosaic law which declared the pig an unclean animal.  In his old composition books we discovered some of his early poems, showing that Georgie was not always the matter-of-fact business man he is to-day.  Here is one:

"There's music in the moaning pines,
There's music in the leaves,
There's music in the church bell chimes,
There's music in the trees,
There's music in great nature's harp
That stirs the hearts that feel
But nothing stirs my heart so deep,
As when a pig doth squeal".

     Here is another headed, "Thanksgiving":

"Come let us raise a joyful sound,
A sound to beat the band,
And all unite to sound the praise
Of Hormel's Dairy Brand."

     But to the man whose ear was attuned to the music of the pines and the leaves, the thunderings of Niagara were disturbing.  He longed to get away from their noisy demonstration.  At that time Horace Greeley was proclaiming "Go west young man, go west."  George listened to the call and obeyed its summons.  He came to Minnesota.  For a time he did not recognize the golden opportunity about him.  His first demonstration of rare ability was exhibited when he married an Austin Belle.  It takes a good head to pick out a good wife.  There are a lot of men in Austin with good heads.  It often seems that the men make better selections than their wives do.  But this is not a history of the Birthday club but a biography.  From the time of George's marriage his success began to be marked.  He built a packing house one year, added to it the next, then added to it the next year, and the next and the next and the next and he is still adding.  This year he built an office.  It is the story of the playing blocks all over again.  He still wants more blocks and he still wants more pigs.     Mr. Hormel's politics is best expressed by a little poem found on his desk during the last campaign:

"I care not if a candidate,
Eats pie with a knife or fork,
But I never vote for any man
Who won't eat pork."

     Mr. Hormel has had the honor of being a member of our city council, but it is not true that he learned his business methods while on that board.  He made a splendid alderman and was never re-elected.  But he was later chosen a member of the light and power board.  The council thought that a man who could make money out of pig squeals could perhaps make a municipal plant pay and he did.
     Personally Mr. Hormel is blessed with a sunny, amiable temper.  His associates all testify to that strong characteristic of the man.  Things may go wrong, machinery break, orders not be filled, the markets may go cris cros, but you can count on his smile at the buffets of fortune and his song, "Keep Sweet," rising above the din of the packing house.  None but the most confirmed optimist can take trouble and vexations with so light a heart as George Armour Hormel.
     While not a society man or a huge success as a parlor gladiator, he has taken a deep interest in the Birthday club.  In an unpublished interview he gave the following as his reason:  "You have succeeded in getting members into that club with such marvelous appetites, that I am always reminded of the raw material at the packing house, and so it never takes my mind off from business when I go to the Birthday club.  I think it is a club which should be encouraged for I know of no more splendid body of consumers of the face of the earth."
     Such then is the man at 48, in the prime of life.  What the coming years will bring him and make of him can only be conjectured.  That he may prosper and improve and live to celebrate 48 more birthdays is the wish of every member in this club which so gladly does him honor to-night.


Given the typically florid newspaper prose of the era, we were left wondering whether George A Hormel's birthday celebration was more in the vein of a tongue-in-cheek roast as opposed to a conventional birthday observances. "Dairy Brand" referred to in the article was George A Hormel and Company's first registered patent and trademark. Historically intriguing is the author's account of Hormel's middle name as "Armour," which would certainly beg the question as to a possible association with the 'Armour and Company' dynasty of Philip Danforth Armour.

By 1939 Hormel produced 315 distinct products ranging from traditional fresh picnic hams to fertilizer and other production plant by-products. Consistently one of America's most socially and evironmentally conscious Fortune 500 companies, Hormel has remained uncharacteristically loyal to its employees, its hundreds of supporting communities, and the environment. Among its many extraordinary practices over its history, Hormel has:

  • Provided as much as 52 weeks' notice of discharge or layoff to employees during periods of austerity.
  • During World War I Hormel employees bought Liberty bonds and donated an hour's wages per day to the Red Cross. It also began employing females for the first time in the industry.
  • In response to a major labor strike during 1933 Jay C. Hormel instituted numerous innovative labor initiatives such as profit-sharing, the above mentioned 52 weeks' severance notice, merit pay, and a pension plan.
  • Employed 'green' methods of dealing with waste water and waste by-products throughout its hundreds of plants (from as early as 1921).
  • Given back millions of dollars to the communities which have supported its plants in the form of The Hormel Foundation, municipal parks, museums, scholarships and Social Services grants.

