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original Burns and Allen Programs Part 5 header art

The Burns and Allen Radio Programs | Part Five

Dee-Scription: Home >> D D Too Home >> Radio Logs >> Burns and Allen Part 5

The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program was intially broadcast twice each Wednesday night on the East Coast--first at 7.30 p.m. then rebroadcast at 10.30 p.m. (LIFE, October 9th 1939)
The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program was intially broadcast twice each Wednesday night on the East Coast--first at 7.30 p.m. then rebroadcast at 10.30 p.m. (LIFE, October 9th 1939)

Hinds Honey and Almond Cream LIFE ad promoting Burns and Allen from January 29th 1940
Hinds Honey and Almond Cream LIFE ad promoting Burns and Allen from January 29th 1940

Gracie Allen declared her candidacy for President under the Surprise Party banner
Gracie Allen declared her candidacy for President under the Surprise Party banner during Episode No. 22 of The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program

One of several of the slogans of the Surprise Party, 'Down with Common Sense' was often substituted with 'It's In the Bag'
One of several of the slogans of the Surprise Party, 'Down with Common Sense' was often substituted with 'It's In the Bag'

Candidate Gracie poses with the official Surprise Party Mascot, Laura the Kangaroo
Candidate Gracie poses with the official Surprise Party Mascot, Laura the Kangaroo

Gracie's Campaign Train for the Surprise Party made at least thirty-three whistlestops between Union Station in Los Angeles and Union Station in Omaha.
Gracie's Campaign Train for the Surprise Party made at least thirty-three whistlestops between Union Station in Los Angeles and Union Station in Omaha.

Candidate Gracie's Surprise Party Convention Show was held at the Ak-Sar-Ben Coliseum
Candidate Gracie's Surprise Party Convention Show was held at the Ak-Sar-Ben Coliseum

Postcard of Ak-Sar-Ben Coliseum circa 1930
Postcard of Ak-Sar-Ben Coliseum circa 1930

Here's the cover of our own First Edition of Gracie Allen's first book, 'How to Become President' from 1940
Here's the cover of our own First Edition of Gracie Allen's first book, 'How to Become President' from 1940

Gracie Allen donated the proceeds of the sale of her book to the American Red Cross
Gracie Allen donated the proceeds of the sale of her book to the American Red Cross

Here's a sample illustration from Gracie's book--'REQUIRED SHAPES FOR MEN PRESIDENTS'
Here's a sample illustration from Gracie's book--'REQUIRED SHAPES FOR MEN PRESIDENTS'

Spot ad for Hinds Honey and Almond Lotion with a collectable autograph of Gracie Allen
Spot ad for Hinds Honey and Almond Lotion with a collectable autograph of Gracie Allen

Elegant British society band leader Ray Noble moved to CBS with Burns and Allen for The Hinds Honey and Almond Program
Elegant British society band leader Ray Noble moved to CBS with Burns and Allen for The Hinds Honey and Almond Program

Tenor Frank Parker returned for song stylings with Burns and Allen
Tenor Frank Parker returned for song stylings with Burns and Allen

Popular announcer Truman Bradley acted as the spokesperson for Hinds and foil for Burns and Allen. He opened each Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program with 'Hello-tion!'
Popular announcer Truman Bradley acted as the spokesperson for Hinds and foil for Burns and Allen. He opened each Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program with 'Hello-tion!'

Most of us--'of a certain age'--more closely identify Truman Bradley with Frederick Ziv's Science Fiction Theatre (1955-1957) over Television. He's seen here with 'Garco' the Robot.
Most of us--'of a certain age'--more closely identify Truman Bradley with Frederick Ziv's Science Fiction Theatre (1955-1957) over Television. He's seen here with 'Garco' the Robot.

Background

George Burns and Gracie Allen's five seasons over CBS launched a Burns & Allen franchise over Radio, in Film and on Television spanning twenty-six years. Burns & Allen's Radio programs spanned eighteen of those years:

Needless to say, as George Burns and Gracie Allen's fame and popularity continued to rise there were no end of sponsors willing to promote their goods with Burns & Allen as their headliners.

Lehn & Fink sponsor Burns and Allen eighth Radio outing

Lehn & Fink's popular emoluments and hand creams had steadily risen in popularity throughout the first half of the 20th Century. Lehn & Fink also promoted their Lysol, Pebeco Toothpaste and Tussy brands over Radio:

  • 1935 Amateur Gentleman [Leslie Howard Theatre]
  • 1935 Club Romance
  • 1935 The Life of Mary Southern
  • 1936 Between the Bookends
  • 1939 The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program
  • 1945 Blind Date

CBS brings Burns and Allen back into the fold for Hinds

One of the more unlikely duos to achieve Entertainment World super-stardom, Jewish-born Nat Birnbaum [Stage name George Burns] and Irish Catholic-born Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen grew up worlds apart in myriad ways. Nat from New York and Grace from San Francisco found each other in New Jersey, Birnbaum performing a vaudeville act with then partner Lorraine. Grace reportedly approached Birnbaum after his 'Burns & Lorraine' act about working in vaudeville and 'George Burns' offered her a suggestion that she work with him. That was 1922. The act became a couple, and the couple married shortly after meeting. Continuing to slug it out in vaudeville for another five years, Burns & Allen soon caught the attention of the Film Industry and its search for comedy teams for its growing production of 'talkies' of the era. Burns & Allen were featured in several Vitaphone Shorts of the era, eventually leading them into featured guest appearances over network Radio. As the guest appearances grew more frequent, Burns & Allen's novel 'dumb Dora' act acquired exponentially more fans.

