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Original Adventures of Maisie header art

The Adventures of Maisie Radio Program

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Adventures of Maisie MP3 Cover Art
Adventures of Maisie MP3 Cover Art


Joan Bennett and Ann Sothern in publicity still from 1938's Tradewinds
Joan Bennett and Ann Sothern in publicity still from 1938's Tradewinds

Sheila Graham's Byline of July 8, 1945 describes the contractual issues regarding Radio's The Adventures of Maisie
Sheila Graham's Byline of July 8, 1945 describes the contractual issues regarding Radio's The Adventures of Maisie

Ann Sothern rehearses at the CBS mike for the Eversharp-sponsored run of The Adventures of Maisie.
Ann Sothern rehearses at the CBS mike
for the Eversharp-sponsored run of
The Adventures of Maisie.
Eversharp's The Adventures of Maisie spot ad from July 12 1945
Eversharp's The Adventures of Maisie spot ad from July 12 1945


Sept. 19, 1945 article about Ann Sothern
Sept. 19, 1945 article about
Ann Sothern and Maisie

Eversharp announces that it's picking up 'Maisie' as its sole sponsor, while dropping the Milton Berle Program.
Eversharp announces that it's picking
up 'Maisie' as its sole sponsor, while dropping the Milton Berle Program.

1950 spot ad for The Adventures of Maisie over M-G-M Net affiliate WDLP.
1950 spot ad for The Adventures of Maisie over M-G-M Net affiliate WDLP.

M-G-M/Mutual spot ad for the January 4th 1952 premiere of The Adventures of Maisie, by transcription.
M-G-M/Mutual spot ad for the January 4th 1952 premiere of The Adventures
of Maisie, by transcription.


Ann Sothern rehearsing for the M-G-M transcribed run of The Adventures of Maisie.
Ann Sothern rehearsing for the M-G-M transcribed run of The Adventures of Maisie.


Background

Two circumstances converged in 1937: famous big screen vamp, Jean Harlow, died unexpectedly on June 7, 1937; and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M) had developed a comedy/adventure series for Harlow, to capitalize on her growing audience appeal as a comedienne. But with Harlow's tragic premature demise, Louis B. Mayer was forced to continue casting around for someone to replace Jean Harlow in the project.

Meanwhile, Joan Bennett and Ann Sothern had both impressed audiences with their performances in 1938's Tradewinds, a Walter Wanger production. But it was Sothern's snappy delivery of her dialogue in Tradewinds that caught Louis B. Mayer's eye--and ear. He signed Sothern as a contract player and ultimately cast her in all ten of the 'Maisie' films between 1939 and 1947.

We should point out that this series has nothing whatsoever to do with the similarly titled "Adventures of Mazie" from 1926. That was a serial adventure film completely unrelated to the Maisie character in The Adventures of Maisie or the Maisie feature-length movies that preceded and succeeded it.

The Maisie character was inspired by novelist Wilson Collison, whose charming back-story for Miss Mary Anastasia O'Connor captured the imagination and increasing interest of Louis B. Mayer. The fictional Miss O'Connor was a former burlesque song and dance girl performing under the stage name 'Maisie Ravier'--often in a 'sister act' with 'Daisie Ravier', a character referred to in both the Maisie films and program #1 of the syndicated radio series, The Adventures of Maisie.

CBS Radio pounds out a deal for 'Maisie' with M-G-M

It was Ann Sothern's November 24, 1941 appearance in Lux Radio Theatre's adaptation of 1941's Maisie Was A Lady that first alerted CBS to Sothern's natural Radio talent. After over three years of contractual wrangling, CBS persuaded M-G-M to undertake a syndicated radio version of Maisie Ravier's adventures, appropriately entitled, The Adventures of Maisie. M-G-M produced the series, retaining all syndicated distribution rights and CBS obtained the right to the production's first syndicated run, which premiered on July 5, 1945. 'Maisie' immediately captured the imagination of millions of radio listeners and her mixed-metaphor retorts, such as "Likewise I'm sure." and "men of the opposite sex" entered domestic vernacular for decades to follow.

The Adventures of Maisie aired--complete--over CBS between 1945 and 1947. Somewhat of a departure from Maisie Ravier's multiple situations and circumstances in Film, the CBS run of The Adventures of Maisie premiered during the Summer of 1945 with Ann Sothern, as Maisie, tethered to love interest Mike, a struggling local attorney, portrayed by Wally Maher.

By the time that Eversharp assumed full sponsorship for the CBS run, Wally Maher as Mike, the legal beagle love interest, waned; to be replaced by Maisie acquiring Middletown's local newspaper and serving as its owner and manager. One might surmise that it was Eversharp's preference that 'Maisie' be set in a regular office setting, so as to better serve the company's primary product promotions. Thus entered True Boardman, already a writer for the CBS run, as Maisie's new Managing Editor, David Matthews. Less a love interest than a comedic foil for Maisie, for the remainder of the first CBS/Eversharp season, Editor Matthews was weekly bedeviled by Maisie's mismanagement of her newspaper as by her varied causes, promotional gimmicks, and campaigns--very few of which actually advanced her newspaper's circulation . . . much to the consternation of her Managing Editor.

'Maisie's second CBS/Eversharp season found her with a new love interest: Elliot Lewis as Bill Doolittle, who--the epitome of his name--was the perfect 'clay' for Maisie to mold and shape into a man of her own design--though ultimately in vain.

M-G-M Radio Attractions Net syndicates Maisie by transcription


September 1948 spot ad announces the call letter change from WHN to WMGM

The Marcus Loew Booking Agency had owned radio station call sign WHN since 1946. In September of 1948 WHN changed its call sign to WMGM, in part to capitalize on a series of M-G-M radio programming projects that Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions was attempting to introduce to a national audience. Programs such as The Adventures of Maisie, Crime Does Not Pay, The Hardy Family, M-G-M Theatre of The Air, and The Story of Dr. Kildare, all drew on material that M-G-M, as a film studio, already owned.

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions logo

Having established Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions for the express purpose of transcribing, then syndicating, this programming, all that remained was for M-G-M to obtain a well-established radio station from which to broadcast their programming packages. The working assumption was that once heard in a wide enough area they'd be picked up nation-wide in due time. The concept seemed to be working for several years, until a change in M-G-M focus made their M-G-M Radio Attractions division redundant. WMGM slowly began changing its format to remain viable to its expanding local audience, and the era of MGM-produced, network-ready, syndicated content dwindled to nothing.

The M-G-M cachet was so persuasive that within days of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions' July 1949 trade announcements, M-G-M Radio Attractions had sold the following initial eight-program 'portfolio' to over 200 outlets in 45 states and Canada:

The package actually came to the air before M-G-M's own WMGM began its initial broadcast run in October 1949. Chicago's Mutual key station, W-G-N, was the first to broadcast M-G-M Theatre of The Air on September 16, 1949, barely a month after the first programs had been recorded.

M-G-M's Maisie, Hardy Family and Dr. Kildare franchises, alone, spanned forty-two feature films over twenty years. Their broad appeal and feel-good, optimistic values and themes were like a tonic to post-Depression America. When M-G-M spun off its M-G-M Radio Attractions syndicated Radio programming division it seemed only natural to draw upon their proven track record of popular Film features and shorts. M-G-M's Crime Does Not Pay series of short features were another natural candidate for a Radio feature. M-G-M Theatre of The Air was an obvious answer to Lux Radio Theatre, the Screen Guild Theatre series', and NBC's long-running series' of Film adaptations.

Thus, in one master stroke, the newly formed M-G-M Radio Attractions brought a compelling package of four half-hour features, an hour-long film adaptation feature, and three fascinating fifteen-minute features, Hollywood U.S.A., Good News from Hollywood, and At Home With Lionel Barrymore to Radio to compete, head-to-head with the best, then-available Radio programming of the era.

It's easy to see why the package was gobbled up within days of its announcement. Small market Radio outlets, as well as large, highly successful regional Radio broadcasters could obtain a diverse, highly promising package of features from a major studio, starring some of the greatest talent of the era--and at a fraction of the cost to produce and broadcast these features in-house.

Of course by 1949 America had heard literally hundreds of uplifting, 'family values,' small town-oriented situation comedies and serials. But then in 1951, the Mutual Broadcasting System (MBS) sought to expand its own feature programming. It seemed natural to turn to M-G-M Radio Attractions for solid, already transcribed programming. Mutual stations had already comprised the majority of subscribers to M-G-M's intial portfolio of eight Radio Attractions features. So it was that, mid-1951, MBS and M-G-M began hammering out a deal for what eventually became a ten-feature package of transcribed, syndicated programming, as follows:

A stunning and compelling lineup to be sure, the package carried forward the half-hour features Crime Does Not Pay, The Hardy Family, The Story of Dr. Kildare, and The Adventures of Maisie, as well as the hour-long feature, M-G-M Theatre of The Air. The MBS package added the half-hour situation comedies, Woman of The Year and The Modern Adventures of Casanova; the half-hour mystery, The Black Museum; the half-hour variety feature, The Gracie Fields Show; and complimented M-G-M's Film adaptation feature, M-G-M Theatre of The Air with The M-G-M Musical Comedy Theatre of The Air.

After months of wrangling and delays, the deal was finally struck in November of 1951 and MBS began 'officially' airing the M-G-M Radio Attractions features the week of January 2-8, 1952. Designed to air in the prime-time spot of 8-10 p.m., Monday through Saturday, the package was also structured as a co-op package, similar to competing NBC's 'Tandem Package'. The Mutual package, referred to as 'MBS Plus', offered 'co-operative' advertising spots for multiple sponsors and advertisers. Thus a sponsor or advertiser could purchase any combination of quarter-hour advertising blocks between 8 p.m. and 10 p.m., from Monday to Saturday on a daily, weekly, or biweekly basis. The opportunity to leverage their sponsoring expenses held great appeal as Radio entered an era of stiff competition with Television for sponsors' dollars. It also afforded member MBS stations a combination of straight drama, adventure, situation comedy, Film and Musical adaptations, and Variety programming in a package that sold for the approximate cost of three to five weekly half-hour features.

The MGM syndication was again picked up--this time by the Mutual Broadcasting System--and aired for a following three years between October 27, 1949 (over W-G-N) and December 26, 1952. The 1949 run was clearly re-scripted and re-transcribed, as many of the episodes contain contemporaneous references to both movies of 1949 and 1950, and specific references to 1950 within the revised scripts.

As further evidence of the series having been re-transcribed, note the November 9, 1949 news clipping [below] in the Lurene Tuttle biography, wherein she's described as working on The Adventures of Maisie broadcast with Ann Sothern. 'Maisie' also ran in syndication via the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS) for several years between 1952 and 1955, as END-434, The Adventures of Maisie (END refers to ENtertainment, using Domestic Network broadcast material, in whole or in part.)

But this wasn't quite the end of the road for our indefatigable Maisie. MGM Television brought Maisie to the little screen in 1960, starring Janis Paige in the role of Maisie Ravier. Unfortunately for both Ms. Paige and MGM, Ann Sothern's own highly successful Television progams, Private Secretary (1953-1957) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958-1961) all but ensured that an all too long anticipated Maisie Television series would flop. This was by no means a reflection on Janis Paige whose own career should have been a natural backdrop from which to embody the Maisie Ravier character, but after over 20 years of the public's association of the Maisie character with Ann Sothern, MGM's cash cow had pretty much run dry.

In tribute to Ann Sothern herself, her success in both Private Secretary and The Ann Sothern Show had, by that time, subtly transformed the public perception of Ann Sothern's characterizations to a level more associated with that of Lucille Ball. As both actresses--and good friends--matured, so did the level of sophistication of their small-screen personae. They both became less slapstick, more wordly-wise, and somewhat more domesticated, in keeping with the trend in Television throughout the 1950s and early 1960s.

The Adventures of Maisie endures as a wonderful sociological time capsule. An M-G-M Transcriptions program, the production values are excellent for their time. Albert Sack's music direction for CBS, and Harry Zimmerman's theme music for the M-G-M Radio Attractions Maisie character were spot-on. As one might expect from a studio with the resources of MGM, the writing was absolutely superb. The scripts tapped into the myriad of situations and characters Maisie encountered during her Film adventures. As such, the scripts were consistently fast paced, very clever, posed compelling situations for the protagonist, and provided fascinating variety.

A long list of Radio's greatest voice talent ensured its fascinating characterizations would rise to the quality of what one would expect from an MGM-produced program. Maisie's core ensemble had actors Hans Conried, Lurene Tuttle, Gerald Mohr, Frank Nelson, Bea Benaderet, Pat McGeehan, Peter Leeds, Howard McNear, and Sheldon Leonard returning for many of the programs. M-G-M Film Stars Audrey Totter and Gene Kelly filled in for Ann Sothern during the 3-month period of her hospitalization and recovery from thyroid surgery and its complications. Lurene Tuttle and Hans Conried, in particular, were absolutely brilliant throughout the series.

This program remains a top-notch, highly collectable--and highly listenable--Golden Age Radio gem. The ditzy--yet worldly-wise--Maisie is blessed with wisdom and a Life philosphy that are as applicable today as they were in the 1940s. In that respect alone, Maisie's indestructible outlook and optimism have much to offer today's listeners.