From the mid-1930s to the mid-1950s Hormel sponsored several popular variety programs during Radio's Golden Age:

  • 1936 Hormel Chili Beaners
  • 1936 Saturday Night Swing Club
  • 1936 Swing with the Strings
  • 1939-1950 It Happened in Hollywood
  • 1940 The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
  • 1949 Girls' Corps
  • 1949 Hormel Girl's Band
  • 1949 Music With the Hormel Girls

Burns and Allen 'swing' back to NBC for Hormel

Burns and Allen never lacked for great Music talent for their programs over the years. For The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show for Hormel and Spam it was the legendary Swing clarinetist Artie Shaw and his 22-piece orchestra that served up the instrumentals for the new NBC program.

From the March 11th 1941 edition of the Joplin Globe:

NEW YORK DAY BY DAY

BY CHARLES B. DRISCOLL

     New York.—A pleasant lunch, long protracted, at the Algonquin with George Burns and Gracie Allen leaves me with a happy feeling.
     Once more I have been mistaken in an unfair snap judgment and prejudice against people whom I didn't know.
     While I have laughed at Burns and Allen many times, hearing their persistent funny patter on the air and on the stage, I have always thought I didn't like them personally.  Just one of those silly prejudices some of us get about people much in the public eye.
     I couldn't give any reason for not liking these two people, I just didn't like them.  Personally, they would be extremely obnoxious to me, I was sure.
     How unfair and cruel such judgments can be!  Not that Burns and Gracie give a hoot what I thought about them.  Not that I could damage their great popularity by what I thought about them, or even said.
     But it is unfair to oneself to harbor unfounded prejudices.
     Anyway, I've spent two and a half hours talking with two of the most unassuming and charming show people I've ever met, George Burns and his red-headed, bright, intelligent little wife, Gracie Allen.
     The chief impression I carry away from this fortunate luncheon is the modesty and earnest endeavor of the two successful showfolk.
     There is no cockiness about either one of them.  They are as anxious about their jobs as though they were just starting out in life.  They want to please the public; they work hard on their acts, and they have a genuine artist's haunting fear that maybe it won't go over the next time.
     I have seldom met a real artist of any kind who was satisfied with his work, who boasted about his perfection, who went about telling the world how good he was.  That kind of fellow usually has a ghost doing his work.  He is strutting somebody else's stuff.  He isn't an artist, a creator, at all.
     George M. Cohan is one of the most successful theatrical men in all history.
     He is so modest about his work that you might gather from a conversation with him a feeling that he has no faith in himself.  That isn't the case.  He knows what he can do; but he also knows that show business is tricky, and that tomorrow's venture may hang upon one genuine handicap.  You'll never hear Cohan talking about how good he is.  But it is easy to get him to talk about the flops he has been in.
     Gracie Allen has made millions laugh by her professional dumb-bell character on the stage and on the air.
     I hate to disillusion you, but she is one of the most intelligent actresses it has been my good fortune to meet.
     They told me about an experience they had at the White House, when they entertained the president.  I don't know whether they're pro-Roosevelt or anti.  But they had a good time out of their White House appearance.
     George admitted that they were both scared to death.  He said they hated to flop in such distinguished company.  Well, the little audience was friendly and the president laughed immoderately at the gags. The show was a success.
     But then, they didn't know how they should act when Mrs. Roosevelt greeted them after the entertainment, to thank them for coming.
     Even as you and I, these two troupers were embarrassed, befuddled, not knowing what one says to a president's wife.
     So Gracie said, "I saw you once, Mrs. Roosevelt, at So-and-so's dress shop, in New York."
     "Oh, do you buy your clothes there, too?" asked the lady.
     Then they went into a huddle about clothes.  Just two women, going over the old subject again.  George is proud of Gracie for that.
     George told me how he happened to fire his chauffeur.  He never had had a chauffeur before, but he was feeling rich, and he didn't like to drive.
     This one was too obsequious.  George hated the moment when the chauffeur would jump out and open the door for him.  George had always opened his own doors, and felt like a sissy when the English chauffeur did it for him, bowing ever so slightly.  There was always a race to see who could open the door first.
     And George always had the car stopped some distance from the destination, because he didn't want his friends to see him being waited upon by a full-grown man.
     But one day, while walking along Fifty-second street, Manhattan, with a friend, George mentioned the fact that he wanted a cigar and had left his supply in the car.
     The English chauffeur popped right up from the rear, where he had been following, and opened before the astounded George and his friend—a humidor filled with choice cigars.
     "Go back and put that thing in the car, and drive the car home.  And you're fired!" cried the embarrassed
funny man.

(Released by McNaught syndicate. Inc.)