Gracie's 1940 Presidential Campaign for the 'Surprise Party'

Gracie Allen first launched her Presidential run under the auspicies of The National Weekend Party

During the Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program broadcast of the evening of February 28th 1940, Gracie announced her candidacy for President of the United States running under her newly established 'Surprise Party.' Asked about the name she gave to her new political party she stated that though her Mom was a Democrat and her father a Republican, Gracie had been born a Surprise.

While Eddie Cantor and Will Rogers had previously thrown their own hats into the Presidential Ring over Radio, Gracie's Presidential run would prove to generate even greater and wider interest throughout America. Her two slogans for the run were "Grace the White House with Gracie" and "It's In the Bag."

The gimmick proved so popular that Gracie found herself making the rounds of other popular Radio programs of the era to campaign, among them:

  • The Jell-O Program with Jack Benny
  • The Johnson Wax Program with Fibber McGee and Molly
  • The Texaco Star Theatre with Ken Murray
  • Dr. I.Q. The Mental Banker

From the March 1st 1940 edition of the Oakland Tribune: 

CURTAIN CALLS:  CARRILLO
HAS POLITICAL COMPETITION
 Gracie Allen's Proposed
Race for Presidency of
U.S. Leaves Soanes Cold
 By WOOD SOANES
 
     While Leo Carrillo is out to garner some free publicity for himself by announcing his candidacy for Governor of the sovereign State of California, Gracie Allen has decided to run for President of these United States.
     Miss Allen, with characteristic disregard for formality decided not to wait until after the election to say "Nuts to the voters!" she said it before the poll and managed to obtain 864 signatures to petition for the presidential nomination.
     Professional petition circulators established themselves on Hollywood street corners the other day with blank petitions and two bags of nuts.  Every time a bona fide voter signed the petition he was given a handful of nuts.  In 40 minutes 800 signed.  "That," observed Miss Allen when she recived the returns, "is as much support as some of the actual candidates seem to have.  So maybe I really should run for President."
     I suppose I'm a hopeless old fogy, but somehow this and the other gags that are supposed to be so hilarious during presidential campaigns seem to me in very poor taste.  After all, the offices of Governor and President are about the highest within our gift.
     There are undoubtedly a number of persons who sincerely believe that Leo Carrillo would be a good Governor and that he possesses the necessary qualifications to serve the State where his forebears lived and died long before it was in the Union.
     There may even be some who feel that Miss Allen has sufficient native shrewdness to warrant her removal from nitwit radio programs to the chair occupied by Washington and Lincoln.  Somehow I feel that the project is tainted with effrontery.
     It wasn't so long ago that this same comedienne was involved in a rather smelly enterprise having to do with the smuggling of gems into this country in an effort to avoid taxes.  Surely that wasn't a press agent stunt, too! . . .

It should come as no surprise that Gracie's short-lived campaign left some wonderful malaprops and erstwhile Suprise Party planks in its wake:

  • Gracie boasted that America's $43 Billion National Debt of the era was "the biggest in the world."
  • On the Neutrality Bill before Congress her position was "If we owe it let's pay it!"
  • Gracie was also uncharacteristically supportive of arch Right Wing Representative Martin Dies' ever-expanding witchhunt committee. Of Dies Red-baiting comte. Gracie observed "If we didn't keep going [with it], who'd color our Easter eggs?"
  • On the question of recognizing Russia, Gracie opined "I don't know . . . I meet so many people."
  • She also stated flatly that she'd "make no fireside chats from the White House between April 15th and October 15th", declaring "Washington is awfully hot in Summer."
  • Gracie proposed doing away with campaign buttons in favor of sew-on campaign messages, "the better to discourage supporters from changing their minds" about her candidacy.
  • She adopted a female kangaroo by the name of "Laura" as the Surprise Party Mascot, citing the fact that 1940 was a Leap Year.
  • Gracie's Surprise Party campaign ditty--composed by Charles Henderson-- was "Vote For Gracie," one refrain of which was "If the country's going Gracie, so can you."
  • Gracie announced the location of her Surprise Party Convention to be Omaha, Nebraska from May 15th to May 18th, making it the first National Party convention of the year.
  • Gracie received a political endorsement from Harvard University.
  • Gracie undertook a whistlestop campaign aboard the private car of W. Averell Harriman, Chairman of the Board of the Union Pacific Railroad. The whistlestop campaign took them from Union Station in Los Angeles to Omaha's Union Station, stopping at numerous byways enroute.

Collaborator Charles Henderson wrote 'Vote for Grace' for Gracie Allen's short-lived Presidential Campaign
Collaborator Charles Henderson wrote 'Vote for Grace' for Gracie Allen's short-lived Presidential Campaign

From the May 9th 1940 edition of the Spokane Daily Chronicle:

Gracie Allen Swoops Toward Nebraska
in Whirlwind Presidency Campaign

 Band, Wise Crackers
Included Among
Her Props.
 