Series Derivatives:

"Maisie"; The Adventures of Maisie; AFRTS END-434, The Adventures of Maisie
Genre: Golden Age Radio Comedy Adventure Drama
Network(s): CBS, M-G-M Radio Attractions Network, MBS, AFRTS
Audition Date(s) and Title(s): Unknown
Premiere Date(s) and Title(s): 1945-47 CBS Run: 45-07-05 01 Department Store Sales Girl

1949-1952 Run: 49-10-27 01 Department Store Sales Girl
Run Dates(s)/ Time(s): 1945-47 CBS Run: 45-07-05 through 47-03-28; 30-minutes with commercial fill; CBS, Thursday nights at 8:30 p.m.; Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m.; Fridays at 10:30 p.m. [in 1946-1947 syndication]

1949-1952 Run: 49-10-27 through 52-12-26; 30-minutes with commercial fill; MBS [W-G-N, Chicago], Thursdays, 9:30 p.m.
Syndication: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Radio Attractions
Sponsors: 1945-47 CBS Run: Eversharp writing instruments

1949-1953 Runs: Getchal and Richards, Inc. [Zotos Fluid Wave]
; Jacobson Foods; MGM; Charles Antell Inc, of Baltimore [Formula No. 9 Hair Lotion and Shampoo]; National Health Aids [Fastabs]

Director(s): 1945-47 CBS Run:

Tony Stanford, William Rousseau, Cal Kuhl [Producers/Directors, original CBS Run]

1949-1953 Runs:

Tom McKnight [ Director M-G-M/MBS Run]
Raymond Katz [ Producer/Transcriber M-G-M/MBS Run]
Principal Actors: Ann Sothern, Wally Maher, True Boardman, Elliott Lewis, Audrey Totter, Gerald Mohr, Lurene Tuttle, Sheldon Leonard, Hans Conried, Ben Wright, William Conrad, Herb Vigran, Sidney Miller, Mary Jane Coft, Harry Bartell, Howard McNear, Bea Benaderet, Joan Banks, Joe Forte, Hugh Studebaker, Rona Williams, Stanley Waxman, Jerry Hausner, Maya Gregory, Gloria McMillan, Gil Stratton, Barney Philips, Frank Nelson, Jack Edwards, Marvin Miller, Ramsey Hill, Alec Hartford, Tommy Bernard, Elmore Vincent, Alan Reed, Peter Leeds, James Eagles, Sammy Hill, Ted Osborne, Tom Tulley, Ted de Corsia, Shep Mencken, Johnny McGovern, Junius Matthews, Donald Woods, Gene Kelly, Florence Hallup, Gilbert Barnett, Herb Butterfield, Hal Gerard, Frederick Warlock, Elvia Allman, Will Wright, Bob Cole, Byron Kane, Jeffrey Silver, Sandra Gould, Arthur Q. Bryan, Virginia Gregg, Gigi Pearson, Wally Maher
Recurring Character(s): 1945-47 CBS Run:

Maisie Ravier [Ann Sothern]; Mike [ Wally Maher]; Managing Editor David Matthews [True Boardman]; Bill Doolittle, Maisie's boyfriend [Elliott Lewis]

1949-1953 M-G-M Runs: Maisie Ravier [Ann Sothern]; Eddie Jordan [Pat McGeehan] an Engineering hopeful working as an insurance agent, introduced as Maisie's long-suffering boyfriend in program #4; Mrs. Kennedy 'Mrs. K.' [Bea Benaderet], Maisie's boarding house landlady.
Merton, Maisie's persistent, young suitor and fellow boarder at Mrs. Kennedy's Boarding House.
Protagonist(s): Maisie Ravier [Mary Anastasia O'Connor] from Brooklyn, U.S.A., "A hard working girl who's hardest work is finding work." Working on the foundation of a 6th-grade education [or 4th-grade, depending on the episode], she's had a career on the stage [burlesque] as a self-described 'shantoozie' [chanteuse], which informs several episodes, and during which she adopted her stage name, Maisie Ravier. Apparently she's a former WAC as well, alluding to her military service in several episodes.
Author(s): Wilson Collison [Creator]
Writer(s) True Boardman, Artie Phillips, Forrest Barnes, Sam Taylor [ CBS Run]

Artie Phillips,
John L. Green [ M-G-M/MBS Runs]
Music Direction: Albert Sack; Harry Zimmerman [Composer, Conductor]
Musical Theme(s): Original music by Harry Zimmerman
Announcer(s): Hy Averback, Jack McCoy, John 'Bud' Hiestand, Bob Williams
Estimated Scripts or
Broadcasts:
1945 - 1947 Run: 85
1949-1952 Run:78
Episodes in Circulation: 1945 - 1947 Run: None
1949-1952 Run: 67
Total Episodes in Collection: 83
Provenances:


First Maisie Spot Ad, from July 12, 1945
First Maisie Spot Ad,
from July 12, 1945


Somewhat lackluster Billboard review of the M-G-M Radio Attractions transcription of Maisie which aired on December 8th 1949 on WMGM
Somewhat lackluster Billboard review
of the M-G-M Radio Attractions transcription of Maisie which aired
on December 8th 1949 on WMGM



MGM Radio Attractions transcription label for Program 9 of The Adventures of Maisie.
MGM Radio Attractions transcription label for Program 9 of The Adventures of Maisie.


'The Directory of The Armed Forces Radio Service Series'.

Notes on Provenances:

Most widely circulated program logs are in error to one degree or another. The most helpful provenances were newspapers.

Digital Deli Too RadioLogIc


OTRisms:

All program circulating titles are anecdotal. We have the program numbers for many of the programs from those provided on the original transcription labels. The program titles, except for those derived from the few surviving contemporaneous radio listings, have evolved from the episode naming conventions--or absence thereof--of individual collectors. These anecdotal names range from barely appropriate, to completly unrelated to the script.

We apologize in advance for the sheer length of this provenance section. The Adventures of Maisie has been poorly documented and inaccurately titled throughout the otr years. There's very little about it that's not in error to one degree or another. As such it will remain a work in progress for the forseeable future.

The dates of the 1945-1947 run are from contemporaneous newspaper listings.

The theoretical dates of the 1949 Run are extrapolated from the premiere episode announcement airing over W-G-N, October 27, 1949. The 1949 run is also identified, in part, by the M-G-M promotions of their 1949 and 1950 movies in the credits.

Maisie's 'real' name is Mary Anastasia O'Connor, not Mary Ann Stacy O'Connor.

The title for program #1 should be 'Department Store Sales Girl', not 'The Department Store Clerk.' The word 'clerk' appears nowhere in the episode. An appropriate alternative title would be 'Daisie Ravier', in reference to the stage name of Maisie's former dancing partner in the episode.

The title for program #2 should be 'Effie and The Professor', not 'The Poet--Effie.' Effie Bascomb [Lurene Tuttle] is a small-town poet with designs on a Hollywood career as a song writer. She's been convinced she's got what it takes because a con-artist and masher--'Professor' Jeff Brady [Gerald Mohr]--has taken her money for 'writing lessons' and when her money runs out, tells her Hollywood awaits. Sheldon Leonard is heard as the bus driver.

The title for program #3 should be 'Acme Surplus Truck Driver', not 'The Truck Driver.' The War Surplus materiel involved in the script is the key to the program's plot. Of note is a wonderful 'Who's On First' kind of dialogue between the Maisie and Sidney Miller's character regarding his wife having a baby.

The title for program #4 should be 'Next Stop, Niagara Falls', rather than 'Eddie the Boyfriend.' Acting on 'lovelorn advice' from her landlady, Maisie gets her boyfriend fired and ex-flame Marsha Brent [Joan Banks] gets him rehired--and promoted. But Eddie's new engineering job is at Niagara Falls--with Marsha Brent. Bea Benaderet is introduced as Mrs. Kennedy, Maisie's boarding house landlady.

The title for program #5 should be 'Maisie Ravier, Private Detective', not 'The Phony Doctor.'

The title for program #6 should be 'Jerome Schmerzterbreugen vs. The Bebopster', rather than 'Bobby Kent.' Jerome Schmerzterbreugen [Gil Stratton] is the young, lovelorn suitor whose attraction to his girlfriend is eclipsed by her adoration of Bobby Kent [Hans Conried], Bebopster and Teen Idol. Maisie gets poor Jerome back in the good graces of his girlfriend only to lose her once again, to Boyd Floyd, the lastest crooning sensation.

The title for program #7 should be 'Eddie Designs A Suspension Bridge That Goes Nowhere', or 'The Suspension Bridge Paved with Good Intentions', rather than 'Eddie Designs A Bridge.'

The title for program #8 should be 'Sonja, the Smartest Dog In The World', rather than 'Sonja, the Smart Dog.'

The title for program #9 should be 'Lord Deveridge and Lady Ravier', not 'Lord Deveridge and Lady Revere', for obvious reasons.

The title for program #10 should be 'Agatha Schlump's Boarding House', rather than 'Stranded in Bartonville.' The script revolves around Bartonville landlady, Agatha Schlump [Lurene Tuttle] and her 'makeover' under Maisie's supervision.

The title for program #11 should be 'Hotel Mercury Night Clerk', or 'The Fake Baron and Baroness', not 'Owes Money to Night Clerk.' The script revolves around Maisie mistaking a newly married couple, The Schmidts [Hans Conried and Lurene Tuttle], for Baron Probocznik, a 'dignitary' from Russian Georgia. Her present dilemma--having to work off a hotel bill as a Night Clerk--is only incidental to the plot.

The title for program #12 should be 'All Kinds of Crazy Laws', rather than 'Trouble with The Law.'

The title for program #13 should be 'A Suit for Aiding and Abetting', rather than 'Clothes for The Poor.'

The title for program #14 should be 'Bixel's Department Store Kissing Contest', rather than 'The Sales Contest.' Maisie's beau, Eddie Jordan, is batting zero in a sales contest at Bixel's Department Store. Maisie's solution? Offer to give any man who buys something from Eddie a kiss.

The title for program #15 should be 'Maisie, The Farmer's Matchmaker', rather than 'On the Farm.'

The title for program #16 should be 'Maisie Bets Joe's Tonsorial Parlor and Shaving Solarium On A Horse', rather than 'The Manicurist - Bookie in the Barbershop.'

The title for program #17 should be 'Chester Drake's Phony Love Letter', rather than 'Chester Drake, Actor, Is Maisie's Idol.'

The title for program #18 should be 'The Stage-Door Jasper Caper', rather than 'Jasper, Love Sick Fan of Chorus Girl Maisie.' Maisie is shadowed by a lovesick stage-door Johnny named Jasper. She's saved from his advances--and Jail--by a similarly smitten Taxi Driver, Pete Hagenschmittenfeldt.

The title for program #19 should be 'Maisie Inherits The Millvale Sentinel', rather than 'The Missing Heir.'

The title for program #20 should be 'Maisie Wrecks A Wreck and Bags A Bag ', rather than 'Maisie Wrecks Old Car and Must Pay.'

The title for program #21 should be 'Maisie Gets The Charity Ball Rolling', rather than 'The Costume Ball.'

The title for program #22 should be 'Millie The Moll Alias Moitle The Moiderer', rather than 'Safe Cracking.'

The title for program #23 should be 'Maisie and The Professor', rather than 'Professor Elliot.'

The title for program #24 should be 'Hazel La Verne', not 'Hazel.' This program is significant because Audrey Totter fills in for Ann Sothern and her Maisie character as fellow burlesque girl, Hazel La Verne. MGM builds Ann Sothern's 'excuse' into the script--laryngitis.

The title for program #31 should be 'Bill Jones' Memories of Maisie', not 'Paul Jones, Soldier on Leave.' MGM Star Gene Kelly fills in for Ann Sothern, while Florence Halop subs for the Maisie Ravier character.

The title for program #32 should be 'Maisie and The Maharani Mix-up', not 'Stranded In India.' Although the first two minutes mention that Maisie is stranded in India, the arc of the plot centers on one of Maisie's old Hollywood acquaintances--a gold digger--and her impending marriage to Maharajah Ishmael, Extreme Potentate of Mustafabam, Prince of Ishman Ho, Rajah of Magarak, Plenipotentiary of Booghadof, Ruler, Emperor, Soverign and Prince of Karawagoni. The future Maharani, Delores King, demands that Maisie act as her maid, to gain ocean passage money to return to the U.S.. The Maharajah's valet [Hans Conried] arrives at Ms. King's hotel suite to collect her for a visit with the Maharajah at his palace. The valet finds Maisie dressed in Delores' wedding gown, believing Maisie to be the Maharani-to-be. Predictable hilarity and confusion ensue.

The title for program #33 should be '1-Year, 4-Month, 8-Day Anniversary at The Ritz Garden', rather than 'Anniversary for Eddie and Maisie.'

The title for program #34 should be 'Maisie the Hollywood Matchmaker', rather than 'In Hollywood to See Stars.' Maisie enlists famous Hollywood movie star, Jonathan Bradshaw's support [Frank Nelson] in a matchmaking conspiracy.

The title for program #35 should be 'The Orphanage Benefit Speaker Mix-up', rather than 'Two Speakers With Same Speech.'

The title for program #36 should be 'Maisie Reforms An Ex-Convict', rather than 'The Ex-Convict.' Ex-convict Harry Johnson [Gerald Mohr], pulls a hold-up of the dues money [$9.28] from Maisie's "The Hotcha Dance Palace Girls Book Reading and Culture of All Kinds Club [The HDPGBRCAKC]." The cops nab him, but at his trial soft-hearted star-witness Maisie caves on the witness stand.

The title for program #37 should be 'Fontaine's Phony Talent Scout Racket', rather than 'Phony Screen Test.'

The title for program #38 should be 'Maisie The Financial Counselor', rather than 'The Money Manager.'

The title for program #39 should be 'Maisie Saves The Orphanage', rather than 'The Orphanage.'