And from the May 2nd 1941 edition of the Oakland Tribune: 

Interviewing
Gracie Allen
Is SO Silly
 Hollywood's No. 1
Flibbertigibbet
Has Writer on Run
 By JOHN TRUESDELL
 
     Hollywood, May 2.--"Gracie Allen and George Burns, will you please take the stand.  Tell me, Miss Allen does -----"
     "Oh, just call me Gracie.  Everyone does--even the garbage man.  If it's good enough for the garbage man, it's good enough for you."
     "Now, Gracie, that wasn't a very tactful way to put it."
     "Georgie, you hush up.  We have a very nice garbage man in Beverly Hills.  He's a sort of a rambling wreck from Georgia collect."
     "Yes, mmmmmmmm.  I see what you mean, Gracie."
     "I beg your pardon, Miss Allen, I don't want to break in on your and George's next week's radio routine.  I only wanted to -----"
     "Oh, you listen to the radio?  Isn't that cute!  Georgie, he listens to the radio."
     "Yes, isn't it."
PLUG FOR HARRIS
     "You know, my Uncle Lester listens to the radio and he's just crazy about Phil Harris.  Speaking of Phil Harris--gee, he's a brawny, big wonderful fellow.  In fact, every time I look at Phil I think--there but for the grace of God goes Georgie."
     "Quiet, Gracie, Quiet!  This man has identified himself as a newspaper man.  What you say he'll print."
     " Oh, you're a printer."
     "No, no, Gracie, he's a writer."
     "I knew a writer once.  What a wonderful fellow!  He wrote with his toes."
     "Wrote with his toes?"
     "Sure.  He didn't have any arms and he'd draw Edinburgh  Castle with his toes on Santa Monica Beach sand and then write with his toes 'Edinburg Castle' right under the picture.  He got a lot of money that way.  People would throw dimes and quarters at him.  Tell me, Mr.----- Mr.----"
     "Call me John."
     "Well, then, tell me, do you write with your -----"
     "No, Gracie, no--don't say it.  Now maybe if you have any more questions for Gracie I had better answer them.  Gracie gets sort of-----well-----sort of mixed up."
     "Thank you, Mr. Burns.  There are one or two more.  Do you think-----"
GRACIE SLIGHTLY FUDDLED
     "Excuse me, Georgie, for breaking in, but there's a question I'd like to ask Mr.-----Mr.-----"
     "Call him John."
     "Don't be silly.  Of course I'll call him John.  We are old friends.  The only thing I wanted to say was--I read your column and I like it, especially when you have something in it about Gracie Allen.  But there are times when I just can't stand it!"
     "All right then, tell him, Gracie.  Be Frank and tell him what it is that you don't like."
     "It's just that sometimes I think his columns are awfully silly."
     "Your witness!"

Series Derivatives:

Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Variety
Network(s): NBC
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 40-07-01 01 Title Unknown
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 40-07-01 to 41-03-24; NBC-Red; Thirty-nine, 30-minute programs, Friday evenings
Syndication: National Broadcasting Company
Sponsors: George A. Hormel and Company [Spam]
Director(s): William Burns, George Burns
Principal Performers: George Burns, Gracie Allen, Bud Hiestand, Artie Shaw, The Smoothies, Cobina Wright, Jr., Mary 'Bubbles' Kelly, Joe Pasternak, Willie Burns, Joe Kearns, Peter Lind Hayes, Gale Gordon, Jack Norton, Cobina Wright, Sr., Beatrice Fairfax,
Recurring Character(s): Artie Shaw Orchestra guitarist, Senor Lee; Mary 'Bubbles' Kelly; Elliott, 'The Sound Man'; Elsie Tralafass; Professor Alvin W. Thorndike, A.B.P.S. M.A. Ph.D [Gale Gordon]; Sadie Smith (alias Fifi LaMont);
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s) George Burns, Willie Burns
Music Direction: The Artie Shaw Orchestra and The Smoothies
Musical Theme(s): "Crazy People" by Artie Shaw
Announcer(s): John 'Bud' Hiestand, Jimmy Wallington [from New York]
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
39
Episodes in Circulation: 28
Total Episodes in Collection: 28
Provenances:

RadioGOLDINdex, Hickerson Guide, vocalgroupharmony.com,

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the RadioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


What you see here, is what you get. Complete transparency. We have no 'credentials' whatsoever--in any way, shape, or form--in the 'otr community'--none. But here's how we did it--for better or worse. Here's how you can build on it yourselves--hopefully for the better. Here are the breadcrumbs--just follow the trail a bit further if you wish. No hobbled downloads. No misdirection. No posturing about our 'credentials.' No misrepresentations. No strings attached. We point you in the right direction and you're free to expand on it, extend it, use it however it best advances your efforts.

We ask one thing and one thing only--if you employ what we publish, attribute it, before we cite you on it.