     HOLLYWOOD, May 9, (UP)--That silver-tongued orator, servant of the people, sterling politician, friend of the poor and especially of the rich, Gracie Allen, headed on a whirlwind trip to Omaha today for her nomination as president of the United States.
     Her special train will meander into Nebraska four days hence.  Candidate Allen said she couldn't go any faster because she had to make 31 rear platform speeches enroute about something that Garner, Taft, Dewey and the others have forgotten.
     "They do not realize," thundered the spearhead of the Surprise party in a soprano voice, "that a full half of the married people in America--I repeat--a full half, are women."
     Candidate Allen took with her a full staff of writers of wise cracks, an imitation kangaroo, a 50-piece band, and four press agents, including Miss Pauline Swanson, beautiful blonde.
               Beautiful Agent Useful.
     "If more candidates had more beautiful press agents," Miss Allen said in an off-the-record-don't-quote-me interview, "there probably wouldn't be anything in the papers about them at all.  And what a great relief that would be."
     As for the wise-crack authors, Candidate Allen said she understood some of the other presidential candidates hired speech writers, too.
     "Only they use Joe Miller's book," she said.  "We have fresh jokes."
     According to the publicists, who don't much care whom they quote, Postmaster General James A. Farley will make the nomination speech.
               Nut for Squirrels.
     Once  she gets to the White House she's going to make some drastic reforms.  She intends to plant nut trees, for the squirrels.  She's going to paint the executive mansion sky blue because the people are tired of looking at it white; install a ping-pong table in the east room for exercise, and cover the chairs in the house of representatives in chintz.
     She also intends to eliminate Washington's smoke-filled rooms, locked doors, lime lights, and little black books for the following reasons:
     1.  She doesn't smoke.
     2.  On account of the fire hazard.
     3.  Lime light is hard on a President's complexion.
     4.  She likes books with pictures.

And there was this from the May 15th 1940-05 edition of the Gallup Independent:

Gracie Allen's Presidential Campaign Is Giving
Rise To Some Issues Never Heard Of Before


     OMAHA, Neb., May 15 (AP)--Gracie Allen, who will be nominated the "Surprise" party's candidate for president at its convention (don't take it seriously) Friday, disclosed today a platform she says can't be beat.
     As a matter of fact it can't even be understood.
     The radio and film comedienne and her husband, George Burns, are the feature attraction of Omaha's second annual Golden Spike Days celebration, of which the convention is a high-light.
               On Foreign Relations
     Opening with her opinion on foreign relations, Miss Allen said in an interview "Well, they're all right with me. Only when they come they've just got to bring their own bedding."
     The farm problem is simple--"All you need is aspirin and horse liniment.  I'll have every farmers' parity, and shall insist on larger fields so that the poor old asparagus won't have to grow standing up."
     As for pension plans, Gracie applies a bit of reverse technique.  She confided she wants to give old age to everyone with a pension.
     If she gets to the White House, she plans lots of interviews with the press, but she'll stay in the west wing while the reporters stay in the east wing.
               No Misquoting
     "That way they'll never be able to misquote me," she explained.  "It's just like telephones.  I simply never answer them, that's what they were made for, you know."
     Even the White House will be changed.  There will be elevators that run horizontally, "around and around," and an ostrich farm out in back so that at the annual Easter egg hunt, "If the little kiddies can't find any of them, then I'll make the ostriches come out and sit on the eggs.  I just love children."
     The Surprise party's candidate for president waved gaily at several thousand supporters who flocked into the Union station to greet her Tuesday afternoon, accepted a bouquet of flowers, then remarked:
     "These must be Republican blossoms--they look a little Dewey."
     That indicates the general idea of the fun and nonsense Omahans and visitors to the city are promised during the Golden Spike Days celebration.


In a followup to the coverage of Gracie's Omaha event, the Gallup Independent posted this in its May 16th 1940 edition: 

Gracie Allen In 'Fireside Chat' 
      OMAHA. Neb., May 16 (AP) Gracie Allen, the Surprise parly's candidate for president, indulged in a fireside chat last night, and if all her listeners didn't warm up to her ideas—well, you know Gracie.
     Good-humored, portly Irish Dan Butler, mayor of Omaha, fed Gracie her gags in a nationwide (CBS) radio broadcast, witnessed by several thousand Omahans at the Ak-Sar-Ben coliseum as a feature of the Golden Spike Days celebration.
     For his reward the mayor got a kiss and a promise that if elected, Gracie would appoint him secretary of the interior "so we can have some X-ray pictures taken together."
     She spurned his offer to call him Dan "because you can't say Dan over the radio."
     Gracie promised, if elected, to put up a few jars of "federal reserves" and scrub floors to prove she can manage the house of representatives.
     Instead of treaties with Europe and Asia, she will substitute "treaties with sugar and cream," and because she likes Mayor Butler so well she will decline any new proposals from Senator Wagner.
     About that time the mayor asked for an aspirin, and got the kiss.
     Tonight Omaha witnesses a torchlight parade on behalf of Gracie's campaign, and the convention proper will be held Friday night.
     The celebration ends Saturday night with grand ball.

Given the current political landscape it would appear that Gracie Allen launched her Presidential campaign about 71 years too early. We're willing to bet that anyone who could perfectly channel Gracie Allen this election cycle would run away with the election. Of course as noted above, America was in debt only $48 Billion in 1940 as compared to the $65 Trillion of America's current long-term indebtedness. Even adjusting for inflation, that would be $625 Billion as compared to $65 Trillion.