The title for program #40 should be 'Maisie The Deserted Wife', rather than 'Birthday Gifts.'

The title for program #41 should be 'Maisie and The Dueling Actors', rather than 'Theatrical Agent.'

The title for program #42 should be 'Maisie Sells Restoro Skin-Rejuvenator', rather than 'Eddie Sells Cemetery Plots.'

The title for program #43 should be 'Nancy Hummerschlager's Vacation', rather than 'Helping A Working Girl.'

The title for program #55 should be 'Spike 'Romeo' McCloskey and The Milk Fund', rather than 'Small Town Newspaper.'

The title for program #56 should be 'Eddie and Maisie, Inc.', rather than 'Home Movies.'

The title for program #57 should be 'Larry Cooper, The Wolf with The Five Grand Bracelet', rather than 'The Stolen Bracelet.'

The title for program #58 should be 'Maisie and The 10,000 Dollar Statue', rather than 'Eddie Changes Apartments.'

The title for program #59 should be 'Maisie, Stand-In for Yvonne DuWitté, Prima Ballerina', rather than 'Yvonne of The Ballet.'

The title for program #60 should be 'Maisie, as 'Portrait of An Angry Woman'', rather than 'The Artist's Model.'

The title for program #61 should be 'J.C. Higgenbottom and The Overlapping Grip', rather than 'Insurance.'

The title for program #62 should be 'Maisie Sinks Duke Johnson's Gambling Ship', rather than 'Duke Johnson.'

The title for program #63 should be 'Maisie and 25,000 Dollar The Cover-up', rather than 'Off To Rio.'


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The Adventures of Maisie Program Log

Date Program Title Avail. Notes
45-06-28
--
--
45-06-30 Atchison Daily Globe
. . .
Ann Sothern as "Maisie" sets up housekeeping on KMBC Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. . . .

45-07-05
1
Department Store Sales Girl
N
[ Premiere Episode of Original Run ]

"Screen Star Ann Sothern will bring her beloved "Maisie" character to radio starting on CBS Thursday night."

45-07-12
2
Title Unknown
N
45-07-08 Nebraska State Journal
THURSDAY
Maisie--(7:30p.m. KFAB)
Ann Sothern, popular screen comedienne, is the star of this new light comedy series in the role of the little Brooklyn blonde with a heart of gold who spurns diamonds and often weilds a club. She is secretary to a none-too-successful attorney in the series.

45-07-19
3
Title Unknown
N
45-07-19 Mason City Globe-Gazette
THE MILLIONS of fans of Ann Sothern's "Maisie" pictures for M-G-M have some to expect that Maisie Ravier will overcome all obstacles the hard way--and that's the way Miss Sothern does it in real life. For instance, at her redio debut last Thursday, Producer Tony Stanford noticed that she'd memorized her script.
"That isn't necessary," he told her. "Why not do it the easy way and simply read it into the mike?"
"But I'm used to memorizing my lines," protested Ann. "Reading them would be the hard way!"
Listen to "Maisie" over KGLO-CBS Thursday at 7:30p.m.

45-07-26
4
Title Unknown
N
45-07-26 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN trips blithely in and out of another riotus escapade on KGL)-CBS' comedy show "Maisie," Thursday, at 7:30p.m. Tony Standford directs; Albert Sack directs the orchestra.

45-08-02
5
Title Unknown
N
45-08-02 Mason City Globe-Gazette
FUN AND MIRTH run rampant as inimitable Ann Sothern gets herself involved in a laugh-provoking situation on CBS' "Maisie" series, Thursday, over KGLO-CBS at 7:30 p. m. from Hollywood. Tony Sanford directs. Albert Sack directs the orchestra.

45-08-09
6
Title Unknown
N
45-08-09 Mason City Globe-Gazette
"TROUBLE BREWS in plentious quantities" for provocative Ann Sothern who gets herself entangled in a riot of mirth and fun on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" Thursday, at 7:30p.m. TOny Sanford directs; Albert Sack directs the orchestra.

45-08-16
7
Title Unknown
N
45-08-16 Mason City Globe-Gazette
FUN AND MIRTH run rampant as inimitable Ann Sothern gets herself involved in a laugh-provoking situation on CBS' "Maisie" series, Thursday, over KGLO-CBS at 7:30 p. m. from Hollywood. Tony Sanford directs. Albert Sack directs the orchestra.

45-08-22
8
Title Unknown
N
[ Moves to Wednesday night at 10:30; replaces the Milton Berle Program; begin sole Eversharp sponsorship]

45-08-22 Mason City Globe-Gazette
OFFHAND it may sound like "Maisie" is being chased around some--but don't take it offhand. "Maisie," the big-hearted secretary Ann Sothern portrays on KGLO-CBS, is simply doing a bit of moving around the network.
For the record this is what happens:
"Maisie's" escapades until last week took place on KGLO-CBS Thursday nights 7:30 to 7:55 p. m. However, this time, beginning Thursday, Aug. 23, will be occupied by another program. As for "Maisie," she's due for a double move:
For three Wednesday nights, Aug. 22, 29 and Sept. 5, she'll carry on between 9:30 and 10:00 p. m.
And following that, as of Sept. 12, "Maisie" will settle down to the Wednesday night half-hour between 8:30 and 9:00 p.m.
45-08-29
9
Title Unknown
N
45-08-29 Mason City Globe-Gazette
MIRTH RUNS RAMPANT as inimitable Ann Sothern gets herself involved in hilarious escapades on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie' series Wednesday, at 9:30p.m.

45-09-05
10
Title Unknown
N
45-09-05 Mason City Globe-Gazette
TROUBLE SEEKING "Maisie," whose warm-hearted generosity lands her behind the "eight ball" involves herself and her friend Mike in another laugh-riot on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" Wednesday, at 9:30p.m. Ann Sothern plays Maisie; Wally Maher is Mike.

45-09-12
11
Trouble In Double Doses
N
[ Moves to 9:30 p.m., EST]

45-09-12 Mason City Globe-Gazette
"TROUBLE IN DOUBLE DOSES" is the medicine provocative Ann Sothern is up against as she "tees off" on another laugh-jammed episode of KGLO-CBS' new comedy series "Maisie" Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. Albert Sack conducts the orchestras. The new time is one hour earlier than previously..

45-09-19
12
Title Unknown
N
45-09-19 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN, star of CBS' hilarious Wednesday comedy series, "The Adventures of Maisie," adroitly combines the qualities of artistry and acumen in her career as a screen and radio star. There's amble reason behind this fact inasmuch as Ann's mother was a famous concert singer, her father a prominent business man, and her grandfather was Simon Lake, inventor of the submarine.
Ann's talent appears to be effortless, but actually she has devoted her young life to the blueprint of her profession. She was born Harriet Lake in Valley City, N. Dak., in a home where music was essential. At 7 she was playing Bach and Beethoven. She was educated in Minneapolis public schools and later attended the University of Washington.
Hollywood was on the interary of her mother's concert tours and the blonde, serene eyed girl played several early minor parts in pitures. The late Florenz Ziegfeld saw her in one of those films and offered her a part in "Smiles" with Marilyn Miller. Broadway took her to its heart.
In 1937 she played her first motion picture role under the name of Ann Sothern for M-G-M studios. The next year she made a sensational hit in the title role of the first "Maisie" in film which estanblisher her as a top comedienne.
Five feet, one-inch tall, Ann weighs 112 pounds. Her blonde hair curls naturally, and her eyes are gray-blue. She is married to Lt. Robert Sterling, and they have one child, a daughtere. She plays an excellent game of tennis and golf and collects unique chinaware as a hobby.
"Maisie" is heard over KGLO-CBS at 8:30p.m. on Wednesday.

45-09-26
13
Title Unknown
N
45-09-26 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN, as provocative Maisie St. Clair [sic], keeps fun flying fast and furious on KGLO-CBS' hilarious "Maisie" program, Wednesday at 8:30 p. m. Albert Sack directs the orchestra;Tony Stanford directs.

45-10-03
14
Title Unknown
N
45-10-03 Mason City Globe-Gazette
LOVELY, VIVACIOUS Ann Sothern, film and radio star, fills in and out of one provoking situation after another in the inimitable "Maisie Show" Wednesday over KGLO-CBS at 8:30p.m. Albert Sack conducts the orchestra' Tony Stanford directs.

45-10-10
15
Title Unknown
N
45-10-10 Mason City Globe-Gazette
CAPRICIOUS, gum-chewing Ann Sothern, as "Maisie," naively blunders into and out of a series of situations on her KGLO-CBS show Wednesday at 9:30p.m.

45-10-17
16
Title Unknown
N
45-10-24
17
Title Unknown
N
45-10-24 Mason City Globe-Gazette
WARM-HEARTED, lovable "Maisie," played by Ann Sothern, becomes entangled in one merry jam after another over KGLO-CBS Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Tony Sanford produces and directs the show. Albert Sack conducts the orchestra.

45-10-31
18
Title Unknown
N
45-10-24 Mason City Globe-Gazette
BIG-HEARTED "Maisie," played by Ann Sothern, finds her good intentions pave the way to a log of trouble and fun, over KGLO-CBS Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Tony Sanford produces and directs the show. Albert Sack conducts the orchestra.

45-11-07
19
Title Unknown
N
45-11-07 Mason City Globe-Gazette
WARM-HEARTED and lovable Maisie Ravier, played by screen lovely Ann Sothern, gets in and out of unpredictable situations on KGLO-CBS's "Maisie Show" Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Tony Sanford produces and directs the show. Albert Sack conducts the orchestra.

45-11-14
20
Title Unknown
N
45-11-14 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN, the warm hearted, gum-chewing gal, gets into a tide of trouble on the KGLO-CBS's "Maisie Show" Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Music is by Albert Sack's orchestra. Tony Sanford produces and directs the show.

45-11-21
21
Title Unknown
N
45-11-28
22
Title Unknown
N
45-11-28 Mason City Globe-Gazette
WARM hearted, lovable Maisie, played by Ann Sothern, saves the day at the eleventh hour on KGLO-CBS's "Maisie" program Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Albert Sack's orchestra flavors the show. Tony Sanford directs.

45-12-05
23
Title Unknown
N
45-12-05 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN, playing warm-hearted, lovable Maisie Ravier, talks herself in and out of trouble in her KGLO-CBS "Maisie" Comedy Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Albert Sack's orchestra suplies the music. Tony Sanford produces.

45-12-12
24
Title Unknown
N
45-12-12 Mason City Globe-Gazette
MAISIE REVERE, that warm-hearted, lovable Brooklyn blond, played by Ann Sothern, gets into a muddled situation on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" Comedy Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Albert Sack's orchestra suplies the rhythm. Tony Sanford produces.

45-12-19
25
Title Unknown
N
45-12-26
26
Title Unknown
N
45-12-26 Mason City Globe-Gazette
MAISIE REVERE, warm-hearted Brooklyn blond, played by Ann Sothern, ties herself and everyone else into numberous knots on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" Comedy Wednesday at 8:30p.m. Music is supplied by Albert Sack.

46-01-02
27
Title Unknown
N
46-01-02 Mason City Globe-Gazette
MAISIE REVERE, warm-hearted Brooklyn blond, is constantly trying to help out everybody, but usually does the opposite on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" Wednesday at 8:30p.m.
"Maisie" poses as the rich aunt of an RAF pilot who is in love with the town's local belle. The girl's family object to the marriage and in trying to get the two together, Maisie rouses the ire of the mayor.
Music on the program is supplied by Albert Sack's orchestra. Tony Sanford produces.

46-01-09
28
Title Unknown
N
46-01-09 Mason City Globe-Gazette
WHEN Maisie Revere tries to fix something, she fixes it all right--or does she? Not according to those she tries to "help" on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie Show" Wednesday, at 8:30 p.m. Albert Sack's orchestra provides the music.

46-01-16
29
Certain To Win
N
46-01-16 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN, KGLO-CBS' "Maisie," tries to run a column in her newly acquired newspaper, on the broadcast of Wednesday, at 8:30 p.m. Maisie supplies the name of a horse "
Certain to win" to a gangster, and when it loses--there's trouble. Music is by Albert Sack's orchestra.

46-01-23
30
Title Unknown
N
46-01-23 Mason City Globe-Gazette
"MAISIE" Revere, played by Ann Sothern, is now a newspaper owner, and tries to run her sheet like a veteran, but as usual muddles everything, Wednesday, at 8:30 p.m., over KGLO-CBS.

46-01-30
31
Title Unknown
N
[ Production moves to New York for two weeks]

46-01-30 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN, as Maisie Revere, newspaper publisher, keeps her staff going half crazy trying to undo her brilliant strategems, on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" program, Wednesday, at 8:30 p.m.
Miss Sothern, normally heard from Hollywood, will do her Jan. 30 and Feb. 6 broadcasts from New York.

46-02-06
32
Title Unknown
N
46-02-06 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN, KGLO-CBS' "Maisie," as crusading publisher of her small-town newspaper, stirs up hilarious comedy Wednesday, at 8:30 p.m.
True Boardman, taking the part of David Matthews, managing editor, has a near breakdown trying to keep up with the boss.

46-02-13
33
Title Unknown
N
[ Production returns to Hollywood]

46-02-13 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN is heard as the irrepressible star of the comedy "Maisie," over KGLO-CBS Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
Maisie keeps Middletown in a perpetual state of turmoil, to the chagrin of the managing editor of her newspaper, harassed David Matthews, portrayed by True Boardman. William Rousseau produces the program.