We continue to provide honest research into these wonderful Golden Age Radio programs simply because we love to do it. If you feel that we've provided you with useful information or saved you some valuable time regarding this log--and you'd like to help us even further--you can help us keep going. Please consider a small donation here:

We don't pronounce our Golden Age Radio research as 'certified' anything. By the very definition, research is imperfect. We simply tell the truth. As is our continuing practice, we provide our fully provenanced research results--to the extent possible--right here on the page, for any of our peers to review--or refute--as the case may be. If you take issue with any of our findings, you're welcome to cite any better verifiable source(s) and we'll immediately review them and update our findings accordingly. As more verifiable provenances surface, we'll continue to update the following series log, as appropriate.

All rights reserved by their respective sources. Article, log, and independent research results copyright 2011 The Digital Deli Online--all rights reserved. Any failure to attribute the results of this copywritten work will be rigorously pursued.

[Date, title, and episode column annotations in
red refer to either details we have yet to fully provenance or other unverifiable information as of this writing. Red highlights in the text of the 'Notes' columns refer to information upon which we relied in citing dates, date or time changes, or titles.]







The Burns and Allen Radio Programs Log | Part Six

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
40-06-26
--
--
40-06-26 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM





40-07-01
1
Artie Shaw Performs 'Frenesi'
N
40-07-01 Wisconsin State Journal - 8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ, WTMJ): premiere of a new series with stooge, "Bubbles" Kelly, the Smoothies, and "new" music by Artie Shaw.

40-07-01 Capital Times
With the arrival in Hollywood of the Smoothies—Babs, Charlie and Little Ryan—to complete the cast of their new program, George Burns and Gracie Allen have prepared a surprise
package of comedy for their broadcast tonight, over WMAQ at 8:30. Orchestra Leader Artie Shaw will present "Frenesi," a Mexican number which he introduced recently
40-07-08
2
Grandpa Allen's Surprise Birthday Party
Y
40-07-08 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30--Burns & Allen--WMAQ WTMJ
40-07-15
3
Title Unknown
N
40-07-10 The Hammond Times
For their new sponsor things are as always and with the rather more convenient time, Spam should be enabled to use the pull of the pair to better advantage than the honey-almond cream concocter. Artie Shaw is less a stooge and more a band leader than the former incumbent, Ray Noble. Shaw was given, the unprecedented opportunity of playing two complete numbers.

40-07-15 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30--Burns & Allen--WMAQ WTMJ
40-07-22
4
Gracie Satirizes Lillian Russell
N
40-07-22 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Gracie satirizes "Lillian Russell"
40-07-29
5
Sandy's Kiddie Party at the Cocoanut Grove
Y
40-07-29 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30--Burns & Allen--WMAQ WTMJ
40-08-05
6
George Auditions for Joe Pasternak
Y
40-08-02 Lowell Sun
THAT WAS A FUNNY ONE.the other night, .in the Burns and Allen program, wasn't it?...Gracie Alien was trying to understand what a tourist is ... George Burns explained:"A tourist is a person who travels from place to place and never stops." ..."Oh," Gracie popped up, "Eleanor Roosevelt!"...

40-08-05 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Joe Pasternak gets ribbed.
40-08-12
7
The Story of Gold Rush Gracie
Y
40-08-11 San Antonio Express
Charlie and Little Ryan, the male two-thirds of the Smoothies, heard on NBC and WOAI's Burns and Allen show, can qualify as amateur marriage brokers. Nine years ago, soon after they started their radio careers as a harmony duo, Charlie and Little Ryan added a girl to the act, and renamed her Babs. Since that time there have been six different girls added to the act and renamed Babs, but so far no girl has lasted longer than two years. Matrimony overtook each one of the six. The present Babs, Rosalind Stuart, has been a member of the trio since the autumn of 1939. So far, she has announced no plans for marriage. Hear Burns and Allen at 8:30 Monday night.

40-08-12 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Minnesota sends two lakes to be named.
40-08-19
8
Piggy-back with Poopsie
Y
40-08-18 San Antonio Express
While Gracie stops to get her breath and George mops his brow Artie Shaw-and the orchestra will clear the air with a Lennie arrangement of "April in Paris' during the Burns and Allen broadcast over NBC and WOAI Monday at 8:30 p. m. As their contribution to the festivities on this date, the Smoothies will give out with "Six Lessons from Madame La Zonga."

40-08-19 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
"April In Paris."