Even more ironic, Gracie Allen herself would unquestionably be taken more seriously today than the likes of Sarah Palin, Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry, Newt Gingrich, or Herman Cain. Gracie was definitely onto something--simply seven decades ahead of her time. But given today's toxic political climate, George Burns' own legal problems of 1939 and 1940 might well have derailed a Gracie Allen run for the Presidency today. Within weeks of each other during 1939, George Burns and Jack Benny were under a grand jury indictment for trafficking in smuggled jewelry, and Burns was under investigation by the I.R.S. for tax evasion. No doubt the welcome diversion of Gracie's 'Presidential run' helped to distract from George's legal misfortunes of the era.

It would appear that not everyone enjoyed Gracie Allen's brilliant parody of a race for the White House. Here's a countervailing critique from the July 3rd 19 edition of the Oakland Tribune:

CURTAIN CALLS:  BAD TASTE
OF GAG DAWNS ON GRACIE


Professional Flagwaving
At Its Worst in Phony
Campaign for President

By WOOD SOANES

     It took some time for the light to penetrate, but Gracie Allen has finally become aware of the bad taste involved in her gag campaign for president.
     Not, to be sure, before she had collected a great deal of free publicity on a Coast-to-Coast tour and managed to write a book on the subject of her candidacy.
     At any rate Miss Allen called the gentlemen of the press together the other day and observed:
     "I've carried the joke far enough.  Fun is fun but the sacred right of franchise under the American Constitution is nothing to be trifled with.
     "This is a presidential year and we are on the eve of selecting a President in the gravest period of our history.  Every American should consider casting his 1940 presidential vote the greatest privilege of his life.
     "Nowhere else in the world would a comedy treatment of a presidential campaign be permitted.  No one knows better than I that in Europe such a mock race would have landed me and my husband in serious trouble.  Thank God that America still has its democracy--and its sense of humor."
      I'm afraid that America's sense of humor isn't quite as elastic as Miss Allen hopes.
     There was a good deal of resentment about the gag from the very first.  I know that I treated the plan with considerable rancour in these columns and found, to my astonishment, that more people were in agreement than I suspected.
     Other writers, too, pointed out the bad form involved, but Paramount or Miss Allen's radio sponsors persisted in pursuing the idea.  I don't know who was actually responsible.  It may even have been Miss Allen who seems to be taking the blame as she originally took the credit.
     This seems quite unlikely, however, since radio and screen actors do pretty much what they are told, and they are uniformly eager to do anything from a handstand at Hollywood and Vine to the tedious business of reading a book if it will guarantee them an extra inch of space in the newspapers.
     Yet even if they viewed the rages of the drama commentators as sour grapes, both Miss Allen and her husband, George Burns, should have been able to detect a feeling of resentment in the reception of their idea on the tour which was anything but a successful good will tour.
     However, it is all over now, and it is to be hoped that Hollywood and the radio people have learned something from the contretemps.
     There are still a great many citizens left in these United States who can't see anything funny in a travesty on the office of President.  It is their inalienable right to disagree with the incumbent and his policies, but they separate the man from the position in their mind's eye.
     Many of us, too, are irked by the business of professional flagwaving, a trick evolved by George M. Cohan in his salad days as a song-and-dance man to bring audiences to their feet as he finished his turn.  The original idea was seized upon and expanded until it grew out of all proportions.
     Perhaps the topper of the flagwaving schemes will come tomorrow when Gene Autry, the singing cowboy of the films, takes to the boulevards of Hollywood wearing a suit contrived of American flags.
     If that isn't the height of bad taste, then my sense of values is distorted.
     Going back to Miss Allen and her observation that nowhere else in the world would a comedy treatment of a presidential campaign be permitted, she is right for once.  But I don't attribute it, as she did, to the democracy of the United States as much as to our National tolerance of stupidity.


One of the more caustic and Conservative columnists of the era, Wood Soanes was one of the isolationist 'America First' proponents of the era, vehemently opposed to America's entry into World War II. As must be apparent from his other bylines in this series of articles, Soanes was not a great fan of Progressives or Progressive artists of the era. What remains obvious from all of Soanes' critiques of the era is that he was no fan of Burns and Allen. Nor, apparently, was he possessed of either a sense of irony or sense of humor. If Eleanor Roosevelt herself could appreciate the irony and cleverness of Gracie's run for prez, we find it somewhat silly of Soanes to have savaged Gracie's efforts in the manner presented.

Series Derivatives:

The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program
Genre: Anthology of Golden Age Radio Variety
Network(s): CBS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 39-10-04 01 Title Unknown
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 39-10-04 to 40-06-26; CBS; Thirty-nine, 30-minute programs, Wednesday evenings (initially at 7:30 pm E.S.T and rebroadcast at 10:30 p.m. E.S.T.)
Syndication: Columbia Broadcasting System
Sponsors: Lehn & Fink [Hinds Honey & Almond Cream]
Director(s):
Principal Performers: George Burns, Gracie Allen, Frank Parker, Ray Noble, Mayor Dan Butler, Mary Kelly,
Recurring Character(s): Mary 'Bubbles' Kelly
Protagonist(s): None
Author(s): None
Writer(s) Willie Burns, Gracie Allen, George Burns
Music Direction: The Ray Noble Orchestra
Musical Theme(s): "The Very Thought of You" by Ray Noble; "Vote for Gracie" by Charles Henderson
Announcer(s): Truman Bradley
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
39
Episodes in Circulation: 14
Total Episodes in Collection: 14
Provenances:

RadioGOLDINdex; Hickerson Guide; "How to Become President" by Gracie Allen (c.1940)

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were the log of the RadioGOLDINdex and newspaper listings.