46-02-20
34
Title Unknown
N
46-02-20 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN "MAISIE" SOTHERN, as small-town publisher, keeps managing editor Matthews on the jump in hilarious comedy over KGLO-CBS Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. True Boardman plays Matthews, Director of the program is William Rousseau. Albert Sack directs the orchestra.

46-02-27
35
Title Unknown
N
46-02-27 Mason City Globe-Gazette
A HALF-HOUR of delightful comedy of life in Middletown, is heard on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" show, starring Ann Sothern, Wednesday at 8:30 p.m. True Boardman plays the part of David Matthews, managing editor of Maisie's newspaper. William Rousseau directs. Incidental music is by Albert Sack's orchestra.

46-03-08
36
Title Unknown
N
[ Moves to Fridays, 9:30 p.m.]

46-03-08 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN trips her merry way through a half-hour of uproarious comedy on KGLO-CBS' "Maisie" show, Friday at 9:30 p.m. True Boardman plays the part of David Matthews, managing editor of Maisie's newspaper. Boardman, Artie Phillips and Forrest Barnes do the scripot. William Rousseau directs. Music is by Albert Sack and the orchestra.

46-03-15
37
Title Unknown
N
46-03-22
38
Title Unknown
N
46-03-22 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN is starred in a half-hour of rib-tickling comedy in her familiar characterization of wise-cracking "Maisie" over KGLO-CBS Friday at 9:30 p.m. True Boardman plays the role of David Matthews, managing editor of Maisie's newspaper. Direction is by William Rousseau. Albert Sack and his orchestra do the incidental music.

46-03-29
39
Title Unknown
N
46-03-29 Mason City Globe-Gazette
"MAISIE" starring Ann Sothern, offers a half-hour of comedy, Friday over KGLO-CBS at 9:30 p.m. With Ann on the program is True Boardman who plays the part of harassed Dave Matthews. William Rousseau directs. Music is by Albert Sack and the orchestra.

46-04-05
40
Title Unknown
N
46-04-05 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN as "Maisie" manages to keep Middletown and David Matthews, managing editor of her newspaper, in a continual state of stress and strain as she blithely trips her way through a half-hour of comedy on the "Maisie" show, Friday, over KGLO-CBS at 9:30 p.m.

46-04-12
41
Title Unknown
N
46-04-12 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN is heard in a half-hour of comedy in her familiar wiseacre role, "Maisie," Friday at 9:30 p.m. Cal Kuhl replaces William Rousseau as producer-director of the show.

46-04-19
42
Title Unknown
N
46-04-19 Mason City Globe-Gazette
"MAISIE" irrespressibly wise-cracks her riotous way through a half-hour of lively comedy, starring Ann Sothern over KGLO-CBS, Friday at 9:30 p.m. Ann Sothern is starred in the title role. Cal Kuhl directs.

46-04-26
43
Title Unknown
N
46-04-19 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN is heard in her familiar wise-cracking role as star of the KGLO-CBS comedy show "Maisie" Friday at 9:30 p.m. Producer-director of the program is Cal Kuhl. Scripts are by Sam Taylor.

46-05-03
44
Title Unknown
N
[Moves to 8:30 p.m..]

46-05-03 Mason City Globe-Gazette
ANN SOTHERN as the curvaceous wisecracking "Maisie" is heard in a half-hour of comedy on the "Maisie" show Friday at 8:30 p.m. over KGLO-CBS. Cal Kuhl is producer-director. Scripts are by Sam Taylor.


46-05-10
45
Title Unknown
N
46-05-10 Mason City Globe-Gazette
THE rapid-fire wisecracks of blond "Maisie," sharp-tongued beauty with a heart of gold, are heard on KGLO-CBS' comedy prograrm "Maisie" Friday at 8:30 p.m. Ann Sothern is starred in the title role. Cal Kuhl is producer-director. Scripts are by Sam Taylor.

46-05-17
46
Title Unknown
N
46-05-17 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie provides a half-hour of fast comedy and a first-class headache for her managing editor, David Matthews. Ann Sothern portrays the wise-cracking Brooklyn blond at 8:30 p.m.

46-05-24
47
Title Unknown
N
46-05-24 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Ann Sothern will be heard in her familiar comedy role as "Maisie" at 8:30 p.m. To quote Miss Sothern, "Maisie's clothes may be a little too garish, her chewing gum may click too noisily, and her grammar isn't always right, but she has certain basic qualities of generosity, tolerance, courage and an easy gallantry that are more inspiring than a volume of solemn words."

46-05-31
48
Title Unknown
N
46-05-31 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie, the lovable ex-hoofer from Brooklyn so deftly protrayed by Ann Sothern of the screen, airs another fast comedy show at 8:30 p.m.

46-06-07
49
Title Unknown
N
46-06-07 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Ann Sothern is heard as "Maisie," the role she has made familiar to CBS listeners and movie fans, at 8:30 p.m. Maisie is warm-hearted, but her barbed wisecracks get her into one dilemma before she can extricate herself from another.

46-06-14
50
Title Unknown
N
46-06-14 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Friday
KGLO
8:30 Maisie, Eversharp Co., CBS

46-06-21
51
Title Unknown
N
46-06-21 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie, the familiar role played by screen actress Ann Sothern, wise-cracks through another hilarious comedy routine at 8:30 p.m.

46-06-28
52
Title Unknown
N
[ Season finale; replaced by "Intrigue" for the Summer]

46-06-28 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie: Swift-moving comedy is presented on the "Maisie" show at 8:30 p.m. Ann Sothern stars as the wise-cracking "Maisie" with the heart of gold.

46-07-05
--
--
46-07-05 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Friday P.M.
KGLO
8:30 Intrigue, CBS





46-08-09
--
--
46-08-09 Mason City Globe-Gazette
KGLO
8:30 Jim Carter, CBS
46-08-16
53
Maisie 'Helps' A Discharged Vet
N
[Returns from six-week vacation.]

46-08-16 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Cheerful Earful is the news that "Maisie," starring Ann Sothern, will provide laughts once more on Friday nights over KGLO, starting with the "Maisie" broadcast at 8:30 p.m. Friday night. "Maisie," soft-hearted but hard-headed and sharp-tongued, continues as the publisher of a small town newspaper, her curiosity leading to hilarious entanglements with the managing editor and the community's odd characters. In the first episode, "Maisie" tries to find a job for discharged veteran Bill Doolittle and finally succeeds but only after causing him to lose two jobs through some inadvertant bungling.

46-08-23
54
Title Unknown
N
46-08-23 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie starts a campaign to scuttle a gambling ship, in Ann Sothern's top-notch and well-known role, at 8:30 p.m. The ship sets up for business in the Middletown river, and Maisie's association with the gamblers turns out to be exciting, both for her and for the roulette-and-dice boys.

46-08-30
55
Title Unknown
N
46-08-30 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie tries to sell a dinner service for 16 people to a woman who is giving a wedding banquet for 17, in the Ann Sothern "Maisie" broadcast at 8:30 p.m. Trying her best to clinch the sale, Maisie attempts to discourage one guest from attending the banquet--which would be very well except that the guest turns out to be the bride.

46-09-06
56
Title Unknown
N
46-09-06 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie provides 30 minutes of fast comedy and wisecracks at 8:30 p.m. Ann Sothern is heard in the title role.

46-09-13
57
Title Unknown
N
46-09-13 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie Acrobatic "Maisie" who puts her dainty foot in her prtty mouth every time she tries to help a friend, finds that publishing a newspaper is not a restful occupation on the "Maisie" show at 8:30 p.m. Comedienne Ann Sothern stars in the role of the Brooklyn Blond.

46-09-20
58
Title Unknown
N
46-09-20 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie Tackling the newspaper business with characteristic enthusiasm, "Maisie" is drawn into another hilarious adventure by her soft heart and hard head. Comedian Ann Sothern plays the role she made famous on the screen. "Maisie" is aired at 8:30 p.m.

46-09-27
59
Title Unknown
N
46-09-27 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie A half-hour of fast comedy is presented on the "Maisie" show at 8:30 p.m. Ann Sothern is heard in the title role as the wise-cracking Brooklynite with the heart of gold.

46-10-04
60
Title Unknown
N
[Moves to 9:30 p.m. ]

46-10-04 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie Ann Sothern, starring as "Maisie," manages to get more entertainment for the children of the Middletown orphanage by playing a clever trick on the crooked supervisor of the institution, in the comedy-drama broadcast at 9:30 p.m.

46-10-11
61
Title Unknown
N
46-10-11 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie Ann Sothern, portraying the crusading but confused editor of a small-town newspaper, gives additional evidence that she's blessed with phenomenal luck, in the "Maisie" broadcast at 9:30 p.m. Dame Fortune comes to "Maisie's" rescue when her newest complicated scheme backfires. Al Sack's orchestra supplies the background music.

46-10-18
62
Title Unknown
N
46-10-18 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie Ann Sothern as "Maisie" fighting editor in a feminine fashion, gets involved with a boondoggling legislator in her crusade to provide more housing for veterans, on the "Maisie" broadcast at 9:30 p.m. Her plans nearly go awry when she finally discovers that her campaign was aimed at the wrong senator.

46-10-25
63
Title Unknown
N
46-10-25 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie The G.I. housing shortage arouses the ire of Ann Sothern as "Maisie," and she starts out to do something about it, with amusing results. "Maisie" is heard at 9:30 p.m.

46-11-01
64
Title Unknown
N
46-11-01 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie Ann Sothern, as Maisie, sets out to right a wrong, and comes perilously close to wronging a right, in her "Maisie" broadcast at 9:30 p.m.

46-11-08
65
Title Unknown
N
46-11-08 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern, as Maisie, sets out to smooth the path for boy friend Bill Doolittle's new project, and succeeds only in placing obstacles in his path. However, with considerable luck, she finally blunders her way out of the difficulty.

46-11-15
66
Title Unknown
N
46-11-15 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Maisie's beau, Bill Doolittle, sells a white coat covered with black paint spots as a rare ermine item with formerly belonged to a famous princess. "Maisie," played by Ann Sothern, comes to Bill's rescue when complications ensue.

46-11-22
67
Title Unknown
N
46-11-22 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern as "Maisie" tackles another problem and nearly gets thrown for a loss. Elliot Lewis is heard as boy-friend Bill Doolittle.

46-11-29
68
Title Unknown
N
46-11-29 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern, as "Maisie," sets out to straighten out a few points and "fixes" things with a vengeance.

46-12-06
69
Title Unknown
N
46-12-06 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern, as "Maisie," the inimitable blond from Brooklyn, sets out to unravel the troubles of boy friend Bill Doolittle, with the solution turning out worse than the original problem.

46-12-13
70
Title Unknown
N
46-12-13 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) A crisis arrives in the lives of "Maisie" and her boyfriend Bill, and they figure out an effective, if unorthodox, solution on the "Maisie" show. Ann Sothern stars in the title role.

46-12-20
71
Title Unknown
N
46-12-20 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern makes her way into and out of trouble in a half-hour of comedy as "Maisie." Al Sack conducts the orchestra.

46-12-27
72
Title Unknown
N
46-12-27 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) It's the end of the year but not the end of trouble for "Maisie," as the blundering blond gets into a new series of difficulties. Ann Sothern stars in the title role.

47-01-03
73
The New Year's Ball
N
47-01-03 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Maisie and boy friend Bill Doolittle get involved in a romantic mix-up at a New Year's Ball. Ann Sothern plays the title role.

47-01-10
74
Title Unknown
N
47-01-10 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern plays the title role in "Maisie," comedy-drama of life in a small town, where our heroine and her boyfriend Bill find life complicated but comical.

47-01-17
75
Title Unknown
N
47-01-24
76
Title Unknown
N
47-01-24 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Bill Doolittle, boy friend of Maisie, fails to live up to his name as he does a lot (most of it wrong) in the comedy-drama which has Film Star Ann Sothern in the leading role.

47-01-31
77
Title Unknown
N
47-01-31 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern as "Maisie," suspects the worst when boy friend Bill buys her a bracelet from a recently robbed jeweler.

47-02-07
78
Title Unknown
N
47-02-07 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Bill Doolittle, by terms of a bargain arranged by Maisie, must win the first golf game in order to sell an insurance policy to a golfer client. Ann Sothern stars in the title role.

47-02-14
79
Title Unknown
N
47-02-14 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern, the same Maisie of the movies, finds it easier to create new problems than to solve old ones as editor and publisher of a middle-sized American town newspaper.

47-02-21
80
Title Unknown
N
47-02-21 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Maisie (9:30 p.m. ) Ann Sothern, as Maisie proves that she can get into more trouble than anybody, when Bill Doolittle gives her a problem and she tries to solve it.

47-02-28
81
Title Unknown
N
47-02-28 Mason City Globe-Gazette
Friday P.M.
KGLO
9:30 Maisie, Eversharp, Co., CBS
47-03-07
82
Title Unknown
N
47-03-07 Vidette Messenger
9:30 P.M.--
WBBM--"Maisie," Ann Sothern.

47-03-14
83
Title Unknown
N
47-03-14 Vidette Messenger
9:30 P.M.--
WMAQ--"Maisie," Ann Sothern.

47-03-15 Winnipeg Tribune
Highlights
Definite action over rumors that several sponsors of high budget radio shows would cancel options on their stars has come to light.
Some shows affected include
Frank Morgan and his NBC show Wednesdays at 9 p.m. which will terminate in April; Bob Burns, heard Sundays at 5:30 p.m. over NBC, who finishes the end of May; Eddie Bracken, of CBS shows Sunday, at 8:30 p.m., and Maisie, starring Ann Sothern, heard Fridays at 9:30 p.m. over CBS.