40-08-26
9
Elsie Sues George for Breach of Contract
Y
40-08-26 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Elsie makes Georgie remember a promise.
40-09-02
10
Elsie Tralafass v. Poopsie Burns
Y
40-09-02 Oakland Tribune
6:30 P.M. KPO-Burns and Allen.
40-09-09
11
Calling Millard Byer
Y
40-09-09 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
the traffic case which George won costs him $25, thanks to Gracie.
40-09-16
12
'Dr. Kildare' or 'A Scar Is Born'
Y
40-09-16 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
introducing the dramatics company and "Dr. Kildare."
40-09-23
13
George Writes A Gossip Piece on A Gangster
Y
40-09-23 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Georgie turns newspaperman and columnist.
40-09-30
14
Hughie Salas Proposes to 'Aunt Clara' Burns
Y
40-09-30 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns and Allen--WMAQ WTMJ
40-10-07
15
Hughie Salas Kidnaps George
Y
40-10-07 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
"Aunt Clara" Burns.
40-10-14
16
Gracie is Seen by Professor Thorndike
Y
40-10-14 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns and Allen--WMAQ WTMJ
40-10-21
17
Gracie Psyches the Psychiatrist
Y
40-10-21 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
psychiatrist to be psyched by Gracie.
40-10-28
18
George Has A Bad Dream
Y
40-10-28 Wisconsin State Journal
9-10--Pres. Roosevelt--WENR WMAQ WTMJ

41-10-28 New York Times
Comedy: George Burns and Gracie Allen--WEAF, 7:30-8.
40-11-04
19
George Dates Fifi LaMont of the Follies Bergere
Y
[1940 Elections program]

40-11-04 Wisconsin State Journal
9-10--Pres. Roosevelt--WENR WMAQ WTMJ

41-11-04 New York Times
Comedy: George Burns and Gracie Allen--WEAF, 7:30-8.
40-11-11
20
Gracie's Version of Shakespeare's Henry VIII
Y
40-11-11 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
The Private Life of the Private Wives of King Henry VIII."
40-11-18
21
Thanksgiving At Gracie's
Y
[Thanksgiving Program]

40-11-18 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns & Allen--WTMJ WMAQ
40-11-25
22
Rehearsing the Next Week's Show
Y
40-11-25 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
the cast meets Gracie's folks.
40-12-02
23
George Prepares to Meet the Sponsor
Y
40-12-02 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
the "Perfect" broadcast for the sponsor.

Gale Gordon
as Mr. Phillips

40-12-03 The San Antonio Light
Gracie A!len with partner George Burns and others will assist the United States navy in its recruiting drive with a special broadcast over N. B. C. late today (WOAI—5).
The program will originate from the United State Naval Training station in San Diego, Calif. After George and Gracie are introduced to the 5000 navy enlisted men, they will join Lieutenant Commander Perry Wood in revealing Gracie's uncopyrighted plan for increasing enlistments.
The Smoothies, Babs, Charlie and Little, and Senor Lee, guitarist, also will take part.
40-12-09
24
How George Got His Black Eye(s)
Y
40-12-09 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
a description of the Navy by Gracie.
40-12-16
25
Gracie's Latest, Greatest Play Episode 1
Y
40-12-16 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns & Allen--WTMJ WMAQ
40-12-23
26
Gracie's Latest, Greatest Play Episode 2
Y
[Christmas Program]

40-12-23 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns & Allen--WTMJ WMAQ
40-12-30
27
Gracie Prepares For Christmas--of 1941
N
40-12-30 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Gracie prepares for Christmas--of 1941.
41-01-06
28
Guest Eddie Cantor
N
41-01-06 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Eddie Cantor, guest.
41-01-13
29
George Tries to Impress Cobina Wright, Jr.
Y
41-01-13 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns & Allen--WTMJ WMAQ
41-01-20
30
George's Visits An Art Gallery with Cobina
Y
41-01-20 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
society's Cobina Wright, Jr., continuing in the cast.
41-01-27
31
George Needs His Mink Back from Cobina
Y
41-01-23 Muscatine Journal
Burns and Allen, who planned four broad (comedy) casts from NY, will make it eight.

41-01-27 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Society's Corbina Wright, Jr., brings along her mother, Cobina, Sr., for a visit.
41-02-03
32
On Dad Dearborn's Knee
N
[From Chicago]

41-02-03 Wisconsin State Journal
9 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
climbing on Dad Dearborn's knee in the Windy City.
41-02-10
33
Another New Boy Friend
N
[From New York]

41-02-10 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
as usual Gracie has a new boy friend.
41-02-17
34
Title Unknown
N
41-02-17 Hayward Daily Review
7:30--KPO, Burns and Allen.
41-02-24
35
Beatrice Fairfax Gives Gracie Love Advice
Y
41-02-24 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Beatrice Fairfax gives Gracie and the lovelorn advice.
41-03-03
36
Gracie Goes On Strike . . . For Love
N
39-03-02 Daily Times-Mirror
"Ah Hates Love" Says Gracie
On their program over the NBC-Red network Monday, March 3, at 7:30 p. m. EST. Burns and Allen get into quite a mix-up. It seems that George Burns is trying to break up Grade's romance with Artie Shaw, their bandleader, and Gracie objects. The result is she goes on a love strike.