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The Burns and Allen Radio Programs Log | Part Five

Date Episode Title Avail. Notes
38-09-23
--
--
38-09-23 New York Times
8:30--WABC--Music from St. Louis





39-10-04
1
Title Unknown
N
39-10-04 Wisconsin State Journal
America's favorite Allens--Fred and Gracie--will return to the air tonight after a summer absence.
Gracie's show (WBBM at 6:30) will have George Burns, Ray Noble, and Frank Parker, with Truman Bradley as new announcer.
39-10-11
2
Title Unknown
N
39-10-11 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM
39-10-18
3
Title Unknown
N
39-10-18 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie sings "If I Only Had a Brain."
39-10-25
4
Title Unknown
N
39-10-25 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
George and Gracie sing a duet.
39-11-01
5
Title Unknown
N
39-11-01 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30--Burns and Allen--WCCO WBBM
39-11-08
6
Title Unknown
N
39-11-08 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie sings "Put That Down in Writing."
39-11-15
7
Gracie Sobs
N
39-11-15 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie Sobs!
39-11-22
8
A Murder Mystery
N
39-11-22 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
in a murder mystery.
39-11-29
9
A New Invention
N
39-11-29 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
a new invention.
39-12-06
10
Title Unknown
N
39-12-06 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30--Burns and Allen--WCCO WBBM
39-12-13
11
The Missing Link
N
39-12-13 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
the family tree and the missing link.
39-12-20
12
Christmas In July
N
[Christmas Program]

39-12-20 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie puts Christmas in July.
39-12-27
13
Musical Feud
N
39-12-27 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
a musical feud between Gracie, Ray Noble, and Frank Parker, and of course, side lights by Georgie.
40-01-03
14
Title Unknown
N
40-01-03 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30--Burns and Allen--WCCO WBBM
40-01-10
15
Gracie Finds Another Boy Friend
N
40-01-10 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie finds another boy friend.
40-01-17
16
Opera For Gracie
N
40-01-17 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
opera for Gracie.
40-01-24
17
Gracie Turns Census Taker
N
40-01-24 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie turns census-taker.
40-01-31
18
Pastry Rides Again
N
40-01-31 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie offers "Pastry Rides Again."
40-02-07
19
Gracie Canvasses Door-To-Door
N
40-02-07 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
door to door canvassing.
40-02-14
20
Title Unknown
N
40-02-14 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30--Burns and Allen--WCCO WBBM
40-02-21
21
Clothes Make the Man . . . Go Crazy
N
40-02-21 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
clothes make the man go crazy.
40-02-28
22
Gracie Declares her Candidacy for President
Y
[Gracie announces her candidacy for President of the U.S. for her Surprise Party]

40-02-28 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie runs for president.





40-03-03
--
The Jell-O Program: Gracie for President
Y
40-03-03 New York Times
7:00-WEAF--Jack Benny, Comedian

40-03-03 Wisconsin State Journal
6 p.m.--Jack Benny (WIBA, WMAQ):
Gracie Allen keeps her presidenttial campaign going into the Benny program.
40-03-05
--
Johnson Wax Program: Gracie Pays A Visit to Campaign
Y
40-03-05 Wisconsin State Journal
8:30--NBC
Fibber McGee and Molly

40-03-05 New York Times
9:30-WEAF--Fibber McGee and Molly

40-03-06
--
The Texaco Star Theatre: Gracie Visits to Campaign
N





40-03-06
23
Hat's Off to Gracie
Y
40-03-06 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30--Burns and Allen--WCCO WBBM
40-03-13
24
Gracie's Triumphant Return
Y
40-03-13 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie gives the low-down on her Washington visit.
40-03-20
25
Gracie Answers Her Political Mail
N
40-03-20 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie answers the political mail and Frank Parker sings "Kathleen Mine."
40-03-27
26
The Surprise Party Platform
Y
40-03-27 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30--Burns and Allen--WCCO WBBM
40-04-03
27
It's In the Bag
Y
40-04-03 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
"It's in the Bag," the campaign slogan.
40-04-10
28
Gracie Allen Vs. The Census Taker
Y
40-04-10 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie acknowledges college votes.
40-04-17
29
Gracie Hones Her Dallas Variety Club Speech
Y
40-04-17 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
Gracie unveils her convention wardrobe.
40-04-24
30
More Surprise Party Plans
Y
40-04-24 Wisconsin State Journal
6:30 p.m.--Burns and Allen (WBBM):
more "surprise" plans.
40-05-01
31
Gracie Talks About General Johnson's X-Ray
N
40-05-01 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM

40-05-01 The Lima News
George Burns will do something brand new by changing his song from "Ain't Misbehavin"' to "Always Think of Mother" on the Burns and Allen program Wednesday, 6:30 p. m., WABC.
Gracie will talk in general about an x-ray picture she saw of General Hugh Johnson.
40-05-08
32
Leaving For Omaha with Laura--as Aunt Clara
Y
40-05-08 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM

40-05-07 Circleville Herald
George and Gracie and the Burns and Allen troupe will prepare to leave for Gracie's presidential convention in Omaha on the Wednesday, May 8, Burns & Allen program at 6:30 p.m. over CBS. Frank Parker will sing "All the Things You Are," and Ray Nobles band will play "My My."
40-05-15
33
Gracie's Suprise Party Convention In Omaha
Y
40-05-15 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM

40-05-15 Lima News
Dan Butler, Omaha's popular bachelor-mayor, will turn comedian for the day Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. over WABC, when he goes on the Burns and Allen program to pledge support to Gracie whose Surprise Party convention is being held in Omaha this week.
40-05-22
34
Gracie's Acceptance Speech
Y
40-05-22 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM
40-05-29
35
At the San Francisco World's Fair
Y
[From the San Francisco World's Fair on Treasure Island]

40-05-29 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM
40-06-05
36
First Episode of Swiss Family Robinson
N
40-06-05 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM

40-06-08 The Daily Mail
Under an arrangement just effected, the Burns and Allen show will switch from the CBS chain to the NBC network July 1. The Shift also brings a change in sponsors.
40-06-12
37
Second Episode of Swiss Family Robinson
Y
[Father's Day program]

40-06-12 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM

40-06-14 Wisconsin State Journal
When Burns and Allen move their radio show to NBC July 1, Artie Shaw's orchestra will join them.
40-06-19
38
One Million B.C.
N
40-06-19 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM

40-06-19 Lima News
Gracie Allen and George Burns will give their version of the picture "One Million B.C." on the Burns and Allen program, Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. WABC. With Gracie setting the musical pace by singing "What's the Matter With Me," Frank Parker will answer her vocally with "Devil May Care." Ray Noble's orchestra will furnish the musical background.
40-06-26
39
Memories, Memories, Memories
Y
[Last broadcast for Hinds Honey and Almond Cream. Replaced by the George Burns and Gracie Allen Show for Hormel and Spam]

40-06-26 Wisconsin State Journal
5:30--Burns & Allen--WCCO WBBM

40-06-26 Lima News
The entire Burns and Allen cast will join forces in trying to explain to Gracie Allen that she is about to launch a new program for a new sponsor on a new network on the Burns and Allen program Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. Gracie, feeling blue and alone sings "I'm Nobody's Baby" and Frank Parker will sing "I'll See You Again." Ray Noble's farewell number will be "Hold My Hand."





40-07-01
--
--
40-07-01 New York Times
7:30-WEAF--Burns and Allen, Comedians; Shaw Orchestra






The Burns and Allen Radio Programs Biographies




Nathan Birnbaum [George Burns]
Vaudeville Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1896-1996)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1932 The Robert Burns Panatela Program
1933 The White Owl Program
1934 The Adventures Of Gracie
1936 The Campbell's Tomato Juice Program
1936 The Campbell's Soup Program
1937 Lux Radio Theatre
1937 The Jell-O Program
1938 The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
1938 Chesterfield Time
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program
1940 The Rudy Vallee Sealtest Show
1941 Well, I Swan
1942 United China Relief
1942 Command Performance
1942 Treasury Star Parade
1943 Command Performance
1943 The Bob Burns Show
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1943 It's Time To Smile
1943 Paul Whiteman Presents
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1943 Mail Call
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1944 The Bakers Of America Show For the Armed Forces
1944 Your All-Time Hit Parade
1944 Birds Eye Open House
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1945 The Eddie Cantor Show
1945 Robert Benchley, Radio Critic
1945 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1945 The Danny Kaye Show
1946 Request Performance
1948 Philco Radio Time
1948 The Eddie Cantor Pabst Blue Ribbon Show
1948 Guest Star
1948 Kraft Music Hall
1949 Gisele Of Canada
1949 The Aldrich Family
1949 The Ammident Show
1951 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1951 The Bing Crosby Show
1952 The Lucky Strike Program
1952 The Doris Day Show
1964 The Arthur Godfrey Show
Here's To Veterans
George Burns circa 1935
George Burns circa 1935
From theMarch 10th 1996 edition of the Winnipeg Sunday Free Press:
 
He's gone to meet God--and Gracie
 
By Myrna Oliver
Los Angeles Times
 
     LOS ANGELES — George Burns — the indefatigable entertainer whose staying power became the last, most
endearing gag in a graceful, laughfilled career — died yesterday morning at his home in Beverly Hills.  He was 100 years and 49 days old.
     The comedian, actor, singer and author apparently died of heart failure a few hours after his nurse found him shaking and breathing shallowly in his bed.  His son Ronnie was with him at the end.
     There were no last-second oneliners or pithy sign-offs, said Burns' longtime manager and friend, Irving Fein. But for years, Burns had insisted in gravelly monotone: "I don't believe in dying... It's been done."
     Condolences poured into the Burns home from around the United States, recalling the comedian's many incarnations — as the vaudevillian, the hit radio and television act with his beloved wife Gracie Allen, and as the irascible elder statesman of comedy.
     In a statement, President Clinton called Burns "one of the great entertainers of all time."
     His friend of nearly eight decades, comedian Milton Berle said:  "He's up there in heaven with Gracie, doing their act.  And if I know George, he'll be throwing one-liners at St. Peter."
     Burns had been in ill health since July 1994, when he slipped and fell in the shower at his home in Las Vegas. His frailty caused him to cancel performances celebrating his centenary at the London Palladium and Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas.  He was also too ill with the flu to attend his own 100th birthday bash in January.
     Burns will be buried alongside Allen at a private funeral service Tuesday at Forest Lawn cemetery here, Fein said.  A public memorial may be scheduled later.
     "It's been hard to imagine show business before George Burns," said Bob Hope, who now, at 92, becomes comedy's elder statesman.  "Now, it's difficult to imagine show business without him."