47-03-21
84
Title Unknown
N
47-03-21 Morning Herald
CBS--10:30 Ann Sothern's Maisie
47-03-28
85
Title Unknown
N
[ Final CBS/Eversharp broadcast ]

47-03-28 The Daily Mail
CBS--10:30
Ann Sothern's Maisie finale

47-04-04
--
--





49-10-19
--
--
49-10-19 Salt Lake Tribune
KALL
9:00 -- Comedy! Can You Top This?

49-10-26
1
Department Store Sales Girl

October 26th 1949 premiere spot ad for KALL, Salt Lake City
October 26th 1949 premiere spot ad for KALL, Salt Lake City

Y
[ Salt Lake City Premiere of M-G-M Radio Attractions Run ]

49-10-26 Salt Lake Tribune
KALL
9:00 -- "Maisie" Starring Ann Sothern


49-10-27
1
Department Store Sales Girl
Y
[ Premiere Episode of M-G-M Radio Attractions Run ]

49-10-27 Wisconsin State Journal
9:30 p.m.--Maisie (WGN): 
new series starring Ann Sothern.

a.k.a. 'Daisie Ravier'.
The credits promote MGM's East Side, West Side (released Dec. 22, 1949).
49-11-03
2
Effie and 'The Professor'
Y
The credits promote MGM's East Side, West Side (released Dec. 22, 1949).
49-11-10
3
Acme Surplus Truck Driver
Y
The credits promote MGM's East Side, West Side (released Dec. 22, 1949).
49-11-17
4
Next Stop, Niagara Falls
Y
Ann Sothern is heard mis-speaking her boyfriend's name as Eddie Jackson, vice Eddie Jordan.

The credits promote MGM's Malaya (released Dec. 27, 1949).
49-11-24
5
Maisie Ravier, Private Detective
Y
Listen for the clever reference to the radio program, Suspense.
Maisie is cattily referred to as Miss Peroxide of 1950.

The credits promote MGM's Battleground (released Nov. 9, 1949).
49-12-01
6
Jerome Schmerzterbreugen vs. The Bebopster
Y
The credits promote MGM's On The Town (released Dec. 8, 1949).
49-12-08
49-12-15
49-12-22
49-12-29
50-01-05 Eddie Designs A Suspension Bridge That Goes Nowhere
Y
50-01-12 Sonja, the Smartest Dog In The World
Y
50-01-19 Lord Deveridge and Lady Ravier
Y
50-01-26 Agatha Schlump's Boarding House
Y
The credits promote MGM's On The Town (released Dec. 8, 1949).
50-02-02 Hotel Mercury Night Clerk
Y
50-02-09 All Kinds of Crazy Laws
Y
50-02-16 A Suit for Aiding and Abetting
Y
50-02-23 Bixel's Department Store Kissing Contest
Y
50-03-02 Maisie, The Farmer's Matchmaker
Y
50-03-09 Maisie Bets Joe's Tonsorial Parlor and Shaving Solarium On A Horse
Y
50-03-16 Chester Drake's Phony Love Letter
Y
The credits promote MGM's Key To The City (released Feb. 2, 1950).
50-03-23 The Stage-Door Jasper Caper
Y
The credits promote MGM's Key To The City (released Feb. 2, 1950).
50-03-30 Maisie Inherits The Millvale Sentinel
Y
The credits promote MGM's Key To The City (released Feb. 2, 1950).
50-04-06 Maisie Wrecks A Wreck and Bags A Bag
Y
The credits promote MGM's Nancy Goes To Rio (released March 10, 1950).
50-04-13 Maisie Gets The Charity Ball Rolling
Y
50-04-20 Millie the Moll alias Moitle the Moiderer
Y
Ann Sothern does her best Mae West Impression
50-04-27 Maisie and The Professor
Y
50-05-04 Hazel La Verne
Y
Audrey Totter fills in for Ann Sothern as 'Hazel La Verne'
a.k.a. 'House of The Future'
50-05-11 Title Unknown
N
50-05-18 Title Unknown
N
50-05-25 Title Unknown
N
50-06-01 Title Unknown
N
50-06-08 Title Unknown
N
50-06-15 Title Unknown
N
50-06-22 Bill Jones' Memories of Maisie
Y
Gene Kelly fills in for Ann Sothern as Bill Jones, reflecting on the time he was smitten over Maisie. Florence Halop plays Maisie Ravier.
50-06-29 Maisie and The Maharani Mix-up
Y
50-07-06 1-Year, 4-Month, 8-Day Anniversary at The Ritz Garden
Y
50-07-13 Maisie the Hollywood Matchmaker
Y
No closing credits
50-07-27 The Orphanage Benefit Speaker Mix-up
Y
50-08-03 Maisie Reforms An Ex-Convict
Y
50-08-10 Fontaine's Phony Talent Scout Racket
Y
Jack McCoy is the Announcer
50-08-17 Maisie The Financial Counselor
Y
50-08-24 Maisie Saves The Orphanage
Y
Commercial fill format change
50-08-31 Maisie The Deserted Wife
Y
50-09-07 Maisie and The Dueling Actors
Y
'Bud' Hiestand is the Announcer
50-09-14 Maisie Sells Restoro Skin-Rejuvenator
Y
Jack McCoy is the Announcer
50-09-21 Nancy Hummerschlager's Vacation
Y
50-09-28 1-Year, 4-Month, 8-Day Anniversary at The Ritz Garden
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #33
50-10-05 Maisie the Hollywood Matchmaker
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #34.
Closing credits present
50-10-12 Spike 'Romeo' McCloskey and The Milk Fund
Y
50-10-19 The Orphanage Benefit Speaker Mix-up
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #35
50-10-26 Maisie The Deserted Wife
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #40
50-11-02 Maisie and The Dueling Actors
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #41
50-11-09 Maisie Sells Restoro Skin-Rejuvenator
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #42
50-11-16 Nancy Hummerschlager's Vacation
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #43
50-11-23 Maisie Reforms An Ex-Convict
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #36
50-11-30 Fontaine's Phony Talent Scout Racket
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #37
50-12-07 Maisie The Financial Counselor
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #38
50-12-14 Spike 'Romeo' McCloskey and The Milk Fund
Y
Rebroadcast of Program #46
50-12-21 Eddie and Maisie, Inc.
Y
50-12-28 Larry Cooper, The Wolf with The Five Grand Bracelet
Y
51-01-04 Maisie and The 10,000 Dollar Statue
Y
51-01-11 Maisie, Stand-In for Yvonne DuWitté, Prima Ballerina
Y
51-01-18 Maisie, as 'Portrait of An Angry Woman'
Y
51-01-25 J.C. Higgenbottom and The Overlapping Grip
Y
51-02-01 Maisie Sinks Duke Johnson's Gambling Ship
Y
51-02-08 Maisie and 25,000 Dollar The Cover-up
Y
51-02-15 Napoleon's 10,000 Dollar Love Letter
Y
51-02-22 Muscles
Y
51-03-01 The Wild West Dude Ranch
Y
51-03-08 Merton's Dreams
Y
51-03-15 The Hayfields vs the McCoys
Y
51-03-22 The Fortune Teller
Y
51-03-29 The Newspaper Columnist
Y
51-04-05 Las Vegas
Y
51-04-12 Millie Faraday of Hollywood
Y
51-04-19 Eddie Jordan, Private Eye
Y
51-04-26 Manganese Gold Mine
Y
51-05-03 Hotel Social Director
Y
51-05-10 The Universal Elixir
Y
51-05-17 The Indian Guide
Y
51-05-24 1001 Soaps for the Maharajah
Y
51-10-04 Killer Diller
Y
51-10-11 Aunt Hattie
Y
51-10-18 The Spicy Novel
Y
51-10-25 The African Guide
Y
51-11-01 Stanley Trotter from Ampop
Y
51-11-08 Beatrice Butterfield, Inc
Y
51-11-15 Giant 'Thursday Island Pink' Pearl
Y
51-11-22 The Efficiency Expert
Y
51-11-29 Jimmy Harris for Mayor
Y
51-12-06 The Magic Act
Y
51-12-13 Tex's Oil Stock
Y
51-12-31 Title Unknown
Y





51-12-28
--
--
51-12-28 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Bedtime Story
52-01-04
1
Department Store Sales Girl
N
[MBS Mutual-Don Lee Run; Charles Antell, sponsor]

52-01-04 Janesville Gazette
RADIO CHATTER
'Ann Sothern's "Maisie"
Joins WCLO Schedule at 7
By RALPH SCHROEDER
     Ann Sothern joins the parade of stage and screen stars on the WCLO-Mutual schedule when her Adventures of Maisie dramas debut tonight at 7. These Friday night shows are part of the Monday through Saturday M-G-M produced features scheduled by WCLO for its program log for the New Year.
     The "Maisie" programs feature the blonde comedienne as a down-to-earth miss who becomes involved in unusual situations but somehow manages to emerge as the heroine.
The initial broadcast finds Maisie helping an unfortunate young woman regain her job after being fired. When she plays up to the boss to relsent and re-hire the girl, it provides a hilarious situation.
    
Tom Knight directs and Arthur Phillips writes the scripts. Harry Zimmerman is the musical director.

52-01-11
2
The Hollywood Talent Scout Racket
N
52-01-11 Janesville Gazette
By RALPH SCHROEDER
Maisie
     Ann Sothern, cast in the title role for her Adventures of Maisie, breaks up a would-be Hollywood talent scout's racket during the broadcast tonight at 7. Maisie poses as a stage struck girl and traps the swindler in a rollicking escapade.
     Tonight's broadcast marks
the second in this series of WCLO-Mutual-M-G-M programs.

52-01-18
3
Maisie Stops the Express Train
N
52-01-18 Janesville Gazette
RADIO CHATTER
Maisie's a Daisy, But
Not to This Train Crew
By RALPH SCHROEDER
    
An expectant mother aboard an express train brings out the maternal instinct in Maisie, who promptly becomes involved in a sereis of complicated situations related on Adventures of Maisie on WCLO at 7 tonight.
    
When the mother-to-be faints, Ann Sothern, as Maisie, pulls the emergency cord and brings the train to a screeching halt. Both are put off the mainliner when the train crew discovers the baby is not due for eight months and Maisie goes home with the woman to straighten out her domestic difficulties.

52-01-25
4
The Orphans and The Wrestler
N
52-01-25 Janesville Gazette
RADIO CHATTER
By RALPH SCHROEDER
Maisie
     Maisie's eyes are bigger than her purse. That's the lovable trait backgrounding The Adventures of Maisie broadcast tonight at 7. In this laugh-packed episode. Maisie, as portrayed by Ann Sothern, sees a group of orphans eagerly eyeing billboards at a movie house. She has $3 in her purse, but the box office fee for the group is $6. A professional wrestler, standing in line and waiting for his ticket, vounteers his aid--with the fun beginning at this point.

52-02-01
5
All Work, No Play
N
52-02-01 Janesville Gazette
RADIO CHATTER
"All Work, No Play" Adage
Sparks "Maisie" Funfest
By RALPH SCHROEDER
     All work and no play can make Maisie (Ann Sothern) a dull girl. And our economy-mided heroine finds this to be true during the Adventures of Maisie broadcast tonight at 7.
     It costs money to go out and she and her boyfriend are build ing up their bank accounts for their eventual marriage.If invited out, of course, Maisie and her fiance will join in the fun. When three such invitations are accepted for the same evening, the fun really begins and all at Maisie's expense.

52-02-08
6
The Parking Incident
N
52-02-08 Janesville Gazette
RADIO CHATTER
Parking Automobiles Is
Humorous "Maisie" Lesson
By RALPH SCHROEDER
     Parking an automobile is usually a simple routine--that is for everyone but Maisie (Ann Sothern). Mutual's Adventures of Maisie broadcast tonight at 7 is to be based on a parking incident.
    
She shoves the car on the sidewalk to her auto can fit into the space vacated. And then she learns she has picked on the police chief's car. Everybody will laught at this situation--except Maisie and the chief.

52-02-15
7
Maisie Adopts A Dog
N
"Ann Sothern adopts a dog"
52-02-22
8
Title Unknown
N
52-02-29
9
Title Unknown
N
"Maisie is Introduced to modern art and classes a at an exhibition during the Adventures of Maisie broadcast tonight. When Oliver Button is threatened with eviction, Maisie sells one of his paintings to cover his rent."
52-03-07
10
Filling Out the Insurance Questionnaire
N
52-03-07 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Beloit Regional Final.
52-03-14
11
Maisie Pawns Her Way to Adventure
N
52-03-14 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Advs. of Maisie
52-03-21
12
Title Unknown
N
52-03-21 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Advs. of Maisie
52-03-28
13
Title Unknown
N
52-04-11
14
Title Unknown
N
"Ann Sothern meets outlaw chief."
52-04-18
15
Title Unknown
N
"Merton, the dreamer at Maisie's (Ann Southern) boarding house, is solely responsible for the episode that takes place tonight on ADVENTURES OF MAISIE"
52-04-25
16
Title Unknown
N
"A shootin' feud between the Hayfields and McCoys, erupts as Maisie (Ann Sothern) is mistaken for Grandpaw Hayfield's hillbilly
grand-daughter, Daisy-Belle tonight on ADVENTURES OF MAISIE."
52-05-02
17
Title Unknown
N
"An amusing episode takes place tonight on , ADVENTURES OF MAISIE when Maisie applies for a job as a tearoom fortune teller."
52-05-09
18
Don't Be Stupid--Ask Cupid
N
"ADVENTURES OF MAISIE, starring Ann Sothern presents Maisie tonight in her new job as a columnist for the lovelorn."
52-05-16
19
Title Unknown
N
52-05-16 Janesville Gazette
RADIO CHATTER
Maisie, "Hot" Car involved
in Tonight's Adventure
By RALPH SCHROEDER
Maisie (Ann Sothern) gets the most unusual jobs during her comedy escapades on her programs. But the one which starts the comedy routine for the Adventures of Maisie broadcast tonight at 7, was seemingly a most simple task.
She was asked to drivce a car to Las Vegas, Nev. She didn't know it was stolen . . . and by the time she finds out everybody's in trouble and her audience is laughing too hard to care.