41-03-03 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WMAQ):
Gracie goes on strike--for love.
41-03-10
37
Title Unknown
N
41-03-10 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns & Allen--WTMJ WMAQ

41-03-17
38
Making Gracie Jealous with Grappling Gertie
Y
[St. Patrick's Day program]

41-03-17 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns & Allen--WTMJ WMAQ
41-03-24
39
Title Unknown
N
41-03-24 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Burns & Allen--WTMJ WMAQ





41-03-31
--
--
41-03-31 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30--Cavalcade of America--WMAQ






The Burns and Allen Radio Programs Biographies




Nathan Birnbaum [George Burns]
Vaudeville Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1896-1996)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1932 The Robert Burns Panatela Program
1933 The White Owl Program
1934 The Adventures Of Gracie
1936 The Campbell's Tomato Juice Program
1936 The Campbell's Soup Program
1937 Lux Radio Theatre
1937 The Jell-O Program
1938 The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
1938 Chesterfield Time
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program
1940 The Rudy Vallee Sealtest Show
1941 Well, I Swan
1942 United China Relief
1942 Command Performance
1942 Treasury Star Parade
1943 Command Performance
1943 The Bob Burns Show
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1943 It's Time To Smile
1943 Paul Whiteman Presents
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1943 Mail Call
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1944 The Bakers Of America Show For the Armed Forces
1944 Your All-Time Hit Parade
1944 Birds Eye Open House
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1945 The Eddie Cantor Show
1945 Robert Benchley, Radio Critic
1945 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1945 The Danny Kaye Show
1946 Request Performance
1948 Philco Radio Time
1948 The Eddie Cantor Pabst Blue Ribbon Show
1948 Guest Star
1948 Kraft Music Hall
1949 Gisele Of Canada
1949 The Aldrich Family
1949 The Ammident Show
1951 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 The Bing Crosby Show
1952 The Lucky Strike Program
1952 The Doris Day Show
1964 The Arthur Godfrey Show
Here's To Veterans
George Burns circa 1935
George Burns circa 1935
From the March 10th 1996 edition of the Winnipeg Sunday Free Press:
 
He's gone to meet God--and Gracie
 
By Myrna Oliver
Los Angeles Times
 
     LOS ANGELES — George Burns — the indefatigable entertainer whose staying power became the last, most
endearing gag in a graceful, laughfilled career — died yesterday morning at his home in Beverly Hills.  He was 100 years and 49 days old.
     The comedian, actor, singer and author apparently died of heart failure a few hours after his nurse found him shaking and breathing shallowly in his bed.  His son Ronnie was with him at the end.
     There were no last-second oneliners or pithy sign-offs, said Burns' longtime manager and friend, Irving Fein. But for years, Burns had insisted in gravelly monotone: "I don't believe in dying... It's been done."
     Condolences poured into the Burns home from around the United States, recalling the comedian's many incarnations — as the vaudevillian, the hit radio and television act with his beloved wife Gracie Allen, and as the irascible elder statesman of comedy.
     In a statement, President Clinton called Burns "one of the great entertainers of all time."
     His friend of nearly eight decades, comedian Milton Berle said:  "He's up there in heaven with Gracie, doing their act.  And if I know George, he'll be throwing one-liners at St. Peter."
     Burns had been in ill health since July 1994, when he slipped and fell in the shower at his home in Las Vegas. His frailty caused him to cancel performances celebrating his centenary at the London Palladium and Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas.  He was also too ill with the flu to attend his own 100th birthday bash in January.
     Burns will be buried alongside Allen at a private funeral service Tuesday at Forest Lawn cemetery here, Fein said.  A public memorial may be scheduled later.
     "It's been hard to imagine show business before George Burns," said Bob Hope, who now, at 92, becomes comedy's elder statesman.  "Now, it's difficult to imagine show business without him."

Goodnight, Georgie

Show business career began in 1903

The Canadian Press

     George Burns died quietly at age 100 yesterday morning. A sketch:
    
Beginnings: Born Nathan Birnbaum in New York City on Jan. 20, 1896.
    
Early Years: Entered show business in 1903 as member of Peewee Quartet, then began vaudeville in 1905. Formed comedy act with Gracie Allen in 1923.
    
Later Years: Performed for some 90 years.  Career spanned vaudeville, radio (The Burns and Allen Show), movies, television (The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show), nightclubs, best-selling books, recordings and video. Made first feature film with Allen in 1932, The Big Broadcast.
    
Married: Had two children, son and daughter, with Allen, whom he wed in Cleveland in 1926.
    
Awards: Won Grammy in 1991 for best spoken-word recording for excerpts from Gracie:  A Love Story.  Won Oscar for the aging vaudevillian in the 1975 film The Sunshine Boys.
    