Goodnight, Georgie

Show business career began in 1903

The Canadian Press

     George Burns died quietly at age 100 yesterday morning. A sketch:
    
Beginnings: Born Nathan Birnbaum in New York City on Jan. 20, 1896.
    
Early Years: Entered show business in 1903 as member of Peewee Quartet, then began vaudeville in 1905. Formed comedy act with Gracie Allen in 1923.
    
Later Years: Performed for some 90 years.  Career spanned vaudeville, radio (The Burns and Allen Show), movies, television (The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show), nightclubs, best-selling books, recordings and video. Made first feature film with Allen in 1932, The Big Broadcast.
    
Married: Had two children, son and daughter, with Allen, whom he wed in Cleveland in 1926.
    
Awards: Won Grammy in 1991 for best spoken-word recording for excerpts from Gracie:  A Love Story.  Won Oscar for the aging vaudevillian in the 1975 film The Sunshine Boys.
    
Quotes: On retirement:"I can't afford to die when I'm booked."
     On why he was considered sexy:  "I've been longer at it than anyone else."
     On age: "I've reached the point where I get a standing ovation for just standing."


Burns exits enduring,
endearing career

By Charles Champlin
Los Angeles Times

     LOS ANGELES - George Burns, who died yesterday at the still-extraordinary age of 100, made it seem for a while as if he had no intention of leaving at all.
     With his cigars and martinis and his fondness for the company of pretty young women, he made old age out to be not a grey back bedroom but an extension of the prime of life.  The great achievement of his career may well have been to convince millions, who may have been doubtful, that life begins or begins again, not at 40 but at 79, as his did when he made The Sunshine Boys after a hiatus from the cameras of 36 years.
              
Extraordinary
     His long climb from the lowest rungs of vaudeville to the top and then into radio and television as half of Burns and Allen prepared him, if not later audiences, for his extraordinary and endearing success as a single.
     He remembered that when he and Grade were in vaudeville, he learned to go onstage with a cigar before the audience arrived, to test the prevailing drafts, so he could stand downwind from Gracie.  He had learned that audiences resented him when the cigar smoke went in Gracie's face.
     He used to claim he had the easiest act in vaudeville, since all he had to do was say "You what?" or "Your brother what?" to trigger Gracie's glorious inanities ("You could have knocked me over with a fender"). The truth was, of course, that George was the ultimate old pro, who quickly saw the appeal of Gracie's chirpy malaprop innocence.
     "Say, good night, Gracie," Burns would say.
     "Good night, Gracie," she would reply.
     Chatting in his Hollywood office a few years ago before going off to do a show in Lafayette, La., he suddenly
called to an assistant, "Phone Lafayette and find the name of the oldest theatre in town.  I'll tell 'em I played there 50 years ago."  After the hard years in tank-town vaudeville, he knew how to win an audience.
              
A trouper
     Burns was a trouper in the old "the-show-must-go-on" tradition.  Only a few years ago, he fell and stripped the skin off one shin, raising a ghastly bruised welt and reducing his gait to a hobble.  He examined it in his Las Vegas dressing room one night after a performance.  I'd have said it was a miracle he could stand, but he'd done an hour with the audience none the wiser about the injury or the pain.
     He was one of the great show business raconteurs, onstage (where his tales were central to his charm) and offstage (where they flowed from an apparently bottomless memory).  As with Alfred Hitchcock, another superb raconteur, it was not always clear where memory left off and imagination began, but it hardly mattered.
     There was always a discernible ring of truth, as in his story about an early partner who could sing but not talk without a heavy stammer.  One night at their boarding house in Altoona (or some such place) the partner ran to George gasping unintelligibly.  "Sing it!" George said he cried.  The partner sang, "We been robbed, we been robbed, we been robbed," to a tune George, for once, could not remember.
     Many of George's stories, public and private, involved his long, dear friendship with Jack Benny.  The game between them was that George could send Jack into hysterics with the lift of an eyebrow, but Jack could not raise a laugh from George, hard as he tried.
     My favorite among the stories was of a long-ago breakfast.  Jack said, "What're you having?"  George said, "Steak and eggs; I'm hungry. What about you?"  "I'm having Cream of Wheat," Jack said.  "Why" George asked, incredulous.  "Because Mary Livingston says it's good for me," Jack explained.  "But steak and eggs are good for you."  "That's right," Jack said defiantly.  When the waiter came, they both had steak and eggs.  When the bill arrived, George said, "You pay it, Jack."  Jack said, "Why should I pay all of it?" "Because if you don't," George
said, "I'll tell Mary you didn't have Cream of Wheat."
     Amazingly, George Burns linked a day before radio, let alone television, with a world of CD-ROMs and cyberspace.  And no small part of the fondness audiences of all ages had for him was that he bespoke times when things seemed simpler, more innocent, less frazzled and cynical, when a few bars of soft-shoe and lines of a foolish
song from an ancient vaudeville act carried a strong and particular magic.
     After Gracie died, George made monthly visits to her grave to bring her up to date on his doings.  Now,
whatever one's theological leanings, it is nice to think of the act reunited.



Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen
Vaudeville Stage, Radio, Television and Film Actor
(1895-1964)

Birthplace: San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1932 The Robert Burns Panatela Program
1933 The White Owl Program
1934 The Adventures Of Gracie
1936 The Campbell's Tomato Juice Program
1936 The Campbell's Soup Program
1937 Lux Radio Theatre
1937 The Jell-O Program
1938 The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show
1938 Chesterfield Time
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1939 Information Please
1940 The Hinds Honey and Almond Cream Program
1940 Good News of 1940
1940 The Rudy Vallee Sealtest Show
1940 Fibber McGee and Molly
1941 The New Burns and Allen Show
1942 United China Relief
1942 Command Performance
1942 It's Time To Smile
1942 Treasury Star Parade
1942 Well, I Swan
1943 This Is My Story
1943 The Bob Burns Show
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1943 Paul Whiteman Presents
1943 Cavalcade For Victory
1943 Mail Call
1944 Radio Hall Of Fame
1944 The Bakers Of America Show For the Armed Forces
1944 Your All-Time Hit Parade
1945 The Eddie Cantor Show
1945 Robert Benchley, Radio Critic
1945 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1945 The Danny Kaye Show
1945 Birds Eye Open House
1946 Request Performance
1947 The Jack Carson Show
1947 Songs By Sinatra
1947 Guest Star
1947 Front and Center
1948 Philco Radio Time
1948 The Eddie Cantor Pabst Blue Ribbon Show
1948 Kraft Music Hall
1949 Gisele Of Canada
1949 The Aldrich Family
1949 The AmmiDent Show
1949 The Adventures Of Philip Marlowe
1949 Life With Luigi
1949 The Bing Crosby Show
1949 Suspense
1951 Hedda Hopper's Hollywood
1952 The Bob Hope Show
1952 The Doris Day Show
Gracie Allen circa 1937
Gracie Allen circa 1937
From the August 28th 1964 edition of the Oakland Tribune:
 
Heart Attack Kills
Gracie Allen at 58
 
     HOLLYWOOD (AP) - Gracie Allen, whose scatterbrained comedy helped make Burns and Allen a top act in show business for 34 years, died last night after a heart attack.  She was 58.
     Spokesmen for the family said Miss Allen died at 11:15 p.m. and that her husband, comedy actor George Burns, was at her side at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital.
     Contacted at the Burns home in Beverly Hills, William Burns, George's brother, said the popular comedienne had been in seemingly good health before being stricken.
MILD ATTACK
     He said she had experienced mild heart attacks in the past.  They didn't, however, seem to slow her down much.  Ten days ago she and her husband were among the guests at the gala wedding reception for Edie Adams and her new husband Marty Mills.
     She appeared effervescent and cheerful, as she has been since her retirement in 1958.
     Until then, the strain of sustaining her nitwit role sometimes made her tense and withdrawn.
REAL ACTRESS
     At the time of her retirement, Burns explained why she quit:  "She's never missed acting for a minute.  She never was a ham, anyway.  Most actors are aware of playing to an audience.  Not Gracie.  The side of the stage toward the audience was a wall to her.  She concentrated only on what she had to say and never gave a thought to cameras or lights or makeup or anything.
     "She deserved a rest.  She had been working all her life, and her lines were the toughest in the world to do. They didn't make sense, so she had to memorize every word.  It took a real actress.
     "Every spare moment — in bed, under the hair dryer — had to be spent in learning lines.  Do you wonder that she's happy to be rid of it?"
     Miss Allen was born in 1906, the year of the great earthquake in San Francisco.  Named Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, she was one of four daughters of Edward Allen, a song and dance man then booked in San Francisco.
     At 3 1/3, she had made her stage debut but she continued in Catholic schools until she was 14, when she began a dancing act with her three older sisters.
     Later, she joined an Irish song and dance act and at one time went to secretarial school in Hoboken, N.J.  It was in New Jersey that she met George.
     Born Nathan Birnbaum in 1896 Burns had been through the vaudeville mill and claims to have weathered 50 partners before encountering Gracie.
     She saw him on a bill at Union Hill, N.J., where he was booked as Burns and Lorraine.  They met after the show and George revealed he was seeking a new partner.  He suggested that Gracie join him.
REWROTE THE ACT
     Gracie recalled later "Of course George had written this act for himself, with himself as the comedian and I as the straight man but the funny thing -- my straight lines got the laughs.  People laughed twice as hard at my not being funny as they laughed at George's being funny.  When we came of after the first show, he said, 'We're switching parts, Gracie.'  He rewrote the act then and there."
     Burns and Allen played vaudeville for three years hefore he was able to convince her they should get married. They were wed in Cleveland on Jan. 7, 1926.
INTO BIG TIME
     After their marriage they were propelled into the big time.
     They became headliners in vaudeville and starred on the bill that ended Vaudeville at New York's Palace Theater.  After guest-starring on Rudy Vallee and Guy Lombardo radio programs, they began their own show on Feb 15. 1932.
     Their career continued in radio and television until Gracie's retirement.
     They also appeared in such movies as "Big Broadcast of 1932," "International House," "Love in Bloom," "Damsel in Distress," "College Swing," "Honolulu" and ' The Gracie Allen Murder Case."
     George once analyzed his wife's humor "Gracie is not really crazy, if she were, we couldn't get a day's work."




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