"Maisie unwittingly drives a stolen car to Las Vegas"
52-05-23
20
Title Unknown
52-05-30
21
Title Unknown
52-06-06
22
Title Unknown
52-06-13
23
Title Unknown
N
"Amusing incidents happen on the ADVENTURES OF MAISIE when Maisie, played by Ann Sothern, gets her lazy boy friend a job as a private detective."
52-06-20
24
Title Unknown
N
"Singer stranded on Mediterranean island,"
52-06-27
25
Title Unknown
N
52-06-27 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
It's the last program until next fall for Ann Sothern as Maisie in that rollicking 30 minutes of laughts on the Adventures of Maisie. The program is heard at 7 p.m. and brings another situationf or Maisie to solve. No matter how hard she tries to be of help, Maisie always manages to get involved with little trouble and has a lot of trouble finding her way out.

"Mindreader reads assistant's mind and fires her."
52-07-04
26
Title Unknown
N
52-07-11
--
--





52-09-26
--
--
52-09-26Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Symphonic Strings
52-10-03
27
N
52-10-03 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
Language-strangling, mirth provoking Maisie, Ann Sothern, if you please, returns from vacation for her Adventures of Maisie broadcast tonihgt at 7. And for her first adventure into mirthland, Maisie injects herself into the innocuous conversation of two women. It all happens on a bus, with Maisie discovering she should have waited for the next one.

52-10-10
28
Title Unknown
N
52-10-10 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
Maisie (Ann Sothern) thought the turban-headed man having a street argument with a bus driver--and with all the passengers looking on--was a former nimd-reader she'd once worked with. But she discovers, during the Adventures of Maisie broadcast tonight over WCLO at 7, the betoweled one was actually a poohbah of a hard-to-pronounce kingdom--and therein lies another tale of hilarious adventure.

"Ann Sothern meets a turbaned man and mistakes him for a mind-reader she once knew"
52-10-17
29
Title Unknown
N
52-10-17 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
Ann Sothern as Maisie will rovide the comedy tonight on the Adventures of Maisie broadcast at 7 o'clock. Maisie, by trying to be of aid to others, manages to become involved in situations that bring confusion instead of help. All in all, the program provides listeners with 30 minutes of fun. All star Hollywood casts play the supporting roles on these productions.

52-10-24
30
Title Unknown
N
52-10-24 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Advs. of Maisie
WGEZ--Advs. of Maisie

"Ann Sothern dreams up a money making scheme"

52-10-31
31
Title Unknown
N
52-10-31 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WGEZ--Advs. of Maisie

52-11-07
32
Title Unknown
N
"Adventure of a girl cab driver"

52-11-07 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Advs. of Maisie

52-11-14
33
Title Unknown
N
52-11-14 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
The Adventures of Maisie will be broadcast over WCLO at 7 p.m., starring Ann Sothern as the incomparable Maisie. These situational comedies provide listeners with plenty of laughs as Maisie, always trying to do good, manages to involve herself in some kind of mixup. These unintended mixups become the basis of the show's laughs, which are many.

52-11-21
34
Title Unknown
N
52-11-21 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
The wise-cracking blonde from Brooklyn brings WCLO listeners another 30 minutes of comedy tonight at 7. Ann Sothern, who stars in the role of Maisie, becomes involved in another hairbrained idea on the broadcast of the Adventures of Maisie. This program is the Friday edition of the popular block of MGM-Mutual series of shows heard Monday through Friday at 7 p.m.

52-11-28
35
Title Unknown
N
52-11-28 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
There will be no basketball game for sports fans tonight but there will be plenty of good radio programs over WCLO. At 7 p.m. the Brooklyn blonde names Maiside will be ready to entertain you iwth a progrma of situational comedy. Maisie, try as she will, seems to become involved in situations that would have been solved more easily without her help. However, it provides listeners with plenty of laughs on the Adventures of Maisie tonight.

52-12-05
36
Title Unknown
N
52-12-05Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--Advs. of Maisie

52-12-12
37
Title Unknown
N
52-12-12 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
At 7 this evening, WCLO listeners will be entertained with 30 minutes of comedy on the Adventures of Maisie program starring Ann Sothern. Miss Sothern stars in the Maisie role which she created many years ago. The format of the show has Maisie trying her best to be of help to others but she always manages to become involved in the wrong way.

52-12-19
38
Title Unknown
N
52-12-19 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
That screwball blonde from Brooklyn will be on the loose tonight in another comedy program on the Adventures of Maisie. The 30 minutes of comedy relief have Ann Sothern in the starring role of the dizzy blonde from Brooklyn. Maisie, as you know, is always trying to be of help to someone but somehow always manages to become involved in some trouble during the process. A log of laughs await you on the Adventures of Maisie tonight at 7.

52-12-26
39
Title Unknown
N
[ Last Episode ]

52-12-26 Janesville Gazette
Maisie
Your week end can be merrier with the many laughs that await you on the Adventures of Maisie program tonight at 7. Ann Sothern portrays the Maisie role. Maisie, as you know, is the blonde from Brooklyn that tries to be of help to others but somehow managers to involver herself in situations that cause plenty of confusion.

53-01-02
--
--
53-01-02 Janesville Gazette
7:00 P.M.
WCLO--DAV program

The Adventures of Maisie Biographies




Ann Sothern
[
Harriette Arlene Lake]

(Maisie Ravier)

Stage, Screen, Radio and Television Actor.
(1909-2001)

Birthplace: Valley City, North Dakota

Education:
University of Washington

Radiography:

1936 Hollywood Hotel
1939 Gulf Screen Guild Theatre
1940 Good News Of 1940
1941 Lux Radio Theatre
1942 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1944 Cavalcade Of America
1944 Radio Almanac
1945 This Is My Best
1945 Harold Lloyd Comedy Theatre
1945 The Adventures Of Maisie
1946 The Danny Kaye Show
1946 Stars In the Afternoon
1948 Suspense
1948 Command Performance
1949 Duffy's Tavern
1949 The Adventures Of Maisie
1950 MGM Theatre Of the Air
1952 The Martin and Lewis Show
Voice Of the Army


'Maisie' Filmography:

1939 Maisie
1940 Congo Maisie
1940 Gold Rush Maisie
1941 Maisie Was a Lady
1941 Ringside Maisie
1942 Maisie Gets Her Man
1943 Swing Shift Maisie
1944 Maisie Goes to Reno
1946 Up Goes Maisie
1947 Undercover Maisie

Redhead Harriet Lake circa 1929
Redhead Harriet Lake circa 1929

Harriet Lake vamping it for publicity photo circa1929
Harriet Lake vamping it for publicity photo circa 1929
Blonde Ann Sothern circa 1937
Blonde Ann Sothern circa 1937
Ann Sothern circa 1933
Ann Sothern circa 1933

Ann Sothern circa 1937
Ann Sothern circa 1937

Ann Sothern circa 1936 over NBC
Ann Sothern circa 1936 over NBC

1943's Swing Shift Maisie poster
1943's Swing Shift Maisie poster

Ann Sothern and James Craig in a publicity still from 1943's Swing Shift Maisie
Ann Sothern and James Craig in a publicity still from 1943's Swing Shift Maisie
'Maisie' illustration from promotional poster for 1940's Congo Maisie
'Maisie' illustration from promotional poster for 1940's Congo Maisie

Ann Sothern publicity still circa 1939
Ann Sothern publicity still circa 1939

Ann Sothern publicity still circa 1950
Ann Sothern publicity still circa 1950

Robert Sterling [William Sterling Hart], Ann Sothern's 2nd husband and father to her only child, Tisha circa 1954
Robert Sterling [William Sterling Hart], Ann Sothern's 2nd husband and father to her only child, Tisha circa 1954
Ann Sothern holding daughter Patricia Ann ("Tisha") for Radio Mirror circa 1946
Ann Sothern holding daughter Patricia Ann ("Tisha") for Radio Mirror circa 1946
Ann Sothern and her beautiful daughter, Tisha Sterling circa 1962
Ann Sothern and her beautiful daughter, Tisha Sterling circa 1962

First off, full disclosure: we're huge fans of Ann Sothern. There's our editorial disclaimer. Nevertheless, the fact remains that Ann Sothern was one of the 20th Century's greatest dramatic and comedic talents. More than any other Golden Age actress, Ann Sothern was "in love with the present" every day of her long, storied life.

Born in Valley City, North Dakota, Harriette Lake was the second of three daughters born to itinerant 'businessman and thespian', Herbert Lake and Opera singer and diction coach, Annette Yde. Though her father deserted the family when Harriette was 6, she nonetheless was born to a very cultured and intellectual family. Her paternal grandfather, Simon Lake, had invented the modern submarine and her maternal grandfather, Hans Nilsson was a noted Danish violinist. Her older sister Bonnie Lake would go on to become a prolific song writer in her own right, publishing "Sandman", "I've Got Your Number" and "Gracias", and eventually forming her own music publishing house, Bonnie Lake Music Publishing Company. Her younger sister Marian Lake was one of the longer-runnning ghost writers for the famed Dear Abby agony column.

Harriette Lakes's first Stage appearance was in Broadway's Smiles (1930) at the Ziegfield Theatre. She then appeared in America's Sweetheart (1931), at the Broadhurst Theatre, Everybody's Welcome at the Shubert Theatre, and Of Thee I Sing (1933) at the Imperial Theatre.

She began her Film career as petite (5'1"), 18-year old redhead, Harriet Lake in the 1927 musical, Broadway Nights. She followed that--still as Harriet Lake--with the 1929 Warner Bros. musical, The Show of Shows. In an extraordinary Film career that followed, she would star in 64 movies for RKO, Warner Bros. and MGM, only finally achieving an Oscar nomination--for Best Supporting Actress--in 1987's The Whales of August. She lost her only nomination in 60 years to Olympia Dukakis.

Ann Sothern's voice was music to the ears whether talking or singing. Her gentle, kind eyes, iridescent personality and timeless beauty, though apparent to the world, were features she was just as content to downplay her entire life. But it was her natural wisdom and good humor that permitted her to endure physical and health setbacks that would destroy the outlook of any average person. Resilient is the best way to describe her early career. When her RKO and Warner Bros. musicals bombed at the box office, she jumped to comedies, and ultimately to dramas and mysteries.

An MGM series planned for Jean Harlow was sidelined when Harlow unexpected died on June 7, 1937. The following year Joan Bennett and Ann Sothern wowed audiences in Trade Winds (1938). Ann Sothern, especially, impressed audiences with her snappy delivery of witty dialogue. So it was that Louis B. Mayer found his replacement for the legendary Harlow. He signed Ann to an MGM contract and cast Sothern as Maisie, the first of ten 'Maisie' features over the next 8 years. Sothern's Maisie took no guff from anyone--least of all, wolves--loved fellas she could 'help' in some way, and remained a great pal to competing gals. In short, everyone loved Maisie--and everyone was quickly falling in love with Ann Sothern.

Ann Sothern's Radio career, though not as prolific as her Film career, was certainly as entertaining. It was Ann Sothern's appearance on Lux Radio Theatre's adaptation of 1941's Maisie Was A Lady that first alerted CBS to Sothern's natural Radio talent. After over three years of contractual wrangling, CBS persuaded M-G-M to undertake a syndicated radio version of Maisie Ravier's adventures, appropriately entitled, The Adventures of Maisie. M-G-M had long maintained that Ann Sothern's contract prohibited her from performing as Maisie Ravier over any other medium. M-G-M finally reached a compromise with CBS, with M-G-M producing and pressing the electrical transcriptions and retaining syndication rights, and CBS gaining the right to air its first run.

The contractual dispute having been resolved, CBS began airing The Adventures of Maisie on July 5, 1945. The reviewers of the day loved the Radio rendition of the Maisie character, as much as Ann Sothern's wonderful depiction of her over Radio. An M-G-M production from the start, its production values were a cut above other radio productions of the World War II era. Ann Sothern's cast and crew welcomed the opportunity to work with her on the air.

In that same vein, here's an interesting quote from the Mason City Globe-Gazette from July 19, 1945 that sums up Ann Sothern's Radio work ethic:

"THE MILLIONS of fans of Ann Sothern's "Maisie" pictures for M-G-M have come to expect that Maisie Ravier will overcome all obstacles the hard way—and that's the way Miss Sothern does it in real life. For instance, at her radio debut last Thursday, Producer Tony Stanford noticed that she'd memorized her script.

"That isn't necessary," he told her. "Why not do it the easy way and simply read it into the mike?"

"But I'm used to memorizing my lines," protested Ann. "Reading them would be the hard way!""