Quotes: On retirement:"I can't afford to die when I'm booked."
     On why he was considered sexy:  "I've been longer at it than anyone else."
     On age: "I've reached the point where I get a standing ovation for just standing."


Burns exits enduring,
endearing career

By Charles Champlin
Los Angeles Times

     LOS ANGELES - George Burns, who died yesterday at the still-extraordinary age of 100, made it seem for a while as if he had no intention of leaving at all.
     With his cigars and martinis and his fondness for the company of pretty young women, he made old age out to be not a grey back bedroom but an extension of the prime of life.  The great achievement of his career may well have been to convince millions, who may have been doubtful, that life begins or begins again, not at 40 but at 79, as his did when he made The Sunshine Boys after a hiatus from the cameras of 36 years.
              
Extraordinary
     His long climb from the lowest rungs of vaudeville to the top and then into radio and television as half of Burns and Allen prepared him, if not later audiences, for his extraordinary and endearing success as a single.
     He remembered that when he and Grade were in vaudeville, he learned to go onstage with a cigar before the audience arrived, to test the prevailing drafts, so he could stand downwind from Gracie.  He had learned that audiences resented him when the cigar smoke went in Gracie's face.
     He used to claim he had the easiest act in vaudeville, since all he had to do was say "You what?" or "Your brother what?" to trigger Gracie's glorious inanities ("You could have knocked me over with a fender"). The truth was, of course, that George was the ultimate old pro, who quickly saw the appeal of Gracie's chirpy malaprop innocence.
     "Say, good night, Gracie," Burns would say.
     "Good night, Gracie," she would reply.
     Chatting in his Hollywood office a few years ago before going off to do a show in Lafayette, La., he suddenly
called to an assistant, "Phone Lafayette and find the name of the oldest theatre in town.  I'll tell 'em I played there 50 years ago."  After the hard years in tank-town vaudeville, he knew how to win an audience.
              
A trouper
     Burns was a trouper in the old "the-show-must-go-on" tradition.  Only a few years ago, he fell and stripped the skin off one shin, raising a ghastly bruised welt and reducing his gait to a hobble.  He examined it in his Las Vegas dressing room one night after a performance.  I'd have said it was a miracle he could stand, but he'd done an hour with the audience none the wiser about the injury or the pain.
     He was one of the great show business raconteurs, onstage (where his tales were central to his charm) and offstage (where they flowed from an apparently bottomless memory).  As with Alfred Hitchcock, another superb raconteur, it was not always clear where memory left off and imagination began, but it hardly mattered.
     There was always a discernible ring of truth, as in his story about an early partner who could sing but not talk without a heavy stammer.  One night at their boarding house in Altoona (or some such place) the partner ran to George gasping unintelligibly.  "Sing it!" George said he cried.  The partner sang, "We been robbed, we been robbed, we been robbed," to a tune George, for once, could not remember.
     Many of George's stories, public and private, involved his long, dear friendship with Jack Benny.  The game between them was that George could send Jack into hysterics with the lift of an eyebrow, but Jack could not raise a laugh from George, hard as he tried.
     My favorite among the stories was of a long-ago breakfast.  Jack said, "What're you having?"  George said, "Steak and eggs; I'm hungry. What about you?"  "I'm having Cream of Wheat," Jack said.  "Why" George asked, incredulous.  "Because Mary Livingston says it's good for me," Jack explained.  "But steak and eggs are good for you."  "That's right," Jack said defiantly.  When the waiter came, they both had steak and eggs.  When the bill arrived, George said, "You pay it, Jack."  Jack said, "Why should I pay all of it?" "Because if you don't," George
said, "I'll tell Mary you didn't have Cream of Wheat."
     Amazingly, George Burns linked a day before radio, let alone television, with a world of CD-ROMs and cyberspace.  And no small part of the fondness audiences of all ages had for him was that he bespoke times when things seemed simpler, more innocent, less frazzled and cynical, when a few bars of soft-shoe and lines of a foolish
song from an ancient vaudeville act carried a strong and particular magic.
     After Gracie died, George made monthly visits to her grave to bring her up to date on his doings.  Now,
whatever one's theological leanings, it is nice to think of the act reunited.



Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen
Vaudeville Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1895-1964)

Birthplace: San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1932 The Robert Burns Panatela Program
1933 The White Owl Program
1934 The Adventures Of Gracie
1936 The Campbell's Tomato Juice Program
1936 The Campbell's Soup Program
1937 Lux Radio Theatre
1937 The Jell-O Program
1938 The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
1938 Chesterfield Time
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1939 Information Please
1940 The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program
1940 Good News of 1940
1940 The Rudy Vallee Sealtest Show
1940 Fibber McGee and Molly
1941 The New Burns and Allen Show
1942 United China Relief
1942 Command Performance
1942 It's Time To Smile
1942 Treasury Star Parade
1942 Well, I Swan
1943 This Is My Story
1943 The Bob Burns Show
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1943 Paul Whiteman Presents
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1943 Mail Call
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1944 The Bakers Of America Show For the Armed Forces
1944 Your All-Time Hit Parade
1945 The Eddie Cantor Show
1945 Robert Benchley, Radio Critic
1945 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1945 The Danny Kaye Show
1945 Birds Eye Open House
1946 Request Performance
1947 The Jack Carson Show
1947 Songs By Sinatra
1947 Guest Star
1947 Front and Center
1948 Philco Radio Time
1948 The Eddie Cantor Pabst Blue Ribbon Show
1948 Kraft Music Hall
1949 Gisele Of Canada
1949 The Aldrich Family
1949 The AmmiDent Show
1949 The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe
1949 Life With Luigi
1949 The Bing Crosby Show
1949 Suspense
1951 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1952 The Bob Hope Show
1952 The Doris Day Show
Gracie Allen circa 1937
Gracie Allen circa 1937
From the August 28th 1964 edition of the Oakland Tribune:
 
Heart Attack Kills
Gracie Allen at 58
 
     HOLLYWOOD (AP) - Gracie Allen, whose scatterbrained comedy helped make Burns and Allen a top act in show business for 34 years, died last night after a heart attack.  She was 58.
     Spokesmen for the family said Miss Allen died at 11:15 p.m. and that her husband, comedy actor George Burns, was at her side at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital.
     Contacted at the Burns home in Beverly Hills, William Burns, George's brother, said the popular comedienne had been in seemingly good health before being stricken.
MILD ATTACK
     He said she had experienced mild heart attacks in the past.  They didn't, however, seem to slow her down much.  Ten days ago she and her husband were among the guests at the gala wedding reception for Edie Adams and her new husband Marty Mills.
     She appeared effervescent and cheerful, as she has been since her retirement in 1958.
     Until then, the strain of sustaining her nitwit role sometimes made her tense and withdrawn.
REAL ACTRESS
     At the time of her retirement, Burns explained why she quit:  "She's never missed acting for a minute.  She never was a ham, anyway.  Most actors are aware of playing to an audience.  Not Gracie.  The side of the stage toward the audience was a wall to her.  She concentrated only on what she had to say and never gave a thought to cameras or lights or makeup or anything.
     "She deserved a rest.  She had been working all her life, and her lines were the toughest in the world to do. They didn't make sense, so she had to memorize every word.  It took a real actress.
     "Every spare moment — in bed, under the hair dryer — had to be spent in learning lines.  Do you wonder that she's happy to be rid of it?"
     Miss Allen was born in 1906, the year of the great earthquake in San Francisco.  Named Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, she was one of four daughters of Edward Allen, a song and dance man then booked in San Francisco.
     At 3 1/3, she had made her stage debut but she continued in Catholic schools until she was 14, when she began a dancing act with her three older sisters.
     Later, she joined an Irish song and dance act and at one time went to secretarial school in Hoboken, N.J.  It was in New Jersey that she met George.
     Born Nathan Birnbaum in 1896 Burns had been through the vaudeville mill and claims to have weathered 50 partners before encountering Gracie.
     She saw him on a bill at Union Hill, N.J., where he was booked as Burns and Lorraine.  They met after the show and George revealed he was seeking a new partner.  He suggested that Gracie join him.
REWROTE THE ACT
     Gracie recalled later "Of course George had written this act for himself, with himself as the comedian and I as the straight man but the funny thing -- my straight lines got the laughs.  People laughed twice as hard at my not being funny as they laughed at George's being funny.  When we came of after the first show, he said, 'We're switching parts, Gracie.'  He rewrote the act then and there."
     Burns and Allen played vaudeville for three years hefore he was able to convince her they should get married. They were wed in Cleveland on Jan. 7, 1926.
INTO BIG TIME
     After their marriage they were propelled into the big time.
     They became headliners in vaudeville and starred on the bill that ended Vaudeville at New York's Palace Theater.  After guest-starring on Rudy Vallee and Guy Lombardo radio programs, they began their own show on Feb 15. 1932.
     Their career continued in radio and television until Gracie's retirement.
     They also appeared in such movies as "Big Broadcast of 1932," "International House," "Love in Bloom," "Damsel in Distress," "College Swing," "Honolulu" and ' The Gracie Allen Murder Case."
     George once analyzed his wife's humor "Gracie is not really crazy, if she were, we couldn't get a day's work."




Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Burns and Allen Part 6