Shortly after Ann Sothern's Radio debut in The Adventures of Maisie, the Mason City Globe-Gazette from July 31, 1945 recorded this charming anecdote:

"WHEN ANN SOTHERN, star of the "Maisie" CBS air series, stepped from the stage following the show last week she was handed a bouquet of American Beauty roses sent by the MGM star's husband, Lieut. Robert Sterling, who's now in the Army Air Force."

In all, Ann Sothern recorded seventy-eight programs of The Adventures of Maisie under her M-G-M contract for CBS Radio. They aired over CBS until the Spring of 1947. The Mutual Broadcasting System (MBS) persuaded Sothern to re-record the entire run for the Mutual Don-Lee Network beginning in 1949. The entire series ran over Mutual for two more years until the Christmas season of 1952.

It was while re-recording the MBS series that Ann Sothern was stricken with a series of illnesses that eventually spanned two years of frequent hospitalizations and recovery cycles. In the process she underwent a thyroidectomy that caused her to to gain weight and retain excessive fluids for the remainder of her life. The complications from the removal of her thyroid gland created other medical problems for her that often sidelined her acting career for months at a time.

Not long before she'd undertaken re-recording her Adventures of Maisie for Radio, the vaunted Hollywood studio system had begun to collapse under its own weight. Ann Sothern, no stranger to the vagaries of the old studio system, landed yet again on her feet with her electrifying performance in 1949's A Letter To Three Wives. Ann Sothern portrayed a radio writer married to teacher Kirk Douglas, while trying to juggle the demands of a demanding employer with the wounded ego of her sensitive husband.

Throughout the years 1950 to 1952, Ann Sothern faced the daunting task of undertaking a Radio program and two critically acclaimed 1950 films--MGM's Nancy Goes To Rio and RKO's The Judge Steps Out. Shooting was interrupted several times during production of both movies for Ann Sothern's health problems. Indeed, for three months of her recording sessions for The Adventures of Maisie good friends Audrey Totter and Gene Kelly filled in for her. The remaining air dates of the period were filled in with re-broadcasts.

The hospitalizations and permament transformation to her metabolism left her much heavier and more and more uncomfortable with her appearance. But even with the increased weight, Ann Sothern was still viewed by her fans as an attractive, sensual, good-humored performer. Even still, it was becoming obvious to her that Television might be a more manageable vehicle for both her talent and ongoing medical recovery.

As might be expected, her Television career was as successful as her Film and Radio careers had been. No stranger to Television, Ann Sothern had already made over 20 appearances on the small screen before she launched her Private Secretary series in 1953. Private Secretary as an immediate success, running from 1953 through 1957. Ann Sothern's Susie McNamara character was as endearing to her fans as Maisie had been. But Susie McNamara was more urbane and sophisticated than Sothern's Maisie.

Sothern followed her Private Secretary series with The Ann Sothern Show, which ran from 1958 to 1961. Sothern's Katy O'Connor character was even more sophisticated and canny than her Maisie and Susie McNamara characters. And in her role as Assistant Hotel Manager for a large metropolitan hotel, Ann Sothern was able to take on even more sophisticated scripts. Indeed even though her weight had almost doubled during the intervening ten years since her thyroid was removed, the middle-aged Ann Sothern remained as charming and endearing as ever to a new generation of fans. Together, the two Television series were nominated for five prime-time Emmy's.

Upon completing her own Television series' Ann Sothern continued to appear in over a hundred more Television episodes, often in recurring roles, as in the two Lucille Ball programs, The Lucille Ball-Desi Arnaz Show and The Lucy Show. Ann Sothern eventually got to reprise A Letter to Three Wives as a 1985 Television special, but this time as Ma Finney. She peformed in four more films, capping her Film career with her first Oscar nomination for The Whales of August, in which her daughter Tisha also appeared.

After the Whales of August, Ann Sothern retired from Film and Television, devoting the remainder of her life to her family and pastimes. She retired to Ketchum, Idaho to live near her daughter and granddaughter, continuing to enjoy friends and family for another twenty years until she passed of natural causes in 2001, at the age of 92.




Walter 'Wally' Maher
(Mike)

Radio, Stage, and Film Actor
(1908-1951)
Birthplace: Cinncinati, Ohio, U.S.A.

Radiography:
1936 The Lux Radio Theatre
1943 The Cavalcade of America
1943 Tommy Riggs and Betty Lou
1943 The Jack Benny Program
1944 Suspense
1945 The Eddie Bracken Show
1945 Arch Oboler's Plays
1946 The New Adventures of Michael Shayne
1946 The Whistler
1948 Let George Do It
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 The Adventures of Philip Marlowe
1950 Family Theatre
1950 Night Beat
1950 The Line-Up
Wally Maher's comparitively sparse entry from the October 1940 edition of Lew Lauria's Radio Artists Directory
Wally Maher's comparitively sparse entry from the October 1940 edition of Lew Lauria's Radio Artists Directory

Wally Maher as a court clerk preparing to pass around Bob Hope's late alimony payments to his three ex-wives in The Big Broadcast of 1938
Wally Maher as a court clerk preparing to pass around Bob Hope's late alimony payments to his three ex-wives in The Big Broadcast of 1938


Wally Maher as pilot Cliff Parsons in 1939's Nick Carter, Master Detective
Wally Maher as pilot Cliff Parsons in 1939's Nick Carter, Master Detective.

Wally Maher spot promotion for 1943's Tommy Riggs and Betty Lou
Wally Maher spot promotion for 1943's Tommy Riggs and Betty Lou

From the November 7, 1946 edition of The Cedar Rapids Tribune:

Wally Maher
Alias Michael Shayne

The fellow who plays Michael Shayne every Tuesday night is no stranger to the role of crime fiction. Wally Maher figures he's been killed more times than any other actor working in radio. He's been chewed by alligators, attacked by vampires, gassed, shot and various other methods of elimination. Wally never played a tough guy until he came to California, his forte is light comedy. In only half a dozen out of 127 pictures has he played light comedy, the rest were heavies.
After starting a radio career in his home town of Cincinnati, he went to New York where he won a host of theatrical roles. Then came Hollywood in 1935 where he continued his radio work and started on pictures. Wally likes comedy, so he likes Michael Shayne. He doesn't like to play tough guys so "Shayne" is as easygoing as a sleuth can be and still keep his self-respect.
He likes to read detective stories, but his favoilte reading is American and Irish history, with, the accent on the latter. His grandparents on both sides came from Tipperary. He has three children, two girls and a boy. Two of the children look like their mother, who is of Italian decent, but Wally says all of them are Irish at heart.
Wally can speak Italian, and when he was working as baggage clerk on the Southern Pacific, he used to go out and greet ths prisoner trains loaded with Italian PWs on their way through Glendale. He talked to them in Italian and used to get a kick out of watching their faces light up.
With his extensive theatrical experience, Wally Maher is capably suited to the role of the "private eye," "Michael Shayne." His secretary-girl friend, Phyllis, is right in there pitching, too. For the best in mystery dramas, "Michael Shayne" is on the air Tuesday nights at 9 o'clock.


Wally Maher had a solid movie career under his belt long before he lent his unmistakable voice talent to Radio. Indeed his filmography reads as long as his radiography. His stocky build and expressive face provided him with regular work as a character actor, but it was his highly distinctive voice that set him apart. Though from Ohio, his uncanny ability to project a gruff, irascible, but humorous East Coast--or West Coast--'tough' earned him countless roles in Radio as a hard-boiled thug, police detective, or adventurous sidekick.

He was a pretty straight foil for Bill Johnstone in The Line-Up, but his wonderfully animated role as George Valentine's nemesis, Lieutenant Riley, in Let George Do It, was in this author's humble opinion, some of Mr. Maher's most satisfying and entertaining work.

Destined to be often confused with Herb Butterfield or Wilms Herbert, Wally Maher's distinctive chortles and grunts usually made the identification of his voice unimpeachable. He debuted as the lead in The Adventures of Michael Shayne, and would have been just as enjoyable as Jeff Chandler, had he secured that role for the entire run of the program. Indeed, the series' creator, Brett Halliday, reportedly preferred Wally Maher's depiction of his protagonist.

Sadly, Wally Maher was hospitalized while appearing in The Line-Up and Let George Do It. He'd had a lung removed shortly before the beginning of the The Line-Up, with Raymond Burr often filling in for him near the end. He passed away December 27, 1951 at St. Vincent's Hospital, in Los Angleles at the age of 43, after an all too brief career of 22 years in Stage, Film and Radio.

It's the wonder of Golden Age Radio that preserves his memory for most of us . . . and what wonderful memories they are.




Lurene Tuttle portraying both the murderess and victim in the Whistler dramatization of 'Death Sees Double'
Lurene Tuttle
(Ensemble performer)

Stage, Screen, Radio, and Television Actress; Lecturer and Acting Coach
(1907-1986)

Birthplace: Pleasant Lake, IN

Radiography:
1937 Hollywood Hotel
1937 White Fires of Inspiration
1937 Columbia Workshop
1937 Lux Radio Theatre
1938 CBS Hollywood Showcase
1938 Silver Theatre
1938 Texaco Star Theatre
1939 Calling All Cars
1939 The Chase and Sanborn Hour
1939 The Jello Program
1940 Good News of 1940
1940 Forecast
1940 The Rudy Valee Sealtest Show
1941 The Great Gildersleeve
1941 Hollywood Premier
1942 CBS Looks At Hollywood
1942 Cavalcade of America
1942 The Adventures of Red Ryder
1942 Stars Over Hollywood
1942 Forty Years Remembered
1942 Hello Mom
1942 The Mayor of the Town
1942 Dr Christian
1943 Wings To Victory
1943 Victory Belles
1943 Lights Out
1943 Suspense
1944 Globe Theatre
1944 Mystery House
1944 The Star and the Story
1944 This Is My Story
1944 Columbia Presents Corwin
1945 Theatre of Famous Radio Players
1945 Arch Oboler's Plays
1945 On A Note of Triumph
1945 Twelve Players
1945 The Whistler
1945 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre
1945 Theatre of Romance
1945 Rogue's Gallery
1946 Strange Wills
1946 Hollywood Star Time
1946 The World of Rosalind Marlowe
1946 Encore Theatre
1946 Dark Venture
1946 The Adventures of Sam Spade
1946 Academy Award
1946 The Mercury Summer Theatre
1946 Favorite Story
1946 The Cat
1947 Maxwell House Coffee Time
1947 The Rudy Vallee Show
1947 The Smiths of Hollywood
1947 The Right To Live
1947 Operation Nightmare
1947 The Adventures of Philip Marlowe
1947 Mystery In the Air
1947 Sound Stage For Joan Crawford
1947 The Raleigh Cigarette Program
1947 Errand Of Mercy
1948 The Unexpected
1948 Your Movietown Radio Theatre
1948 Ellery Queen
1948 In Your Name
1948 The Diary of Fate
1948 Guest Star
1948 Hallmark Playhouse
1948 NBC University Theatre
1948 Make Believe Town
1948 Jeff Regan, Investigator
1948 Let George Do It
1948 Camel Screen Guild Theatre
1948 The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet
1948 The George O'Hanlon Show
1948 The Red Skelton Show
1949 Sealtest Variety Theatre
1949 Pat Novak For Hire
1949 Screen Director's Playhouse
1949 The Prudential Family Hour of Stars
1949 Richard Diamond, Private Detective
1949 Family Theatre
1949 The Adventures of the Saint
1949 Four Star Playhouse
1950 For the Living
1950 Presenting Charles Boyer
1950 Night Beat
1950 The Story of Doctor Kildare
1950 Sara's Private Caper
1950 Hollywood Star Playhouse
1950 Rocky Jordan
1950 The Adventures of Philip Marlowe
1950 The Miracle of America
1950 Tales of the Texas Rangers
1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
1950 Mr President
1952 The Silent Men
1952 The Railroad Hour
1952 The Freedom Story
1953 The Hallmark Hall of Fame
1953 Broadway Is My Beat
1953 The First Nighter Program
1953 General Electric Theatre
1953 You Were There
1956 CBS Radio Workshop
1956 Those Young Bryans
1957 The Ruggles
1958 Heartbeat Theatre
1959 Have Gun, Will Travel

Caption: Lurene Tuttle, Western radio actress, frequently plays in sketches on the CBS Hollywood Showcase (1938)
Caption: Lurene Tuttle, Western radio actress, frequently plays in sketches on the CBS Hollywood Showcase (1938)

Lurene Tuttle circa 1940
Lurene Tuttle circa 1940

Lurene Tuttle circa 1957
Lurene Tuttle circa 1957

Lurene Tuttle with Howard Duff
Lurene Tuttle with Howard Duff
as 'Effie' and Sam Spade circa 1946

Lurene Tuttle plays a duet at the piano with daughter Barbara
Lurene Tuttle plays a duet at the piano with daughter Barbara

Lurene Tuttle rehearses with Dick Haymes for Everything for The Boys
Lurene Tuttle rehearses with Dick Haymes for Everything for The Boys

Lurene Tuttle was also a Mom, one of her great pleasures in life.
Lurene Tuttle was also a Mom, one of her great pleasures in life.

Lurene Tuttle in one of her more sultry roles.
Lurene Tuttle in one of her more sultry roles.

Lurene Tuttle shows her amazing versatility yet again.
Lurene Tuttle shows her amazing versatility yet again.

News clipping about Lurene Tuttle, November 5, 1949 thumb
News clipping about Lurene Tuttle, November 5, 1949

Lurene Tuttle with Rosalind Russell
Lurene Tuttle with Rosalind Russell
in the Suspense production of 'The
Sisters' from Dec. 9 1948

Barbara Ruick, daughter of Lurene Tuttle and Mel Ruick circa 1954
Barbara Ruick, daughter of Lurene Tuttle and Mel Ruick circa 1954

Lurene Tuttle served as the first woman President of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Union
Lurene Tuttle served as the first woman President of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists Union

Lurene Tuttle served on the Board of the Screen Actors Guild from 1951-1954
Lurene Tuttle served on the Board of the Screen Actors Guild from 1951-1954
Lurene Tuttle served on the faculty of the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts
Lurene Tuttle served on the faculty of the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts
Lurene Tuttle's Radiography is arguably the most extensive and versatile in the annals of Golden Age Radio History. There was simply nothing she--and her amazing voice--could not do, and do superbly. She remains this author's all-time favorite radio actress. Lurene Tuttle was born in Pleasant Lake, Indiana in 1907, but was reared out west on a ranch in Arizona near the California border. O.V. Tuttle, her father, had performed in minstrel shows but relied primarily on work as a railroad station agent during the 1920s. Lurene Tuttle's grandfather had been a Drama teacher, managing an opera house at one time in Indiana, her birth state. Lurene studied acting in Phoenix and the cute, petite redhead showed her scene-stealing comedic talent early on.

After she turned 15, her family relocated to Monrovia, California, where Lurene Tuttle began her performing career in earnest. She obtained her formal dramatic training at the Pasadena Playhouse, appearing in many of their productions with great success. She later joined Murphy's Comedians, a vaudeville troupe, and began performing as a dramatic ingénue in stock productions.

Though Broadway eluded her, Lurene Tuttle performed on Stage regularly until the 1930s.

Known for her fine speaking voice and extraordinary range of dialects, The Depression Years lead her to work in Radio, a natural medium for her extraordinary voice talent. For the next 25 years of the Golden Age of Radio, Lurene Tuttle became one of Radio's most recognized voices in virtually every Radio venue in which she performed.

From the August 1947 issue of Radio Mirror, in Lurene Tuttle's Own words:

Luck Is Hard Work
By Lurene Tuttle

I WONDER if the first "split-personality" a psychologist ever discovered wasn't an actress?  And if you're a radio actress as well, believe me--my personality isn't just split, it's all in little pieces.
     In the morning I wake up, peer at myself in the mirror and--yes--I can recognize the Ted hair and the grey eyes that belong to Lurene Tuttle; but an hour later I'm standing in front of a microphone, sneering my way through a broadcast as a blackhearted murderess . . . or as an eighty-year-old grandmother . . . or as a brat or as a queen . . or a barmaid.
     And that goes on all day long.

     Is it any wonder I sometimes wonder just who Lurene Tuttle is?  Not only are there all these make-helieve characters I slip in and out of during broadcasting hours--but there's the me that is mother to my teen-age Barbara.  And the me that likes to prowl around in dusty antique shops for the little porcelain dogs I collect.  And likes to play crazy word games with friends or settle weighty problems over a midnight pot of coffee.
     And there's the me that's known around the studios as "The Rock."  (It doesn't apply, they tell me, to the way I look; I can't gain an ounce over my hundred and two pounds and I stopped growing at five feet three.)  It's short for the Rock of Gibralter, that symbol of stability and dependability.  Maybe it's not glamorous, but I'd rather be known as "The Rock" than as almost anything eise, because it indicates that I've been at least a little successful in being where I'm supposed to be when I'm supposed to be there, and in giving the best performance I know how no matter what the part.
      I say almost anything else.  That means that, above all, I want to be the me that's Barbara's mother.  I don't understand actresses who are ashamed to admit they have grown-up daughters.  Barbara is in High School, and I see no point in talking about her as "my little girl," trying to disguise my age, as I've heard some do.  I'm a lot more apt to brag about her!  She's bright and she's pretty and some day I think she'll be showing me how to act.
     Barbara's father, Mel Ruick, and I were divorced a few years ago.  We're still good friends.  Though his radio announcing keeps him in New York, Mel was able to spend Christmas here with Barbara and they are still a close father-and-daughter team.  But, for most of the year, it's just the two of us, and Miss Johnson, who looks after us both.  And, of course, all of Barbara's friends . . . I'll never forget, for instance, last New Year's Eve.  It's seldom I go to a party, but this one I was looking forward to.  Yet--promptly at twelve midnight I had to excuse myself, explain hastily to my escort, and drive home and then taxi an assorted bunch of some twenty-five kids from Barbara's party to their respective homes which were scattered all over the San Fernando Valley!  I got back to my own party and date at two-thirty in the moming, just as all the other guests were yawning their way out the front door.
     But I'm no Big Sister, only, to Babs. I'm her mother.  She comes to me with help with her problems as well as for her fun.  Whether it's boy-friends or clothes or our endless discussions of what she will do when she's "grownup," I try my honest best to help her.  We have our rules, too.  When it comes to schoolwork--my share is helping in research, but she's the one to actually do the job.
     And there's one opening night I'm looking forward to as intensely as if it were my own premiere of the movie "Heaven Only Knows."
     Babs and her gang of friends have made a movie of their own, with themselves as actors, and they tell me its showing is to have an audience of one.  The kids have decided that only Mother Tuttle is to be permitted to peek at it, because it seems they feel I'll take a professional attitude and not a parental one . . . and they're afraid of shocking their own families!
     I do understand--because I remember wondering how my mother and dad were going to react the first time they saw me kiss a boy on stage!
     Between that first kiss and that good part I mentioned in Seymour Nebenzal's "Heaven Only Knows" there have been a lot of years, a lot of disappointments, a lot of hard, hard work.
     Before Barbara goes into anything like that, I want her to have all the sound preparation she can get; I want her to have the same safe, lovely life I had as a child.  Not that my family was rich, or that I was sheltered from the world.  But there had always been affection, family ties, experiences shared.
     It was in a small mining town called Johannesburg, on the edge of the California Mojave desert that I spent my childhood.
     DAD was station master and every day I met the trains with him.  The mines at Johannesburg and Atolia and the Yellow Aster at Ransburg, nearby, were going full blast and it attracted people from all over the country.  I was excited by all these colorful people and, unconsciously, I studied them and watched them.  Afterwards I would imitate them.  Dad always encouraged me, because his own hobby was putting on amateur theatricals.
     It wasn't difficult to break into stock companies.  For many years I was leading lady for major stock companies, among them the Henry Duffy Players.
     Then came the depression--and stock was out.  Came my marriage to Mel Ruick and Barbara.
     Even if stock companies hadn't gone out of business, though, I had resolved to be a mother, entirely, for the first three years of Barbara's life.  That kind of security I felt she needed because I knew how formative are these early years of a child.  After that, I felt, she wouldn't need me with her; she would be sure of my love for her.  But until she was three years old I had determined to forget the stage.
     The time passed.  Three years were soon over.  Barbara had had everything, so far, that I could give her, and I was ready to go back to work.  I was and am an actress; an actress has to act to be happy.  But at that point, I suddenly discovered that I was a frustrated housewife with no future in sight.  A person doesn't just walk out and get a good part on the stage or in the movies.  I hadn't thought at all of radio.  I got very, very discouraged indeed.
     And all of a sudden a friend, Cy Kendall, called me to say that tryouts for the Hollywood Hotel program were being held at CBS and why didn't I rush right over?  But I've never been in front of a microphone in my life, I worried--even as I was putting on my hat and running out the front door.  I was scared, all right, but it was a chance to act, and I was passing up no chance at that stage of my career!
     At ten o'clock I entered the studio.  It was five o'clock before my turn came.  But I got the part!
     Though I signed a contract with the Hollywood Hotel program for three years, new parts came slowly.  Then I heard Charles Vanda of CBS was producing White Fires.  I begged for a chance.  White Fi res was the weekly dramatic presentation of lives of famous people--just the kind of roles I wanted.
     The next week I was on the show, and I stayed with White Fires for two years.  I grew with that show.
     I learned something very strange about myself, then.  In a theater or in a movie you have costumes, and makeup men to change your appearance.  But there is nothmg of that in radio.  You wear the same dress you wore when you were out shopping an hour before and your make-up is just what you would ordinarily have on the street.
     But I swear that with me there is an actual physical as well as emotional change that goes on when I pick up the script and start reading my lines.
     The time I spent on White Fires really paid off and nowadays I have so much work it's like hopping on and off a merry-go-round every week, grabbing for the brass ring at every show.
     Want to take a ride with me for one week?  Here's how it goes--
MONDAY:  Breakfast with Barbara.  To the movie set of "Heaven Only Knows" (I play Mrs. O'Donnell, the
scrublady).  Rehearsal of the Dark Venture radio show at five; broadcast at 9:00 (murderess) .
     Tuesday: Movie set in the morning.  Rehearsal for Academy Award show (fourteen-year-old girl).   Home to spend an hour with Barbara.
     Wednesday:  Ten o'clock broadcast of serial Masquerade.  On to movie set.  Back to studio for Academy Award broadcast.  Home, to check household accounts and plan week's menus with Miss Johnson.
     Thursday:  This was the day I almost fell off that merry-go-round.  Morning, on "Heaven Only Knows" set in costume and make-up.  Since we were going to be shooting off and on all day, I had the bright idea of keeping my scrublady costume on even when I went to broadcasts.
     But it didn't work out that way.  At 2: 45 when I put in an appearance for the Dick Haymes rehearsal, the director took one horrified look at me and loudly said No!  Nothing to do but send a studio page for my own clothes on the set; showed up just in time for me to change and dash over to the first show of Burns and Allen at NBC; back to movie set at 6:30 (and into scrublady costume); back to Burns and Allen again for second show; to Dick Haymes broadcast on CBS; back to movie set again and into scrublady costume for night shooting that lasted until 12: 30 in the morning!
     Friday:  Up in the morning for Masquerade.  Rehearsal then of Star Tune show (tough chorus girl).
     For the future I want what every radio actress wants--a show of my own.  Top billing, instead of building characters to prop up someone else.  And a chance to use originality.
     But until that time, I'll go on being "the Rock."  It's not so bad really.  And it has its rewards.  There's a true story about an evening at the Robert Youngs' house where a friend was telling Mrs. Young that her husband was getting to be very popular in radio, in addition to his movie career.
     "Why," the friend said, "every time I turn on the radio lately, I hear Bob on some program."
     "Yes," Mrs. Young replied, "Bob is getting to be the male Lurene Tuttle of radio."

Aptly referred to as "The First Lady of Radio," she was most fondly remembered for her role as Effie, the deliciously endearing "Girl Friday," to Howard Duff's Sam Spade on The Adventures of Sam Spade. Dyed-in-the-wool Sam Spade fans universally refer to the interaction between Duff and Tuttle as pure Radio magic--and deservedly so. Her comedic timing and interplay with Duff was absolutely superb, rivalled only by the Radio chemistry between Frances Robinson and Bob Bailey in Let George Do It.

By the time Film and early Television discovered her acting talent she found second and third careers as a durable, versatile character actress in a wide range of roles characterized primarily by their depiction of archetypal middle-American wisdom and warmth. Later years found her in recurring characterizations as a 'brittle' world-weary matron.

She debuted in Film in Heaven Only Knows (1947), then appeared alongside Cary Grant in Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (1948) and Room for One More (1952). She performed with Marilyn Monroe in Don't Bother to Knock (1952) and Niagara (1953). She also appeared with Joan Crawford in Goodbye, My Fancy (1951) and Leslie Caron in The Glass Slipper (1955). To Film's everlasting shame, she never got her chance to appear as a lead, not for lack of either versatility or talent. As it was, she continued to develop her talent as a durable, reliable character actor--and occasional scene-stealer.

Indeed her innate ability to steal any scene--on big screen or small--with an impish, knowing grin or world-weary, cynical glance remained two of her signature characterizations throughout her remarkable career. Her only real lead during this period was her portrayal of the crazed Ma Barker, in Ma Barker's Killer Brood (1960), a B-movie that's reached cult status.

Television was more cognizant of Lurene Tuttle's natural warmth and wisdom, which, given the kinder, gentler, family oriented fare of 1950s Television, found her performing regularly in a wonderful array of sitcoms, appearing as a starchy relative, gossipy gadfly, or archetypal down-home townfolk.

Lurene Tuttle married fellow actor and announcer, Mel Ruick a performer she met often while both were performing in Radio. Their daughter, Barbara Ruick, became an actress best known for her portrayal of Carrie Pipperidge in the wonderful musical comedy Carousel (1956). Barbara Ruick later married famed American composer John Williams, but died unexpectedly in 1974, just as John Williams' world-renowned talent was becoming recognized.

Lurene Tuttle became a widely-respected Drama and diction coach for several decades. She taught radio technique in the 1940s and re-trained several prominent actors returning from World War II duty. After her Television career in the 1950s, Lurene Tuttle returned to teaching. Her students included Red Skelton, Orson Welles, Milton Berle, Steve Allen, and Jayne Meadows. She joined the faculty of The University of Southern California, teaching acting technique, and remained in Southern California until she succumbed to cancer at the age of 78.

"I have a full life - radio acting, TV shows, movies, and my daily teaching - all crammed with delight. I find that the best way for me to conduct my life is to run my life - my way." -- Lurene Tuttle

Thankfully, her fame endures as new generations of Golden Age Radio and Television fans continue to discover her anew. Thus she remains to this day--and throughout the forseeable future--as one of the most beloved, most enjoyed and most admired voice and character talents of The 20th Century.

Lurene Tuttle as listed with Wormser, Heldfond & Joseph circa 1986
Lurene Tuttle as listed with Wormser, Heldfond & Joseph circa 1986




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